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ARMY AND MILITIA.

ANNUAL REPORT

OP THE

INSPECTOR GENERAL OP RECRUITING

FOR

1891.

ta fiotl) of 13arUamcut Si) (SomntauU of IBajceip.

LONDON;
PRINTED FOR HER MAJESTY’S STATIONERY OFFICE,
BY HARRISON AND SONS, ST. MARTIN’S LANE,
l-EUJTBUS IK OttDIKARY TO HKU MAJESTY.

And to be purchased, either directly or through auy Bookseller, from


BYRE AND SPOTTISWOODE, EAST HARDING- STUKET, FLEET STREET, E.C., and
32, ABINGDON STREET, WEST.MINSTEIJ, S.W. ; or
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90, WEST NILE STREET, HLASGOW, or
HODGES, FIGGIS, & Co., lOI, GRAFTON STREET, DUBLIN.

1892.
[0.—0597.‘J Fricc 3ld.

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ABMT AHD MILITIA.

ANNUAL REPOET

Of THl

INSPECTOR GENERAL OF- RECRUITING.

Horse Guards, War Office,


SIS, 18th February 1892.
I HA.VE the honour to submit herewith my annual report on operations connected
with this Office for the past 12 months.
To facilitate reference it is divided as usual into four parts:—
1. General observations on the conditions under which the army has been, is, and
probably must in the immediate future be, recruited.
2. The results of recruiting for the regular forces during the past year.
3. The operations connected with the formation of Reserves.
4. The results of Recruiting for the Militia during the same period.
To the above are annexed Appendices, in which will be found the figures upon which
mainly-the statements contained in this Report are based.
As in previous years, a table is appended to this Report (Appendix M.), showing
the comparative strength of the Regular Army, the Army Reserve, the Militia,
Yeomanry, and Enrolled Volunteers, during the last ten years.

PART I.

GSNERAL OBSERVATIONS."

1. The preliminary returns of the Census of 1891 show, conclusively, that in almost Eecrulting
every rural district in the British Isles the population has decreased in the last decade; in rural
whilst in the towns in which any manufacture on a large scale has been established
the numbers of the inhabitants have increased to an astonishing extent. To such a
degree has this depopulation of rural districts taken place, in some regimental recruiting
areas, that it has become impossible for them to furnish from their own resources the
requisite supply of recruits.
The difficulty of obtaining recruits from these areas is due partly to the effects of
the Elementary Education Act of 1870, which has greatly tended to an aggregation of
the rural classes in the urban centres of manufacturing activity, still greater even than
that caused by the many inventions of labour-saving agricultural implements, and
partly to an ever-increasing distaste to any check on personal liberty. The supply of
recruits has been, and must in the future, to a still greater extent, be sought from the
urban populations; moreover, recruits in any large numbers can only bo obtained of an
age at wliiob lads have not been accustomed, for any lengthened period, to freedom
from restraint.
2. In Ireland there have been other causes for the falling off in the numbers of recruits. iVelaud.
Even those enlisted have been obtained with difficulty from districts which, even 10
years ago, provided the Army with an abundant supply of men of fine physique, and of
an age which admitted of their being fit for drafts to India within 12 months of their
enlistment.
The chief of these causes are the great increase in the number of emigrants, mainly
to America, and tbe opposition of the Nationalist Party to the enlistment of any young
a p. 1957. 708G8. Wt. 21599. \ O

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Irislimaii in Her Majesty’s Forces,. The-cens\is‘ of Ir-eland SLOTTS, moreover, a decrease
in tlie 'whole population to the extent of 468,674 or 9*1 per cent, of the population
during the last decade.
There were difficulties in the adaptation of the existing system of recruiting to the
migration and emigration of portions of the population, of which the extent and
direction could not be ascertained with any accuracy until the issue of the Preliminary
Census Return in 1891.
Recruiting 3. The following table (Ho. 1) shows the numbef of recruits raised for the regular
Expenditure. Army and the Militia during the last five years, and the amounts expended in each year
on the recruiting service.-
Tftbie 1.
Bccruits Baited. Amount?
expended
Year. on the ,
Regular Amy. / liiilitia. Recroiting Service’

£
1886^7 38,102 40,124 56,063
1887-8 29,557 36,514 48,006
1888- 26,107 33,155
9 30,433
1889- 28,854 35,813
90 25,701
1890r-l 32,923 39,991 30,278

The decrease in the expenditure since' the year 1887-8 is mainly due to the discon
tinuance of the Recruiting Pee, knpwn as “ bringing money,” amounting to upwards of
11,000^. a year; and of advertisements in newspapers at ah average annual expenditure
of 2,(B0Z.
- ClaM of 4. It has been stated that the Army is recruited from “ the dreg.s of the population”
-. recruits
■enluted.
and the “ riff-raff” of the towns. These statements are not borne out by facts. "Were
they true it would be impossible that the returns of each year should show, as they do,
a steady decrease in crime of all sorts, and an almost entire ahsence of those crimes
which are most rife amongst the “ dregs ” and “ riff-raff” from which the soldiers are
said to, be recruited.
Such crimes as theft and violent assaults are now almost unknown in the Army;
whilst drunkenness is very much less frequent than it was evem five years ago, as will
be seen by the subjoined figures, which have been extracted from the G-eneral Annual
Returns of the British Army for the year 1890 (the latest available) :—
\

During 1885. During 1890.

Proportion Proportion
Number. per thousand Number. per thousand
of. average stren^h. of average .strength.

Number of Courts Blartial - 14,280 76 10,673 53


Number of minor punishments 284,008 1,505 212,150 1,056
inflicted.
Number of men fined for drunkenness 23,324 253 17,000 167
Number of men in possession of 72,345 380 90,160 449
Good Conduct Badge.

This diminution in crime is attributable, to a great extent —


1st. To the great increase in the comfort and the healthy amusements to the soldier
within the precincts of his barracks, and the endeavpur to make it his home.
2nd. To the improvement, especially in the last three years, in the quality and variety
of the food provided for the soldier, who is therefore less tempted to indulge
■ in intoxicating liquors whilst in search of food outside his barracks.
3rd. To the influence of education, which has enabled many more soldiers than here-
tofore to derive amusement from the books and newspapers at their disposal,
in the regimental or garrison libraries and recreation rooms.
4th. To tho necessity which has arisen for the enlistment of younger men, lads
of 18, who have not had sufficient opportunity or leisure to admit of their
having adopted vicious habifis or tastes; and who, being fresh from the
control of their parents or their employers, have not to overcome tho dislike
to subordination which older men of the same class would exporienco.

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5. It is not only on tliis acconnt tliaf rocruits enlisted between 18 and 19 make Age of
better soldiers than those over 20 at the tirne of their enlistment The shapes of the recruits,
younger men can be more easily improved, their muscles and bodily strength can bo
developed with greater facility, whilst their constitutions, not having been so long
exposed to the privations and the temptations to an unhealthy life so common to the
class from which the largest number of our recruits are drawn, are more rapidly
and more surely strengthened by good and regular food habits. The restrictions of
Barrack existence, also, serve as a check upon oyer indulgence in those vices, which
so largely contribute to wreck the health of their equals-in civil life.
The question of youthful soldiers is one of degree. In my opinion the ideal recruit
would be a young man of 19. With good food, physical drill,, and a carefully-arranged
course of gyinnastics, such a lad would still have time to develop in physical strength
and size, and to establish a good constitution, before he became 20, and therefore of
an age to serve in India. Between that age and 30 is the period, in a working man’s
life, when he has the greatest pleasure in a military career.
6. The difficulty of finding any large number of young men of 19 years and upwards Special
willing to enlist is very great. Out of this arises the necessity of enlisting the lads enlistments,
between 18 and 19, whoj owing 'to the adverse circumstances of their childhood and
boyhood, are, in one or more respects, not up to the minimum standards prescribed for
the various arms of the Service. Becruits of this description were, prior to the end of
August last, only allowed to be enlisted upon the authority of His Royal Highness the
Gommander-in-Ohief, through the Inspector-General of Recruiting. These were termed
colloquially “ Specials.” Of late years, trade having been in an exceptionally flourishing
condition, this class of recruits has been numerically very large, amounting to about
32 per cent, of the total number enlisted.
It must not, however, be supposed that any large proportion of these specially
enlisted recruits wore much below the prescribed standards, or that they have been
enlisted simply because they presented themselves to the recruiters. Before any such
could be approved, there must be on record the opinion of the Medical Officer who
passes him, and the belief expressed in writing of the Approving Officer (generally of
the rank of Colonel) that the lad is “ likely to develop and to become an efficient
soldier.”
In August last it was deemed advisable to delegate to the Approving Officer the
absolute power of approval, of this class of recruit, as being the person more likely to
be able to judge of the lads capacity for physical development than could possibly be
the Inspector-General of Recruiting, who had not seen him. From the returns of lads
thus specially enlisted, which are furnished weekly, and from those I have seen
during my inspections, I have reason to believe that this increased responsibility has
made the Approving Officers more careful in their selections than they were prior to
the change.
Even immmediately prior to this change, there was not much cause for complaint, as
it will be seen from the annexed return that, of those lads specially enlisted in the six
months ending 30th June last, there remained only 30 per cent, still below the
standards at the close of the year.
Humber of men serving in Regiments, Battalions, and Batteries, at home
on 1st January 1892, who were speciaUy enlisted, under the regulated
standard, during the six months ending 30th June 1891 - - r 3,315
Humber of these who were still under standard on the 1st January 1892 - 995
Per-centage under standard on the 1st January 1892 - - - 30
It must be remembered that, whilst a few of these young soldiers had been nearly
12 months in the ranks, many of them had been little more than six or seven months
in the Service, and that, for the slightest variation from any of the standards, a soldier
is still termed a “ Special.”
7. I do not, however, consider oven this per-centage satisfactory, and believe that Gymnastic
it might be very much reduced by a difierent and a more scientific treatment of recruits training of
whilst at the Depot. When they enlist they are frequently half starved, and are, Keerniw.
therefore, not in a physical condition to undergo long hours of drill, often of a
monotonous and uninteresting description. It would be more reasonable to alternate
drill with such gymnastic exercises as would gradually develop those muscles and
staying powers, which would render the recruit more lit to undergo tbe fatigue of
drill mth or without arms. An hour or so daily of gymnastic exercise would do
more to develop the physical strength and the bodily conformation of these lads than
A 3

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6
would weeks of drill without them. It is to he hoped that, at an early date, the limited
amount of gymnastic apparatus necessary for such instruction will be provided (under
cover from weather) at all the Dep6ts.* The Returns furnished {vide Appendix L.)
by the Inspector of Gymnastics go far to support this recommendation.
Age and 8. There is one more point of view from which the enlistment of lads of 18 years
standard of of age must be considered, viz.:—The economic or financial effect on the Nr jon.
, measure* Whilst, on the one hand, it must be conceded that it is more costly to keep a soldier
ment.
for the 18 months or two years which must elapse before a lad of 18 can be sent to
serve in India, it is contended that the advantages which would accrue to his
constitution, from the extra period during which he has been well fed and his physical
powers carefully and systematically developed, are such as to make him a better
soldier all round on his arrival in India, and more able to stand up against bad
climates.
Moreover, there are considerable economies accruing to the Nation at large, from the
fact that many of these lads, at the time of their enlistment, are within a measureable
distance of falling into temptation to commit crime in order to obtain a livelihood.
After due consideration of the subject from every point of view, and in face of the
necessity to provide over 39,000 recruits during the present year, I cannot do otherwise
than recommend that no change be made in the standards of age, height, weight, or
cheat expansion, and the continuance of the permission to enlist lads of 18 and upwards,
who, though they may be not up to all the other standards, appear likely to develop,
within a reasonable time, into efficient soldiers of the prescribed standards; the main
conditions of such enlistment being—
1st. That no one over 21 be enlisted under the standard of height.
2nd. That the chest expansion (f.e., the difference beween the maximum and minimum
measurement of the chest) be not less than 1-|- inches.
3rd. That no one known to be less than 18 years of age be enlisted, without previous
reference to Army Head Quarters.
With a continuance of these Regulations I do not apprehend any serious or well
founded ground for complaint, in respect of the ultimate fitness of most recruits for the
career of a soldier.

PART n.
REGULAR ARMY.—^RECRUITING.

Numbers
9. The recruiting has, during the year 1891, been exceptionally brisk, and it is hard
erfisted. to account for it, as there have been no disturbances of trade or manufacture, in the
districts in which it has been abnormally successful, to warrant its being attributable to
lack of work from that cause. Moreover the harvests were unusually late, and the corn
haiwest in many cases had to be reaped by hand, causing wages to range high in^ the
agricultural districts. In several counties upwards of 24s. were the weekly wages given
in September and early in October, and yet the number of recruits enlisted during those
months were largely in excess of that obtained in previous years.
The total numbers who joined for the Regular Army in 1891 were 36,003. Of these
there were 12,975 specially enlisted, either on account of their nob being up to the
standards (co-relative or otherwise), because they were above the standards prescribed
for the corps for which they were attested, or because the Regiments selected by them
were closed for recruiting.
Of the total number of recruits joined, there were 1,995 for 12 years’ Service with
the Colours and no Reserve Service, 32,066 for seven years with the Colours and five,
years in the Reserve, and 1,942 for three years with the Colours and nine yeai's in the
Reserve.

