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ICICI BANK LTD

INDUSTRY PROFILE
Introduction
As per the Reserve Bank of India (RBI), India’s banking sector is sufficiently
capitalised and well-regulated. The financial and economic conditions in the country
are far superior to any other country in the world. Credit, market and liquidity risk
studies suggest that Indian banks are generally resilient and have withstood the
global downturn well.
Indian banking industry has recently witnessed the roll out of innovative banking
models like payments and small finance banks. RBI’s new measures may go a long
way in helping the restructuring of the domestic banking industry.
Market Size
The Indian banking system consists of 27 public sector banks, 26 private sector
banks, 46 foreign banks, 56 regional rural banks, 1,574 urban cooperative banks and
93,913 rural cooperative banks, in addition to cooperative credit institutions. Public-
sector banks control more than 70 per cent of the banking system assets, thereby
leaving a comparatively smaller share for its private peers. Banks are also
encouraging their customers to manage their finances using mobile phones.
ICRA estimates that credit growth in India’s banking sector would be at 7-8 per cent
in FY 2017-18.
Investments/developments
Key investments and developments in India’s banking industry include:

 The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has proposed to allow banks to invest in real estate investment trusts
(REITs) and infrastructure investment trusts (InvITs) which is expected to benefit both real estate and
banking sector in diversifying investor base and investment avenues respectively.
 The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board (CPPIB) and the Caisse de Depot Quebec (CDPQ) have
acquired a 1.5 per cent stake in Kotak Mahindra Bank from Mr Uday Kotak, Executive vice-chairman
and Managing director, Kotak Mahindra Bank, for a total consideration of Rs 2,254 crore (US$ 350.0
million).
 Fullerton India Credit Co Ltd, a non-banking finance company (NBFC), has raised Rs 500 crore (US$ 75
million) through masala bonds, to support its onward lending and other financing activities.
 The Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority of India (IRDA) has allowed insurers to invest up
to 10 per cent in additional tier 1 (AT1) bonds, that are issued by banks to augment their tier 1 capital, in
order to expand the pool of eligible investors for the banks.
 Qatar’s Doha Bank plans to apply to the Qatar Central Bank and Reserve Bank of India for permission
to establish a local subsidiary in India, with the vision to create a retail branch network in India.
 Fairfax Financial Holdings, a Canada-based financial services firm, has received an approval from the
RBI to acquire a majority 51 per cent stake in Kerala-based Catholic Syrian Bank for Rs 1,000 crore
(US$ 150 million), which will be the first takeover of an Indian bank by a non-banking financial entity,
after RBI tweaked ownership norms.
 IndiaPost has received the final license from RBI to start its payment bank operations, thus becoming
the third entity in India after Bharti Airtel and Paytm to receive payment bank license from RBI.
 Microfinance firm Ujjivan Financial Services Ltd has announced starting of banking services across its
branches under the name of Ujjivan Small Finance Bank Ltd, thus becoming the largest among five
small banks which are scheduled to start their operations or have already started.
Government Initiatives

 Finance Minister Mr Arun Jaitley has proposed various measures to quicken India's transition to a
cashless economy, including a ban on cash transactions over Rs 200,000 (US$ 3,100), tax incentives
for creation of a cashless infrastructure, promoting greater usage of non-cash modes of payments, and
making Aadhaar-based payments more widespread.
 The Government of India has announced demonetisation of high denomination bank notes of Rs 1000
and Rs 500, with effect from November 08, 2016, in order to eliminate black money and the growing
menace of fake Indian currency notes, thereby creating opportunities for improvement in economic
growth.
 The RBI has cut its key repo rate by 25 basis points to 6.25 per cent, in order to boost growth as
according to RBI, the inflation momentum has moderated because of a normal monsoon.

The government and the regulator have undertaken several measures to strengthen
the Indian banking sector.

