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SCIENCE DEPARTMENT -PHYSICS

STUDY WORKSHEET
NAME:_____________________________________

Chapter 8: Electric Fields

1 Which statement defines electric field strength between two parallel plates? [1]
A Electric field strength is equal to the charge per unit distance between the plates.
B Electric field strength is equal to the force per unit charge.
C Electric field strength is equal to force times the distance between the plates.
D Electric field strength is equal to the potential difference times the distance
between the plates.
2 Which diagram correctly shows the electric field between two charged plates?
A B

C D

[1]
3 The diagram shows two parallel, charged plates.

Which statement about the electric field at points P, Q and R is correct? [1]
A The field at P is greater than the field at Q and R.
B The field at P is less than the field at Q and R.
C The fields at P and Q are equal but greater than the field at R.
D The fields at all points P, Q and R are all equal.
4 There is a potential difference of 200 V across a pair of parallel plates which are 4.00 cm apart.
Calculate the force on a charge of 2.50 nC which is between the plates.
A 2.00  10−9 N
B 1.25  10−7 N
C 2.00  10−7 N
D 1.25  10−5 N [1]
5 Which diagram correctly shows the electric field between two parallel plates
and the path of an electron as it passes between the plates?

A B

C D

[1]
6 State two possible SI units for electric field strength. [2]
7 A +5.0  10−8 C point charge experiences a force of 1.5  10−3 N when placed in a uniform
electric field. Calculate the electric field strength. [2]
8 Calculate the force experienced by an oil droplet with a charge of 3.2  10−19 C due to a
uniform electric field of strength 5.0  105 V m−1. [2]

9 The diagram shows two parallel, horizontal plates separated by a vertical distance of 3.0 cm.
The potential difference between the plates is 600 V.
a Calculate the magnitude and direction of the electric field between the plates. [3]
b Describe the electric field between the plates. [2]
c An oil droplet of weight 6.4  10−15 N is held stationary between the two plates.
i State whether the charge on the droplet is positive or negative.
Explain your answer. [2]
ii Determine the charge on the oil droplet. [2]
10 A proton is travelling at right angles to an electric field of strength 2.40  10–6 V m–1.
a Calculate the force on the proton due to the electric field. [2]
b Calculate the acceleration of the proton in the direction of the field. [2]
c Write down the acceleration of the proton at right angles to the field. [1]
11 A pair of parallel plates are 5.0 cm apart and are connected to a 200 V supply. A particle of
dust between the plates experiences a force, due to the field, of 3.2  10−4 N.
Calculate the charge on the dust particle. [3]

Total: Score: %
28
Chapter 9: Electric Current
Data needed to answer questions can be found in the Data, formulae and relationships sheet.
1 Which of the following is the basic SI unit for electric charge? [1]
C ohm
A ampere
D volt
B coulomb
2 What are the charge carriers in a solution during electrolysis? [1]
A electrons only
B positive ions only
C negative ions only
D both positive and negative ions
3 There is a current of 0.24 A through a lamp for 40 minutes.
How much charge passes through the lamp? [1]
A 576 C C 0.60 C
B 9.6 C D 0.01 C
4 When a resistor is connected across a battery of 2.8 V there is a current of 0.35 A.
What is the resistance of the resistor? [1]
C 0.98 
A 8.00 
D 0.13 
B 1.02 
5 A car headlamp when connected to a 12 V battery converts energy at a rate of 50 W.
How much energy is converted when it is switched on for 5 minutes? [1]
A 2J
B 120 J
C 300 J
D 150 000 J
6 A current of 2.0 A passes through a component of resistance 24 .
What is the rate of energy transfer? [1]
A 6W
B 12 W
C 48 W
D 96 W
7 Calculate the charge passing a point in a wire carrying a current of 1.2 A for 3.0 minutes. [2]
8 Calculate the current for a calculator battery delivering a charge of 3.8 × 10−3 C in 120 s. [2]
9 A component is connected to a d.c. supply. The supply has negligible internal resistance.
At 6.0 V, the current in the component is 0.023 A. When the p.d. is doubled, the current in the component increases to
0.100 A.
a Calculate the resistance of the component at 6.0 V. [2]
b Does the component obey Ohm’s law? Explain your answer. [2]

10 The diagram shows the I–V


characteristics of two components
A and B.