• At the present time there are only 13 Bcglmontal Districts which have the use of gymnasia.

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The subjoined Table No. II. will show how the recruits obtained were distributed.
It as been arranged so as to admit of comparing the results of recruiting during the
last five years.
Table II.
Corps. 1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891.

Household Cavalry - 157 129 168 144 167


Cavalry of the Line - 2,769 2,449 2,551 2,893 3,606
Boyal Artillery 4,974 4,279 5,569 5,469 4,961
Royal Engineers 1,005 701 945 984 811
Foot Guards 1,266 824 1,207 1,221 1,604
Infantry of the Line - 19,626 15,842 17,702 19,296 22,980
Colonial Corps 403 277 269 501 705
Army Service Corps - 584 393 570 457 541
■ Ordnance Store Corps 50 26 31 21 67
Medical Staff Corps - 378 150 .361 358 373
Army Post OjBdce Corps 3 74 13 17 4
Corps of Ordnance Artificers ■ 10 4 11 15
Corps of Armourers - 11 35 34
Corps of Army Signallers 135

Total 31,225 25,153 29,401 31,407 36,003

10. The effect of the recruiting operations for 1891 upon the establishments of the Kecraiting
various arms of the Service will be seen on reference to Table III. for the
various
arms.
NOK-COlOnSSIOSKD OrWCBRS AKD
Table IH.
On 1st Jan.
ErraoxiTzs. ESTABUSHMBST.
1892.

Arm of th« Serricc. aVi es


9
eS
a s
«s
»-5
d

au
1-* CO ‘ CD O
c;
CO

^ CO dc3 u
B.
Q s
CO

Houiahold CaTslry 1,209 1,211 2 1,212 1,212

Cav.airy of tha Lins - 16,807 17,300 403 16,991 16,893 98 407

Eoyixl Artillery 84,187 34,297 110 34,257 34,860 108 63

Royal Engineer* 6,320 6,424 104 6.343 6,366 23 58

Toot Guard* - - - 5,277 5,442 165 5,644 5,644 202

Infantry of tlio Lin* 129,207 128,732 475 130,918 131,958 1,040 3,226

West India and Colonial Corpi 2,657 3,147 490 5,044 5,056 12 1,909

Army Service Corps 8,038 3,181 98 3,013 3,144 131 13

Ordnance Store Corps - 710 726 16 666 716 50 10

Medical SlaB Corps - 2,332 2,342 10 2,366 ■ 2,369 3 27

Corps of Ordnance Artificer* 79 92 13 79 89 10 3

Corps of Armourers 298 819 21 276 305 29 14

TOTAI. 202,116 203,163 1,522 475 206,809 208,112 1,401 98

1,047 1,303

11. From these tables it will be seen that there has been but little difficulty ia Cavalry.
maintaining the Cavalry, both at homo and abroad, up to its strength, so far as numbers
are concerned.
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The average, age of the: recruits as higher than that of those Be^imehts aiid Corps
for which the standards are not so high. The larger- the measurements the older is the
lad, as a rule. There has, nevertheless, been some difl&culty in obtaiuing the requisite
number of men of sufficient age to meet the requirements for the drafts to the Cavalry
Regiments in India. This is, to a .great extent, due to the limited establishments, of the
Dep6ts of these Regiments in England’. This, however, is again a question of age.
On 1st January 1891 the-strength of the- Cavalry of the Line, Non-Commissioned
Officers and, men, ^as 16,807. On 1st Ja-nuary 1892 the corresponding number was
17,800, showing a net increase of 498 durmg the past year. ,' .

lipyal T12. On 1st January .1891 the strength of the Royal Artillery was 34^187- On 1st
Artillery. January 1892 the number wa:s R4,297, showing an increase of 110-during the year.
The number of recruits enlisted for the Royal .Artillery during 1891 was 4,961,
brino-ing that arm of the service to within 63 of its establishment. The -recruiting for
the Sarrison Artillery, for which the standards are higher than for the other branches
of that arm, has been satisfactory. This may be the result of its increased rates of ‘
pay, and of the changesyiii its conditions oi Service. , .
«

lldyal 13. There has been no difficulty experienced in keeping


Engineers or any of the Departmental C.orps, up to their establishments. It may-'be well here to
imd Depart'
-mental remark that I believe that the facility with which recruits are obtained for all the
Corps. above-mentioned Corps is mainly due to the fact that they either learn the trades
necessitated by their se'rvice in the Corps, or improve their knowledge of these trades,
whilst in the.ranks.' Soldiers passing to the Army Reserve from those Corps have no
difficulty in at once finding permanent employment in civil life.

The Foot 14.' The recruiting for the Root Guards, as well as^that for the Cavalry and Depart-
Guards. mental Corps, alvrays suffers from the disadvantage of having no Militia to which they
are affiliated,.and with whose recruits their own are drilled. Moreover, it is well
known that the .personal, cost to the. soldiers of the Foot Guards, in the up-keep of their
uniform, is greater than* it is to Infantry 6f the Line, whose service does not, to so
large an dxtent, necessitate their being quartered in a dirty atmosphere such as that of
London.
On 1st January 1891 the Brigade of Guards was 367 Non-Commissioned Officers
and men under establishtaent, and on 1st January 1892 the deficiency was only 202.

Table IV. The following Table contains full statistics aS to service in the Root Guards durin
the past year:—
(1) Recruits joined during 1891 - - - ~ 1,604
(2) Transfers to the Reserve - - - - - 854
(3) Casualties from other causes:
(or.) Discharged to pension - - - - 35
(&.) „ by purchase - . - - 143
(c.) „ by invaliding , - 104
„ as not likd-y to become effective soldiers 2
; T , r Under 5 ft. 7 in. in height (including
(4) Number serving on IsbJ s _ . . ,t 193
January 1892 - ‘ [ Above 5 ft. 7 ins. in height 5,224
(12 years with the Colours during 1891 37
(5) Number enlisted for-! 3 „ „ „ „ - 934
(_ 7 ,, ,> ,, ,, 633
392
(6) Number who extended their Colour Service to during 1891 67

The proportion of those who have enlisted in -the Guards for seven years has been
39 per cent., and that of those who, having enlisted for three years, extended their
service to seven years was 48*7 per cent., as against 48*9 per cent, in 1890.

Infantry < 15. On the 1st January 1891 the strength of tho
tha Line. Non-Commissioned Officers and men, and on the 1st January 1892 the numbers wore
128,732. The establishment during the year has, moreover, been increased from 130,918
to 131,958 Non-Commissioned Officers and men.

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The number of recruits raised for this branch of the Service during 1891 was
22j980, as against 19,296 in 1890!
The subjoined figures shew the heights and chest measurements of recruits raised
for the Infantry of the Line during 1891, as far as the information is obtainable

Heights. Chest Measurements.

Under 6 feet 4 inches Under 33 inches - 4,974


Over 5 feet 4 inches Over 33 inches 17,424
Not reported Not reported 582
Total Total 22,980

It must be borne in mind, as pointed out in paragraph 6, that 70 per cent, of


the specially enlisted recruits grow up to and over the prescribed standards in an
average period of nine months; and that, without the universal and systematic
gymnastic training at the Depdts whicK I so strongly recommend.
The deficiency of 4,949 on the 1st January 1892, shown in Table III., is somewhat
misleading, inasmuch as it is not possible to have the Establishments of the Army
complete at that period of the year:—
1st. Because it is not lawful to have, at„ any period of the year, the Army on the
British Establishment over the numbers voted by Parliament.
2nd. Because, during the six months between September and April, there is a
continuous drain on the British Establishment, owing to the drafts being
sent from the Home Battalions,, to make good the deficiencies in those
abroad, due to the return to England, at that season of the year, of the men
whose colour service has expired, who are invalided, or who, for other reasons,
arc sent home for discharge. As it has been actuarially calculated that the
Army can never be, at this period of the year, within about 2,000 of its
Establishment, the deficiency thjs year may more fairly be stated as 1,000,
exclusive of the Colonial Corps which are in process of formation and are
still about 1,900 below their authorised numbers.
16. Table Ho. V. gives particulars of the efiective strength and establishment of Colonial
the several Colonial Corps on the 1st January 1891 and 1st January 1892: Corps.

Wanting to Table V.
EpyBCTITJCS* ESXABLISHUXKT.
complete.

c: m c3 a
aa s
at-90
Corps.J •n 53
oS a a
<*
i-s
< o> [ c> «3
a
03
I
CO 00 t-4 ! Si
a' C’ o
P o
o a^ o a'
00
a'
GO

O O p O a
O O
West India Regiment 1,599 1,704 105 1,976 1,977 377 273
Royal Malta Artillery 337 330 334 334 +3 4
African Artillery (Sierra Leone and West"!
15 93 78 279 279 264 186
Indies) - - - -J
Gun Lascars and Asiatic Artillery, Chinn, &c. 312 493 181 902 902 590 409
"Eastern Battalion 118 168 50 158 158 40 + 10
(Submarine ^Miners)
Royal West India Corps 66 134 68
Engineers 130 130 64 +4
(Fortress and Submarine
Mining Companies)
Indian Infantry Battalion (Hong Kong) - 920 924 920 024
Total Rank and Eilc - 2,447 2,922 482 4’,699 4,704 2,252 1,782
475

Total Ron-Commissioned OlTicers and Men - 2,657 »,147 490 5,044 .5,056 12 2,387 1,909

These figures show a material increase of 490 men on the efiective strength of
the Colonial Corps during the year, the Establishment remaining practically the same.
The number of recruits raised during the year amounted to 705, compared with
501 in 1890, and 269 in 1889.
17 The total number of Militiamen who enlisted iu the Eogular Army, the Havy, Kolistmoiit
an! the Royal Marines, during 1891 was 13,'.'37, compared with 13,107, who joined o£ men lie-
from the Militia dui'ing the preceuiiig year. longing to
Pull details "with regard to these men will bo found in Part IV. of this Report, and the Miiitin,
in Appendix K.
a 70368. 3

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Enlistaient 18. Enrolled .Yolunte.e^rs to the number of 2,180 enlisted into the Regular Army in
.^enrolled 1891 as conapared with 1,895 in 1890. Although this is a considerable accession of
Volnnteors.
wellTdrilled soldiers to the Regular Forces, any pressure to bring about such enlistments
is, in my opinion, much to be deprecated. These men 'have generally been obtained,
clothed, and drilled, at much personal cost of time,.trouble,, and money, to their o&cers,
and in most cases these enlistments are resented by them. As the sergeant-instructors
of all Volunteer Corps are ex-officio recruiters it is ■wiser to discourage this practice,
■where it is distasteful of their immediate superiors in their corps.
localisation 19. By Table VI. evidence is given of the progress made in Territorial enlistments
'(Infantry).
since the system -was established; and Appendices A. and B. sho'w in detail the ■work
done in the way of recruiting, during the last five years, in each of the Territorial
Districts.
Table VI.
Number of Infantry Soldiers
Date. serving in lhe>Territoriai-Regiment, -who
were bom in its Regimental District

1st January 1883 .24,247


}f 1884 32,376
5J 1885' 34,654
1886 40,265
1887 45,979
» 1888 48,899
1889 49,665
» 1890 51,131
1891 52,725
}» 1892 53,480

.-England.
20: The Recruiting Areas in England in which the most noteworthy increase in
numbers has taken place are as follows:—
2nd Regimental .District ‘ - - - G-uildford.
3rd 99 - - Canterburv.
*5th - - - Hewcastle-on-Tyne.
6th - Warwick and Birmingham.
10th 99
- > - Lincoln.
♦14th - York.
17th 99 - Leicester.
20th 99 - - - Bury, Lancashire.
22nd 99 - Chester.
30th 99
- Burnley.
31st 99 99 • Kingston-on-Thames.
33rd 99 99 - - - Halifax.
38th 99 “ Lichfield.
*40th - Wariington.
41st 99 99 - - - Cardifi*.
49th 99 - - Reading.
50th - Maidstone.
63rd - Ashton-under-Tyne.
65 th 9 )
- Pontefract.
*68th - Kewcastle-on-Tyne.
Militia and Volunteer Artillery Districts
Great Yarmouth.
^Liverpool (Seaforth).
Dover.
Woolwich.
Recruiting Districts:—
^London.
’♦•Liverpool.
Scotland. 21. Tlie districts in Scotland where there has been a material improvement in the
numbers of last year are the *lst, *26th, *71st, 75th, and ''^Plst Regimental Districts.
Most of the recruits obtained in Scotland are from, tlio mining, manufacturing,
and trade, centres, and no improvement has been made in the recruiting from the
Highlands or in the agricultural districts. As a matter of fact, the surplus male
population of Scotland of the age and standards required, is not sufficient to furnish
the requirements of the so-called Scottish Regiments.
* Those Districts were inspected by the Inspector-General of Recruiting during the year.

