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2005-2006 PETROLEUM TRAINING GUIDE

NEW in this catalog!


● Career Course

Progression Matrices
● Integrated Certificate
Programs
● In-house Training
● 8 New Courses

www.petroskills.com
www.ogci.com
OGCI_covers.qxd 7/26/05 9:47 PM Page 4

Message from the Managing Director

In 1963, OGCI delivered the first petroleum technology short course. In 2001, Shell, BP, and OGCI formed the PetroSkills alliance
and launched a new age in petroleum learning. Since then, Saudi Aramco, Halliburton, Occidental Petroleum, Unocal, John M.
Campbell & Company, the University of Trinidad & Tobago, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, and Repsol have joined to help define the
industry’s standard in technical training. In the past five years the alliance has worked together to build a world leader in petroleum
training. Even with all of this growth, we’re not finished yet. Just what is PetroSkills and where is it heading?

In 2005 PetroSkills is:


■ A program of over 120 of the finest courses building skilled application the entire range of petroleum technology from exploration
through to the refinery.
■ Open to anyone from any organization through over 500 public sessions delivered in more than 30 cities, or at your location
anywhere in the world
■ Directed by an Industry Advisory Board that actively provides overall direction and quality assurance
■ Over 110 instructors, consisting of the petroleum industry’s leading technical experts - each selected by member company advisors
for their ability to deliver the finest in petroleum technology competency development
■ Based on detailed competency maps that outline the specific skills professionals need to do their jobs. These maps are available to
you in a personal competency inventory website so that you can inventory your petroleum technology competencies, identify gaps
and create a plan to fill those gaps

In 2006 PetroSkills will:


■ Expand to provide additional courses in Petroleum Business Management and the Facilities and Process Engineering Program
■ Expand our public courses in the Arabian Gulf
■ Link courses with on-the-job work experiences to improve how we develop competencies, and
■ Undoubtedly, welcome new members to the alliance

COVER IMAGE: When you attend a PetroSkills program, you can be sure that it will fit into your overall career development program, and will be
The Narrows the best training available.
Zion National Park
Utah, USA After 40 years, OGCI and John M. Campbell are still the world leaders in petroleum technology training. We’ve trained more than
A labyrinth of narrow 234,000 participants from 50 countries on six continents. We’ve earned our reputation by offering practical, business relevant courses
canyons cut through the that build the skills you need for immediate hands-on utility. With PetroSkills, this heritage grows even stronger.
soft sandstone by the
Virgin River. In places,
I need to say one thing about our Facilities Program – as we’ve grown, we’ve also outgrown the ability to put our entire program in a
the deep canyons are single catalog. If you are interested in a wider selection of downstream courses, please visit our website at www.petroskills.com to find
barely 12 meters wide. out more.

If there’s anything I can do to help, please e-mail me directly at fbrett@petroskills.com. I’d be happy to hear from you.

J. FORD BRETT
OGCI® is a registered trademark of Oil & Gas Consultants International, Inc.
PetroSkills® is a registered trademark of PetroSkills, LLC
OGCI_pg01-12.qxd 7/26/05 9:26 PM Page 1

Delivering Knowledge. Developing Competence.

Industry Benchmark What is PetroSkills?

The power behind PetroSkills is the Competency Based. Quality Courses. Quality Instructors.
alliance itself. Member company PetroSkills is a unique competency-based PetroSkills’ coursework is reviewed and
subject matter experts direct and training program – not just a collection of strengthened by each of its partner companies.
maintain detailed competency maps courses. Course content is based on detailed The member curriculum advisors and the
for each petroleum discipline, skill and competency maps developed with our PetroSkills Board must approve each course,
resulting in an operator’s ‘shared member companies. Each discipline is detailed ensuring practical, up-to-date relevant training.
viewpoint’ of the skills required to through these competency skill maps to ensure The same is true for the instructors that teach the
perform at different levels within that professionals receive the skills they need at courses – they must be approved by the
each field. PetroSkills’ training their individual level and put them on the right PetroSkills Board and member curriculum
courses and work experiences are track for advancement. Another feature of the advisors.
then developed to deliver the competency maps is that they are available to
competencies outlined on these individuals and companies via a web-based Convenient and Frequent.
maps, and are continually improved Competency Assessment Tool (CAT). The CAT Convenient and frequent delivery is a key part
and renewed to stay current with allows professionals to track their development, of the PetroSkills philosophy. By presenting
industry trends, technology and determine what skills they need, and create a courses near to the client on a shared basis, we
demands. The alliance enhances this customized plan to fill those learning gaps. keep travel and other costs as low as possible
value by making the training while still delivering our programs worldwide.
available on a more convenient and Practical. Real-World. In addition to teaching hundreds of sessions
frequent basis across the globe. Business-Relevant. in dozens of cities each year, PetroSkills will
Practicality sets us apart. This competency- bring any of its courses to you on an in-house
focused learning delivers the individual skills basis worldwide.
and technology needs of operating companies
and industry professionals. Our goal is that after
attending a PetroSkills course, professionals will For more information, contact:
training@petroskills.com
return to their workplace and immediately apply
the skills learned to create value. 800.821.5933
918.828.2500 (worldwide)

All classes available on your site. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 1


OGCI_pg01-12_v2.qxd 8/2/05 10:19 AM Page 2

Table of Contents

Inside Front Cover


MESSAGE FROM THE MANAGING DIRECTOR 10 INTEGRATED CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS
1 OVERVIEW OF PETROSKILLS 11 COMPETENCY MAPS / COMPETENCY ASSESSMENT TOOL
4 2005-2006 WORLDWIDE TRAINING SCHEDULE 12 TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR NON-TECHNICAL PROFESSIONALS
9 NEW GRADUATE PROGRAM

Introductory / Cross-Training
13 BASIC DRILLING, COMPLETION AND WORKOVER OPERATIONS 14 OFFSHORE SYSTEMS BASICS (NON-TECHNICAL STAFF)
14 BASIC PETROLEUM ENGINEERING PRACTICES 15 WELL PLANNING AND OPERATIONS, ASSET TEAM CROSS-TRAINING
14 BASIC PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY (FORMERLY DEA-44 HORIZONTAL TECHNOLOGY)
15 NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN OLD FIELDS

Geology
16 COURSE PROGRESSION MATRIX 18 MAPPING SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES
17 BASIC PETROLEUM GEOLOGY 19 PETROLEUM GEOCHEMISTRY: TOOLS FOR EFFECTIVE
20 BASIN ANALYSIS WORKSHOP: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT
17 CARBONATE RESERVOIRS 19 PRODUCTION GEOLOGY FOR OTHER DISCIPLINES
17 COMPRESSIONAL STRUCTURAL STYLES 21 PROSPECT AND PLAY ASSESSMENT
18 DEEPWATER SANDSTONES 19 SANDSTONE RESERVOIRS
21 DEVELOPMENT GEOLOGY 20 SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY: AN APPLIED WORKSHOP
18 EXTENSIONAL STRUCTURAL STYLES 20 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY IN PETROLEUM EXPLORATION AND
21 GEOCHEMICAL TECHNIQUES FOR SOLVING RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT
MANAGEMENT AND FIELD DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS

Geophysics
22 COURSE PROGRESSION MATRIX
25 ADVANCED SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: A 2-D, 3-D SEQUENCE AND
24 INTRODUCTION TO SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: AN EXPLORATION
WAVELET ANALYSIS WORKSHOP WORKSHOP
23 PRINCIPLES OF 3-D SEISMIC INTERPRETATION AND APPLICATIONS
24 AVO AND SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS
23 SEISMIC INTERPRETATION
23 BASIC GEOPHYSICS
24 SEISMIC SURVEY DESIGN, DATA ACQUISITION, AND PROCESSING
Petrophysics
26 COURSE PROGRESSION MATRIX 29 PRODUCTION LOGGING
30 APPLIED ROCK MECHANICS 29 SHALY SAND PETROPHYSICS
28 CAPILLARITY IN ROCKS 30 STRUCTURAL AND STRATIGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION OF DIPMETERS
28 CARBONATE PETROPHYSICS AND BOREHOLE-IMAGING LOGS
27 CORING AND CORE ANALYSIS 27 WELL LOG INTERPRETATION
27 FOUNDATIONS OF PETROPHYSICS 30 WIRELINE FORMATION TESTING AND INTERPRETATION
28 INTEGRATION OF ROCKS, LOG AND TEST DATA

Well Construction / Drilling


31 COURSE PROGRESSION MATRIX 33 DRILLING PRACTICES
35 ADVANCED WELL CONTROL 35 MANAGED PRESSURE DRILLING: APPLICATION, DESIGN AND
32 BASIC DRILLING TECHNOLOGY EXECUTION
32 CASING AND CEMENTING 34 MANAGING WELLSITE OPERATIONS
35 CEMENTING PRACTICES 34 PRACTICAL DRILLING SKILLS
33 DIRECTIONAL, HORIZONTAL, AND MULTILATERAL DRILLING 33 SOLIDS CONTROL SYSTEMS
32 DRILLING FLUIDS TECHNOLOGY 34 WELL ENGINEERING

2 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available on your site. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg01-12.qxd 7/26/05 9:26 PM Page 3

Reservoir Engineering
36 COURSE PROGRESSION MATRIX 38 OIL RECOVERY ENHANCEMENT TECHNIQUES
37 APPLIED RESERVOIR ENGINEERING 40 RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION: A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TEAM
37 BASIC RESERVOIR ENGINEERING APPROACH
37 BASIC RESERVOIR SIMULATION 40 RESERVOIR ENGINEERING FOR OTHER DISCIPLINES
41 GAS RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT 38 RESERVOIR FLUID PROPERTIES: PREPARATION FOR RESERVOIR
42 HORIZONTAL AND MULTILATERAL WELLS: ANALYSIS AND DESIGN ENGINEERING AND SIMULATION STUDIES
39 INTEGRATED RESERVOIR MODELING 41 RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT
42 NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS: GEOLOGIC AND ENGINEERING 41 RESERVOIR SIMULATION STRATEGIES
ANALYSIS 38 WATERFLOODING A TO Z
40 OIL AND GAS RESERVES EVALUATION 39 WELL TEST DESIGN AND ANALYSIS

Production Engineering
44 COURSE PROGRESSION MATRIX 51 HORIZONTAL AND MULTILATERAL WELLS: DRILLING AND
47 ACIDIZING APPLICATIONS IN SANDSTONES AND CARBONATES COMPLETIONS
51 ADVANCED HYDRAULIC FRACTURING 49 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING APPLICATIONS
45 ARTIFICIAL LIFT SYSTEMS 49 OILFIELD WATER PRODUCTION, HANDLING AND INJECTION
47 BEAM PUMPS 50 PRODUCTION LOGGING
45 COMPLETIONS AND WORKOVERS 46 PRODUCTION OPERATIONS 1
47 ELECTRICAL SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS 46 PRODUCTION OPTIMIZATION USING NODAL TM ANALYSIS
48 FORMATION DAMAGE: CAUSES, PREVENTION AND REMEDIATION 50 PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY FOR OTHER DISCIPLINES
48 GAS LIFT 50 SAND CONTROL
48 GAS PRODUCTION ENGINEERING 46 SURFACE PRODUCTION OPERATIONS
49 GAS WELL DELIQUIFICATION 45 WELL STIMULATION: PRACTICAL AND APPLIED