 Government of India has decided to amend Section 35 A of the Banking Regulation Act that will allow
the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) to direct banks for the recovery of non-performing assets (NPAs)
 The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has proactively instructed banks to increase their levels of provision on
the loans provided to the telecom sector as a prudent measure, which will help to shore up provisions
for future recognition of any non-performing assets arising out of the sector.
 The RBI has allowed banks in India to raise funds through issuance of rupee-denominated bonds
overseas, also called masala bonds, within the current limit of Rs 2,44,323 crore (US$ 36.6 billion) set
for foreign investment in corporate bonds.
 The Ministry of Labour and Employment has successfully opened around 3,840,863 bank accounts as
on December 26, 2016, for workers especially in the unorganised sector, as part of its campaign to
promote and ensure cashless transfer of wages to workers.
 The National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development (NABARD) plans to provide around 200,000
point-of-sale (PoS) machines in 100,000 villages and distribute RuPay cards to over 34 million farmers
across India, to enable farmers to undertake cashless transactions.
 The Government of India’s indigenous digital payments application, BHIM (Bharat Interface for Money),
has recorded 18 million downloads since its launch on December 30, 2016, according to Mr Amitabh
Kant, Chief Executive Officer, NITI Aayog.
 The Ministry of Finance has lowered the threshold for making electronic payments to suppliers,
contractors or institutions from Rs 10,000 (US$ 150) to Rs 5,000 (US$ 75), in order to attain the goal of
complete digitisation of government payments.

Road Ahead
Enhanced spending on infrastructure, speedy implementation of projects and
continuation of reforms are expected to provide further impetus to growth. All these
factors suggest that India’s banking sector is also poised for robust growth as the
rapidly growing business would turn to banks for their credit needs.
Also, the advancements in technology have brought the mobile and internet banking
services to the fore. The banking sector is laying greater emphasis on providing
improved services to their clients and also upgrading their technology infrastructure,
in order to enhance the customer’s overall experience as well as give banks a
competitive edge.
Many banks, including HDFC, ICICI and AXIS are exploring the option to launch
contact-less credit and debit cards in the market shortly. The cards, which use near
field communication (NFC) mechanism, will allow customers to transact without
having to insert or swipe.
Mr Bill Gates, Co-founder of Microsoft Corp, has stated that India will move quite
rapidly to a digital payments economy in as little as seven years, based on the
introduction of digital payment banks combined with other things like direct benefit
transfers, universal payments interface and Aadhaar.

COMPANY PROFILE
ICICI Bank was originally promoted in 1994 by ICICI Limited, an Indian financial institution, and was its
wholly-owned subsidiary. ICICI's shareholding in ICICI Bank was reduced to 46% through a public
offering of shares in India in fiscal 1998, an equity offering in the form of ADRs listed on the NYSE in
fiscal 2000, ICICI Bank's acquisition of Bank of Madura Limited in an all-stock amalgamation in fiscal
2001, and secondary market sales by ICICI to institutional investors in fiscal 2001 and fiscal 2002. ICICI
was formed in 1955 at the initiative of the World Bank, the Government of India and representatives of
Indian industry. The principal objective was to create a development financial institution for providing
medium-term and long-term project financing to Indian businesses.

In the 1990s, ICICI transformed its business from a development financial institution offering only project
finance to a diversified financial services group offering a wide variety of products and services, both
directly and through a number of subsidiaries and affiliates like ICICI Bank. In 1999, ICICI become the
first Indian company and the first bank or financial institution from non-Japan Asia to be listed on the
NYSE.

After consideration of various corporate structuring alternatives in the context of the emerging
competitive scenario in the Indian banking industry, and the move towards universal banking, the
managements of ICICI and ICICI Bank formed the view that the merger of ICICI with ICICI Bank would
be the optimal strategic alternative for both entities, and would create the optimal legal structure for the
ICICI group's universal banking strategy. The merger would enhance value for ICICI shareholders
through the merged entity's access to low-cost deposits, greater opportunities for earning fee-based
income and the ability to participate in the payments system and provide transaction-banking services.
The merger would enhance value for ICICI Bank shareholders through a large capital base and scale
of operations, seamless access to ICICI's strong corporate relationships built up over five decades,
entry into new business segments, higher market share in various business segments, particularly fee-
based services, and access to the vast talent pool of ICICI and its subsidiaries.