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il- //
; 22. The number of recruits raised by Eecruiting District Agencies in Ireland during Ireland,
1891 was 3,282, as compared with 3,448 in 1390. The Eecruiting Distriqts in which
a marked improvement in tlie numbers of recruits is observable are the lOOth, 101st,
and 102nd Eegimental Districts, and the South Irish Militia Artillei’y District.
In.order to reduce the cost of unnecessary journeys, power was delegated during
the past year to Officers Commanding Eecruiting Districts to send direct to the
Headquarters of the Home Battalion those recruits who enlisted for regiments nearer
to the Headquarters than to the Depots of their regiments; and, in order the more
readily to meet the wishes of recruits, power was, at the same time, delegated to
Officers Commanding Eegimental Districts to send direct to the Headquarters of the
Home Battalion any man who could show reasonable grounds for not wishing to
remain at the Depot where he was enlisted.
Many recruits were previously lost, in consequence of the delay necessitated by having
first to obtain permission from Army Headquarters.
Sl%

23. In 1891 there were 5,956 more recruits who offered themselves for medical Medical
examination than in 1890, the numbers being 61,322 and 55,367 respectively. The examination
per-centage of rejections was 39’6 per cent, in 1890 and 37-7 per cent, in 1891.
In order to reduce this per-centage, orders have been issued for all duly appointed
recruiters to be carefully instructed by the Medical Officer in charge of the district, so
as to enable them to detect with greater ease the disabilities which cause the medical
rejection of recruits.
The recruiters already appointed are instructed as opportunity offers. It is hoped
by this means to save money to the public, disappointment to the recruiter, and
disgust to the recruit, who resents, being told that he is unsound and unfit for the
Army.
" Table YII. shows.under different headings the numbers of and causes of rejections, in
each year during the last five years:—
Table VIL
Xumlier •who
Rejections per 1,000
Tear. offered for Medical
Men.
Examination.

1887 60,976 456*24


1888 49,172 459-02
1889 53,888 415-30
1890 55,367 396-12
1891 61,322 377-57

The causes-of . rejection for each of these years, classified under two heads, viz.,
ailments and want of physique,, are as follow ; and I desire to draw especial attention
to the increase in the proportion of rejections by Medical Officers, of recruits who are
apparently not 18, and of those who Aid not appear likely to become efficient, soldiers.
This would seem to point to the conscientious manner in which the Medical Officers
have performed their difficult task.

Proportion of rejected per 1,000


Number rejected.
inspected.
Causes of Rejection.

1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891. 1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891.

Yxrlous ailments 12,841 10,404 10,399 11,636 12,680 211 212 193 ■208 206

*5 fUnilor chest measure- 9,096 7,588 7,497 5,623 5,7.15 149 154 139 102 93
•2 ment.
Si I Under height 2,144- 1,463 1,626 1,392 1,642 35 30 30 25 27
RH S.J Under weight 2,610 2.209 2,071 2,441 1,991 43 45 38 44 32
' Apparently under age 744 588 477 510 592 12 12 9 9 10
® of 18 years.
Not likely to becomc- 382 319 310 430 533 6 8
R efiiciont soldiers.
Total - 14,976 12,167 11,981 10,396 10,473 245 247 222 188 171

Not stated

Gt'neral total 27,820 22,571 22,380, 21,932 ,23,153 456 459 4V5 396 37?

B 2

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'Ifiiadhrd.' 24. There has -been no change in the standard, or- in the regulations affecting the
admission of growing lads into the Army under the standard, except those mentioned
in paragraph 6, under the heading of General observations.
Enlistments 25. The number of men whose oases were reported to the War Office during 1891,
•under age. on the ground that they were under 18 years of age on enlistment, was 139, of whom
86 were discharged as not being worth keeping, either from their physique or on account
of their extreme youth. Further details on this head will be found in Appendix F.
Fraudulent 26. The number of men tried for fraudulent enlistment during the jp’ear 1891 was
.enlistments. 392, or 1*08 per cent, on the total number of recruits enlisted. The number for 1890
was 339 or 1*07 per cent., and if the same care were taken to detect this crime as is
taken in London, this class of offence would cease to exist.
At St. George’s Barracks, London, where 5,541 recruits were approved during
1891, there were only 20 men who have been found to have enlisted fraudulently, or
0*36 per cent, on the total number of enlistments...
* * ^
■incrwise of 27. To improve the recniiting of the Army I recommend—
-recruiters. 1st. That more 5pecia7paid I^cruiters be authorised, in order that the recruiting may
be more continuous, instead of being periodically interrupted in consequence
of the Recruiters having to attend the training of the Militia Regiments to
which they belong.
:J?cw re- 2nd. That recruiting areas, not co-terminoiis with the Territorial Districts, be set
cruiting
ar^.
apart, for special supervision by selected District Recruiting Officers acting
more directly under the orders of the Inspector-General of Recruiting.
-Advertise- 3rd. That more money be spent in advertisements, and in the establishment of
ments and suitable Recruiting Offices and temporary Depots in districts where barrack
recruiting
oSces.
accommodation is not available within a reasonable distance.
{These proposals have repeived the sanction of the Secretary of State for War.]

Waste of the Army,


Waste of 28. The term “Waste” is somewhat of a misnomer ; because, although it is used to
-the Armjr. express the diminution in the numbers of men serving with their Corps, a very large
proportion of these men merely change the conditions of their service, by being
transferred to the Army Reserve. I have, however, retained the expression as it is so
well understood by military men.
The waste of the Army during 1891 was 34,956, as against 31,139 during the year '
1890. Appendices 0 and D show how this waste is apportioned.
Transfers to 29. The transfers to the Reserve during 1890 and 1891 were as follows:—
:tlie Reserve.
Ta 1891. In 1890.

On expiration of Colour Service 16,128 12,085


By indulgence . - l-,676 2,042
Other causes .^0 72

* Totals 17,894 14,199

Eumber of Effectives at the commencement of the year 202,116 201,848


Per-centago of Iranifers to numbers of Effectives 8*8 7*0

In 1884 there were 33,924 recruits enlisted for short service. Of these only the
men who are s.erving abroad are hablo to be transferred to the Reserve during the
present year, unless, they have extended their service. To these must be added those
still at home who, having enlisted in 1885 for seven years with the Colours, would,
unless they have prolonged their Colour Service, come forward for transfer to the
Reserve in 1892. The number enlisted in 1885 for short service was 38,426. There
remains to be added the number of those soldiers, who, having enlisted for three years
with the Colours in 1889, may prefer not to extend thein Colour Service.
From these figures must be deducted not only the waste from various causes, but also
those serving in Corps into which enlistment is for only three years’ Colour Service.
Making due allowance for these variations of service, the nett waste from this cause,
during the cuirent year, may fairly be estimated at 19,000.

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30. The number of desertions during 1890 and 1891 was as follows:— ’ «• Desertions.

During 1890. During 1891.

Total number of desertions 4jl34 4,631


Rejoined’from desertion 1,565 1,707
Nett waste by desertion 2,569 2,924

The proportion of desertions to the eflPective strength for the two years is the
same, ie., 2-1 per cent.
Details as to the service of deserters from 1886 to 1890 inclusive will be found in
Appendix H. The returns for 1891 are nob yet completed. **
31. The total numbers discharged were 11,300 in 1891, and 11,718 in 1890. Discharges.'
.Of these, 3,048 were discharged as invalids in 1891, and 3,321 in 1890; and.3‘,088
were discharged by purchase in'1891, against 2,897 in 1890. Appendices D., B.,
and Gr. will give the figures, for the last five years, as compared with the efieotive
strength for each year.
32. The numbers discharged for misconduct compare favourably with former years, For mis-
as will be seen by Table VIII. conduct.

Table VIIi;
Discharged for Per-centag# on i
During
Misconduct. Average Strength.

1887 1,854 •9
1888 2,020 •9
1889 1,636 •8
1890 1,603 •8
1891 1,590 *8

As no reasonable application for the discharge of a soldier of really bad character


is ever refused, this return shows that the general conduct of the soldiers in the Army
is better than it was; and every effort should be made to render the standard of
character so high in the Army, that to be a soldier means, jprimd facie, a well-
conducted man, worthy of trust.

PAKT m.
THE ARMY RESERVE.

33. Table IX. shows the annual increments to the 1st Class Army Reserve during Growth *f
th* Resarviks.
the last five years, whilst Table X. will show, for the same period, the numbers in the
Reserve belonging to the various branches of the Service.
Table IX,
Relegated to
On completion Before the Reserve,
Year. ' of Colour completing Total.
having re^enlisted
Service. Colour Service. irregularly.

1887 7,205 3,360 136 10,701

1888 5,076 3,264 69 8,409

1889 10,176 2,453 63 12,692

18(K) 12,085 2,042 72 14,199

1891 16,128 1,676 90 17,894

These transfers have necessarily resulted in a large addition to the numbers of


the 1st Class Army Reserve, amounting to upwards of 18,000 men during the last three
years; the strength of the Reserve having risen from 50,341 on the 1st January 1889 to
68,421 on the 1st January 1892. On the latter date, the Militia Reserve also numbered
B 3

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30,171, making a'tota;i Eeserve^ of 98,592 men, available for general service at borne
and abroad in tbe event of a mobilisation.
Table X. Corps
Ord- Army
Royal Infantry Army Jledical of Colo-
Eoyal Root nance Post
Date. CaTalry. En- of Service Staff Army nial Total.
Artillery. Guards. Store Office
gineers. the Line. Corps. Corps. Signal- Corps.
Corns. Corps.
lers.

1st January 1888 .1,224 3,035 1,138 3,054 38,126 1,457 6S2 105 98 31 50,950
lit January 1889 3,470 3,509 1,226 3,09 7 ► 36,270 1,625 858 127 100 59 50,341
lit January 1890 .3,781 4,898. 1,315 3,166 37,819 1,817 983 1.57 111 89 54,136
1st January 1891 4,211 5,759 1,383 3,746 40,679 2,056 1,039 176 111 120- 59,280
lit January 1892 4,677 7,066 1,556 4,216 47,075 2,219 1,068 200 112 409 123 68,421

Depiirt- 34. Tbe subjoined figures sbpw tbe strength of tbe various Departmental Deserves
iieutai on tbe 1st January 1892, compared with tbe numbers for the 1st January 1891. Tbe
SMerres.
Telegrapb Eeserve, tbe Army' Post Office Corps, and tbe Corps of Army Signallers,
consist efolusiyely of 'efficient members of tbe Post Office Volunteer Corps, and tbe
Eail-way Deserve is composed of Dailu'ay Workmen wbo are members of tbe 2nd Totver
-Hamlets Engineer Volunteers, or tbe 2nd Cbesbire Engineer Volunteers.

On 1st January' On lit January


1899. 1891.

r Kailway Eeserre 112 113


Royal Engineers <-
t Telegraph Reserve - 93 97

Army Post Office Corps • 112 111

Corps of Atmy Signallers 109

Total 426 321

-Suj!.plemen- Table No, XL shows tbe strength of tbe Supplemental Deserve, during tbe last five
lal/Eeserre. years, and the number of enlistments therein, compared with the number of men
discharged from tbe service on tbe expiration of their original 12 years’ engagement.
I
Table XL
Strength of the Discharges on completion of engagement. Re-enlistments
Supplemental Per-centage
in the
Tear. Reserve of
Supplemental
at the end of From the Prom the Re-enlistments.
Total. Reserve.
each year. Regular Amy. Army Reserve.

1887 1,452 1,321 4;759' 6.080 605 9-9


1888 3,040 1,638 9,023 10,661 1,846 17-3
1889 5,171 1,692 9,523 11,215 2,396 21-3
.1890. 7,094 1,071 9J85 10,856 2,384 2,1-9
1891 9,133 788 {9,689 10,477 ?.731 26-5

TOTAL 6,510. 42,779 49,289 9,962

35. From these figures it will be seen that tbe Supplemental Deserve (composed of
men who cannot be summoned until after all tbe men of tbe first Army Deserve have
been called into-stbe ranks), consists of only 9,133. men. As these men have been on
an average about six years away from tbe Colours, and have been udtbout any
training during that period, those who have been more than that time in tbe Deserves
cannot be considered as very efficient for active Service, without two months training.
I should like to have some assurance that, every year, each man in tbe Army
Deserve should be as efficient in drill and in rifleTiractice as an “ efficient ” Volunteer.
If this were exacted, I would recommend steps being taken to increase tbe numbers in
tbe Supplementary Deserve.
It would be wise to allow a man medically sound to continue in Section D of tbe
1st Glass Army Deserve, until tbe hge of 40, by prolonging bis service in it from
year to year after bis annual training. Tbe expense to -the nation would be but small
Oompared ■v.'itb tbe value of this additional force to tbe Deserve in time of war. With
a view to make its conditions of service and pay better knovm, they will in future be

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ppinfced on the back of tbQ soldier’s character oertificafce, -which he receives on transfer
to tho Army Reserve. - , . . . . ,i
36. Table XII. shows the, numbers struck off each year as absentees during the last Absentee*
five years, and it is satisfactory to note the diminution, year by year, in the per-centage from the
of loss from this cause:— ■ < Reserve.

Effective Strength Table XII.


Struck off as of the heserve on the Proportion of
Years. Absentees to .1,000 of,the
Absentees. 1st .JanuaH’ in
each year. Effective Strength.

1887 1,801 46,858 33

1888 - 1,408 50,950 28

1889 1,368 50,341 27

1890 - 1,254 54,136 23

1891 1,258 59,280 21

MILITIA RESERVE.

37. To facilitate reference to the state of the Reserves whichMilitia would be ava
for Service in the ranks of the Regular Army, except in case of mobilisation for Reserve.
Home Defence, the Militia Reserve is dealt w*ith prior to the recruiting and the
general state of that branch of the Defensive Porces of the country.
By Appendix R, it will be seen that the strength of the Militia Reserve, on
1st January 1892, was 30,171, as against 30,245 in January 1891.
If ever it should be decided not to. insist on the men in the Army Reserves being
trained after leaving the Colours, it seems to me that it would be wise to increase the
numbers of the Militia Reserve, which is trained for 28 days each year.
The waste in this Reserve is shown in the table referred to above.