Production Facilities Design, Operation and Maintenance


52 COURSE PROGRESSION MATRIX 54 JMC CONSULTING SERVICES
53 FACILITIES COURSE LIST 55 OPERATOR TRAINING

Petroleum Business Management


56 COURSE PROGRESSION MATRIX 60 OIL AND GAS TEAMS: HOW TO MAKE THEM WORK
60 ADVANCED DECISION ANALYSIS WITH PORTFOLIO AND PROJECT 58 PERSONNEL SUPERVISION IN THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY
MODELING 58 PETROLEUM FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING
57 BASIC PETROLEUM ECONOMICS 59 PETROLEUM FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING PRINCIPLES
57 EXPANDED BASIC PETROLEUM ECONOMICS 61 PETROLEUM FINANCIAL WORKSHOP
57 ECONOMICS OF WORLDWIDE PETROLEUM PRODUCTION 61 PETROLEUM PROJECT MANAGEMENT: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES
61 FUNDAMENTALS OF INTERNATIONAL OIL AND GAS LAW 59 PETROLEUM RISKS AND DECISION ANALYSIS
62 FUNDAMENTALS OF U.S. OIL AND GAS LAW 59 PRESENTATION SKILLS FOR THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY
60 INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM CONTRACTS AND NEGOTIATIONS 62 RESOLVING CONFLICTS: PREVENTING AND ADDRESSING CONFLICTS
58 MEETING MANAGEMENT AND FACILITATION FOR THE PETROLEUM IN PETROLEUM ORGANIZATIONS
INDUSTRY 62 SOCIAL OUTREACH STRATEGIES: PRINCIPLES AND BEST PRACTICES

63 INSTRUCTOR BIOGRAPHIES
70 PUBLICATIONS
72 REGISTRATION FORM / BOOK ORDER FORM
Inside Back Cover REGISTRATION DETAILS

All classes available on your site. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 3


4
Worldwide Training Schedule

HOUSTON
OTHER U.S.A.
CALGARY
UNITED
KINGDOM
OTHER
EUROPE
MIDDLE EAST
SOUTHEAST
ASIA
LATIN / SOUTH
AMERICA
OTHER

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INTRODUCTORY / CROSS TRAINING


13 BASIC DRILLING, COMPLETION AND WORKOVER OPERATIONS SCHROEDER Apr 3-7 Mar 20-24 Jul 10-14 May 22-26
Aug 7-11

800.821.5933
8/2/05

14 BASIC PETROLEUM ENGINEERING PRACTICES BOATRIGHT / FOSTER / RANDOLPH / ROSS Nov 28-Dec 2, ’05 Apr 3-7 Oct 24-28, ‘05 May 13-17 Sep 4-8
Jan 23-27 Oct 30-Nov 3 Mar 13-17
May 15-19 Jun 19-23
Aug 14-18 Oct 23-27
Nov 27-Dec 1
4:26 PM

14 BASIC PETROLEUM TECHNOLOGY BOATRIGHT / FOSTER / RANDOLPH / ROSS Apr 17-21 Oct 17-21, ‘05 Nov 14-18, ‘05 Apr 1-5 Dec 5-9, ‘05 Nov 7-11, ‘05
Dec 4-8 Oct 23-27 Mar 20-24 Aug 7-11
Jun 12-16
Sep 18-22

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Page 4

Nov 13-17
14 OFFSHORE SYSTEMS BASICS (NON-TECHNICAL STAFF) JMC SPECIALIST Mar 13-17 Sep 18-22 Oct 9-13
15 WELL PLANNING AND OPERATIONS, ASSET TEAM CROSS-TRAINING KNOLL Oct 24-28 ‘05 Apr 24-28 Nov 21-25, ‘05 Nov 12-16, ‘05
(FORMERLY DEA-44 HORIZONTAL TECHNOLOGY) Jun 5-9 Dec 4-8
Oct 23-27
15 NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN OLD FIELDS MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS Apr 3-7 Jun 26-30 May 1-5 Nov 14-18, ‘05
Sep 18-22

GEOLOGY
17 BASIC PETROLEUM GEOLOGY LINK / DILLON Dec 5-9, ‘05 Oct 24-28, ‘05 Oct 24-28 ‘05 Mar 20-24 Mar 27-31 Jun 5-9

w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m
Feb 13-17 Jul 17-21 Oct 23-27 Sep 11-15
May 8-12 Oct 2-6
Nov 13-17
17 CARBONATE RESERVOIRS MOORE Nov 7-11, ‘05 Sep 11-15 Feb 4-8
Mar 6-10
Nov 6-10
17 COMPRESSIONAL STRUCTURAL STYLES GROSHONG / LOWELL May 29-Jun 2 Oct 9-13
18 DEEPWATER SANDSTONES CRONIN May 1-5 Oct 9-13 Jun 16-20
18 EXTENSIONAL STRUCTURAL STYLES GROSHONG / LOWELL Dec 4-8
18 MAPPING SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES GROSHONG Apr 3-7 Jun 5-9 Jul 24-28
19 PETROLEUM GEOCHEMISTRY: TOOLS FOR EFFECTIVE MCCAFFREY / BARKER Apr 17-21 Oct 2-6 Nov 12-16 ‘05
EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT
19 PRODUCTION GEOLOGY FOR OTHER DISCIPLINES LINK / DILLON Mar 6-10 Jul 24-28 Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 Sep 18-22 Jan 28-Feb 1 Nov 7-11, ‘05
Nov 6-10 Oct 30-Nov 3 Sep 4-8
19 SANDSTONE RESERVOIRS CRONIN Feb 27-Mar 3 Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 May 22-26 Dec 10-14, ‘05 Jul 10-14 Nov 21-25, ’05
Oct 30-Nov 3 Dec 9-13
20 SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY: AN APPLIED WORKSHOP MOORE Nov 14-18, '05 Jul 31-Aug 4 Sep 18-22
Nov 13-17
20 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY IN PETROLEUM EXPLORATION AND DEVELOPMENT GROSHONG Mar 27-31 Jul 17-21 Dec 10-14, ‘05
20 BASIN ANALYSIS WORKSHOP: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH PIGOTT Apr 24-28 Oct 24-28, ‘05 Nov 21-25, ’05
Nov 20-24
21 DEVELOPMENT GEOLOGY SNEIDER Dec 12-16, ‘05 Jun 12-16 Sep 25-29 Mar 18-22 Jul 17-21
May 22-26
Dec 11-15
21 GEOCHEMICAL TECHNIQUES FOR SOLVING RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT MCCAFFREY Feb 13-17 Sep 18-22 May 7-11
AND FIELD DEVELOPMENT PROBLEMS
21 PROSPECT AND PLAY ASSESSMENT TREESH Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 Jul 24-28
May 1-5

All classes available on your site. Contact us today.


Oct 30-Nov 3
21 PROSPECT AND PLAY ASSESSMENT TREESH Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 Jul 24-28
May 1-5

today.
Oct 30-Nov 3

HOUSTON
OTHER U.S.A.
CALGARY
UNITED
KINGDOM
OTHER
EUROPE
MIDDLE EAST
SOUTHEAST
ASIA
LATIN / SOUTH
AMERICA
OTHER

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GEOPHYSICS

23 BASIC GEOPHYSICS DIEPHUS / MACPHERSON / REED Oct 3-7, ‘05 Oct 17-21, ‘05 Sep 4-8 Jun 12-16 Apr 24-28
8/2/05

Feb 20-24 Oct 16-20


May 15-19
Sep 18-22
23 PRINCIPLES OF 3-D SEISMIC INTERPRETATION AND APPLICATIONS THAPAR Jun 19-23 Aug 7-11 Nov 28-Dec 2, ‘05
23 SEISMIC INTERPRETATION BURRELL May 8-12 Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 Oct 3-7, ‘05
4:26 PM

Oct 30-Nov 3 Nov 13-17


24 SEISMIC SURVEY DESIGN, DATA ACQUISITION, AND PROCESSING THAPAR Jun 5-9 Jul 24-28 Dec 10-14, ‘05 Mar 13-17 Nov 14-18, ‘05
Dec 9-13
24 AVO AND SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES: PRINCIPLES AND APPLICATIONS THAPAR Jun 12-16 Jul 31-Aug 4 Dec 17-21, ‘05 Mar 20-24 Nov 21-25, ‘05
Dec 16-20

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Page 5

24 INTRODUCTION TO SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: AN EXPLORATION WORKSHOP PIGOTT Oct 9-13 May 15-19 Dec 5-9, '05 Jun 5-9 Feb 18-22 Jul 31-Aug 4
Dec 4-8
25 ADVANCED SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY: PIGOTT May 22-26 Dec 12-16, '05 Jun 12-16 Aug 7-11
A 2-D, 3-D SEQUENCE AND WAVELET ANALYSIS WORKSHOP Dec 11-15

PETROPHYSICS
27 FOUNDATIONS OF PETROPHYSICS DAVIES / FOSTER Oct 17-21, ‘05 Sep 11-15 Oct 2-6 Mar 4-8 May 22-26 Jun 12-16
Jan 30-Feb 3
Jul 10-14
Oct 16-20
27 CORING AND CORE ANALYSIS SKOPEC Dec 5-9, ‘05 Jun 19-23 Aug 14-18
Mar 20-24
Nov 27-Dec 1

w w w. o g c i . c o m
27 WELL LOG INTERPRETATION PIGGIN / FOSTER Dec 12-16, ‘05 Jul 24-28 May 29-Jun 2 Feb 20-24 Oct 24-28, '05 May 6-10 Aug 21-25
Mar 27-31 Nov 6-10 Jun 26-30 Jun 19-23
Jun 5-9 Nov 13-17
Sep 18-22
Dec 4-8
28 CAPILLARITY IN ROCKS MURPHY Jun 1-2
28 CARBONATE PETROPHYSICS HURLEY Feb 20-24 Oct 30-Nov 3 Aug 14-18 Apr 29-May 3 Oct 24-28, ’05
28 INTEGRATION OF ROCKS, LOG AND TEST DATA SNEIDER Jun 26-30 Sep 18-22 Mar 25-29
29 PRODUCTION LOGGING HILL Dec 12-16, ‘05 Jul 31-Aug 4
Dec 11-15
29 SHALY SAND PETROPHYSICS DAVIES Aug 28-Sep 1 Nov 28-Dec 2, ‘05
30 STRUCTURAL AND STRATIGRAPHIC INTERPRETATION OF HURLEY Feb 27-Mar 3 Mar 20-24 Aug 21-25 Nov 26-30, ‘05
DIPMETERS AND BOREHOLE-IMAGING LOGS May 6-10

w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m
30 WIRELINE FORMATION TESTING AND INTERPRETATION CHEN Mar 13-17 Aug 7-11 Nov 21-25, ‘05 Oct 17-21, 05
30 APPLIED ROCK MECHANICS SKOPEC Nov 7-11, ‘05 May 15-19 Jun 12-16
Apr 17-21
Nov 6-10

800.821.5933
5
6
Worldwide Training Schedule

HOUSTON
OTHER U.S.A.
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MIDDLE EAST
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WELL CONSTRUCTION / DRILLING


32 BASIC DRILLING TECHNOLOGY CARDEN / RAMSEY / ROBINSON Oct 24-28, ‘05 Apr 24-28 Sep 11-15 Oct 2-6 Mar 25-29
Feb 6-10

800.821.5933
8/2/05

Jul 24-28
Nov 6-10
32 CASING AND CEMENTING BYROM Nov 7-11, ‘05 Jun 12-16 Oct 3-7, ‘05
Oct 23-27
32 DRILLING FLUIDS TECHNOLOGY MORALES / HILL Dec 5-9, ‘05 Feb 18-22
4:26 PM