Calculate the resistances of A and B. [2]


11 Calculate the potential difference across a component that transfers 15 J of energy when a charge of 4.2 C flows
through it. [2]
12 A 12 V, 36 W lamp is operated for 1 hour (3600 s). Calculate:
a the energy dissipated by the lamp [2]
b the current in the lamp. [2]
13 A solar cell delivers an average current of 80 mA over a 6-hour period. Calculate the total charge that flows from the
solar cell. [3]
14 A resistance wire carries a current of 2.0 A. Calculate the number of electrons flowing past a point in the wire per
second. [3]
15 During a thunderstorm, a lightning strike has a current of 9000 A and transfers a charge of
18 C to the ground. Calculate:
a the duration of the lightning strike [3]
b the number of electrons transferred to the ground. [2]
16 A 100  resistor can safely dissipate 0.25 W. Calculate the maximum current in the resistor. [3]
17 A filament lamp in a small torch is labelled as ‘1.5 V, 400 mA’. The filament lamp transfers 5.0% of the electrical
energy into light and the remainder is dissipated as heat. Calculate:
a the power rating of the lamp [2]
b the power radiated as light [2]
c the resistance of the filament lamp. [2]
18 A cell provides a constant current to a circuit. The diagram shows the graph of current against time.
a Calculate the flow of charge Q in a time t when the current is I. [1]
b Justify the statement: ‘the area under a current–time graph is equal to the
charge flow’. [1]
c Given that the information in b is always true for any graph of current against time, estimate the total charge
delivered by a cell when the current varies as shown in the graph below. [2]

Total: Score: %
45
Chapter 10 Kirchhoff’s Laws Worksheet (AS)
1 The diagram shows part of a circuit.
What is the current X ? [1]
A 0.6 A
B 2.0 A
C 4.8 A
D 6.2 A

2 The diagram shows a junction in a circuit.


What is the current Y ? [1]
A +0.2 A
B 0.2 A
C +1.8 A
D 1.8 A

3 The diagram shows a circuit. The current in the circuit is 0.8 A.

What is the e.m.f of the cell E2? [1]


A 0.56 V
B 0.80 V
C 2.80 V
D 4.80 V
4 A student is to measure the resistance of a lamp. Which circuit should he use? [1]

A B

C D
5 The diagram shows a network of resistors.

What is the total resistance between points P and Q? [1]


A 1.8 
B 4.0 
C 8.7 
D 18.0 
6 State Kirchhoff’s first law. [1]
7 Determine the current I in each of the circuits below.

[1]
b

[1]

[2]
8 Several identical cells are used to connect up circuits. Each cell has e.m.f. 1.5 V.
Determine the total e.m.f. for the following combinations of cells.
a b c

[1] [1] [1]

9 Use Kirchhoff’s second law to calculate the current I in the circuit shown below. [3]
10 The diagram shows an electrical circuit.
The battery and cell in the circuit
may be assumed to have negligible
internal resistance. Calculate:
a the current in the 12  resistor [3]
b the p.d. across the 68  resistor. [2]
c What assumption must you make
to solve this problem? [1]

11 Use Kirchhoff’s laws to determine


the currents I1, I2 and I3 in the circuit
on the right. [6]

Total: Score: %
28
Chapter 11 Worksheet (AS)
1 What is the unit of resistivity? [1]
A ohm
B ohm metre
C ohm metre−1
D ohm metre−2
2 Which of the graphs shows the I–V characteristic of an ohmic conductor? [1]