PART IV.
MILITIA.

38. Prom Appendix I, it will be seen that, although there were 37,487 recruits umbers
enlisted between the termination of the training of 1890 and that in 1891, only 34,983 enlisted.
"Waste of the
were finally approved and came up for preliminary drill. Of these 27,750 completed Militia.
their preliminary drill; tlie remainder either joined the Regular Army or the Royal
Marines, or they purchased their discharge, were discharged as unfit, were absent
without leave, or disappeared in other ways before the conclusion of the drill period.
The satisfactory side of this diminution, in the numbers available for the annual
training of the Militia, is that out of these there were 6,871 who joined the Regular
Porces; the unsatisfactory part is that 3,474 purchased their discharge, and 3,672
absented themselves without leave.
39. There is every reason to suppose that, when trade is slack, times hard, or the Irregular
weather persistently inclement, men and lads out of work enlist for the Militia for the enlistments.
sake of tbe food, clothes, shelter, and. bounty, which they obtain for so doing.
It is not unlikely that there are a certain number of these lads who go from one
depot to another, during the slack time and in winter, enlisting in one regiment of
Militia after another, and going through a coiu'se of drill in each. From an economical
point of view this is quite imlefensible ; l)ut I can see only one way to prevent this
practice, and in my opinion the remedy is more objectionable from an economical point
of view than the abuse to be corrected. The remedy would bo to have all Militia
recruits drill about the same period of the year, and just prior to the annual trainings,
B 4

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wWcli should also all- take place simultaneously. The abuse, however, is not so wide-
spread as to call for so drastic a remedy. ' -
As there is no cloud’without its silver lining, so this abuse has the advantage, of
making known, throughout the length and breadth of the land, the comforts of a soldier’s
life, and acts as^ an advertisement iii aid of recruiting.
, It'is extremely difficult to detect these Militia recruits who enlist fraudulently, as
they are, as a rule, so young that 'they have no military bearing to awake suspicions
in the minds of recruiting agents.

, Kationalitic* 40. Table No. XIII. shows the nationalities of the recruits enlisted in the Militia, and
Of Militia the various Arms of_ the Service which they elected to join, during the year .1891,
•liecruits. compared with the numbers for "the previous year.
Table XIII.
Halionalities. During 1890. •During 1891. Arms. During 1890. During 1891.

English Militia 27,210 30,812 Artillery Militia 3,237 3,586

^Scotch „ 3,983 3,903 Engineer „ 800 871

Irish „ 4,441 -5,068 Infantry „ 31,597 35,326'

Total 35,634 39,783 Total 35,634 39,783

By-this it will be'seen that .the numbers enlisted for tbe English Militia show an
increase of 3,602, while in the Scotch Militia there was a decrease of 80, and in the
Irish Militia an increase of 627. The total number of recruits raised for the Militia
generally, during 1891, shows an increase of 4,149 when compared with the figures for
the preceding year. The number enlisted for each regiment and battalion of Militia
during 1891 will be found in Appendix J. .

Opinions o( 41. The opinions of the Inspecting Officers as to the physique of the recruits in the
Inapecling^ ranks at the time of the “annual training are as'follows, and they may be considered
Officers.
very satisfactory:—
Excellent - 1
Exceptionally good - 2
1
"Very satisfactory
Satisfactory - . - 19
Yery good - - - 19
Good - - - - 54
Eairly good - - - 15 ^147 favourable.
Yery fair - 2
Eair - - - - 27
Gro^ng lads -
Up to standard
tip to average
Below average
Short and stout, small and sturdy
. Small hut improving -
Young but improving
Indifferent 21 unfavourable.
Large per-centage of “ specials ”
Poor - -
Young and weedy
Slight falling off -

Total ^ - - 168

Submarine 42. Table XIY. shows the present condition of the Submarine Miners Milifeia,
Mining* compared with the three preceding years, and there is every reason to e.vpect that,
Militia.'

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■when the service and its demands on the time of the men composing these corps are
better known, the establishments will be reached and maintained.

Table XIV.
Total Effectives. On 1st January 1'.92.

Division.
On On On On
1st Jan. 1st J.an. 1st Jan. 1st Jan. Establish-
Effectives. "Wanting.
1889. 1890. 189i. 1892. ment.

Portsmouth Division 158 178 209 204 204 265 61


Plymouth „ 129 154 171 163 163 171 8
Thames and \ 93 183 247 302 302 330 28
Medway J ”
Harwich „ 63 57 57 57 93 36
Milford Haven „ 41 49 69 69 118 49
South Wales "1
97 103 218 218 286 68
and Severnj ”

Total 380 716 836 1,013 1,013 1,263 250

•43. Table XV. shows for the last five years (1) the numbers of soldiers discharged Re-engage-
from the Begular Porces now serving in the Militia: (2) the number of re-engaged ments and
Re-enlist-
Militiamen; and (3) the number of Militiamen who have re-enlisted after completing ments.
their first Militia engagement.
Tablejpr.
Serving in the Militia on
Glass.
1st Jan. 1st Jan. 1st Jan. 1st Jan. 1st Jan.
1888. 1889. 1890. 1891. 1892.

(1.) Discharged soldiers 4,756 5,362 6,008 6,478 6,905


(2.) Re-engaged Militiamen - 31,498 30,763 31,422 32,127 33,108
(3.) Militiamen who re-enlisted after! 6,838 ! 6,808 6,957 6,631 7,488
completion of engagement -j

Total 43,092 42,933 44,387 45,236 47,501


Per-centage on the enrolled | 39 40 42 44 47
strength - - -/

44. Table XVI. gives the numbers, the service, and the age (so far as it can be
known), of the Militiamen who joined the Regular Array during the last live years,
"Volunteers
and it is satisfactory to note that the numbers for 1891 are better than during 1890 to Regular
and the preceding years. The numbers furnished to the Line by each regiment and Army.
battalion of Militia during 1891 will be found in Appendix J.
Table XVr.
1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891.

Ho. -who had not served a training - 5,778 5,482 7,420 7,392 8,027
Ho. who had served one training 3,645 3,267 3,482 3,476 3,724
Ho. who had served two or morej^ 2,083 1,534 1,697 1,794
trainings- - 1,791

Total 11,506 10,283 12,599 12,662 13,542

Under 20 years of age 8,247 7,883 9,983 10,080 10,262


Over 20 years of age 8,259 2,400 2,616 2,582 3,280

Total 11,506 10,283 12,599 12,662 13,542

n 703G8.

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Pesertors 45. Table XVII. gives tlie statistics of desertion from the Militia during the last five
arid *
years. The numbers are uhliaually large, and seem to point to the necessity for
Absentees.
some-additional measures for the detection of this crime.
Table XVII.
Total Effectives Deserted Per-centage to
Year. on 1st Janxiaiy during Rejoined from Net Loss
Effective
in each Year. Desertion. by Desertion.
the Year. Strength.

1887 - 110,488. 10,288 1,229 9,059 8-2


1888 . 108,718 8,795 749 8,046 7*4
1889 - 106,533 8,670 797 7,873 7-4
1890 - 103,685 8,903 815 8,088 7-8
1891 - 101,820 10,706 1,034 9,672 10*5

liecritifs for 46. There can be no doubt that the persistent search after Militia recruits by the
tbs Militia Sergeants belonging to the various Corps and by those of the Permanent StaflT, acting
.ani.Ilegnlar
Army,
under the careful and zealous supervision of the Adjutant, ought to lead to the
enlistment of a better stamp of Militia recruit than is at present obtained.
There are still a few Officers commanding Militia Corps and their Adjutants who resent
their recruits enlisting into the Kegular Army, and from one point, of view it is only
natural that they should do so. The recruits of such Corps are discouraged by them
from drilling on enliscment. This segregation of Militia recruits from those of the Line
militates against enlistments into the Uegular Forces from these Pogiments. Every
effort should be made to induce these Commanding Officers to conform to the more
general practice of allowing their recruits to drill on enlistment with those of the
territorial Regii^^nt to which they belong.
Every effort is being made to prevent the possibility of there being any just cause
of complaint, on the part of the soldier, that he was not fully aware of all the terms of
the contract of his enlistment; but, inasmuch as many of the lads who enlist are not
intelligent, or not anxious to have them explained prior to attestation for the- Regular
Forces, it is well to- keep the door open to admit them through the .ranks of the
Militia.
Although the cost to the public is greater when a lad enlists first into the Militia,
and then into the Regular Army, the recruit who thus makes his trial of a soldier’s life
is more likely to be contented hereafter, than the man who enlists straight into the
Anny, without any knowledge of its restrictions upon individual liberty, or the
conditions of a soldier’s life.
I have the honor to b®,
Sir,
Your obedient Servant,
W. FEILDING,
The Adjutant General to the Forces, Lieut.-General,
&c., &c., &c. Inspector-General of Recruiting.

1
t

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19 7

APPENDICES.

APPENDIX A.

EECEUIT3 raised in each REGIMENTAL DISTKICT, ARTILLEEY DISTRICT’, ENGINEER DISTRICT,


■ and RECRUITING DISTRICT, during the last five years.

Begimentnl H'ead’Quarters of Date of Uuiing During During During During


Commanding Officer. Appointment. 1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891.
Diiitricts. District.

ENGLAND.

2nd Regt* List. Guildford Col. E. L. Hercy 22 Oct. 1887 182 194 368 348 475
•8rd ,1 j, .CanterburT „ E. T. Hobson 17 Oct. 1887 270 306 316 273 340
4tli ,, I, Lancaster - - „ 0. R. Middleton 2 Jan. 1888 303 200 203 215 159
5th , Newcastle-on-Tyne - „ C. E. Hope 13 April 1839 178 84 114 305 433
-I*
6th , Warwick:
Birmingham - \ f4G0 721 1,206
., H. D’O. Farrington 17 Oct. 1887 781 585
Other Tov.-ns J \32» 485 337

Hounslow E. A. Wood, C.B. 1 April 1890 382 4S3 446 352 343
7th „
8th ft Warrington A. C. Twentyman, C.B. 10 Oct. 1887 ICS 137 184 122 164
9th |> Norwich C. S. Perry 26 Mar. 1890 327 183 175 267 283
Lincoln - H. G. Carleton - 27 Nov. 1891 400 280 242 109 169
10th „ ■»>

•nth- Exeter , D. M. Iloirc 7 May 1890 314 245 260 336 256
»

Bury St. Edmunds •T. E. Collins 12 May 1890 260 214 233 210 224
12 th „
Taunton W. H. Thompson - 4 June 189P 399 311 330 325 262
13th „
york W. R. Truman - 25 April 1891 346 383 302 296 302
14th „ n
Beverley H. J. Hallowes - 25 Feb. .1890 110 113 128 92 111
15th „ »
Bedford - R. W. M. Wcthefcll 1 Sept. 1887 343 237 267 259 193
16 th „

17th %ft Leicester H. Langtrj’ 4 ifar. 1891 516 388 505 417? 528
Richmond, Yorkshire H. E. Davidson - 15 Jan. 1888 271 258 196 185 166
19th
Bury, Lancaihire G. Baker, C.B. SO June 1891 255 207 204 547 605
20th „
Chester W. V. Brownlow, C.B. 30 Aug. 1889 223 192 161 225 341
22nd „
Wrexham - R. S. Liddell ' 3 June 1889 121 48 146 164 ih
28rd „ t

Brecon G. Baton, C.M.G. 3 June 1889 205 139 164 205 231
24th »
Bristol - G. Salis-Schwahc 18 Jan. 1890 975 642 1,114 824 813
28th »
29th Worcester F. C. Buxton ■ 19 Dec. 1887 689 465 557 S4S 395
Burnlej’ - , - W. J. Frampton 12 June 1888 145 169 247 181 260
SOth
Ivingston-on-Thames L. Hornby 1 Dec. 1891 221 84 275 369 839
31st

Bodmin - G. 0. Swiney 7 Mar. 1888 65 77 69 86 117


32hd „
Halifax E. G. Fenn 27 Jan. 1891 402 149 249 366 464
33rd „
Carlisle - P. L. Bellamy 8 Mar. 1889 83 52 77 108 108
S4th „
Chichester R. F. Buller 3 Nov. 1888 42S 325 489 390 405
35th „
Winchester J. E. Whitting 12 April 1891 619 598 613 581 530
»7th „

Lichfield C. G. Heathcote - 12 Nov. 1887 336 174 216 214 348


3 8 th
Dorchester C. E. King 1 April 1887 225 200 2.i8 228 233
39th
40th Warrington A. C. Twentyman, C.B. 10 Oct. 1887 175 209 186 203 270
>7 303 230 246 221 314
41st Cardiff - S. W. Rawlins 22 May 1888
Oxford T. M. Bailie 10 Nov. 1887 239 224 284 256 260
4Srd

Warlc'y - C. Maguire 1 April 1890 392 409 497 506 .541


44th >• 579
"Derby II. II. Flooko 28 Aag. 1890 481 495 586 55v>
45tli )? 410
Preston - F. G. Berkeley 21 July 1888 323 283 461 378
47th » 335
-Xorthampton C. E. Foster 21 April 1889 249 2C0 296 352
48 th tp
leading - H. C. Borrett lOhlar. 1890 309 173 239 233 371
49th }p

Maidstone D. J. D. Safford - 12 July 1889 236 138 229 197 260


SOth „ tp
Pontefract WL Byam, C.B. 1 April 1887 182 107 250 237 295
SIst „ » 191
Shrewsbury E. A. Carer - 27 Sept. 1888 281 260 238 239
53rd „ 274
pf
Hounslow E. A. Wood, C.B. 1 April 1890 224 SGS 861 294
57th „ tt
Devizes A. L. Walker - 3 April 1888 279 175 266 176 170
«2nd „

Ashton-uuder-Lyno „ A. G. n. Church 12 July 1888 702 905 853 941 1,015


63rd „ fp
346
Lichfield .,C. G. Heathcote - 12 Nov. 1887 355 282 401 311
64th „ pp
241 460
Pontefract W. Byam, C.B. 1 April 1887 182 14G 266
65th „
Newcastle-ou-Tync „ C. E. Hope 13 April 1889 204 115 197 204 473
68th „

Total (English Regimental l 15,660 12,914 15,697 15,723 j 18,320


Districts) - •J

0 2

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APPENDIX A.—contimied..
Head Quarters of Date of During During During During During
Districts. Commanding Officer.
District. Appointment. 1887. 1888. 1889, 1800. 1891.