Jun 5-9
Oct 16-20
Dec 4-8
33 DRILLING PRACTICES CARDEN / GRACE May 8-19 Mar 27-Apr 7 Aug 26-Sep 6

w w w. o g c i . c o m
Page 6

33 SOLIDS CONTROL SYSTEMS ROBINSON Jun 12-16


33 DIRECTIONAL, HORIZONTAL, AND MULTILATERAL DRILLING CARDEN May 22-26 Nov 7-11, ‘05 Oct 3-7, ‘05 Sep 9-13
Nov 6-10
34 MANAGING WELLSITE OPERATIONS JONES / WESTERMARK Oct 31-Nov 4, '05
Mar 13-17
Oct 30-Nov 3
34 PRACTICAL DRILLING SKILLS ROBINSON / RAMSEY Mar 6-10 Oct 9-13
34 WELL ENGINEERING WESTERMARK Jun 19-23
Nov 6-10
35 ADVANCED WELL CONTROL CARDEN Jul 17-21
35 CEMENTING PRACTICES CALVERT Jul 24-28
35 MANAGED PRESSURE DRILLING: APPLICATION, DESIGN AND EXECUTION KNOLL / REHM Jul 10-14 Aug 21-25 Nov 27-Dec 1

w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m
RESERVOIR ENGINEERING
37 BASIC RESERVOIR ENGINEERING BOATRIGHT / SCHROEDER / HAZLETT Dec 5-9, ‘05 Aug 14-18 Oct 17-21, ‘05 Nov 7-11, ‘05 Feb 18-22 Jun 5-9
Feb 13-17 Apr 24-28 Feb 27-Mar 3
Jun 19-23 Oct 16-20 Mar 27-31
Sep 25-29 Jun 19-23
Nov 13-17 Aug 21-25
Nov 6-10
37 BASIC RESERVOIR SIMULATION GOCHNOUR / WALDREN Sep 8
37 APPLIED RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS / Mar 6-17 Jul 17-28 Oct 24-Nov 4, ‘05 Jun 5-16 Aug 7-18 Dec 3-14, ‘05
HAZLETT Oct 2-13 Nov 6-17 Jul 24-Aug 4 Dec 9-20
Oct 16-27
38 OIL RECOVERY ENHANCEMENT TECHNIQUES RAZA Nov 28-Dec 2, ‘05 Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 Sep 18-22
Nov 27-Dec 1 Oct 30-Nov 3
38 RESERVOIR FLUID PROPERTIES: PREPARATION FOR RESERVOIR PETROSKILLS SPECIALIST
ENGINEERING AND SIMULATION STUDIES
38 WATERFLOODING A TO Z RAZA May 22-26 Dec 5-9, ‘05 Oct 24-28, ‘05 Sep 11-15 Mar 11-15
Dec 4-8 Oct 23-27
39 WELL TEST DESIGN AND ANALYSIS MATTAR Oct 3-7, ‘05 Nov 20-24 Jul 10-14
Apr 3-7
Oct 16-20
39 INTEGRATED RESERVOIR MODELING KELKAR Dec 12-16, ‘05 May 22-26
Dec 11-15
40 OIL AND GAS RESERVES EVALUATION NELMS Mar 27-31 Jul 17-21 Jun 19-23
40 RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION: A MULTI-DISCIPLINARY TEAM APPROACH TREESH Oct 2-6 Aug 21-25 Jul 17-21 Mar 11-15

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■ Reservoir Engineering continued on next page...
today.
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HOUSTON
OTHER U.S.A.
CALGARY
UNITED
KINGDOM
OTHER
EUROPE
MIDDLE EAST
SOUTHEAST
ASIA
LATIN / SOUTH
AMERICA
OTHER

RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

40 RESERVOIR ENGINEERING FOR OTHER DISCIPLINES MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS / Apr 3-7 Jul 10-14 May 8-12 Oct 3-7 ‘05 Sep 16-20 Sep 4-8
8/2/05

HAZLETT Jul 24-28 Oct 2-6


41 RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT RAZA / MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS Oct 3-7, ‘05 Aug 28-Sep 1 Jul 10-14 Mar 18-22 Nov 21-25, ’05
Feb 20-24
Oct 9-13
41 RESERVOIR SIMULATION STRATEGIES WALDREN Apr 24-28 Oct 31-Nov 4 ‘05
4:26 PM

Sep 11-15 Aug 21-25


Oct 30-Nov 3
41 GAS RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS Nov 28-Dec 2, ‘05 Aug 14-18 Oct 17-21, ‘05 Apr 24-28
Dec 4-8 Oct 16-20
42 HORIZONTAL AND MULTILATERAL WELLS: ANALYSIS AND DESIGN HILL / ZHU Dec 12-16, ‘05 Jul 31-Aug 4
Page 7

All classes available on your site. Contact us today.


Dec 11-15
42 NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS: GEOLOGIC AND ENGINEERING ANALYSIS TEUFEL Oct 17-21, ‘05 Jul 17-21
Oct 23-27

PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
45 WELL STIMULATION: PRACTICAL AND APPLIED COULTER Sep 11-15
45 ARTIFICIAL LIFT SYSTEMS LEA / DUNHAM Aug 7-11 Mar 13-17 May 29-Jun 2 Oct 9-13
45 COMPLETIONS AND WORKOVERS PEDEN / BARRY / JENNINGS Apr 24-28 Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 Oct 3-7, ‘05 Mar 18-22
Oct 16-20 Jun 26-30
Dec 11-15
46 PRODUCTION OPERATIONS 1 COULTER / PEDEN / JENNINGS / BARRY Oct 31-Nov 11, ‘05 Nov 7-18, ‘05 Dec 5-16, ‘05 Mar 4-15
Apr 17-28 May 1-12 Jul 3-14
Jul 24-Aug-4 Oct 30-Nov 10 Dec 4-15
Oct 23-Nov 3

w w w. o g c i . c o m
46 PRODUCTION OPTIMIZATION USING NODAL* ANALYSIS WILSON May 1-5 Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 Sep 18-22 Jun 19-23
Oct 30-Nov 3
46 SURFACE PRODUCTION OPERATIONS SCHROEDER May 8-12 Oct 17-21, ‘05 Mar 13-17 Jul 3-7 Nov 12-16, ‘05 May 29-Jun 2
Dec 5-9, ‘05 Nov 18-22
Oct 9-13
Dec 4-8
47 ACIDIZNG APPLICATIONS IN SANDSTONES AND CARBONATES JENNINGS May 22-26
47 BEAM PUMPS LEA May 15-19
47 ELECTRICAL SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS LEA Aug 28-Sep 1
48 FORMATION DAMAGE: CAUSES, PREVENTION, AND REMEDIATION COULTER Nov 28-Dec 2, ‘05 Jul 17-21
Nov 27-Dec 1
48 GAS LIFT LEA / DUNHAM Oct 23-27 Oct 31-Nov 4, ‘05 Sep 11-15 Dec 3-7, ‘05
Dec 9-13

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48 GAS PRODUCTION ENGINEERING KELKAR Mar 13-17 May 8-12 Nov 21-25, ‘05
Jun 5-9
Nov 20-24
49 GAS WELL DELIQUIFICATION LEA Jul 10-14 Jun 5-9
49 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING APPLICATIONS JENNINGS Oct 3-7, ‘05 May 1-5
Apr 10-14
Oct 2-6
49 OILFIELD WATER PRODUCTION, HANDLING AND INJECTION SHARMA Mar 20-24 Apr 24-28 Jun 12-16
Nov 13-17

800.821.5933
50 PRODUCTION LOGGING HILL Dec 12-16, ’05 Jul 31-Aug 4
Dec 11-15

7
■ Worldwide Training Schedule continued on next page...
8
Worldwide Training Schedule
Mick_new01-12.qxd

HOUSTON
OTHER U.S.A.
CALGARY
UNITED
KINGDOM
OTHER
EUROPE
MIDDLE EAST
SOUTHEAST
ASIA
LATIN / SOUTH
AMERICA
OTHER

Pg Course Instructor

PRODUCTION ENGINEERING continued...


50 PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY FOR OTHER DISCIPLINES BARRY / MCKINZIE Oct 3-7, ‘05 Oct 24-28, ‘05 Jun 10-14 Aug 14-18 Apr 3-7

800.821.5933
8/2/05

Mar 20-24 Jul 10-14 May 15-19


Sep 18-22 Oct 30-Nov 3
50 SAND CONTROL MCKINZIE Oct 17-21, ‘05 Jul 10-14
Oct 16-20
51 ADVANCED HYDRAULIC FRACTURING JENNINGS Jul 17-21 Oct 17-21, ‘05
4:26 PM

Oct 16-20
51 HORIZONTAL AND MULTILATERAL WELLS: DRILLING AND COMPLETIONS BYROM Oct 31-Nov 4 ‘05 Jun 19-23 Oct 2-6
Oct 30-Nov 3

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Page 8

PETROLEUM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT


57 BASIC PETROLEUM ECONOMICS SEBA Nov 7-9, ‘05 Jun 26-28 Apr 10-12 Apr 15-17 Apr 24-26 Oct 17-19, ’05
May 15-17 Sep 25-27
Jul 19-21
Nov 6-8
57 EXPANDED BASIC PETROLEUM ECONOMICS SEBA Nov 7-11, ’05 Jun 26-30 Sep 25-29 Apr 15-19 Apr 24-28
May 15-19
Nov 6-10
57 ECONOMICS OF WORLDWIDE PETROLEUM PRODUCTION SEBA Jun 5-9 Sep 11-15

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58 MEETING MANAGEMENT AND FACILITATION FOR THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY PELTON Oct 13-14 ‘05
Sep 28-29
58 PERSONNEL SUPERVISION IN THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY COTTRILL Feb 27-Mar 3 Sep 25-29 Jun 5-9
Jul 17-21
58 PETROLEUM FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING BOYD Jun 19-21 Jul 17-19
59 PETROLEUM FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING ANALYSIS BOYD Jun 19-23 Jul 17-21
59 PETROLEUM RISKS AND DECISION ANALYSIS SCHUYLER / NIEMAN Dec 12-16 ‘05 Aug 21-25 Oct 24-28, ‘05 Jan 21-25 Sep 4-8 Nov 21-25, ’05
Jun 12-16 Apr 24-28
Dec 4-8 Oct 23-27
59 PRESENTATION SKILLS FOR THE PETROLEUM INDUSTRY PELTON Oct 10-12, ‘05
Mar 27-29
Sep 25-27
60 ADVANCED DECISION ANALYSIS WITH PORTFOLIO AND PROJECT MODELING SCHUYLER Jun 19-23 Oct 30-Nov 3 Nov 28-Dec 2, ’05
60 INTERNATIONAL PETROLEUM CONTRACTS AND NEGOTIATIONS SEBA Nov 14-18, '05 Sep 18-22
Jul 24-28
Nov 13-17
60 OIL AND GAS TEAMS: HOW TO MAKE THEM WORK TREESH Jun 26-30 Jul 31-Aug 4 Oct 17-21, ’05
61 PETROLEUM FINANCIAL WORKSHOP BOYD Oct 10-14, ‘05 Jul 24-28
Oct 30-Nov 3
61 PETROLEUM PROJECT MANAGEMENT: PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES BRETT Dec 5-9, '05 May 15-19 Mar 11-15 Oct 3-7, ’05
Jul 10-14
Nov 27-Dec 1
61 FUNDAMENTALS OF INTERNATIONAL OIL AND GAS LAW HUGHES Aug 14-18 Apr 29-May 3
62 FUNDAMENTALS OF U.S. OIL AND GAS LAW HUGHES Oct 31-Nov 4 ‘05
Mar 27-31
62 RESOLVING CONFLICTS: PREVENTING AND ADDRESSING CONFLICTS SIEMENS May 8-12 Oct 9-13
IN PETROLEUM ORGANIZATIONS
62 SOCIAL OUTREACH STRATEGIES: PRINCIPLES AND BEST PRACTICES WELLS Oct 24-26, ‘05 Aug 21-23
Jul 10-12

All classes available on your site. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg01-12_v2.qxd 8/2/05 4:52 PM Page 9

Accelerate your learning


with competency-based
training.