A B
3 The diagrams show two wires both made from the alloy eureka. Wire 1 has length L, diameter d and resistance R.
Wire 2 has length 2L and diameter 2d.

wire 1 wire 2

What is the resistance of wire 2? [1]


1
A R
4
1
B R
2
C R
D 2R
4 The graph shows the variation of the resistance of a thermistor with temperature.

Which conclusion can be made directly from the graph? [1]


A The resistance of the thermistor increases when the current through it increases.
B The resistance of the thermistor increases when the potential difference across it decreases.
C The resistance of the thermistor increases when the temperature of the thermistor decreases.
D The resistance of the thermistor increases when the temperature of the thermistor increases.
5 A student has a metallic conductor and a semiconductor. The temperature of the two materials
is raised.Which line in the table correctly shows the change in their resistance? [1]
Metallic conductor Semiconductor

A decreases decreases
B decreases increases
C increases decreases

D increases increases
6 The graph shows the I–V characteristics of a filament lamp.

a Does the lamp obey Ohm’s law? Explain your answer. [1]
b Calculate the resistance of the lamp at 4.0 V. [3]
c Describe how the resistance of the lamp depends on the current. [1]
7 A negative temperature coefficient (NTC) thermistor
and its connecting leads are coated with a high-
resistivity plastic material. The thermistor is placed in a
beaker containing hot water. The temperature of the
water is kept constant at 80 °C. The I–V characteristic
of the thermistor is shown below.

a Calculate the resistance of the thermistor. [2]


b State and explain the change, if any, to the shape of
the graph of I against V when the temperature is lowered and maintained at 30 °C. [2]
8 A wire is made of a material of resistivity ρ. Write an equation for the resistance R of a wire
of length L and diameter d. [2]
9 A manganin wire of radius 0.15 mm has a resistance of 5.33  per metre of length.
a Calculate the resistivity of manganin. [4]
b Explain how your answer to a would change if the manganin wire had twice the radius. [2]

Total: Score: %
22
CHAPTER 12: PRACTICAL CIRCUITS
1. A battery of e.m.f. 6.0 V, and internal resistance 1.0  is connected to a resistor and drives a current of 125 mA
through it. What is the resistance of the resistor?
A. 0.75  C. 47 
B. 1.75  D. 48 
2. In the circuit shown below, the current in the ammeter is zero.
Which statement is correct?
A. The e.m.f. E2 is equal to E1.
B. The e.m.f. E2 is equal to R1/R2.
C. The e.m.f. E2 is greater than E1.
D. The e.m.f. E2 is less than E1.
3. When potential difference across the terminals of a battery is
measured using an analogue voltmeter of resistance 95 , the reading
on the voltmeter is 5.70 V. When it is measured
using a very high resistance digital meter the reading is 6.00 V.
What is the internal resistance of the battery? [1]
A. 0.2  C. 5.0 
B. 1.8  D. 28.5 
4. The diagrams show a potentiometer being used to compare two resistors. The ammeter in each circuit reads zero.

What is the ratio of the two resistances? [1]


R1 x1
A 
R2 x2
R1 x
B  2
R2 x1
R1 y
C  1
R2 y2
R1 y
D  2
R2 y1

5. A student designs a circuit to give an decreasing voltage output as


the temperature increases. She builds the circuit in the diagram, but
finds that the output voltage increases with increasing
temperature.A friend suggests four possible changes to the circuit.
Which change would produce the effect she wanted? [1]
output
A Replace the resistor with one of higher resistance.
B Replace the resistor with one of lower resistance.
C Reverse the polarity of the battery.
D Swap the position of the thermistor and the resistor.
6. A d.c. power supply of e.m.f. 12 V has an internal resistance of 2.3 . It is accidentally shorted
out across its terminals by a short length of wire of negligible resistance.
a Calculate the current drawn from the supply. [2]
b Suggest why it may be dangerous to have a supply shorted out in this way. [1]
7 A cell of e.m.f. 1.5 V is connected across a length of wire of resistance 2.6 . A high resistance voltmeter placed
across the terminals of the cell measures 0.85 V. Calculate:
a the potential difference across the internal resistance [2]
b the internal resistance of the cell. [2]
8 The diagram shows a potential divider circuit.