SCOTLAND.

1st Regt* Dist. Glencorse Col. C. W. N. Guinaess, C.B. 28 Jan. 1889 780 458 390 290
31st „ „ Ayr II P. G. Jackson 21 Jan. 1891 125 108 82 95
25tli It II Berwick-on-Tweed „ G. T. L. Carwitheu 1 April 1890 124 130 SO 47
26th & 71st „ Hamilton :
Glasgow 529 749

42nd
Other towns
Perth -
:} T. 11. Stevenson, C.B.
C. T. Wallace
17 Mar. 1887
23,July 1890
800
278
839
225
{ 391
220
300
275
72nd 9> Port George A. Murray 29 Dec. 1890 102 72 73 GO
75th it Aberdeen W. Green, C.B. - 1 April 1887 143 143 141 T07
79th it Inverness A. Murray 29 Dec. 1890 83 51 07 29
91st Stirling A. C. Nightingale - 6 Dec. 1887 234 192 101 203-

Total (Scorch Regimental Districts) 3,741 2,224 2,080 3,221 2,GS4

IRELAND. ■

18thRegt‘ Dist. Clonmel Col. Don. H. Parnell, C.B. 23 Oct. 1888 292 226 333 376 253
27th Omagh „ J. P. Caldwell - 12 July 1887 133 112 65 117 105
83rd Belfast „ IV. J. Holt, C.B. 2.5 Mar. 1890 523 329 354 079 511
87th it
Armagh „ H. R. Abadie, C.B. 14 July 1890 133 122 71 12S 97
£8th it Galway „ M.P. Blake 21 June 1889 324 190 139 163 126
100th it Birr „ R. A. Crawford 25 Nov. 1891 ICG 171 161 147 205
lOIst it Tralee - „ D. Makgill - Crichton- IGPeh. 1891 318 187 157 196 279
Maitland.
I03nd Naas „ P. J. pane 20 June 1889 182 145 132 170 213

Total (Irish Regimental Districts) 2,071 1,482 1,412 1,976 1.789

Sunderland Lieut.-Col. J. C. Robinson 1 ‘April 1890 174 112 286 3tf2 28S
Liverpool H. W. Rookc 1 Oct. 1891 14 26 40 107 227
Great Yarmouth „ W. V. Gregory 1 Oct. 1891 717 477 516 561 630
Dover „ P. P. Dilmas 17 Aug. 1891 466 409 ■f- 426 380 462
Woolwich Major G. Monck-Mason (Acting 252 221 439 325 503
Militia & Volun- i temporarily.)
teer Artillery,^ Gosport Lieut.-Col. A. W. Perrier 30 May 1891 225 192 221 214 ' ICC
Districts. Devonport „ G. C.H.Parlby 24 Jan. 1890 151 126 170 195 166
Leith „ C. W. Thomson 29 Nov. 18SS 132 37 61 101 85
Aberdeen W. P. Georges 1 Mar. 1891 176 170 129 88 84
Newport, Jlon. - . G.C.K. Parlby 24 Jan. 1890 207 132 199 155 251
Londonderry - Col. L.P. Perry 28 May 1S90 331 225 246 352 281
Templemore Lieut.-Col. T. J. Jones* 14 Dec. 1886 262 195 158 200 290

Tot.al (Artiilery Districts) 3,107 2,319 2,891 2,980 3.433

York Col. ir. T. Turner 1 Mar. 1891 4


Chester „ W. K. Slacke - 1 Dec. 1891 42
Colchester „ C. J. O’N. Perguson 24 Jan. 1890 16
Engineer Districts ■ Devonport „ R. W. Stewart 1 July 1890 No Returns furnished. - 27
Gosport „ A. G. Durnford - 1 April 1891 17
Edinburgh „ T. P. -White 9 Mar. 1890 2
Chatham (S.M.E.) Licut.-Co). A. J. Hepper 2 July 1890 79

Total (Engineer Districts) 187

London Col. K. G. Henderson, C.B. - I Mar. 1888 3,529 3,097 4,066 5,031 5,537
Recruiti.igDi8tricts| Liverpool Major G. A- W. Porrest 17 Dec. 1890 391 258 474 509 560
Dublin Col. J. D. Dyson-Lauric 8 Mar. 1889 693 748 751 922 922

Total (Recruiting Districts) 4,613 4,103 5,2D1 6,462 7,019

N.B.—The above tabic docs not include recruits raised at the Head Quarters of Regiments, Battalions, and Batteries.
* This officer vacated the appointment in November 1891, and it was still vacant on tho 1st January 1892.

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21
APPENDIX B.
DETAIL of RECRUITS raised in REGIMENTAL DISTRICTS and ARTILLERY DISTRICTS
during 1891.
Number of Recruits enlisted in each District during the Year.
Number Percent-
Infantry of the Line. in Terri- age of
torial Recruits the men
Regi- appointed shown in
ment on to Terri- preceding
Ref^mcntal Distr.^.'ts. Enlisted De))art- Total 1st Jan. torial column,
for or Enlisted Ca- Artil- En- Foot 1892 born Rcgi- who have
appointed for or mental Regular Militia. in the nicnts enlisted
to the appointed valry. lery. gineers, Guards. Regi- from &il m ths
Terri- to other Corps. Army mental sources. Terri-
torial Regi- District. torial
Regi- ments. District.
ment.

■MiP & VoP ArP Dist. 137 34 97 3 15 3 289 565


5th Eegt* District - 127 190 47 17 9 43 3 436 185 354 275 46
10 th j, j, 96 35 I.*; 11 5 3 166 316 558 282 34
► 14th „ 9) 106 131 29 16 9 0 303 412 815 227 47
sd 15 th „
17th „
»
9)
65
313
12
112
19
44
7
21
1
1
6
35
1
3
111
529
71
37.6
211
856
426
371
15
84
3 1I 19th „ 99 113 19 13 5 16 166 605 311 216 52
Ul 33rd „ 225 123 60 40 2 15 4 469
C5 99 606 614 300 75
w 45th „ 99 223 149 37 28 8 104 11 560 6S8 867 242 92
51st „ 99 183 58 9 21 15 8 293 515 829 305 60
o 65 th „ 99 216 140 17 17 3 63 4 460 598 892 285 76
IS 68th ,, 166 191 49 00 G 37 o 473
99 812 493 367 45
Total 1,832 1,297 373 302 44 363 44 4,255 5,748 6,800 3,296 56

'MiP & VoP Arty Dist. 74 118 1 5 4 227 285


4th Rcgt* District - 82 34 14 14 1 10 4 159 166 939 299 27
6th „ „ 282 862 134 149 S 95 10 1,540 1,143 1,267 •126 66
8th „ ,, 73 65 21 o 1 4 166 573 935 192 38
20th » 237 265 44 20 5 11 18 600 1,342 1,260 301 79
22 nd >> 124 114 30 36 7 23 7 341 403 685 288 43
23 rd 99 15 o o 1 2 3 124 211 452 403 24
. 29th 231 78 20 33 1 26 6 395 506 932 278 83
■< SOth «>> 145 82 12 6 9 4 258 306 727 347 42
34th » 59 15 10 15 8 107 , 227 279 17b 35
38th 212 67 31 24 9 3 347 743 967 269 79
40th ,, ,, 211 39 13 7 1 271 502 1,007 284 74
c 47 th „ „ 1-12 144 19 20 40 7 377 386 1,064 195 73
Is 53id „ „ 144 40 17 4 31 4 240 259 874 206 70
63rd „ ,, '37.6 351 106 103 20 33 25 1,014 1,410 147 403 93
64th „ „ - 230 36 17 11 1 19 314 472 1,184 299
Liverpool Eecg. Dist.- .366 68 82 o 34 561 344

Total 2,647 2,647 5SS 646 54 359 105 r,041 9,278 12,719 4,360 61

’MiP &'"VoP Artr List. 221 44 331 10 1-1 10 630 341


a 9th Uegl' District 173 41 13 24 4 26 3 284 403 1,601 301 57
U
^ . 12th !> 171 16 11 8 12 3 221 382 1,597 226 76
16 th 98 50 18 12 15 2 198 436 1,055 118 S3
44th 225 204 50 39 13 5 541 795 1,014 275 82
48th , 203 87 26 16 16 1 351 382 773 693 29

Total 870 619 162 430 21 99 24 2,739 6,040 1,613 54

f Artillery District 1.58 21 294 16 6 8 503 '191


j 2nd RegP District 219 170 52 26 I 7 475 783 913 334 66
I 7th
31st
„,, „„ 71
378
194
376
37
35
26
35 4
3
8
12
3
343
839
171
1,233
987
666
307
438
23
86
Q 125 69 11 11
a 43rd „ „ 22 3 23 264 413 .563 261 48
c 49 th „ ,, 246 36 .39 18 7 15 11 372 471 1,183 274 90
•d
n 57th „ 134 87 36 16 1 20 294 97 1,173 357 38
o
)A London Recg. Dist. 2,740 1,255 822 189 136 399 5,541 2,751

Total 1,173 3,830 1,497 1,248 220 199 464 8,631 6,109 5,485 1,971 60

o g fMiP& VoPArtr Diet. 102 70 243 15 17 15 462 305


P-iS J 3rd Regt* District 159 42 78 38 4 n 8 340 209 906 299 53
0) S
35th ,, „ 175 84 57 56 5 11 17 405 478 1,476 285 62
50th „ ,, 152 57 23 18 6 3 259 544 844 238 I 64
’6
Total 486 285 228 355 24 45 43 1,466 1,536 3,226 822 59

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APPENDIX "Q.—reonMmmd.
Numter of Recruits enlisted in each District during the Year.
Number Percent-
in Terri- age of-
Infantry of the Line. Recruits men
torial
Regi- appointed shown in
ment on to Terri- preceding
Enlisted Depart- Total 1st Jun. torial column
Dtoff roontal Diatrints. Ca- Artil- En- Root Regi- who luire,
for or Enlisted 1802 born
appointed for or mental Regulai Slilitia. in the ments enlisted
to tlio appointed valry. ^cry. gineers, Guards, Rcgi- from all in the
Terri- to other Corps. Army. montnl sources. Terri-
torial Regi- District. torial
Regi- ments. District.
ment.