Introducing the PetroSkills New Graduate Program.


Moving new hires up the learning curve quickly and with the right knowledge is in the best interest of everyone. At PetroSkills, we
help make that happen. We have developed a program specifically to help recent graduates acquire the skills and knowledge that they
need, all in a logical sequence and manageable pace.
It’s what you learn that makes the difference. The PetroSkills New Graduate program uses coursework that has been developed and
refined by an industry review board, so you are assured that the training you receive will develop the competencies needed back on the
job. Afterall, our goal is to enable professionals to immediately apply the skills learned to create value.
Above is a sample of a New Graduate progression matrix for a Reservoir Engineer. Matrices have also been developed for many
other positions, and can be found on our website at www.petroskills.com.

An OGCI Company

w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 9
OGCI_pg01-12_v2.qxd 8/2/05 10:22 AM Page 10

Integrated Certificate Programs Comprehensive, High Energy Training

Our Integrated Certificate Programs are designed to bring technical professionals up to a meaningful level of contribution in a minimum
period of time. The courses that make up our IC programs are designed to provide convenient and effective solutions for fulfilling contractual
training obligations connected to Production Sharing Contracts.
All of these programs are conducted at the PetroSkills Training Center in Houston, Texas. It is here that we are able to provide a secure, professional
and accommodating environment for all of our course attendees. In addition to our professional instruction, PetroSkills provides a training coordinator
who is available to assist with lodging, banking, and all personal matters. If there are other personal or professional concerns or cares for a participant, a
simple phone call or e-mail prior to the start date of the course will ensure that it is handled prior to their arrival. Due to the demanding nature of these
extremely concentrated programs, we also build in the flexibility to allow the curriculum to be segmented and taken over two or three years. Should you
have any questions or concerns, please contact us at www.petroskills.com.
PLEASE NOTE: Tuition fees for the Integrated Certificate Programs do not include lodging, meals, and transportation for the participant. Shipment of
training materials to the home country is also the responsibility of the participant and can cost US$500 or more for shipping and customs. We help in
providing these services as part of the program.

English Language Training

OGCI Training provides English language training for individuals who wish to improve their English skills. Its emphasis is on enabling participants to
communicate in English, especially in the area of oilfield terminology, and can be designed for any level of English proficiency. Target proficiency goals set
for each individual are monitored throughout the program and the classes are conducted by qualified English instructors with diverse backgrounds.

Professional Petroleum Engineering Institute (PPEI)

PPEI is a concentrated program designed for entry level personnel who will need to fill ■ Basic Petroleum Engineering Practices Jan. 23-27
■ Foundations of Petrophysics Jan. 30-Feb. 3
responsible positions in the near future. PPEI has been conducted since 1978, and we are proud that ■ Basic Drilling Technology Feb. 6-10
many early graduates are now in key positions throughout the international oil industry. The program ■ Basic Petroleum Geology Feb. 13-17
■ Basic Geophysics Feb. 20-24
builds competence in all aspects of applied petroleum engineering for participants with technical ■ Open Week Feb. 27-Mar. 3
backgrounds such as engineering, geoscience, physics or mathematics. The total PPEI tuition per ■ Applied Reservoir Engineering Mar. 6-17
■ Coring and Core Analysis Mar. 20-24
participant is US$32,500. A deposit of US$3,250 is due prior to the start of the program. ■ Well Log Interpretation Mar. 27-31
■ Well Test Design and Analysis Apr. 3-7
■ Open Week Apr. 10-14
■ Production Operations 1 Apr. 17-28
■ Production Optimization Using NODALTM Analysis May 1-5
■ Surface Production Operations May 8-12
■ Expanded Basic Petroleum Economics May 15-19

Professional Petroleum Geoscience Institute (PPGI)

PPGI is designed for geologists, geophysicists and petrophysicists. As with PPEI, it brings ■ Basic Geophysics Feb. 20-24
■ Sandstone Reservoirs Feb. 27-Mar. 3
graduates to a level of meaningful contribution to the company’s success in a short period of time. ■ Carbonate Reservoirs Mar. 6-10
Various aspects of geosciences combine to form a rounded knowledge base. A degree in geology ■ Open Week Mar. 13-17
■ Coring and Core Analysis Mar. 20-24
or science is recommended. The total PPGI tuition per participant is US$20,250. A deposit of ■ Well Log Interpretation Mar. 27-31
US$2,025 is due prior to the start of the program. ■ Mapping Subsurface Structures Apr. 3-7
■ Open Week Apr. 10-14
■ Petroleum Geochemistry: Tools for Apr. 17-21
Effective Exploration and Development
■ Basin Analysis Workshop: An Integrated Approach Apr. 24-28
■ Prospect and Play Assessment May 1-5

Professional Economics and Management Institute (PEMI)

OGCI Training presents the PEMI program as a certificate series designed for oil industry ■ Economics of Worldwide Petroleum Production Jun. 5-9
managers or persons targeted for management positions. The focus of the curriculum is on the ■ Petroleum Risks and Decision Analysis Jun. 12-16
■ Petroleum Finance and Accounting Analysis Jun. 19-23
business aspects of the upstream oil and gas industry. A key element in this training package is the ■ Oil and Gas Teams: How to Make Them Work Jun. 26-30
■ Open Week Jul. 3-7
development of a thorough understanding of the opportunities and risks involved in the international ■ Petroleum Project Management: Principles Jul. 10-14
petroleum business. Instructors for the series are world-renowned for their wide experience in both and Practices
■ Personnel Supervision in the Petroleum Industry Jul. 17-21
domestic and international petroleum industry. The PEMI courses are presented in logical sequence ■ International Petroleum Contracts and Jul. 24-28
and include learning techniques such as lectures, exercises, group discussions, role-playing, team Negotiations
projects and evening reading assignments. The total PEMI tuition per participant is US$15,750.
A deposit of US$1,575 is due prior to the start of the program.

10 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m
OGCI_pg01-12_v2.qxd 8/11/05 10:12 AM Page 11

Competency Maps

S KILL BASED . B USINESS RELEVANT. P ERFORMANCE FOCUSED .


Competency-based training is the foundation of PetroSkills. In fact, the PetroSkills alliance, through its discipline-specific competency maps, has
become the industry benchmark for competency development.
The PetroSkills training alliance leverages the experience and expertise of its member companies to develop detailed COMPETENCY MAPS for each
petroleum discipline. These maps document the technical skills required at specific levels of expertise. This enables individuals and organizations to
identify and manage the skills that they require to be successful. The PetroSkills courses are designed to deliver these competencies as part of a
coordinated training program. For more information, contact us at training@petroskills.com.

GEOPHYSICS COMPETENCY MAP (SELECTED SAMPLE)

Competency Assessment Tool

For a technical professional to prepare a development plan, they must first perform a skills analysis to identify what development is needed. The
PetroSkills Competency Assessment Tool (CAT) is a software application that helps the organization and the individual do just that. Using the tool,
individuals assess themselves against the PetroSkills Competency Maps to identify their current knowledge and skill base. Meanwhile, the
organization can create competency profiles that indicate the requirements for various positions within the organization. The CAT can then be used to
compare the individual’s skill profile with what the organization requires in that position, producing a summary of the skills that need to be developed.
With these needs identified, the CAT will assist the user with developing a learning plan to develop those skills, whether through courses, work
experiences, reference material, technical papers or other means. Please contact us at CAT@petroskills.com for more information about the
Competency Assessment Tool and how it can work for you.

All classes available on your site. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 11


OGCI_pg01-12.qxd 7/26/05 9:27 PM Page 12

Training Program for Non-Technical Professionals

Non-technical staff, professionals, and managers are a majority in most oil and gas companies. Understanding how to collaborate with and
enhance those technical professionals is key to individual and group success.
At Petroskills, we have put in place a program that is designed to support, enhance, and maximize the value of the interaction between non-
technical and technical professionals.
This program will provide the required competencies and knowledge that petro-techs, administrative, management, field support, accounting,
purchasing, economics, legal, finance, HR, Land, IT and data processing personnel need in order to maximize the value & impact of their
professional skills in the oil and gas industry.
Understanding the industry and, the role of your skill sets will enable you to apply your skills to greater effect helping both your career and your
company at the same time. The knowledge and perceptions you will gain in these courses will make a positive difference to your career in the Oil &
Gas Industry

PETROLEUM
DRILLING & RESERVOIR GEOSCIENCES FORMATION BUSINESS
PRODUCTION EVALUATION MANAGEMENT
Overview Gas
Processing
(non-technical)

Well Stimulation Presentation Skills

Basic Drilling Basic Foundations of Basic


Basic Reservoir Geophysics Economics
Operations Petrophysics

Offshore Systems

Basic Petroleum Technology

12 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m
OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 1

Basic Drilling, Completion


and Workover Operations

I NTRODUCTION/ OGCI

I N T R O D U C T O RY / C R O S S - T R A I N I N G
COURSE INSTRUCTOR
RICHARD H. SCHROEDER

C ROSS- T RAINING COURSE LEVEL:

DESIGNED FOR
BASIC

Cross-training of other technical disciplines such


as reservoir and surface facility engineers, geo-
scientists, support and supervisory personnel and
The six courses in this section were selected to open the course description section of anyone else who interacts with drilling, completion
or workover design engineers
our catalog because of their wide application and benefit for many personnel in the industry. This should not be considered a fundamental
The first three basic courses should be considered for many, if not for all, new or recent course for training engineers seeking a career in
drilling or workovers ( for these, Drilling Practices
entry personnel. The Well Planning and Operations, Asset Team Cross-Training (Formerly and Production Operations 1 courses are
DEA-44 Horizontal Technology) course is excellent for more experienced personnel. We recommended ).

invite you to consider the many applications of these six featured courses to you or your YOU WILL LEARN
• How drilling, completing and reworking a
company’s learning requirements. well affect its ability to produce
• What can be done within open-hole and cased
wells, as a part of reservoir management
INSTRUCTORS • How drilling practices can damage or
stimulate producing wells
D R . K I R K E. B O AT R I G H T S C O T T B. R A N D O L P H ABOUT THE COURSE
E R I C A. F O S T E R D R . S A M M I H. R A Z A This course is designed to give a technical
D R . W. G R E G H A Z L E T T G E R RY H. R O S S overview of the science and art of drilling
operations, completion practices and post-
MHA P E T R O L E U M C O N S U LTA N T S R I C H A R D H. S C H R O E D E R completion well interventions or remedial
R O B E RT G. K N O L L workover techniques . Its purpose is to develop
an understanding of the what, why, and how
of each of these areas of engineering practice.
The participants will learn to visualize what is
happening “downhole”, discover what can be
accomplished and gain an appreciation for the
wellbore risks and the possibility of damage
to the formation. How drilling and completion
practices can alter reservoir interpretation and
performance will be discussed. The participant
will become conversant with specific technical
terminology and aware of practical applications
which should enhance communication and
interaction between disciplines.
COURSE CONTENT
OVERVIEW OF THE DRILLING PROCESS: Overall
drilling practices • Language of drilling • Rigs and rig
equipment • Drilling string components and design • Bits
• Drilling fluids and hydraulics • Rig operation • MWD •
Well control • Hole problems and stuck pipe • Drilling
risks • Coring • Casing and primary cementing •
Directional, horizontal, multilateral and underbalanced
drilling • Wellhead and trees
OVERVIEW OF THE COMPLETION PROCESS: Zonal
isolation • Tubing, packers and completion equipment •
Safety and flow control devices • Open hole completions •
Basic completion types • Perforating • Open and cased
hole logging • Formation damage and treatment •
Completion fluids • Multiple completions
OVERVIEW OF WORKOVER TECHNIQUES:
Stimulation application: surfactants, solvents, acidizing,
fracturing and deep perforating • Formation and sand control
• Scale and corrosion • Paraffin and asphaltenes • Recompletions
• Reworks • Sidetracking • Deepening • Coiled tubing