The battery has negligible internal resistance.


Calculate the potential difference across the 6.0  resistor. [3]
9 A length of wire of resistance 7.3  is connected across the terminals of a cell of e.m.f. 1.4 V. A high resistance
voltmeter measures a p.d. of 0.81 V across the terminals of the cell.
Calculate:
a the ‘lost volts’ (  the p.d. across the internal resistance of the cell) [2]
b the internal resistance of the cell [2]
power dissipated in the 7.3  wire
c the ratio: [3]
total power dissipated by the cell

10 Two cells are connected in series. Each cell has e.m.f. 1.4 V and internal resistance 0.38 .
The combination of the cells is connected across an external circuit of resistance 1.8 .
Calculate:
a the potential difference across the external circuit [4]
b the potential difference across the terminals of each cell. [2]
11 The diagram shows a potential divider circuit. The voltmeter has infinite resistance and the
battery has negligible internal resistance.

a The variable resistor is set on its maximum resistance of 200 . Calculate the
voltmeter reading. [3]
b The resistance R of the variable resistor is gradually altered from its maximum resistance
value of 200  to zero. Draw a sketch graph to show how the voltmeter reading changes
with R. [3]
12 The diagram shows a simple electrical
thermometer based on a negative temperature
coefficient (NTC) thermistor. At 30 °C the thermistor
has a resistance of 2.4 k and this decreases to 430 
at 100 °C. The battery has negligible internal
resistance. Calculate the maximum input voltage into
the datalogger. [4]

13 A chemical cell has e.m.f. 1.5 V and R/ I/A V/V P/W
internal resistance 0.50 . It is 0.00
connected across a variable resistor of 0.10
resistance R.
[2] 0.20
a Copy and complete the table.
(I  current drawn from the cell; V  terminal 0.30
p.d.; 0.40
P  power dissipated by external 0.50
resistor)
0.60
b With the aid of a sketch graph,
describe how the power dissipated 0.70
by the external resistor is affected 0.80
by its resistance. [3]
0.90
1.00
Chapter 11:Resisitivity Marking scheme: Worksheet (AS)

1 B [1]
2 D [1]
3 B [1]
4 C [1]
5 C [1]

6 a The current is not directly proportional to the p.d., therefore it does not obey Ohm’s law. [1]
b V  4.0 V and I  60 mA [1]
V
R [1]
I
4.0
R ≈ 67  [1]
0.060
c The resistance of the lamp increases as the current increases. [1]
V
7 a R [1]
I
12.0
R  150  [1]
0.080
b The resistance of the thermistor is higher at a lower temperature. [1]
1
Since R  , the graph is a straight line of smaller gradient. [1]
gradient of line

L d 2
8 R and A  r2  [1]
A 4
L 4 L
R  [1]
A d 2

9 a L  1.0 m, r  1.5  10−4 m, R  5.33  [1]


RA 5.33    (1.5  10 4 ) 2
  [1]
L 1.0
  3.8  10−7  m ([1] for value, [1] for unit) [2]
b There is no change. [1]
The resistivity depends on the material and not on its dimensions. [1]
Chapter 10 Kirchhoff’s Laws Marking
scheme: Worksheet (AS)
1 A [1]
2 B [1]
3 B [1]
4 B [1]
5 B [1]
6 The sum of the currents into a point  sum of currents out of the same point. [1]

7 a I  2.0  1.0  3.0 A [1]


b 0.7  0.5  I therefore I  1.2 A [1]
c 2.0  I  4.0  0.5 [1]
I  4.5  2.0  2.5 A [1]