S 'Mil* & VoP ArtJ' Dist. 34 16 109 3 2 3 166 80


d) g
o 37th P»egt’ District - 267 83 69 33 33 23 23 630 366 1,357 307 87
39th „ 142 14 10 35 8 13 10 232 233 548 183 78
coQ 62nd ,, ft 137 12, 13 4 1 1 170 274 1,225 190 72
Total 546. 143 108 180 45 40 36 1,098 953 3,130 680 80

g a ' Mil* & VoP ArV Dist 23 12 118 8 2 3 166 160


5.2 11th Eegt'District - 133 32 19 23 20 23 9 259 273 916 287 56
®.!2
K!-- 13th „ „ 169 27 15 31 5 io 6 263 453 1,077 881 44
.32nd „ „ .71 10 3 14 13 2 4 117 130 218 382 19
Total 373 92 49- 186 46 37 22 805 1,016 2,211 1,000 37

H fMil* & VoP Art^ Dist 67 8 170 250 389


.§.2 1 24th Eegt* District - 142 36 15 5 83 231 649 541 289 49
fe P I 28th „ „ 392 162 35 74 19 75 55 812 800 1,731 403 97
123 89 26 23 4 43 7 ■315 280 709 268 46
Total 657 354 84 272 27 151 63 1,608 2,118 2,981 960 68

Total English Districts • 8,584 9,267 3,084 3,619 481 1,293 801 27,129 29,497 42,592 14,702 59

-S f Mil* & Vol' ArtT Dist. 20 5 59 84 444


‘S -• II St Eegt* District 151 238 42 24 10 68 3 536 403 320 241 63
g.Sj21st „ 63 32 4 1 2 1 1 104 225 219 252 25
CO.S2
- > .setii „ „ 42 6 2 3 1 54 181 401 299 14
^ a 26th „ 76 371 48 43 3 62 7 610 ^09 369 675 13
o l_71st ,, „ 138 355 63 62 1 23 10 642 445
CQ 557 601 23
Total 470 1,032 154 192 16 155 21 2,030 2,207 1,866 1,968 24

Mil* & VoP Art^ Dist. 37 3 36 4 84 124


so ao 42nd Eegt* District - 81 117 15 13 5 2.36 297 723 178 46
72nd „ „ 48 7 1 56 247 43! 645 7
in.® ■< 15th ,, ,, 9
.a.S 77 47 14 7 157 198 432 468 16
/9th „ ft 10 2 1 1 15 146 191 382 8
(Z; 91st ft ft 132 109 12 21 4 278 649 3G2 462 28
Total 348 319 38 86 20 826 1,661 2,139 2,135 16

Total Scottish Districts- 818 1,341 192 278 23 175 29 2,856 3,868 4,005 4,103 20

fMilitia Art* District - 136 7 129 4 3 280 685


I 27th Eegt* District - 79 8 9 10 106 355 683 260 30
►I .s
•C g
U) i 83rd tf „ 208 177 26 89 7 2 1 510 773 1,093 318 65
87 th ,, ft 74 10 10 2 I 97 326 546 262 28
102nd „ 147 38 6 19 1 3 214 146 973 348 42
■P Dublin Eecg. Dist, 559 103 217 18 10 15 922 854

Total 508 928 161 466 28 16 22 2,129 3,139 3,295 1,188 43

. ("Militia Artf District 135 2 142 7 1 290 362


c 18th Eegt* District 180 43 . 7 16 3 3 263 359 938 468 88
- is -{ 88th „ » 77 14 5 13 16 i 126 276 845 138 56
aS 1Month
JOOth .. 149 85 G 11 3 201 428 597 291 51
oW LlOlst 211 37 1 24 6 280 494 1,208 353 60
Of
Total 6i; 264 , 21 206 85 1,153 1,919 3,588 1,253 49

Tot.nl Irish Districts 1,125 1,192 182 C72 63 20 28 3,2S2 5,058 6,883 2,141 46

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APPENDIX 0,
INCUEASB and DECREASE of the ARMY reported during each montli of the year 1891.
NOS-COMMISBIO.VED OFPICEUS AXD :MEK—ALL AEMS.

,o ,=
a S
s
u> o
•E a A o
■<
CJ B.
•-S a

Bficotives on tlio Isf)


of tho month -S 202,116 202,897 202,248 201,775 200,072 198,718 198,950 199,357 200,477 201,542 203,209 203,674 203,163
(1st Jttn.
18S)2.)

INOREASE:
fLong ser-
vice 141 143 156 170 14S 139 158 190 167 250 141 187 1,905
Short ser-
Ecoriiiis
vice:
joined'
3 years 226 174 159 156 156 214 128 129 164 164 167 105 1,942
7 years 3,SS9 2,653 2,270 2,124 1,819 2,121 2,405 3,003 2,931 3,523 3,088 2,730 32,066

3,759 2,977 2,585 2,450 2,123 2,474 2,691 3,827 3,262 3,937 3,396 3,022 80,003

Joined from deser-


} 140 138 130 125 165 137 130 126 149 167 154 146 1,707
tion - - -

From Army Re-


sorve } 2
1 1 3 6 4 3 3 1 SO

’Other C.iuses 5 38 7 60

Total increase - 3,901 3,117 2,716 2,576 2,296 2,617 2.825 3,494 3,413 4,106 3,553 3,176 37,790

DEGREASE:

Dead - 127 90 110 133 144 237 187 181 133 169 141 113 1,796

'After 21 years’ ser- 48


vice
07 45 65 74 100 84 182 118 112 141 140 1.17*

After 18 years’
service under
Art. 1033, Royal 12 ■25 29 25 30 23 24 24 10 10 263
Warrant, 2olli
Juno 1881

On conudeting 1st 63 93 81
43 105 62 56 45 39 35 90 71 788
]iorlod

As invalids - 200 217 193 206 270 360 315 279 198 242 182 290 .3,048
By purchase 157 152 163 140 153 12S 120 119 128 119 123 131 1,623

Under Sec. 81, 125 159 99


107 310 123 106 97 112 132 157 183 1,465
Army Act of 1881

Free by indulgence 13 27 26 28 SO 26 34 24 21 22 16 24 290


On conviction of I
making a f.alse
answer on attes-
tation

For misconduct -
I 11

124
20

110
20

109
18

146
27

124 112
31 .33

128
27

ISO
19

151
23

137 130
8 23

133
200

1,590
^Miscellaneous 69 73 03 57 72 •IS 67 69 71 80 72 60 807

931 878 801 935 993 996 901 1,046 881 918 933 1,027 11,300

Struck off as deserters 402 388 403 345 284 323 850 388 416 415 375 482 4,631
'On completion 1,409 2,575
2,175 1,986 555 651 595 751 731 1,455 1,853
S' o of service - } 1.412 16,128
>
On conversion 188 122
of service -
I 150 132 269 187 120 132 117 119 81 109 J.C76

^Relegated 3 10 9 4 5 5 5 3 6 IT 12 11 90
ToMilitia, Yeomanry,
I 44 •IS 00 02 94 65 43 40 51 63 58 67 735
and Volunteers -

Given np as deserters 8 9 3 5 7 4 4 4 7 ' 4 3 5 63


•Other causes 43 86 85 2 90 85 4 30 325

Tefaldocrc.aso - 3,120 8,706 3,189 4,279 3,050 2,385 2,418 2.874 2,348 2,.t39 3,088 3,037 36,743

Not incrc.ase - 781 232 407 1,120 1,065 1,667 465 1,047

Net dtcTMie - 649 473 1,703 1,351 611

* rrincipally interchanges between tho difforent arms of the Sorrice.

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APPENDIX D.
STATE of the AEMY on the 1st January in each year from 1887 to 1892.

On 1st Jan. On 1st Jan. On 1st Jan. On 1st Jan. On 1st Jan. On 1st Jan.
1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891. 1892.

Total Effectives 200,507 203,060 202,761 201,848 202,116 203,163

Establifhmeut 203,207 202,713 203,775 206,246 206,809 208,112

Supcrniimerar}' 347

Wanting to complete 2,760 1,014 4,398 4,693 4,949

INCREASE and DECREASE of the ARMY during the last five years.

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APPENDIX E.
RTOURN of DiscnARGES by PURCHASE during the last live years.
C
Ry Indulgence

SC !» o a i
•o'" V-i=s| 3 ??c=S&
"Jf s g^yj fa
Year, ’/a c5
7i « i?SB -r^
’^-^“=3 3 ! 3 o o s iS i;--=&1s£K P2
>»2 . o c.-- p-
P4 ocu
oco ^ ‘c's “ E> I o o
-. V)
CCQ*-* a a 3 o ii=3.2S
O ■M r-<

1887 1,280 238 299 208 117 64 61 93 86 64 58 63 54 88 1,493 2.773


1888 918 191 241 182 j 121 76 42 35 67 69 44 34 36 20 i 1,339 2.i57
1889 1,042 190 259 253 168 117 60 28 27 60 55 54 39 372 1,682 2,724
1890 1,313 251 309 202 141 71 32 25 20 32 48 49 286 1,584 2,897
1891 R-OGl 255 348 203 131 66 32 27 10 8 25 00 307 1.527 3,088

APPENDIX P.
NUMERICAL RETURN of SOLDIERS whose cases were submitted to the WAR OFFICE during
the year 1891 on the ground that they were under 18 years of age on enlistment.
CAVALRY.

Special Enlistments.
Total
Ages. Number
Chest Number Number Number
Height. Weight. up to
Measurement. Dis- Re- of Ciises
Stan-
charged. tained. dealt
dard.
14 to 15 15 to 16 16 to 17 17 to IS 32 to 33 33 to 34!!5ft. 5ins. 5ft.6ius, Under with.
ins. i
Years. Years. Years. Years. to to
ins. 115 Ihs.
5ft. 6ins. 5ft,7ins.

Heavy Up to Standard.
ilcdium 4 Up to Standard,
Light 4

Total 1
Cavalry J 13

Ro'i'AL ARTILLERY.

Special Enlistments. Tdt.al


Ages. Number Num-
Number Number
Chest Sleasurement. Height. 1 Weight. up to ber of
Dis- Re-
Stan C.ases
charged. tained.
5ft. 2ins 5ft.5ins. dard. dealt
14 to 15 15 to 16 16 to 17 17 to IS 31 to 32 to 33 10 Under
to to
Years. Years. Years. Years. 32 ins, 33 ins 34 ins. 115 lbs. with.
5ft. Sins. 5ft.6ins.
I 1
Gunners Till
Drivers — 4

Total
Royal 12 15
Artillery

FOOT GTUARDS.

Special Enlistments.

Ages Total
Chest Number
Measure- Height. Weight. Number Number Number
ment. up to
Discharged, Re ned. of Cases
Standard.
dealt with.
14 to 15 15 to 16 16 to 17 17 to IS Under 34 Under 5 ft, Under
Y'ears. Years. Years. Years. inches. 8 ins. 115 lbs.

'I’ofal 1
Foot i
Guards J

a 70869. D

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APPENDIX P.—cmitinued.
INFANTRY OF THE LINE.

Special Enlistments.
Total
Ages. Number Number
Chest Height. ! Weight. Number Number
Measurement. up to of Cases
Discharged. Retained.
Standard. dealt
14 to 15 15 to 16 16 to 17|17 to IS 31 to 32 32 to 33 Under Under with.
Years. Years. Years, i Years. inches. inches. 5 ft. 4 ins. 115 lbs.

Total ■>
Infantry I 21 44 37 10 21 12 14 67 65 38 103
of the I
Line J

TOTAL FOR ALL ARMS.

Ages. Total Total


Number
Number of Numbsr Number Number of
up to
17 to 18 Special Discharged. Retained. Cases dealt
14 to 15 i 15 to 16 16 to 17 Standard.
Years. Years. Years. Years. Enlistments. with

24 62 51 48 91 86 53 139

APPENDIX G-.
NUMBER of EFFECTIVES under tliree years’ service on fclie 1st January in each year, from
1887 to 1891, the number of men discharged as Invalids in their 1st, 2nd, and
3rd. year of service, during each of these years, and tlie proportion of Invalids per
1,000 of the Effectives under three years’ service.

Number of 5Ion under three Years’ service on Invalids discliar^d. during the Year under Proportion of Inv.alids per l.OOOEilective
1st January in each Year. three Years’ service. under tiiree Years’ service.

Year. From one From two Under From one From two
Yrom one From two Under one
Under one to two to tlireo Total. to two to three Total. one to t^yo to three Total.
Ye:ir. Year. 'Ycjirs. Yeiu-s. Yetir. Years. Years.
Years. Years.

34.373 31,263 27,213 923-49 289 125 366 1,080 8 18 15 11


18S7

:^,737 30,478 29,936 89,171 210 382 73 965 7 12 12 10


ISSS

1SS9 23,040 25,718 29,488 78,246 101 330 ■420 941 8 12 1-4 12

21,078 24,60-4 72,320 301 335 258 917 11 17 10 13


1S90 26,638

23.893 20,137 72,008 864 375 261 1,000 13 16 18 14


1891 27,073

APPENDIX H.
PAST SERVICES of DESERTERS during the years 1886 to 1890.

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APPENDIX I.
a DETAIL of MILITIA PECRUITS eulisted between the trainings of 1890 and 1891, specifying the casualties between date of enlistment and the annual
^O training for 1891, and the number of such recruits who were present at the annual training.
C9
O
00

Xnmboroniisted Casualties during preliminary drill or drill Ca.3tmltic.s betweoii proliminar.y drill or drill on Absent from training, Present at ‘.raining,
between termination Casiialtifs prior Number liimlly , on onlislmciit. *3 • enlistment and tlie.anminl training. 1801. 1801-.
to e'lininciicemun!
of tho trainiiii;
of preliminary apiirovcd and S ® os=
of 1800 and who came up .s
tcrniinaticn of the
drid or drill on .loinod Regular Joined Regular
enliiitincnt. for:—
Army or o Army or
tmining of IS'OI.
Royal ^lurincs.
C. §:= = fc
Roi’al Marine.s. 1
_ A S 3^ « jF
V
s| Oo
®.§ H .s <s
— s >•
8
*s oS2.-= s'i £ o
- •giS« ■r O’ >>
rs ^ = ”3 V3
<t> •5
^ is o tA o « >
Ji
—« — 2
•5 n A
I- II g
"u82 tr. S
s
to SI g
o ’£i H, - S .OS'** ^
I y rt S5- s <=.
r* o Vs *C « a3 c; a ’ h p S
2 3's3 §^i.5 S3 2-0 !> US'S
O W I M

pEnglaml - 1,035 01 00 u 07.3 C54 134 10 .31 25 .30 1,301 103 5 — 17 1.30 100 032
30

AETll.LEKTi Scotland - 100 •170 17 10 I 13 100 433 8 0 ■4 12 48 440 6 12 2 10 47 353


I
^Ireland .838 T.’-.S 14 12 32.3 7.39 20 21 21 1 .33
27 30 38 880 0 48 747

Total 1.473 1,002 !I2 .33 1,308 1,820 108 10 02 70 18 12; 2,087 120 54 10 20 210 10.3 2,034 12