2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
CALGARY, CANADA
Mar. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
HOUSTON, TEXAS
Apr. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Aug. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100
LONDON, U.K.
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 1 3


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 2

Basic Petroleum Basic Petroleum Offshore Systems Basics


Engineering Practices Technology (Non-Technical Staff)
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


I N T R O D U C T O RY / C R O S S - T R A I N I N G

COURSE INSTRUCTOR
DR. KIRK E. BOATRIGHT, ERIC A. FOSTER, SCOTT B. RANDOLPH, DR. KIRK E. BOATRIGHT, JMC SPECIALIST
SCOTT B. RANDOLPH OR GERRY H. ROSS GERRY H. ROSS OR ERIC A. FOSTER
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC COURSE LEVEL: BASIC
DESIGNED FOR
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR Business professionals from government affairs,
Engineers, engineering trainees, technical managers Administrative, management, field support, public relations, legal, finance, purchasing,
and assistants, technicians, geologists, geophysicists, accounting, purchasing, economics, legal, strategic planning and employee relations
chemists, physicists, service company personnel, finance, human resources, drafting, land and departments. Also engineers and geoscientists
sales representatives, and data processing personnel data processing personnel, as well as investors newly involved with deepwater exploration and
YOU WILL LEARN
and royalty owners development issues
• Basic petroleum geology YOU WILL LEARN YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Reservoir fluid and rock properties • Basic geology as related to oil and gas reservoirs • Appreciate the historical background of
• Fundamentals of reservoir fluid flow • Reservoir fluid and rock properties offshore and deepwater
• Oil and gas reservoir classification, definition, • Basics of seismic technology
delineation and development • Reservoir definition and development; production and • Understand deepwater exploration basics
• Fundamentals of drilling, well completion, and recovery • Understand how wells are drilled and
production operations • Fundamentals of drilling, well completion and completed
• Basics of casing design and primary cementing production operations • Develop systems for exploiting oil and gas
• Primary and enhanced recovery mechanisms • Basic concepts of primary and enhanced recovery fields
• Surface operations operations • Transport oil by pipeline and by tanker
• Surface operations • To use underwater robotics in all phases
ABOUT THE COURSE • Terminology of exploration and production (language • Foresee technology and future possibilities
Basic Petroleum Engineering Practices is far more than an of the oil field)
introduction to petroleum engineering and certainly is ABOUT THE COURSE
ABOUT THE COURSE
not a superficial presentation of the technology of the Basic Petroleum Technology, in its five-day format, is Rapidly increasing demand for oil and gas,
industry. Its purpose is to develop an understanding designed for non-technical personnel and managers and worldwide, has caused a concomitant
of the technology and its applications at an engineer’s presents a practical understanding of the petroleum increase in exploration and development
level, and the confidence and professional enthusiasm industry in an interesting, effective, and efficient manner. efforts in deepwater areas around the world.
which comes with that understanding. The course has Included are the basics of the industry from terminology Deepwater is a relative term. Over the years
had a revolutionary effect on training programs for through basic technology and from geology through it first meant a few tens of feet, then a few
many major oil and service companies by making processing of the petroleum product. Offshore operations hundreds, and now into the thousands. A
specialized training that follows far more effective. are also considered. The course emphasis is generally accepted demarcation of 500 meters,
Participants enter those specialized programs with a understanding the technology. Participants are placed in
the position of Reservoir Engineer, and “Our Reservoir” or 1500 feet, now qualifies as "deepwater"
depth of understanding of that particular technology
and relation to the other technologies of the industry. is defined, analyzed and put in production. Next, drill as it relates to oil and gas exploration.
The course has received high evaluations from recently sites are chosen. Participants are then placed in the Exploration efforts are now being prosecuted
graduated petroleum engineers who have participated. position of Drilling/Completion Engineer, and the in 9000 feet or so, and development systems
The course focuses on the field and application drilling/completion program for “Our Well” is analyzed. are being built for about 7000 feet of water.
approach, and includes classroom exercises, fundamental Participation results in greater job confidence, The course will begin with a brief discussion
engineering problems, and basic field exercises. enthusiasm and productivity. of the history of offshore oil and gas
COURSE CONTENT developments, which can be traced to piers in
COURSE CONTENT such widely dispersed places as Summerland
Reservoir fluid properties • Petroleum geology • The
Reservoir fluid properties • Petroleum geology • Reservoir
properties and evaluation • Exploration technology •
petroleum reservoir • Exploration technology • Drilling California and Baku. It will cover the four
technology • Well completion and workover • Production basic steps, Explore, Appraise, Develop, Produce,
Drilling engineering • Well completion, stimulation and operations • Recovery • Surface processing • Offshore
workover • Well testing and formation damage • operations in enough detail to allow the attendees to
Production operations • Recovery methods • Surface expand their knowledge and vocabulary so
processing
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S that communications and interactions with
colleagues and associates will be easier and
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA more meaningful. All participants will
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
LONDON, U.K. receive a copy of the book, Deepwater
TRINIDAD, UTT - POINT LISAS Petroleum Exploration and Production, A
Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT Nov. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,675 Non-Technical Guide, authored by Leffler,
HOUSTON, TEXAS LONDON, U.K. Pattarozzi and Sterling.
Nov. 28-Dec. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Nov. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
COURSE CONTENT
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S SINGAPORE Some history: 1897 to 2004 • Identifying prospects • Rig
Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 selection/well plan drilling/completing wells • Role of ROV
HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S • Development system choices • Fixed structures/floating
Jan. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
May 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 ABERDEEN, U.K. production systems • Sub sea systems • Construction,
Aug. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Mar. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT installation and mooring • Wet and dry trees/manifolds and
Nov. 27-Dec. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 sleds • Oil, gas and water separation and treatment •
ABU DHABI, UAE Personnel and their quarters safety • Pipelines, flow lines
ABERDEEN, U.K. Apr. 1-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 and risers • Technology and the future
Mar. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT HOUSTON, TEXAS
CALGARY, CANADA Apr. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Apr. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST LONDON, U.K. 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
DUBAI, UAE June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT HOUSTON, TEXAS
May 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT Mar. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TBD
LONDON, U.K. Nov. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA STAVANGER, NORWAY
Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT Aug. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TBD
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA PERTH, AUSTRALIA
Sept. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Oct. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TBD

14 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 3

Well Planning & Operations, New Opportunities in


Asset Team Cross-Training Old Fields
(formerly DEA-44 Horizontal Technology)
PETROSKILLS OGCI
COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR

I N T R O D U C T O RY / C R O S S - T R A I N I N G
ROBERT G. KNOLL MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS OR
DR. SAMMI H. RAZA
C O U R S E L E V E L : INTERMEDIATE
COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED
DESIGNED FOR
This program benefits managers, geologists, DESIGNED FOR
geophysicists, engineers (drilling, completion, Reservoir and production engineers, development
production and reservoir), technicians, key geoscientists, asset team leaders, acquisition and
service providers and all others involved with divestiture managers, and other technical personnel
exploitation technology involved in evaluation and exploitation of reserves
in mature fields
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Work as an effective member of an asset YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
team • Recognize production and reservoir characteris-
• Develop workover, completion, and field tics of old fields that indicate the potential for
development plans that maximize total value increasing reserves and value
• Identify and mitigate common risks and • Understand whether existing recovery factors
failure modes in complex well applications are consistent with the natural drive mecha-
• Assess advanced technology completion nism(s) and the appropriate use of improved
options including: multi-branch, recovery methods

On-Site.
UBD, ERD, CTD etc. • Identify under-performing wells or field areas
and recommend appropriate intervention
ABOUT THE COURSE • Determine the ‘upside potential’ of a field,
The primary objective of this five-day course distinguishing between incremental reserves and
is to provide participants with an appreciation
of the crucial multidiscipline aspect of
optimized horizontal/complex well applica-
tions. The program delivers a practical-based
On-Target. reserve acceleration
• Examine alternative re-development strategies
by studying case histories and working example
industry problems
"big picture" of all the discipline issues and Convenient and Frequent. Designed
ABOUT THE COURSE
team functions required in basic development Specifically for YOUR NEEDS. Don’t buy or sell a producing property before tak-
and then addresses the advanced technical ing this course! There is nearly always ‘upside’ in
options including multi-branch, UBD, ERD, Let us know what your training
mature oil and gas fields that may be particularly
coiled-tubing (CT) technology, and EOR needs are, and we’ll provide a program profitable because of existing wells and infrastruc-
methods. In addition, the course will review that meets them. Our instructors and ture. Successful exploitation requires 1) recognizing
successful and unsuccessful advanced tech- staff can customize any class to meet new opportunities, 2) quantifying reserves, 3) eval-
nology applications; expose common failure uating alternative methods of exploitation, and 4)
reasons and provide practical solutions; your specific training requirements.
Most of our public courses are economic analysis. Case studies and class problems
establish technical exchange and cross-train- address each of these key items and illustrate how
ing with local counterparts; review well available as private, on-site (In-House) new opportunities can be recognized and evaluated
design attributes and competing options; courses. We also have many special for many different types of oil and gas reservoirs.
foster multidisciplinary approach to horizon- courses available as In-House
tal wells; and enhance awareness of opera- The computer-based problems will provide the
tional risks versus geological risks. The sessions. In addition there are “public participant with utility programs and solution
course features hands-on training with com- In-House” courses at requested sites, templates that can be used in the ‘real world’.
puter models utilizing actual field data. Class which include participants solicited One personal computer is provided, at additional cost,
exercises walk through the "decision-making" from other companies. for each two participants.
process from candidate screening through COURSE CONTENT
multi-well development and workover opera- Using our resources, we can develop Why Opportunities Emerge: operating practices and their
tions. petroleum related training programs effect on new opportunities; the contribution of evolving tech-
nology • Recognizing Opportunities: reservoir characteristics
COURSE CONTENT that meet your specific needs. We will indicative of new opportunities, unraveling limited data, link-
Horizontal applications • Completion technology • incorporate your own data and ing operator practices to new opportunities • Reserves versus
Geological considerations • Production engineering • Upside Potential: reserve classification, risk assessment, value
Reservoir engineering principles • Field execution • examples into a course that delivers of new information, data quality control and integration •
Candidate screening and prioritization • Well design, precisely what you need. And best of Reservoir Heterogeneity and New Opportunities: categories of
multibranch • Problem identification and avoidance • PC heterogeneity, reservoir compartmentalization, application of
program examples • Drilling technology, CT, ERD, UBD • all, we’ll deliver that course at your 3-D seismic in ‘old fields’, identification of ‘net pay’, fractured
Field case studies location – anywhere in the world. reservoirs • Exploitation Opportunities: fluid injection, infill
drilling, horizontal and multilateral wells, recompletions in
At PetroSkills, our goal is to deliver stratified reservoirs, de-bottlenecking gathering systems, water
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S management, co-production of water for improved recovery
HOUSTON, TEXAS knowledge that is relevant and practical.
Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 Knowledge that builds competency. 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
DUBAI, UAE Competency that adds value. KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
Nov. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125
To talk with us about customizing Nov. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,400*
LONDON, U.K.
Nov. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT a course for your training program, 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S contact inhouse@petroskills.com. HOUSTON, TEXAS


CALGARY, CANADA Apr. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625*
Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625*
HOUSTON, TEXAS LONDON, U.K.
June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 May 1-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,995+VAT*
Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 DENVER, COLORADO
An OGCI Company June 26-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625*
LONDON, U.K.
Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT *plus computer charge

■ This course is also offered in the Course + format.