8 a E  1.5  1.5  3.0 V [1]


b E  1.5  1.5  1.5  1.5  3.0 V [1]
c E  1.5  1.5  0 V [1]
9 ∑ e.m.f. ∑ p.d. [1]
6.0  (I  10)  (I  20) (clockwise ‘loop’) [1]
6.0
30I  6.0 so I   0.20 A [1]
30
10 a ∑ e.m.f.  ∑ p.d.
6.0  1.5  (I  68)  (I  12) (clockwise ‘loop’) [1]
80I  4.5 [1]
4.5
so I   5.63  10 2 A  5.6  10 2 A (56 mA) [1]
80
b V  IR  5.63  10−2  68 (the current is the same in a series circuit) [1]
V  3.8 V [1]
c The resistance of the voltmeter is infinite (or very large). [1]
11 Loop 1: ∑ e.m.f.  ∑ p.d.
3.0  10I1  20I2 (equation 1) [1]
Loop 2: ∑ e.m.f.  ∑ p.d.
1.5  20I2 (equation 2) [1]
1.5
I2   0.075 A [1]
20
Substituting the value for I2 into equation 1, we have:
3.0  10I1  (20  0.075) [1]
1.5
I1   0.15 A [1]
10
Finally, using Kirchhoff’s first law, we have:
0.15  0.075  I3
I3  0.075 A [1]
Chapter 9: Electric Current Marking scheme: Worksheet (AS)

1 B [1]
2 D [1]
3 A [1]
4 A [1]
5 D [1]
6 D [1]
7 ∆Q  I ∆t [1]
∆Q  1.2  (3.0  60) [1]
Q  216 C  220 C [1]
Q 3.8  10 3
8 I = = 3.16  10–5 A  3.2  10–5 A (or 32 μA) [1]
t 120
V 6.0
9 a R  [1]
I 0.023
R ≈ 260  [1]
b At double the p.d., the resistance is
12
R  120  [1]
0.100
The resistance is not constant. Therefore, the current cannot be directly proportional to
the voltage. The component is non-ohmic. [1]
1.0
10 RA   1.7  [1]
0.60
3.5
RB   5.8  [1]
0.60
W
11 V  [1]
Q

15
V  3.57 V  3.6 V
4.2
W
12 a P [1]
t
W  Pt  36  3600 J  1.3  105 J [1]
b P  VI [1]
P 36
I   3.0 A [1]
V 12
13 ∆Q  I∆t [1]
∆Q  0.080  (6.0  3600) [1]
Q  1.73  10 3 C  1.7  10 3 C [1]

14 Charge per second  2.0 C s1 [1]


I 2.0
Number of electrons per second   [1]
e 1.6  10 19
 1.25  1019 s 1  1.3  1019 s 1 [1]
Q
15 a Q  It , t  [1]
I
t  18/9000 [1]
I  2.0  103 A [1]
Q 18
b Number of electrons   [1]
e 1.6  10 19
 1.13  10 20  1.1  10 20 [1]
16 P  I 2R [1]
P 0.25
I  [1]
R 100
I  5.0  10 A (50 mA)
2
[1]

17 a P  VI [1]
P  1.5  0.40  0.60 W [1]
b Plight  0.05  0.60 [1]
Plight  3.0  102 W [1]
V
c R [1]
I
1.5
R  3.75   3.8  [1]
0.4
18 a Q  It [1]
b Area under graph  area of rectangle  It [1]
1 
c Area  (1.2  600)    1.2  50  [1]
2 
Charge  750 C [1]
Chapter 8:Electric Fields Marking scheme: Worksheet (AS)
1 B [1]
2 C [1]
3 D [1]
4 D [1]
5 B [1]
6 The two units are: V m–1 [1]
and N C–1. [1]
F 1.5  10 3
7 E  [1]
Q 5.0  10 8
E  3.0  104 V m–1 [1]
8 F  EQ  5.0  105  3.2  10–19 [1]
F  1.6  10–13 N [1]
V 600
9 a E  [1]
d 3.0  10  2
E  2.0  104 V m–1 [1]
The field acts towards the negative plate. [1]
b The electric field is uniform between the plates (except at the ‘edges’). [1]
The electric field is at right angles to the plate. [1]
c i Since the droplet is stationary,
the electric force on the droplet
must be equal and opposite to its weight. [1]
The electric force must act upwards,
so the charge on the droplet must
be negative. [1]