EKorxBEK3, England - ■131 ; •128 .30 303 301 27 11 700 7-4 10 24 10 570
j
I

j'England - 22.103 3,832 1.110 200 I 227 21,100 3,-133 3,315 1,318 304 58 400 102 18,018 1,373 11 11 1,572 50 07 20 422 2,330 3,207 8,700 40 71

ISFAXTKT-■< Scotland - 2.210 1,110 131 ; MO ! 01 2,130 SOI 103 27 152 42 22 SO 34 2,487 107 1 1 100 0 0 115 310 200 1,452 18
I !
Jroland - l.t^G - 2.081 33 95 i 53 1,150 1,015 1-41 57 121 00 10 24 20 2,019 154 1 .30 ■48 144 155 2,311 11

Total 2C.10S 7.0S2 1.303 .337 313 21,740 0,250 .3,027 118 1,021 430 01) 313 2-10 24,354 2,001 14 1.3 1.717 83 38 585 2,783 3,052 12,553 60 100

rEngland - 2-3,873 I .3,005 1,227 : 401 1 2-17 22,031 4,40S 3,140 02 220 4-11 2,404
70 1,380 .330 447 21,018 2,550 12 12 1,027 GS 73 .30 .3,317 10,202 i 50 70

Au. Aav3-j Scotland - 2,310 1,025 151 102 74 2.230 1,324 170 35 150 5-4 30 172 1 1 118 0 0 3 117 335 .337 1,807
1.37 41 2,027 10
^Ireland - 1,S’4 2,812 09 107 i 0.3 1,773 2,054 170 Cl 148 120 17 02 35 .3,805 175 2 1 45 12 7 8 40 107 203 3,088 13
J.
General Total 28,013 f',-172 1.417 i 073 ■ 381 20..337 8,410 3,705 104 '1,084 539 100 010 200 27,750 2,807 15 M 1.700 SO 80 41 007 3.020 I 3,857 15,157 A3 108
37,487' 2A01 31,083 7,235 4,032 7,400 15,328

* 'J he lol.-'l m:mh(-rof recruits enlisted for the militia during the calendar year was 39,783, see Appendix J,

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APPENDIX J-.

RETURN showing 5]ie number of Recruits raised' for each Regiment and Battalion of
Militia during 1891, and the number of Recruits furnished by each to the Regular
Army.

Recruits furnished
Recruits, to tlie Regular Army.
raised for
Regi-
each
ineutal Regiment. Head Quarters.
Regiment To
District. linked To
or- other Total.
Rattalion. Batta-
Corps.
lious.

AnxiLLERy:

Antrim Artillery IMilitiii 159 14 1.5 29 C.africkfergus.


Argyll and Bute T7 ,4 2 6 Campbelltown.
Cardigan 90 2 5 7 Aberystwith.
Carmarthen - 153 7 5 12 Carmarthen.
Clare • 90 11 15 26 Ennis.
Cork 96 14 10 24 Cork.
Cornwall and Devon miners 90 2 3 5 Falmouth.
Devon 69 7 .5 12 Devonport.
Donegal ISl 9 2 11 Letterkenuy.
Duhlin City - 191 21 11 82 Dublin.
Durham 185 18 19 37 Hartlepool.
Edinburgh - 175 9 5 14 Edinburgh.
Fife - ' - 162 4 10 14 Cupar.
Forfar and Kincardine 106 15 13 28 Montrose.
Glamorgan 129 13 7 20 Swansea.
Haddington - 35 4 4 8 Dunbar.
Hants and Jsle of Wight 73 21 10 31 Sandown, I. of Wight.
Kent - - - 127 29 12 41 Dover.
Lancashire - 170 24 12 36 Seaforlh, Liverpool.
Limerick Citj- 77 2 23 25 Limerick.
Londonderry 69 9 13 22 Londonderry.
Itlid. Ulster - 52 8 15 Dungaimoa.
Norfolk 151 22 26 48 Yarmouth.
Northumberland 98 ”4 7 11 Berwick-on-Tweed.
Pembroke 17 3 1 4 Fort Hubberstone.
Sligo - 75 3 6 9 Sligo.
Suffolk no 42 14 56 Ipswicii.
Sussex 108 32 34 66 Eastbourne.
Tipperary 63 10 5 15 Clonmel.
Waterford 41 8 5 13 Waterford.
Wicklow 149 14 6 20 Wicklow.
Yorkshire 218 00 24 46 Scarborough.

Total 3,586 407 336 743

I
1 ESGIXKKES;

Fortress fll'Anglesey Militia 52 7 7 Beaaman’s.


Forces. \ R' Monmouthshire 200 26 28 Afonmoulh.

I'l’lymouth Division - 79 22 25 Plymourii.


Milford Haven Division 52 2 2
j- Pembroke Dock.
, Suhnjarine So. Wale.s ami Severn Division 202 4 4
Miner.s. Portsmouth Division 67 8 15 23 Gosport.
Thames and Medway Division 173 n 46 57 Chatham.
Harwich Division - 46 3 15 Harwich.

I Total 134 161

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29

APPENDIX J

Bccruits furnished
liucruits to the Begular Army.
Kcgi- raised for
mental each
liegimeut. Battalion. Head Quarters.
Distiict, Begiment To
or linked To
other Total.
Battalion. Batta-
Corps.
lions.

INFANTRY:
1st The Eoyal Scots 3rd Battalion 404 77 71 148 Giencorse.
2nd Boyal "West Surrey 3rd „ 783 133 205 338 Guildford.
Begiment.
3rd East Kent Begiment - 3rd ,, 209 55 38 93 Canterbury.

4th Boyal Lancaster f 3rd 358 38 64 102


Begiment 4th 362 43 65 108 j- Lancaster.
»
Sill Northumberland Eu- 3rd 186 41 55 96 Alnwick.
siliers.
6th Eoyal Wanvickshire / 3rd 564 74 186 260
} Warwick.
>y

Begiment - 4th V 579 97 193 290

3rd 615 59 286 345 Hounslow


Tth Eoyal Fusiliers 4th 97 8 S 16 Finsbury.
{ 5th 717 74 232 306 Ilomislow.

3rd » 237 31 43 74
8th Liverpool Begiment Warrington.
4th 301 33 61 94

3rd 184 51 30 SI
9th Norfolk Begiment 221 Norwich.
4th 51 49 100

10th Lincolnshire Bcgi- f 3rd 202 25 23 47 Lincoln.


ment - 4th 114 10 5 15 Gninthan;.

11th Devonshire Eegi-f 3rd 117 34 16 50 Plymoutn.


ment - -\ 4th 161 54 11 65 Exeter.

12th Suffolk Begiment


3rd 241 61 49 no Bury St. Edmunds.
4th 140 48 13 61 Ely.

13th Somersetshire LIlight 3rd 162 58 19 77


Infantry - 4th 291 69 45 114 j- Taunton.

14 th West Yorkshire r 3rd 256 35 37


Begiment - - \ 4th 156 36 37 } York.
13 th East rorkshire Ecgi- 3rd 71 28 12 40 Beverley.
ment.
16th Bedfordshire Begi-
Begi-j 3rd 144 23 45 Bedford.
ment 4th 186 19 46 Hertford.

17 th Leicestershire Begi- 3rd 375 142 38 ISO Leicc.ster.


ment.
3rd 70 16 8 24 We.xford.
ISth Boyal Irish Begi- J 202 72 6 78
4th Clonmel.
ment - -1 87 29 12 41
3th Kilkenny;

3rd 340 53 54 107


Iflth Yorkshire Begiment 264 39 34 73 Biehmond.
4th
3rd 878 70 108 ITS
20th Lancashire F usiliers - 468 68 81 149 }Bury.
4th j*
21st Boyal Scots Fusiliers- 3rd f} 225 36 19 55 Ayr.

3rd 254 36 36 Che.ster.


22ud Cheshire Begiment 280 21 38 59
4 th Maeclesilcid.

23rd Boyal "Welsh Fu- 3rd }} 77 19 7 26 Wrexham.


siliers :{ 4th 135 15 4 19 Carnarvon.

2!th South ll^ales Bor-f 3rd 582 96 46 142 Brecon.


dcrers - - t 4 th 67 6 7 13 Welshpool.

25 th King's Own Scottish 3rd 181 IS 10 28 Dumfries.


Borderers.
3rd 227 32 58 90
2Gth Scottish Eifles j- Hamilton.
-{ 4th 282 28 83 111
107 8 o 10 Enniskillen.
27 th Boyal liikillingj^ 3rd
Inniikilling V
67 21 13 34
4 th » Onmgii.
Fusiliers 181 28 29 57 Lillbrd.
5th
I 3rd 633 157 93 250 llristo'
28 th Gloucester Begiment-j^ 4th 277 55 35 90 Cireiiee.ster.

3rd 281 53 40 93
AVorccstcfBcgimsot 1 Worcester,
29lb
{ 4th 237 61 31 92
B 2

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80

APPENDIX S.—conti/imed.
Bccruits furnished
Recruits to the Regular Army.
r.aisod for
Ecf'i- I each
mental Kegimenl. Battalion. Begiment Head Quarters.
District. To To
or linked
Battalion. Batta- other Total.
lions. Corps.

I^’FA^•TRY—cont.

SOth East Lancashire Kegi- 3rd Battalion - 348 66 53 119 Burnley,


inent.
East Surrey Begi- f 3rd „ SSI 198 244 442
31st 154 227 j-Kingston.
inont - 4th „ 793 381

S2nd Duke of Comvrall’s 3rd 130 34 16 50 Bodmin.


Light Infantry.

33rd We.st Biding Ecgi- 3rd 606 100 7x 172 Hulifax.


nient.

31tl) The Border Kegi-f 3rd 121 19 10 29


106 24 6 30 j- Carlisle.
ment - -\ 4th

.35th Boya! Sussex Bcgiment 3rd 478 121 SI • 202 Chichester.


i
37th Utinrpshire Begiment - 3rd 366’ 158 47 ' 205 Winchester,
362 66 45 111
3Sth South Statrordshire f 3rd
326 74 44 118
j- Lichfield.
Bcgiment - -t 4th
39th Dorsetshire Begiment 3rd 233 68 27 95 Dorchester.

40th South Lancashire 3rd 475 160 50 210 YVarringiox,


Begiment.
41st The 'Welsh Begiment 3rd 284 53 44 97 Cardiff.

42nd Boyal-Highlanders - 3rd 302 31 103 Perth.

43rd Oxfordshire Light/ 3rd 104 17 14 31 ^ High IVycomb*.


Infantry - - L 4th 309 53 73 126 Oxford.

3rd » 278 51 51 102


44th Essex Begiment 525 84 jWarley.
4th » 131 215

3rd 288 45 65 110 Derby.


45tlt Derbyshire Begiment 4th 432 78 117 195 Newark.

219 49 86
4/tl: Loyal North Lan-
cashire Begiment-
3rd
4th
it
it 225 32
37
41 73
j- Preston.
4Stfc Northamptonshire 3rd & 4th ,, 382 95 74 169 Northampton.
Begiment.
49th Boyal Berkshire Begi- 3rd „ 464 104 49 1.53 Reading.
ment.
SOth Boyal West Kent/ 3rd „ 254 72 74 146
Illuidstons
Begiment - - 4th ,5 284 68 90 158
51st Yorkshire Light In- 3rd „ 515 128 56 184 Pontefract.
fantiy.
53rd Shropshire Light In- 3rd „ 141 55 18 73 Shrewsbury,
fantry 4th „ 87 19 12 31 Hereford.
548 77 183 260
57ih
3rd
Jiliddlcsex Begiment-^ 4th
91 584 98 204 302
j- Hounslov;.
5th 1S6 2 15 17 Huntingdon,
King’s Boyal Bifle^ 7 th 311 9 67 76 Barnet.
Corps 8th 42 2 22 24 Carlow.
9th 132 41 41 Mallow.

r)2iid Wiltshire Begiment - 3rd 274 75 11 86 Devize.s.

470 89 42 131
63rd blanchester Begimcnt-|
3rd
4th 395 93' 63 156
j-Ashton.,
79 38 117
6'llh North Staffordshire/ 3rd
Begiment - -1 4th
239
180 51 16 67
j-Lichfield.
C5th York and Lancaster 3rd 598 113 86 199 Pontefract.
Begiment.
G8(h Durham Light In - / 3rd » 263 18 23 41 Barnard Castle,
fanti-y - 4th » 550 53 81 134 Newcastle.

50 78
71st Highland Light In- / 3rd
fantry - 4th
»>
»
217
228
28
18 59 77
j-Hamilton.
72nd S( afortl; Highlanders 3rd 284 9 9 Dingwall,

75th Gordon Highlanders - 3rd 203 26 39 66 Abirdsdii.

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APPENDIX J.—continued,

Recruits furnished
llecruits to tlic Regular Army.
Kegi- raised for
mental Kegimout. Bail alio:). each
District. Kegiment To Hoad Quarter*.
or linked To
other Total.
Battalion. Batta-
liins. Corps.

INFANTKY— COH t.

79th Cameron High- 2nd Battalion M7 Inverness.


landers.
3rd » 250 41 37 78 Newtownards.
83rd Royal Irish j 4th 221 49 37 86 Belfast.
Rifles - 5th 149 24 9 33 Downpatrick.
Cth 156 10 29 39 Dundalk.