Visit www.petroskills.com for details.

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 1 5


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 4

G EOLOGY
The courses in this section are Geology courses offered publicly through PetroSkills and OGCI are designed to develop your skills and
GEOLOGY

competency in this discipline. The Course Progression Matrix below shows how these courses relate to each other and provides an easy way to
construct a training plan with coursework that specifically relates to present or future job requirements. Likewise, managers can use the matrices to
develop training plans for their team.
Geologists can also benefit from courses that provide an understanding of other petroleum-related functions and disciplines. Such cross-
training courses are recommended in the lighter-shaded columns on either side of the Geology courses shown on the matrix.

INSTRUCTORS

DR. COLIN BARKER DR. R I C H A R D H. G R O S H O N G , J R . DR. C LY D E H. M O O R E


D R . B RYA N T. C R O N I N DR. D AV I D A. L I N K DR. J O H N D. P I G O T T
D R . D AV I D K. D AV I E S DR. J A M E S D. L O W E L L DR. J O H N S. S N E I D E R
J O H N F. D I L L O N DR. M A R K A. M C C A F F R E Y DR. M I C H A E L I. T R E E S H

16 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 5

Basic Petroleum Geology Carbonate Reservoirs Compressional Structural


Styles
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS
COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR
DR. D. ANDY LINK OR JOHN F. DILLON DR. CLYDE H. MOORE DR. RICHARD H. GROSHONG, JR. AND/OR
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION DR. JAMES D. LOWELL
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
Petroleum industry personnel in need of basic Exploration and development geologists, DESIGNED FOR
geological training, including engineering, exploration and development managers and Geologists, geophysicists, engineers, and

GEOLOGY
geophysical, support, and financial personnel geophysicists. Engineers with some geologic managers responsible for the interpretation and
YOU WILL LEARN
background will benefit. drilling of compressional structures
• Fundamentals of rock formation and deformation, YOU WILL LEARN YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
the essentials of sedimentary environments, and • Basic characteristics of the carbonate • Distinguish the characteristics of
how petroleum migrates and accumulates depositional system important to carbonate compressional and transpressional deforma-
• About petroleum source and reservoir rocks reservoir development tion including distinguishing thin-skinned
• How rock characteristics are related to modern geo- • How sequence stratigraphy can be applied to and basement-involved styles
logical processes carbonates and mixed carbonate-siliciclastic • Identify the characteristics of inversion
• About depositional environments and porosity and systems structures
permeability distribution • Geologic and engineering characteristics of • Apply mechanical-stratigraphic principles
• How to recognize depositional environments on carbonate pore systems governing the formation and evolution of
electric logs, correlate electric logs, and make con- • The nature of carbonate porosity modification structures and apply restoration and
tour maps and cross sections by diagenesis and the role of sea level and balancing techniques
• About plate tectonics and petroleum climate in porosity modification and gross • Predict structural geometry from sparse or
• About geological time and history reservoir heterogeneity inconsistent data using kinematic models
• How geology affects engineering practices • Recognize typical oil-field locations and
• How to develop viable exploration and geometries in compressional structures
• Elements of geophysics and exploration exploitation strategies in a carbonate terrain
ABOUT THE COURSE
by working with actual subsurface data sets ABOUT THE COURSE
Basic Petroleum Geology applies geological principles Compressional structures provide some of the
ABOUT THE COURSE
to petroleum geology, covering structural geology, This rigorous workshop is a must for the geoscientist world's largest known oil reservoirs and remain
depositional environments, and the origin, migration, dealing with exploration for, and exploitation of, major frontier plays. 3-D seismic has revolution-
carbonate reservoirs. The course starts with a ized structural mapping. Making the most real-
and accumulation of petroleum. The geological istic geologic interpretation of these structures
requirements of a wide variety of disciplines in the comprehensive overview of the basic characteristics
of the carbonate depositional system important to requires our ability to recognize and exploit the
petroleum industry are satisfied without requiring a fundamental forms. This course presents out-
technical background. Participants will be able to carbonate reservoir development. The application of
sequence stratigraphic concepts to carbonates as a crop, subsurface, seismic sections, and model
gain perspective about the value of geological predictive tool in exploration for and modeling of analogs that provide structural interpretation in
reasoning and its relationship to their job/role. carbonate reservoirs will be stressed. Carbonate a wide range of compressional environments.
COURSE CONTENT
porosity/permeability modification and evolution will Interpretations are validated by restoration and
Minerals and rocks • Plate tectonics • Geological time • be discussed in a sea level driven sequence by comparison to balanced models. This course
Weathering, erosion, and deposition • Diagenesis • stratigraphic framework. Case histories from around covers the latest restoration techniques and the
Reservoirs • Structural geology and petroleum • Origin, the world will be utilized throughout to illustrate use of the predictive kinematic models for
migration, and accumulation of petroleum important concepts. A major component of the thrust-fold belts. From Calgary, a one-day field
workshop is a series of practical exercises utilizing trip through the external portion of the
actual subsurface data sets that include geophysical Canadian Rockies emphasizes imbricate thrust
logs, core data, biostratigraphic, and seismic data. slices, ramps, transverse faults, flexural-slip
The book entitled Carbonate Reservoirs, by Dr. folds (smooth and angular hinges), flexural-flow
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Moore, was specifically published for this course in
2001. All presentations are electronic. folds, foothill structures, thrust wedges, plung-
CALGARY, CANADA ing folds, and intraplate deformation, all of
Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST COURSE CONTENT which are helpful in envisioning petroleum-pro-
TULSA, OKLAHOMA The basic nature of carbonate sediments and sedimentation ducing structures in other thrust-fold belts
Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 • Carbonate platform types • Carbonate facies models • around the world. From Bournemouth, a one-
Basic concepts of sequence stratigraphy as applied to
HOUSTON, TEXAS† carbonates • The characteristics of carbonate pore systems day field trip visits the Dorset Coast to study the
Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,450 and their geologic classifications • Sea level, diagenesis and effects of compression and transpression on
porosity/permeability evolution • The fate of early formed structural inversion at Durdle Door, Lulworth
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S porosity/permeability during burial • Carbonate reservoir Cove, and Kimmeridge Bay, and the structural
HOUSTON, TEXAS† modeling • Case histories from the Americas, Africa, setting of the Wytch Farm oil field.
Middle East, Europe, and Asia • Exercises from the U.S.
Feb. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,450 and Europe based on actual date sets • Exploration and
May 8-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,450 COURSE CONTENT
exploitation strategies in carbonate terrians
Nov. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,450 Compressional structural styles and their plate-tectonic
habitats • Transpressive structures • Detached and basement
ABERDEEN, U.K. involved styles • Inversion • Structural validation criteria •
Mar. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT Selecting the best balancing and restoration technique •
THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS Flexural-slip restoration • Constant-area restoration • Area-
Mar. 27-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775 depth technique for section validation, depth to detachment,
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S bed-length changes and fault prediction • Fault-bend folds •
MIRI, MALAYSIA† Fault-tip folds • Fault-propagation folds • Detachment folds
June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,150 HOUSTON, TX • Buckle folds and the break-fold model • Compressional
DENVER, COLORADO† Nov. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 drape folds • Duplexes • Triangle zones • Growth folds •
July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,450 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Fracturing in compressional structures
LONDON, U.K. DUBAI, UAE
Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Feb. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
TULSA, OKLAHOMA CALGARY, CANADA†
HOUSTON, TEXAS May 29-June 2 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,450+GST
Oct. 2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Mar. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
CALGARY, CANADA Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 BOURNEMOUTH, U.K.†
Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST LONDON, U.K. Oct. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,945+VAT
† includes field trip Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT † includes field trip

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 1 7


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 6

Deepwater Sandstones Extensional Structural Mapping Subsurface


Styles Structures
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. BRYAN T. CRONIN DR. RICHARD H. GROSHONG, JR. DR. RICHARD H. GROSHONG, JR.
NEW AND/OR DR. JAMES D. LOWELL
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Exploration and production geologists and DESIGNED FOR Early-career geologists and technologists who
geophysicists, stratigraphers, reservoir engineers Exploration and development geologists, make structure maps; those who need to judge
GEOLOGY