F
ii E 
Q
F 6.4  10 15
Q  [1]
E 2.0  10 4
Q  3.2  10–19 C [1]

10 a F  QE 1.60  10–19  2.4  106 [1]


F  3.84  10−13 N  3.8  10−13 N [1]
F
b F  ma  a  [1]
m
13
3.84  10
a N
1.67  10  27
a  2.30  1014 m s−2 [1]
c Zero; the force is at right angles to the field. [1]
V 200
11 E   10−2  4.0  103 N [1]
d 5
F 3.2  10 4
F  EQ  Q   [1]
E 4.0  103
Q  8.0  10−8 C [1]
Chapter 12: Practical Circuits Marking scheme: Worksheet (AS)

1 C [1]
2 D [1]
3 C [1]
4 A [1]
5 D [1]

6 a E  I (R + r)
E
R  0 (since supply is shorted-out) so I  [1]
r
12
I  5.2 A [1]
2.3
b Excessive heating of the power supply. [1]

7 a p.d. across internal resistance  E  V  1.5  0.85 [1]


p.d. across internal resistance  0.65 V [1]
V 0.85
b I   0.327 A [1]
R 2.6
0.65
r  2.0  [1]
0.327
R2
8 Vout   Vin [1]
R1  R2

6.0
V  5.0 [1]
18  6.0
V  1.25 V  1.3 V [1]

9 a p.d. across internal resistance  E  V  1.4  0.81 [1]


p.d. across internal resistance  0.59 V [1]
V 0.81
b I   0.111 A [1]
R 7.3
0.59
r  5.3  [1]
0.111
V2
c P  I 2R or use of VI or [1]
R
0.1112  7.3
ratio  [1]
0.1112  (7.3  5.3)
ratio  0.58 (42% of the power is ‘lost’ internally in the cell) [1]
E
10 a I [1]
Rr
total e.m.f.  2  1.4  2.8 V and total internal resistance  2  0.38  0.76  [1]
2.8
I  1.094 A  1.1 A [1]
0.76  1.8
V  IR  1.094  1.8  1.97 V  2.0 V [1]
b V  E  Ir [1]
V  1.4  (1.094  0.38)  0.98 V [1]
R2
11 a Vout   Vin [1]
R1  R2
200
V  6.0 [1]
180  200
V  3.16 V  3.2 V [1]
b As the resistance decreases, the p.d. across the variable resistor decreases. [1]
Correct values marked [1]
Correct curve shape [1]

12 Maximum p.d. across the 3.6 k resistor is when the resistance of the thermistor is minimum. [1]
R2
Vout   Vin [1]
R1  R2
3600
Vout   5.0 [1]
430  3600
V  4.47 V  4.5 V [1]
13 a

R/ I/A V/V P/W


0.00 3.00 0.00 0.00
0.10 2.50 0.25 0.63
0.20 2.14 0.43 0.92
0.30 1.88 0.56 1.05
0.40 1.67 0.67 1.11
0.50 1.50 0.75 1.13
0.60 1.36 0.82 1.12
0.70 1.25 0.88 1.09
0.80 1.15 0.92 1.07
0.90 1.07 0.96 1.03
1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00

All columns correctly calculated. [2]


b The completed table will show that maximum power is dissipated when the external
resistor has resistance of 0.50 . This resistance value is equal to the internal resistance. [1]
If you want to deliver maximum power to an external load, then its resistance must
‘match’ the resistance of the supply (the cell in this case). [1]

Suitable sketch graph. [1]