In October 2001, the Boards of Directors of ICICI and ICICI Bank approved the merger of ICICI and two
of its wholly-owned retail finance subsidiaries, ICICI Personal Financial Services Limited and ICICI
Capital Services Limited, with ICICI Bank. The merger was approved by shareholders of ICICI and ICICI
Bank in January 2002, by the High Court of Gujarat at Ahmedabad in March 2002, and by the High
Court of Judicature at Mumbai and the Reserve Bank of India in April 2002. Consequent to the merger,
the ICICI group's financing and banking operations, both wholesale and retail, have been integrated in
a single entity.
MC.KINSEY 7’S FRAMEWORK
STRUCTURE
ICICI Bank’s organizational structure is designed to support its business goals, and is
flexible
while at the same time seeking to ensure effective control and supervision and consistency
in standards across business groups. The organization structure is divided into five principal
groups – Retail Banking, Wholesale Banking, Project Finance & Special Assets
Management,
International Business and Corporate Centre.
The Retail Banking Group comprises ICICI Bank’s retail assets business including various
retail credit products, retail liabilities (including our own deposit accounts and services as
well as distribution of third party liability products), and credit products and banking services
for the small enterprises segment.
The Wholesale Banking Group comprises ICICI Bank’s corporate banking business including
credit products and banking services, with dedicated groups for corporate clients,
Government sector clients, financial institutions and rural and micro-banking and
agri-business. Structured finance, credit portfolio management and proprietary trading also
form part of this group.
The Project Finance Group comprises our project finance operations for infrastructure, oil &
gas and manufacturing sectors. The Special Assets Management Group is responsible for
large non-performing and restructured loans.
The International Business Group is responsible for ICICI Bank’s international operations,
including its entry into various geographies as well as products and services for non-resident
Indians (NRIs).
The Corporate Centre comprises all shared services and corporate functions, including
finance
and balance sheet management, secretarial, investor relations, risk management, legal,
human
resources and corporate branding and communications.

SHARED VALUE
SKILL
STYLE
STRATEGY
SYSTEM
STAFF
SWOT ANALYSIS
STRENGTH

 ICICI is the second largest bank in terms of total assets and market share
 Total assets of ICICI is Rs. 4062.34 Billion and recorded a maximum profit
after tax of Rs. 51.51 billion and located in 19 countries
 One of the major strength of ICICI bank according to financial analysts is
its strong and transparent balance sheet
 ICICI bank has first mover advantage in many of the banking and financial
services. ICICI bank is the first bank in India to introduce complete mobile
banking solutions and jewelry card
 The bank has PAN India presence of around 2,567 branches and 8003
ATM’s
 ICICI bank is the first bank in India to attach life style benefits to banking
services for exclusive purchases and tie-ups with best brands in the
industry such as Nakshatra, Asmi, D’damas etc
 ICICI bank has the longest working hours and additional services offering
at ATM’s which attracts customers
 Marketing and advertising strategies of ICICI have good reach compared
to other banks in India

WEAKNESS

 Customer support of ICICI section is not performing well in terms of


resolving complaints
 There are lot of consumer complaints filed against ICICI
 The ICICI bank has the most stringent policies in terms of recovering the
debts and loans, and credit payments. They employ third party agency to
handle recovery management
 There are also complaints of customer assault and abuse while recovering
and the credit payment reminders are sent even before the deadlines
which annoys the customers
 The bank service charges are comparatively higher
 The employees of ICICI are bank in maximum stress because of the
aggressive policies of the management to win ahead in the race. This may
result in less productivity in future years