and petrophysicists geophysicists, engineers, and managers the validity of the maps; development geologists
responsible for the interpretation and drilling and those working mature areas
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Interpret turbidite depositional environments of extensional structures
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
using data from cores, cuttings and wireline logs YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Apply contouring techniques and styles and
• Prepare predictive facies maps • Distinguish the characteristics of
• Apply modern stratigraphic concepts to turbidite recognize common contouring pitfalls
reservoirs extensional and transtensional deformation • Find thickness in deviated wells
• Predict reservoir size, shape, trend and quality for both basement-involved and thin- • Construct accurate thickness maps and use to
skinned styles interpret structure
ABOUT THE COURSE • Predict structural geometry from sparse or • Construct predictive cross sections
The course provides a unique opportunity to exam- inconsistent data using kinematic models • Build a true 3-D interpretation for greatest
ine modern, ancient and subsurface examples of • Recognize typical extensional and accuracy
data from turbidite reservoirs. The process of itera- transtensional petroleum-trapping geometries • Interpret folds and faults from dipmeters
tion of data types, including analog data that was • Map faults and integrate them into horizon maps
collected expressly to solve subsurface issues, will ABOUT THE COURSE
• Apply the best techniques for projecting data
be offered to validate subsurface interpretations. Extensional structures provide some of the
world’s largest known oil reservoirs and • Construct Allan diagrams for fault trap and seal
The course combines review, state-of-the-art and analysis
historical theory for turbidite and debris-flow depo- remain one of the major frontier plays of the
immediate future. Making the most realistic • Map structures with multiple overlapping faults
sition and process including many case studies of
reservoir architecture and sand-body quality and geologic interpretation of these structures is ABOUT THE COURSE
distribution, an introduction to new concepts, only as good as our ability to recognize and This course covers the techniques required to
exploit the fundamental characteristics of the
ideas, and methods in turbidite reservoir geology. forms that are possible. This course presents confidently map subsurface structures in 3
Participants will be introduced to the limitations of outcrop, subsurface, seismic sections, and dimensions from well data. Not just a collection of
conventional models for turbidite reservoirs and model analogs that will provide the starting rules of thumb, this class presents the fundamental
taught how to build enhanced predictive models point for structural interpretation in a wide techniques used to reconstruct structures accurately
using a combination of subsurface, outcrop and range of extensional environments. and effectively in 3-D so that you will get the most
modern sea-floor data. Through practical exercises Interpretations are validated by restoration out of your data. Techniques are taught in easy-to-
and discussions, participants will experience the and comparison to balanced models. This learn forms for manual use with tracing paper,
relative importance of a broad range of subsurface course covers the latest restoration graphs, and a calculator, but the corresponding
data, including the merits of different wireline log techniques and the use of predictive computer-mapping strategies are presented and
kinematic models appropriate for rifted and illustrated throughout. Participants will be
data for distinguishing lithostratigraphic units. 3D other extensional and transtensional areas.
seismic data from a range of locations including the prepared to develop more accurate structural
Atlantic margins, Gulf of Mexico and the North Sea models of reservoirs, find new traps in old fields,
COURSE CONTENT extract the maximum information from exploration
will illustrate the quality and level of reservoir reso- Extensional structural styles and their plate–tectonic
lution possible using modern data. Modern sea- habitats • Models for rifting and passive continental margin
wells, and validate or recognize errors in existing
floor data from several turbidite basins will be evolution • Transtensive structures • Detached and basement- interpretations. Experience and confidence is
available and participants will receive instruction involved styles • Map patterns • Footwall uplift • Pre- developed by applying the techniques in numerous
on interpretation, especially where sea floor data inversion normal faults • Ramp-flat and listric-fault related practical exercises. Dr. Groshong’s book, 3-D
can be used as a proxy of sand distribution in reser-
structures • Rotated block with keystone graben style • Structural Geology, is included with the course
Structural validation criteria • Selecting the best balancing and materials.
voirs. Criteria for identification and interpretation restoration technique • Flexural-slip restoration and predication
of injected sandstones will be discussed, including • Vertical and oblique simple shear • Rigid-block restoration • COURSE CONTENT
explanation of their mechanisms of formation, and Area-depth technique for section validation, depth to detachment, Contouring techniques • Using dip in mapping • Thickness
the understanding of their influence on reservoir bed-length changes and fault prediction • Effect of detachment- in deviated wells • Isopach and isocore maps • Dip domain
zone thickness • Transition from horizontal to vertical cross-sections • Data projection • Analysis of dipmeters for
characteristics. displacement • Extensional drape folds • Trishear models of trend and plunge • Multiple-surface map compatibility •
Composite-surface maps • Fault geometry and displacement
Practical exercises cover all aspects of turbidite drape folds • Sequential restoration of growth structures •
distributions • Constructing fault-plane maps • Heave and
reservoir characterization. Fracturing in extensional structures throw from stratigraphic separation • Fault gap and overlap
related to stratigraphic separation • Faults on isopach maps •
COURSE CONTENT Combining fault and horizon maps • Contouring across faults
Review of turbidite settings, processes, models • Turbidite • Projected fault cutoffs, heave and throw • Map validation
systems at outcrop • Rock analogs for the subsurface using implied fault contours • Finding faults and fault
(including injected sands) • Modern deep-water systems • orientations with scat analysis • Allan diagrams for trap and
seal analysis • Fault-cutoff lines in computer mapping • Soft
Alternative reservoir geometries • Seismic character of linked and hard linked fault geometries • Mapping sequential
deep-water systems • Borehole/wireline characteristics - cross-cutting faults
Significance and use of various tools • Correlation of
reservoir units • Predictive models for sand distribution •
Critical data input to reserve models • Definition of pay

2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS


May 1-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Apr. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
MUSCAT, OMAN CALGARY, CANADA
June 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
LONDON, U.K. HOUSTON, TEXAS LONDON, U.K.
Oct. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT

18 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 7

Petroleum Geochemistry:
Tools for Effective Production Geology for Sandstone Reservoirs
Exploration and Development Other Disciplines
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. MARK A. MCCAFFREY OR DR. COLIN BARKER DR. D. ANDY LINK OR JOHN F. DILLON DR. BRYAN T. CRONIN
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Development and exploration geologists, Petroleum engineers whose jobs require a more Geologists, geophysicists, petrophysicists,
geophysicists, geochemists, petroleum engineers, extensive knowledge of geology, professional staff reservoir and production engineers, exploration-

GEOLOGY
managers, and technical personnel from other disciplines, field engineers who need production managers, all team members involved
a good understanding of subsurface issues, and in reservoir characterization, technicians
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
managers concerned with reservoir evaluation working with clastic reservoirs
• Quantify charge risk during exploration by: and management
identifying petroleum systems, predicting YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
regional variations in organic facies; predicting YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Interpret clastic depositional environments using
source maturity, petroleum volumes, gas/oil • Understand and apply knowledge of data from cores, cuttings and wireline logs
ratios, and risk of oil degradation production geology to perform effectively (including FMI)
• Model source rock maturity and timing as key in integrated Asset Teams • Prepare quantitative facies maps
• Apply sequence stratigraphic concepts to clastic
factors in the petroleum system. • Impact decision making with production reservoirs
• Integrate geochemical, geological, and engineer- and geological information during field’s • Predict reservoir size, shape, trend and quality
ing data to optimize field development by char- life cycle
acterizing reservoir compartments, allocating ABOUT THE COURSE
commingled production, identifying completion ABOUT THE COURSE This course is essential for geoscientists and
problems and monitoring water flood progress The course provides a basic overview of geology engineers involved in the exploration and
and focuses on demonstrating the practical impact development of clastic reservoirs. It focuses on
• Recognize pitfalls in geochemical interpretations methods that can be used to improve the
of geological models and geological uncertainty
ABOUT THE COURSE on reservoir appraisal, development concept prediction of reservoir size, shape, trend and
quality through detailed analysis of depositional
Geochemistry can solve a wide range of problems selection, and actual field development. The course environments and diagenesis. The sedimentary
during petroleum exploration, development, field emphasizes geological factors that affect engineering characteristics of each of the principal clastic
production, and field decommissioning. activities common to drilling, logging, testing, depositional systems are presented in detail, using
Participants learn basic concepts of generation, completion, development, and production. examples from recent environments, outcrops,
migration, accumulation, and petroleum Without a common understanding between cores, wireline logs and test/production data from
composition, and how to dramatically improve geologists and engineers, there can be no real oil and gas fields in various parts of the world
(United States, North Sea/Atlantic, Africa, Middle
exploration success using tools such as interdisciplinary communication or teamwork in East, Far East etc). Practical exercises are taken
geochemical logs; vitrinite reflectance; pyrolysis; reservoir development and production activities. from each of the principal depositional settings
organic facies variations; biomarkers, quantities Engineering and geological coordination are the and involve detailed mapping, interpretation of
generated and expelled; and distribution of source objectives of this course. core and log characteristics, and integration of data
rock maturities. Quantitative computer modeling from FMI logs. Emphasis is placed on the
COURSE CONTENT application of fundamental sedimentary principles
techniques provide information about the timing Correlation and stratigraphy • Structural geology •
and efficiency of generation and migration. The to actual subsurface data so that the participants
Trapping mechanisms and fluid distribution • Seismology can immediately use the information in their
course stresses the integration of geochemical data and mapping techniques • Clastic/carbonate reservoir exploration and development activities.
with geological and engineering information to geology • Reservoir characterization and modeling •
identify reservoir compartments, allocate Volumetrics • Well planning • Reservoir appraisal • Field COURSE CONTENT
commingled production, and monitor flooding. development Genetic stratigraphic analysis • Depositional architecture •
Basins and units • Quantitative facies mapping • Wireline logs
Geochemical applications are illustrated with and conventional cores • Seismic and sequence stratigraphy •
numerous worldwide case studies. No previous Recognition of depositional systems • Process-response facies
background in geochemistry is needed. models • Integrated genetic stratigraphy • Analysis of clastic
depositional systems • Alluvial fan • Fluvial • Eolian •
Lacustrine • Deltaic • Shoreline • Shelf • Slope and basin •
COURSE CONTENT
Incised sequences • Shelf margins and linked downslope
Source rock quality, maturity, and potential • Migration systems • Characteristic log patterns • Flow units • Prediction
efficiency and direction • Maturation and degradation • of reservoir size, shape, trend, quality • How to select optimum
Correlation: oil-to-oil, oil-to-source rock, gases • well locations • Lateral continuity and quality of seals •
Temperature, time and quantitative modeling of maturity for Diagenesis • Sedimentary controls on porosity, permeability,
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
systems with unconformities, changing gradients, and saturation • Reservoir exploration and production case
faulting • Reservoir continuity, lateral and vertical changes in CALGARY, CANADA histories
gravity and viscosity, contributions from discrete zones • Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
Worldwide exploration and production case studies • Project NEW DELHI, INDIA
planning using actual problems Nov. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
CALGARY, CANADA
MUSCAT, OMAN Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
Jan. 28-Feb. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 TRINIDAD, UTT - POINT LISAS
HOUSTON, TEXAS Nov. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,675
Mar. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 DUBAI, UAE
DENVER, COLORADO† Dec. 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,450 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S WARRI, NIGERIA HOUSTON, TEXAS
Sept. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,175 Feb. 27-Mar. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
DUBAI, UAE
Nov. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
CALGARY, CANADA KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100
HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
Apr. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 CALGARY, CANADA
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
LONDON, U.K. Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 DUBAI, UAE
Oct. 2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT † includes field trip Dec. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 1 9


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 8

Structural Geology in Basin Analysis Workshop:


Sequence Stratigraphy: Petroleum Exploration and
An Applied Workshop An Integrated Approach
Development
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. CLYDE H. MOORE DR. RICHARD H. GROSHONG, JR. DR. JOHN D. PIGOTT
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Geologists, geophysicists, exploration/production Exploration and development geologists, geo- Geoscientists who require a practical familiarity
managers, biostratigraphers and engineers physicists, engineers, and geoscience managers with the application of a variety of state-of-the-
GEOLOGY

involved in exploration or reservoir art conventional and unconventional tools of