87th Royal Irish f .3rd 109 13 1.3 26 Armagh.


i'usiliei's 4th » 103 11 8 19 Cavan.
5th 115 5 2 7 Monaghan.

SSth Connaught Ban-J 3rd 57 8 3 11 Castlebar.


gers - -1 4th 68 14 5 19 Galw.ay.
5th 151 19 21 40 Boyle.
91st Argj ll and Suth-
)uth-1
erland Hie
landers
ligh- [ 3rd
4th
242
407
30
36
47
61
Stirling.
Paisley.

100th Leinster Regi- i 3rd 75 24 15 39 Birr.


inent - 4th 75 21 3 24 Maryboro’.
1 5th 99 4 9 13 Navan.

101st Royal Munster I 3rd 100 40 12 Kinsale.


I'usiliers -1 4th 117 19 6 Tralee.
5th 148 63 31 94 Limerick.

102nd Royal Dublin J 3rd 104 25 15 40 Naas,


Ifusiliers -| 4th 319 41 107 148
343 16 i Dublin.
oil) 77 93

417
Rifle Brirade i 5th
6th
7th
92
490
2S

18
50
42
59
78
42
77
Victoria P.ark Square.
Longford.
Dalston.
-I Sth 87 8 8 Mullingar.

Total 35,326 6,206 6,432 12,638

General Total 39,783 6,640 6,902 13,542

E,ECAPITUL.4.TI0N.

Recruits furnished to the Regular Anny.


Recruits
raised for
the To linked To other Not
Militia. Total.
Battalions. Corps. reported.

English ^lilitia 1,788 248 184 12 444


AuTiu.i;aT Scotch „ 555 36 34 70
-{ Irish „ 1,243 123 118 241

Total 3,586 407 336 12 755

EXOINKKKS English hlilitin 871 134 161

5,234
Is'l'.V.NTKy
-I F.nglisI) Militia
Scotch
Irish


28,153
3,348
3.825
349
623
5,281
529
622
10,515
878
1,245

Total 35,326 6,206 6,432 12,638

General Total - 39,783 6,640 6,902 13 13,554

E 3

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32

APPENDIX K.
INOIIEASE and DEOIIEASE of the Militia (exclusive of tlie Permanent Staff) duriug
the last five years.

1887. 1888. 1889. 1890. 1891.

Number tjuroUed on 1st January’ in each year 110,488 108,718 106,533 103,685 101,820

Recruits 33,-597 80,456 33,354 35,634 39,783


Re-enlisted -3,039 2,607 2,901 2,513 2,327
INCREASE
Re-joined from desertion 1,229 749 797 925 1,034
Other causes -

Total increase 37,865 33,812 37,052 39,072 43,144

f.Doad 421 408 363 448 443


I

lo rOn termination of engagement 4,533 3,848 4,097 4,382 4,145


rt J As Invalids 4,193 3,916 3,703 3,867 3,211
'o 1 On payment - 7,230 7,410 8,816 9,348 9,462
o i As bad characters 973 769 667 710 645
■DECREASED
16,929 15,943 17,283 18,307 17,463

Deserted and absentees struck off 10,288 8,795 8^670 8,903 10,706
Joined Regular Army 11,504 10,283 12,599 12,662 13,542
Joined Royal Navy and Marines 283 419 523 445 395
hOther causes 210 149 462 172 383

Total decrease 39,635 35,997 39,900 40,937 42,932

Net increase 212


Net decrease 1,770 2,185 2,848 1,865

Number enrolled on 31st December in each year 108,718 106,533 103,685 101,820 102,032

INCREASE and DECREASE of the Militia Reserve during the year 1891, by Countries
and Arms of the Service.

Countries. Arms.

Total. Total.
English Scotcli Irish
Artillery. Engineers. Infantry.
Regiments. Regiments. Regiments.

Number enrolled on 1st Jan. 1891 j 19,643 3,572 7,030 30,245 .5,294 371 24,580 30,245

Enlisted 4,035 703 1,231 5,969 944 138 4,887 5,969


Re-cnlisted 8 8 16 8 8 16
Other causes (net) 28 10 33

Total increase - 4,043 703 1.239 0,985 975 148 4,895 6,018

.'Dead - 69 12 21 102 22 2 78 102


Discharged 2,964 489 766 4,219 666 61 3,493 4,219
Deserted and Absentees struck off 754 143 350 1,247 249 J2 986 1,247
To Regular Army 288 43 95 426 52 7 367 426
To RoyalNavy and Ro)'al Marinos 11 2 13 3 1 9 13
Other causes (net) 35 17 52 85 85

Total decrease - 4,121 704 1,234 6,059 991 83 5,018 6,002


Net increase 65
Net decreaso 7.8, 74 16 123 74

Number enrolled on 1st Jan. 1892 19,565 3,571 7,035 30,171 5,278 436 24,457 30,171

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APPENDIX 1/

EIETUHN of a parfcv of “ EECRUITS,” Isfc Battalion Northamptonsliiro Bogiment, wliicli passed tlirougk a “ RECRUITS ” course of G-jmnastics at tke
Permanent Bax'racks, Aldersliot (49 days). Commenced course, 21st October, 1891—completed course, lObh December 1891.

At Cemmencoinont of Course. AtCoinplotioii. rncrcaso in Dovolopmcnt. Pavliculiivs on Enlistincnl.


Present Chest
g Jleasureiuent. a
ITanie. a I og Chest mm* ^
C
u
Measurement. «ss
o rH Place of. Trade. SB'S
I .if o o. Cl
.3 s. I c. ao 31in. Max. Differ- Min. Max. Diffei-
P o S' o p >5 ence. ence. S Or*4

mnilis. years. ft. ins. St. lbs, inolios, inches. inches. St. lbs. inches, inches. inches. tnnUis. lb.s. inohe.s. inches, indies. inches, inches, inches inches, inches, inches, inches,
Andrews, T. 3 •i'5 Oi 9 18 33i 10} 11} 10 1 85} H 12} 5 2 2 X i 30 15.7.91 23ft London Publican - 83 35 32} 35 3} 1}
Atwell, C. 3 20 a 9 6 31 10} 11} 9 10 .30} 11} 12? 5 4 2} li 30 23.7.91 20 Cnnimn 4 30 83} 37 3} 1}
Bradbury, 0. 3 21 9 1 311 9} 11} 0 5 S3 10} HI 5 4 1} I 30 21.7.91 21ft Carman 83 35 .32 31} 2}
Blaelcburn, W. 8 18 9 2 32i 10} 11} 9 5 34} 11 12} 5 3 2| } I 30 3.7.91 18ft Labourer 33 35 33 80 3
Cirpeuter, F. 4 19 •n 9 7 33} 10} 11} 9 8 34} H} 12S C 1 1 1} } 25 23.0. 19ft Porter 83 33} 2} In Hospital,
»e:iti.U. - 2 IS e 8 13 32 10 10} 9 0 35} 10} 12 4 3} } 1} 30 13.8.91 13 jruchiiiist 33 35 0 33 33}
Dyer. IT. - 3 IS 3J 9 4 321 10 HI 9 8 35} H 12| 5 2| 1 1 3S 10.7.91 I8ft Pishinonger - 83} 351 2 32} 80} SI 1}
I'lju-lcr, R. 3 19 ■I’i 8 12 32 10} 12 9 2 81} 10} 12} 5 4 2} i 4 35 21.7.91 lO'ft Draper 83 35 2 Slf 31} 2} i
E. 20 <n 10 4 .31} 10? HI 10 12 30? 11} 13 4 5 nl 1 1} 30 28.8.91 20ft Sforlliainpton Carman - 35 30 1 35| 37} itl.
-» 1}
tei - IS n 9 0 32 9} 10} 0 C 331 101 Hi 4 0 li } I 20 7.8.91 18ft London - Skindi’osscr 33 33 52} .35} 21 I
19 10 6 32} 10 12} 10 12 so 11} 15} 0 0 i 30 24.0. 10ft Carman • 33} 85}
or
3} 1} 33| .30 n ■I 00
K >mp. W. 19 9 11 31} lOV 11} 10 2 371 H 12? 5 6 3} 4 1} 35 3.7.91 10 Labourer 35} ■374 34} 37} -9 i
Laplhome.'W. 20 •a 9 7 33 10} 111- 10 0 33} 11} 12} 5 7 OJl
•^9 3» •I 30 3.7.91 20ft Lo.athor dresser 33 3,3 32} 35} 2f a
Low,', C. - 18 5| 9 5 33 9? 10} 9 10 3H- loi Hi 5 5 If I 1 30 14.7.01 18!} Laliouror - 33 35 83 35
3Iay,^V. . 23 cl 9 0 3l| n 11 0 6 33} 10} 12 0 G 3} 4 1 35 12.0. 25 iS'ortlmmpton Pinisher - 834 31? 1} In Hospital.
T. 18 5i 9 8 32} 10} 11} 10 0 84 u 12} 5 0 1} } 1} 35 19.7.91 18ft London - IVarehottseman as 34} 1} 32} 30 SI
Pears Ml, Q. 21 5 9 2 32} 10} 11} 9 .3 34 10? 12} 4 1 1} 4 i 80 8.8.01 2lft Porter 33 35 2 S3 35} 2}
Pnssland, G. 18 •U 9 7 31 10 10 3 35} 11} 12} 3 10 n IJ 30 14.9.01 ISft Engine-driver - 334 35} 0 33} 30
H 11 2}
Page.W. - 18 7i 813 32} »i 10} 9 5 34 10? Hi 5 0 If f 30 30.7.91 18ft Labourer 334 84} 1 32 34} 2} 1}
Richardson, G. 19 5} 5 13 32} 9} 10} 9 7 33} 10? HI 4 1 1} 80 10.8.91 lOft Phinororto Maker 33 35 9 52 35}
It 8} 1}
Terry, S. - IS 5i 8 12 32} 9? !I5 9 3 34| 10} 12 4 2} } } 28 8.8.91 18ft Plumbers Assis- 33 SO 3 51} 35} 31
tant. i
Wain. It. 3 13 5 9 7 31 10} HI 10 0 35} 10} 12} 0 li 34 1} 30 .30.7.91 18ft Gardener• .84 30 2 33} 30} 2? 3•»
W. Ii1« r. J. W.- o 18 S 9 2 32? wi H? 9 C S5} 10} 4 2J 27 21.8.01 1814 Book repairer - 334 35} 2 53 35 3
12} 1
i
\Vli.-in.>y, T. E- 19 8 9. .30} 9? ll 9 0 32 10} 12 3 1} 30 5.9.01 19ft Clerk 33 3-4} 14 20} 31} f*l 3}
" I! '
W»i hn.% A. ■i ! IS ci 8 10 I .31} 10 10} 9 1 33} 10} 11} 0 1} 30 22.0.91 18 Nortbaniplon Labourer - 33 33 32 31} 2}

Av.,ri:re»d Class 19’2« 5} i 9 4 32} 10} 11} 9 9 31? 10| 12} 4'72 34*04 It

G*. W. Pox,
Lieut-Colonel,
Inspector of Gjiunasia.

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APPENDIX M.

STRENGTH of the EBGULIH Aiiitr, the MILUT.V, VOLUNIMDBRS, and Isb and 2nd CLASS ARHB EBSEiivii), on the 1st January 1892, compared
with the previous 10 years.

Yeomanry (Non-
Volunteers General Total,
co.nmis.siom (I 2nd Class Army Reserve
Toti.1 Ofiicer.s and (Number Including the
llcgular Army Militm (Non- Enrolled). (not included
Regular 'I'olal Regular Annj-, in foregoing Columns).
(Noa-coimuissionetl 1st Class Army coimnissioned
YKAH. Army Reserve. Officers niul Militia and 1st Class Army
Officers anti and
Men). Men). Volunteers. Reserve,
1st Class At date Militia, and
l.st November, Reserves of Enrolled
Army Reserve. of Jnspeeiion in Volunlcors.
previous 3'car. previous j'car. 1859 .'ind 1867. Pensioners,

1882 181,H2 24,085 205,827 112,953 t 9,920 208,308 331,184 537,008 1,692 8,859

1883 - 185,518 16,479 201,997 106,054 10,457 207,336 323,847 625,844 1,587 8,187

1884 - 173,529 34,589 208,118 99,440 10,467 209,865 319,272 527,390 1,424 7,172
03
1885 - 181,008 39,244 220,252 104,380 10,801 216,015 330,196 550,448 1,225 6,513

1886 - 192,929 41,963 234,892 108,196 10,640 224,012 342,848 577,740 1,070 5,753

18S7 - 200,507 45,858 247,365 110,488 10,0.) 4 226,752 347,794 59.5,159 789 4,906

1888 - 203,060 50,960 254,010 108,718 10,312 228,038 347,068 601,078 492 3,626

1889 - 202,761 50,841 263,102 106,533 10,017 226,469 848,019 596,121 369 2,485

1890 - 201,848 54,136 255,984 10.3,685 9,774 224,019 337,478 593,462 295 1,661

1891 - 202,116 59,380 261,396 101,820 0,752 221,048 332,620 594,016 161 792

1892 - 203,163 68,421 271,584 102,032 9,776 222,046 333,854 60.5,488 122 390

Tlie Militia Reserve is not included in this column. t Two Yeomanry Corps were not inspected in l.'-’SS. J The 2nd Class Array Reserve and the Enrolled Pensioners are gradually dying out.

House of Commons Parliamentary Papers Online.


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