OPPORTUNITY

 Banking sector is expected to grow at a rate of 17% in the next three years
 The concept of saving in banks and investing in financial products is
increasing in rural areas as more than 62% percentage of India’s
population is still in rural areas.
 As per 2010 data in TOI, the total number b-schools in India are more than
1500. This can ensure regular supply of trained human power in financial
products and banking services
 Within next four years ICICI bank is planning to open 1500 new branches
 Small and non performing banks can be acquired by ICICI because of its
financial strength
 ICICI bank is expected to have 20% credit growth in the coming years.
 ICICI bank has the minimum amount of non performing assets
THREATS

 RBI allowed foreign banks to invest up to 74% in Indian banking


 Government sector banks are in urge of modernizing the capacities to
ensure the customers switching to new age banks are minimized
 HDFC is the major competitor for ICICI, and other upcoming banks like
AXIS, HSBC impose a major threat
 In rural areas the micro financing groups hold a major share
 Though customer acquisition is high on one side, the unsatisfied
customers are increasing and make them to switch to other banks

FINANCIAL ANALYSIS
BALANCE SHEET
I C I C I Bank Ltd. Vs Banking Services

Balance Sheet Summary (Industry Benchmark) : Annualised : Mar 2015 - Mar 2017 : Rs. Million
I C I C I Bank Ltd. Banking services

Mar-15 Mar-16 Mar-17 Mar-15 Mar-16 Mar-17


12 mths 12 mths 12 mths
-
Total liabilities 64,87,841.60 72,38,561.00 77,51,588.40 12,17,72,649.70 13,31,01,114.30 14,30,32,966.00

Total Capital 11,596.60 11,631.60 11,651.10 8,25,621.10 9,60,622.90 9,22,883.10


Paid up equity capital 11,594.50 11,629.50 11,649.00 2,40,115.20 3,13,321.20 3,46,001.90
Paid up preference capital 578.6 703.3 715.4

Share appln money &


suspense account 36,385.00 53,981.00 57,252.10

Reserves and funds 7,92,697.00 8,85,724.10 9,87,859.70 83,24,432.80 92,24,769.10 1,01,85,869.70


Free reserves 1,99,084.40 2,02,801.40 2,19,452.40 23,45,008.40 22,38,778.50 22,74,470.90
General reserves 26,433.50 31,433.50 31,947.10 14,09,955.20 13,90,651.80 13,99,021.50
Balance as per profit & loss
account 1,72,614.20 1,71,321.90 1,87,449.40 8,49,529.70 7,89,945.70 8,17,084.30
Specific reserves 5,93,612.60 6,54,747.90 7,37,985.90 56,47,568.90 63,95,626.50 69,96,256.00
Security premium reserves
(net of deductions) 3,18,415.10 3,21,212.40 3,22,970.00 22,75,139.50 27,12,086.30 30,04,715.40
Capital reserves (incl
grants and subsidies) 25,851.80 49,674.10 1,02,607.10 2,61,143.70 3,15,279.70 4,45,413.20
Capital redemption
reserves
Debenture and bond
redemption reserves

Deposits (accepted by
commercial banks) 36,15,627.30 42,14,257.20 49,00,390.60 9,53,50,587.50 10,21,16,098.00 11,18,02,639.60
Demand deposits 4,95,197.50 5,88,699.20 7,49,834.40 84,26,610.90 90,52,347.40 1,04,23,317.70
Saving deposits 11,48,601.20 13,42,301.30 17,18,384.90 2,25,49,582.80 2,57,26,277.80 3,22,14,083.10
Term deposits 19,71,828.60 22,83,256.70 24,32,171.30 6,43,74,393.80 6,73,37,472.80 6,91,65,238.80

Borrowings 17,24,173.40 17,48,073.80 14,75,561.40 1,15,46,606.20 1,45,98,684.40 1,34,86,765.30


From banks 18,750.00 34,783.90 6,485.00 4,78,644.50 4,33,777.70 5,65,664.20
From financial institutions 1,34,879.70 1,63,509.80 1,03,500.00 12,88,601.00 17,68,844.90 29,11,765.40
Syndicated across banks &
institutions
Debentures and bonds 4,15,388.80 3,85,686.40 4,76,272.10 12,26,044.80 14,71,027.60 19,56,393.60
Foreign currency borrowings 10,35,654.90 11,24,023.70 8,89,304.30 57,76,671.00 63,02,074.80 59,05,499.30
Sub-ordinated debt 14,39,791.40 15,32,902.10 14,29,322.00
Borrowings from rbi 1,19,500.00 40,070.00 11,19,205.10 27,95,669.90 5,84,664.50

Deferred tax liability 26,548.60 31,610.00 33,673.90 2,07,694.60 2,67,009.80 2,77,000.50

Current liabilities & provisions 3,17,198.70 3,47,264.30 3,42,451.70 54,81,322.50 58,79,949.10 63,00,555.70
Current liabilities 2,62,163.00 2,88,811.90 3,19,325.50 49,67,830.00 53,53,649.60 58,18,671.60
Provisions outstanding 55,035.70 58,452.40 23,126.20 5,13,492.50 5,26,299.50 4,81,884.10

Total assets 64,87,841.60 72,38,561.00 77,51,588.40 12,17,72,649.70 13,31,01,114.30 14,30,32,966.00

Net fixed assets 47,253.10 75,769.10 78,052.10 8,32,764.20 11,42,980.00 14,96,699.70


Intangible assets, net 2,705.90 3,061.70 3,258.90 15,200.00 21,603.30 25,586.10
Land and buildings, net 30,623.50 58,476.70 60,511.80 5,41,812.60 8,21,598.30 11,59,492.90
Plant, machinery, computers
& electrical assets, net 1,688.00 1,572.80 1,540.90

Capital work-in-progress 14,332.50 22,940.00 24,496.00

Net pre-operative exp pending


allocation

Investments 18,65,800.40 16,04,118.00 16,15,065.40 3,04,66,961.60 3,37,97,433.10 3,71,01,690.70


Investment in equity shares 1,38,482.90 1,30,155.60 1,30,641.60 6,29,008.70 6,59,811.20 7,86,817.60
Investment in debt
instruments 11,89,756.00 12,20,949.50 12,25,885.40 2,72,64,651.30 3,07,29,652.50 3,33,45,418.30
Investment in approved
securities (slr & oth stat req) 5,239.20 82,231.80 82,238.70

Deferred tax assets 41,028.60 79,310.30 88,396.20 3,30,517.10 6,22,198.90 8,29,202.70

Current assets 6,12,995.00 8,03,143.70 10,18,276.30 1,46,68,083.70 1,64,42,812.30 1,94,13,640.40


Cash and bank balance 4,23,046.20 5,98,687.50 7,57,130.60 1,07,93,174.40 1,20,24,228.70 1,43,19,645.70
Inventories 2.2 1.7 1.2 3,579.00 3,674.30 3,596.10
Receivables 1,89,944.60 2,04,454.50 2,61,144.50

Loans and advances by


finance companies 38,75,220.80 43,52,639.40 46,42,320.80 7,45,29,130.50 7,97,68,597.70 8,29,43,986.30

Total unamortised expenses 6,752.70 274.6 274.6

Addendum Information
Net fixed assets net of reval 47,253.10 47,594.30 47,630.70 5,00,908.70 5,52,615.90 5,81,556.90
Tangible net worth 8,01,587.70 8,66,119.20 9,65,830.50 88,32,052.10 96,26,427.70 1,02,24,286.00
Total outside liabilities 19,86,336.40 20,36,885.70 17,94,886.90 1,65,15,014.80 1,99,53,037.30 1,93,06,152.30

Number Of Companies 108 108 101


CASH FLOW SUMMARY
I C I C I Bank Ltd.

Cash Flow Summary : Mar 2015 - Mar 2017 : Non-Annualised :


Rs. Million

Mar-15 Mar-16 Mar-17


12 mths 12 mths 12 mths
-
Net cash flow from operating activities -95,400.90 1,57,098.90 3,91,902.30
Net profit before tax & extraordinary items 1,58,199.20 1,21,957.20 1,12,786.10
Add: Adj for non-cash and non-op exp 43,381.80 1,22,513.70 1,58,203.70
Less: Adj for non-cash and non-op income 15,972.50 49,157.10 82,724.70
Operating cash flow before working cap chgs 1,85,608.50 1,95,313.80 1,88,265.10
Add:Cash inflow due to decr/(incr) in wkg cap 3,13,991.90 5,98,629.80 7,42,809.00
Less:Cash outflow due to (decr)/incr in wkg cap 5,53,324.90 5,81,056.80 4,92,199.40
Cash flow generated from operations -53,724.50 2,12,886.80 4,38,874.70
Cash flow before extraordinary items -95,400.90 1,57,098.90 3,91,902.30
Cash outflow due to extraordinary items
Cash inflow due to extraordinary items
Cash outflow due to misc expend

Net cash inflow from investing activities -44,839.60 -39,499.90 70,454.10


Less: Cash outflow from investing activities 1,16,785.30 96,985.90 7,832.20
Add: Cash inflow due to investing activities 71,945.70 57,486.00 78,286.30

Net cash flow from financing activities 1,50,056.70 -5,850.70 -3,03,787.80


Less: Cash outflow due to financing activities 2,46,496.20 3,41,353.30 6,17,735.60
Add: Cash inflow from financing activities 3,96,552.90 3,35,502.60 3,13,947.80

Net change in cash & cash equivalents(cl-op) 9,816.20 1,78,934.10 1,58,894.50


Cash & cash equivalents as at the start of the year 4,15,296.00 4,23,046.20 5,98,687.40
Cash & cash equivalents as at the end of the year 4,23,046.20 5,98,687.40 7,57,130.60
INCOME AND EXPENDITURE
I C I C I Bank Ltd. Vs Banking Services

Income & Expenditure Summary (Industry Benchmark) : Annualised : Mar 2015 - Mar 2017 :
Rs. Million
I C I C I Bank Ltd. Banking services

Mar-15 Mar-16 Mar-17 Mar-15 Mar-16 Mar-17

12 mths 12 mths 12 mths

Total income 6,12,690.70 6,85,253.40 7,41,907.20 1,09,57,751.10 1,17,88,746.00 1,23,42,909.60

Income from financial services 6,09,516.60 6,79,542.00 7,33,286.50 1,07,27,195.60 1,12,76,725.40 1,19,02,841.10

Interest income 4,88,203.70 5,24,275.00 5,37,055.60 95,17,036.00 1,00,45,302.70 1,02,50,920.10

Dividends 15,590.60 15,352.20 14,190.40 31,809.10 31,830.00 31,364.70

Income from treasury operations 35,923.40 65,298.20 1,01,691.60 5,17,531.80 4,83,028.20 8,33,444.10

Other income 397.2 2,311.40 700 1,57,080.20 2,12,355.30 2,16,967.10


Prior period and extraordinary
income 2,776.90 3,400.00 7,920.70 72,008.70 2,99,221.70 2,22,662.90

Total expenses 5,00,937.20 5,87,990.50 6,43,896.30 1,00,56,488.30 1,14,37,764.00 1,17,61,762.30


Fee based financial services
expenses 7,222.30 7,246.40 7,443.20
Fund based financial services
expenses 3,03,512.50 3,21,489.30 3,32,184.90 64,90,271.40 68,49,309.60 68,85,691.20

Interest expenses 3,00,515.30 3,15,153.90 3,24,189.60 64,56,040.20 67,59,736.70 67,88,092.10

Treasury operations expenses 2,997.20 6,335.40 7,995.30 33,258.80 81,415.50 96,660.70

Compensation to employees 47,498.80 50,023.50 57,337.00 11,07,577.00 12,15,030.60 12,72,339.80

Indirect taxes 654.6 728.7 730.4

Rent & lease rent 8,904.40 9,750.00 11,137.20 1,70,539.70 1,89,616.40 2,06,203.00

Repairs & maintenance 8,662.20 10,030.10 11,460.10 63,048.30 70,288.40 80,029.00

Insurance premium paid 3,604.80 3,922.10 4,628.90 87,494.50 96,700.80 1,06,927.20

Outsourced professional jobs 449.1 510.1 769.4 37,286.20 43,972.00 41,091.80

Non-executive directors' fees 7.5 10 23.7 416.4 477.5 542.8


Selling & distribution expenses 9,531.20 11,450.00 13,958.70 46,574.90 52,562.40 57,431.00

Travel expenses 1,660.00 2,293.40 2,295.10

Communications expenses 2,624.90 3,026.50 3,430.10 39,425.10 40,660.90 45,192.30

Printing & stationery expenses 1,276.50 1,491.50 1,761.00 22,364.70 23,511.30 25,925.20

Miscellaneous expenditure 27,369.50 31,356.70 35,468.00 3,75,054.60 4,31,761.20 5,31,452.50

Share of loss in other enterprises


Lease equalisation adjustment
charge
Loss on securitisation of assets and
loans 434 7,792.60 841.4
Prior period and extraordinary
expenses 3,945.40 6,390.90 2,371.30

Provisions 36,020.60 1,14,971.30 1,49,385.60 9,71,500.70 18,07,900.60 19,52,915.80

Depreciation 6,589.50 6,985.10 7,576.50 83,861.10 98,206.50 1,08,805.20

Amortisation 31,355.10 3,694.10 4,292.30

Write-offs 60,302.40 2,11,274.10 1,17,655.00

Provision for direct tax 46,445.70 24,694.30 14,775.20 4,59,128.10 2,89,003.00 3,13,788.20

PAT (Profit after tax) 1,11,753.50 97,262.90 98,010.90 9,01,262.80 3,50,982.00 5,81,147.30

RATIO ANALYSIS
PROFITABILITY
I C I C I Bank Ltd. Vs Banking Services

Profitability Ratios (Industry Benchmark) : Annualised : Mar 2015 - Mar 2017 : Rs.
Million
I C I C I Bank Ltd. Banking services
Mar-
Mar-15 Mar-16 Mar-17 Mar-15 Mar-16 17
12 mths 12 mths 12 mths
-
Margins on income
On total income
PBT as % of total income 25.8 17.8 15.2 12.4 5.4 7.3
PAT as % of total income 18.2 14.2 13.2 8.2 3 4.7

On total income net of P&E


PBPT net of P&E&OI as % of total inc net of P&E 31.3 33.9 34.5 19.9 18.7 20.9
PAT net of P&E as % of total inc net of P&E 17.9 13.8 12.3 7.7 0.5 3

On income from financial services


PBPT net of P&E&OI as % of income from fin serv 31.3 34 34.6 20.2 19.1 21.2

Returns on investments
On net worth
PAT net of P&E as % of net worth 14.2 11.2 9.8 10 0.6 3.6
PAT as % of net worth 14.5 11.6 10.7 10.8 3.8 5.9

On capital employed
PAT net of P&E as % of capital employed 4.5 3.6 3.6 4.2 0.3 1.5
PAT as % of capital employed 4.6 3.8 3.9 4.6 1.6 2.4

On total assets
PAT net of P&E as % of tot assets excl reval 1.7 1.4 1.2 0.7 0 0.3
PAT as % of tot assets excl reval 1.8 1.4 1.3 0.8 0.3 0.4

Statutory disclosures of banks


Interest spread 4 4 3.8 3.4 3.3 3.2
Operating profit as a percentage to working funds 3.3 3.6
Profit/loss per employee 1.6 1.4 1,146.60 1,407.40 455.5

Number Of Companies 108 108 101