characterization YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
hydrocarbon evaluation to sedimentary basins
• Apply mechanical-stratigraphic concepts to
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO understand and predict trap geometry YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Identify stratigraphic sequences • Use restoration and balance to validate an • Evaluate the dynamics of basin formation
• Interpret seismic reflection geometries interpretation and interpret the structural • Reconstruct thermal histories of basins
• Relate sequence stratigraphy to basin evolution • Build predictive basin models useful in
architecture, relative sea levels and history • Recognize the structural style or styles of a exploration
• Build predictive stratigraphic models region from map and cross-sectional expression • Apply modern exploration data to basin
ABOUT THE COURSE • Distinguish characteristics of each modeling
Sequence stratigraphy, based on sedimentary structural style on reflection seismic sections
ABOUT THE COURSE
response to changes in relative sea level gives • Interpret the mechanics of deformation for
the explorationist and the development geosci- each structural style Basin analysis demands an integrated approach
entist a powerful new predictive tool for • Predict the effects of deformation on from explorationists. It can be both inappropriate,
regional basin analysis, shelf to basin correla- reservoir porosity, permeability, and continuity as well as misleading, to suggest that the
tion and reservoir heterogeneity. Perhaps tectonic-thermal-sedimentologic evolution of
most importantly, sequence stratigraphy ABOUT THE COURSE any one basin is an established fact, or even
gives the geoscientist a superior framework The explosion of 3-D seismic has given us an that all basins submit to the same simple and
for the integration of geologic, geophysical opportunity to map structures in a more unequivocal models. This five-day course
and engineering data and expertise. We will detailed manner than ever before. However, provides the theory, methods, and practice so
develop the basic concepts of sequence making the most realistic geologic interpretation that participants may develop and optimize their
stratigraphy such as the integration of eustasy of these structures is only as good as our ability own individual basin evaluation and modeling
and tectonic subsidence which gives rise to to recognize the fundamental characteristics modus operandi. Incorporated as practical
the basic cycle hierarchy that can be observed of the assemblage in which they occur. Only problems for workshop analysis and significant
in the geologic record. Using these basic con- by recognition of the many facets, variations, group discussion are case histories from
cepts, we will build a general predictive strati- differences, and similarities of each assem- throughout the world utilizing seismic,
graphic model emphasizing the petroleum blage with its associated styles and substyles, petrophysical, geochemical, and thermal data.
system and particularly stressing shelf to basin can confident interpretations be made. This Areas for analysis include data sets from Africa,
correlation. The particular strength of this course provides an overview of all hydrocarbon- Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico, Mid-Continent US,
workshop is the application of these basic bearing structural assemblages from the trap the Middle East, South America, the North Sea,
principles to actual subsurface data sets gath- to the plate-tectonic scale. The processes that and Southeast Asia. When offered in-house as a
ered into a series of well-founded exercises. In produce the structures and control their two-week course, a rigorous petrophysical core
recent courses the data sets included Miocene variability are explained in terms of basic rock-
mechanical principles and physical-model workshop for sequence stratigraphy and reservoir
delta complexes in Venezuela Cretaceous characterization-development is included.
incised valleys in the US, Paleozoic mixed car- examples. Cross-section balancing and
bonate clastic basin floor fans and low stand restoration are presented as tools for validating One personal computer is provided, at
prograding complexes in the US and Jurassic interpretations as well as for documenting additional cost, for each two participants.
basin floor and slope fans in France. structural evolution. To develop a broad expe-
rience, numerous case-history interpretations COURSE CONTENT
Geodynamics of basin formation • Geothermics (thermal
COURSE CONTENT from around the world are presented as history reconstruction) • Organic geochemistry • Inorganic
Historical framework • Seismic geometries • Unconformities • examples and interpreted in exercises.
Relative sea level • Eustasy • Parasequences and their stack- geochemistry (porosity creation and destruction in the
ing patterns • Parasequences as a correlation tool • COURSE CONTENT
subsurface) • Petrophysics I • Geophysics I (reflection
Relationship of stratigraphic patterns to changes in subsi- Mechanical principles governing folding and faulting • character analysis) • Petrophysics II • Geophysics II
dence rates as driven by regional and earth scale tectonic Mechanical stratigraphy • Predicting srtucture from (reflection group analysis) • Geophysics III (tectonic
processes • Cycle hierarchy • Worldwide cycle chart and its stratigraphy • Deformation mechanisms • Folding vs. fault- seismic styles) • Tectonic and paleoenvironmental
application • The sequence stratigraphic model • LST ing • Palinspastic restoration of cross sections • Structural reconstruction • Dynamic basin classification • Integrated
sequence boundaries, diagenesis related to unconformities, validation criteria • Sequential restoration and growth history petroleum system analysis • Summary and discussion
incised valles, slope fans, basin floor fans and prograding • Structural assemblages: families and styles • Fault-related
complexes illustrated by slide presentation and individual folds • Regional arches and domes • Compaction, dissolution
exercises • TST incised valley fill, two-phase sedimentation and impact structures • Wrench faults: simple, convergent,
pattern, source rock and reservoir seal illustrated by slide pres- and divergent • Thin-skinned fold-thrust belts • Basement-
entation and individual exercises • HST alluvial, deltaic, involved contraction • Inversion • Thin-skinned extension
shoreline complexes and shelf sands illustrated by slide pres- • Basement-involved extension • Salt sheets • Diapirs •
entation and individual exercises • Exploration and production Exploration problems for each style • Plate-tectonic habitats
scaled case histories • Exploration / production strategies of structural assemblages • Effects of structures in reservoirs:
joints, stylolites, faults • Deformation that enhances or
reduces permeability • Predicting the effect of fault zones 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
on fluid flow • Tectonic synthesis and exploration project NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA
HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
Nov. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
PARIS, FRANCE
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Nov. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,875*
DENVER, COLORADO† DUBAI, UAE 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
July 31-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,450 Dec. 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
HOUSTON, TEXAS
LONDON, U.K. 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
HOUSTON, TEXAS PARIS, FRANCE
HOUSTON, TEXAS Mar. 27-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Nov. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,875*
Nov. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
LONDON, U.K. * plus computer charge
† includes field trip July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT

20 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 9

Geochemical Techniques for


Development Geology Solving Reservoir Management Prospect and Play
and Field Development Problems Assessment
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. JOHN S. SNEIDER DR. MARK A. MCCAFFREY DR. MICHAEL I. TREESH
NEW
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Reservoir, development and exploration geologists, Development geologists, petroleum engineers, All exploration team members and leaders
geophysicists, petrophysicists, log analysts, managers, and technical personnel including geologists, geophysicists, geochemists,

GEOLOGY
petroleum engineers, and technicians YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO analysts, reservoir engineers, economists, planners
• Use mud gas isotopes to identify and and managers who make business decisions
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO characterize pay zones based upon exploration data
• Select optimum drill sites for field development • Use the geochemistry of produced fluids (oil,
• Select and use logs and core samples for maxi- YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
gas, water) and/or core material to:
mum benefit in distinguishing reservoir and • Identify missed pay • Calculate geological risk and uncertainty in
non-reservoir rock • Assess reservoir compartmentalization exploration prospects
• Construct geologic reservoir models • Allocate commingled production • Determine prospect volumes
• Identify completion problems (tubing leaks, • Assess reserve distribution in a play
• Apply seismic analysis to reservoir development poor cement jobs, etc.)
• Apply facies characteristics to reservoir perform- • Describe/calibrate risks associated with
• Characterize induced fractures (e.g., fracture finding a successful play
ance to optimize development height)
• Compile a development plan • Monitor the progression of floods (water, gas, ABOUT THE COURSE
or steam) This fully revised and updated course presents a
ABOUT THE COURSE • Predict vertical and lateral variations in fluid state-of-the-art approach to defining prospect and
Knowledge of the controls on reservoir pore space viscosity and gravity; identify the geological play volumetrics, the uncertainties in defining
distribution is critical in the appraisal, develop- processes which control fluid properties in a these volumes and the risk that the
ment, and efficient management of reservoirs. given field accumulation exists. It is a very practical course
Participants will learn, through hands-on exercises, • Use certain key software packages (including,
PeakView, ReserView, OilUnmixer, Excess – easy to adapt directly in the workplace.
how to compile a development plan for a field Pressure calculations, etc.) Participants learn evaluation techniques
which emphasizes optimal recovery. The construc- applicable in any assessment scheme that an
tion of cross-sections and maps for estimating ABOUT THE COURSE organization might use. The course evaluates
During field development and production, numerous other published approaches and contrasts them
hydrocarbons-in-place are shown to play a pivotal problems can be solved through integration of geo-
role in production efficiency. Emphasis is placed chemical, geological, and engineering data (see bullets with the recommended procedures allowing the
on the selection of samples for core analysis and above). Geochemical approaches for solving these participants to choose the very best approach
on how to distinguish reservoir and non-reservoir problems are appealing since: to resource evaluation. It is significant to note
rocks. Structural style and facies concepts are 1. They provide an independent line of evidence that that this course offers the industry the only
used to locate drill sites and describe reservoirs. can help resolve ambiguous geological or engineering quantitative play assessment procedure that is
Ingredients needed for geologic reservoir models data. Example: geochemical data can reveal whether repeatable from play to play and offers measures of
will be reviewed. Participants learn to recognize
small differences in reservoir pressure reflect the pres- the play prospectiveness (size and number of
ence of a barrier between the sampling points. future fields). Important techniques to sum
the need to modify development plans and imple- 2. They are far less expensive than engineering alterna- multiple prospective zones and adjacent
ment activities for correction of deficiencies. Each tives. Example: geochemical allocation of commingled prospects are developed. Lessons learned are
session is custom-tailored for the region in which production costs only 1-5% as much as production emphasized through real oil field workshops
the session is presented. logging. evaluated in a team setting. Course objectives are
3. They have applicability where other approaches do
COURSE CONTENT not. Example: geochemical allocation of commingled to quantify all geologic risks and uncertainties, to
Influence of geological characteristics on development • production can be performed on highly-deviated or provide insights for managers and reviewers in
Economic value of synergistic development teams • horizontal wells and on wells with electrical sub- evaluating assessments, and to enable selective
Appraisal: determining recoverable hydrocarbons • mersible pumps - well types not amenable to produc- planning. Unique tools and approaches described
Reservoir fluid properties and saturation • Influence of tion logging. and practiced include: tying the exploration
capillarity on hydrocarbon distribution and fluid contacts • This course explains how geochemistry complements process to business objectives, fully calibrated
Volumetric reserve estimation and calculation • other reservoir management tools. Case studies and
Depositional and diagenetic controls on reservoir rock play and prospect predictions, segregating play
(pore space), barriers, and hydrocarbon distribution • exercises illustrate key points. Computer-based exer- risk from independent risk, and proven
Aquifer characterization, distribution, and mapping • cises illustrate the utility of certain key software pack- methods of selling your prospect and play.
Seismic applications in appraisal and development • ages. Sampling pitfalls and sources of contamination
are discussed. The course will NOT cover PVT COURSE CONTENT
Development drilling: how to optimize hydrocarbon
recovery • Reservoir zonation and thickness mapping • (Pressure-Volume-Temperature) relationships or equa- Geological controls of oil and gas occurrence: their impact
Reservoir pore space configurations and mapping • tion of state calculations. on exploration risk and success • Risk analysis: principles
Material balance and performance predictions • Geological and practice including geostatistical and Monte Carlo
and petrophysical activities in field review and special One personal computer is provided, at additional techniques • Hydrocarbon charge assessment • Prospect
studies for infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery • Steps cost, for each two participants. assessment workshop • Play assessment techniques:
in building a geologic reservoir model estimating the possible numbers, sizes, and associated risks
COURSE CONTENT for potential fields, dependent versus independent risks •
Using fluid compositions as “natural tracers” for tracking fluid Play recognition and mapping • Play assessment workshop
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S movement and compartmentalization • Understanding • Aggregation of assessment results: summing, risking, and
processes that cause compositional differences between fluids preparation for economic analysis
HOUSTON, TEXAS (e.g., differences in source facies, source maturity, biodegrada-
Dec. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 tion, water washing, evaporative fractionation, etc.) •
Integrating geochemical, geological, and engineering data to
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S identify missed pay, characterize reservoir compartmentaliza-
tion, allocate commingled production, identify well completion
DUBAI, UAE problems, predict fluid viscosity/gravity, and monitor floods •
Mar. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125 Basics of oil, water, gas and mud gas compositional analyses
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S HOUSTON, TEXAS
May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
Dec. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
Feb. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
DENVER, COLORADO 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 CAIRO, EGYPT
May 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125* HOUSTON, TEXAS
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA May 1-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,200 NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
Sept. 25-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT *plus computer charge July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 2 1


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 10

G EOPHYSICS
The courses in this section are Geophysics courses offered publicly through PetroSkills and OGCI are designed to develop your skills and
competency in this discipline. The Course Progression Matrix below shows how these courses relate to each other and provides an easy way to
construct a training plan with coursework that specifically relates to present or future job requirements. Likewise, managers can use the matrices
to develop training plans for their team.
Geophysicists can also benefit from courses that provide an understanding of other petroleum-related functions and disciplines. Such
GEOPHYSICS

cross-training courses are recommended in the lighter-shaded columns on either side of the Geophysics courses shown on the matrix.

INSTRUCTORS

DR. JOHN BURRELL D R . J O H N D. P I G O T T


DR. GERHARD DIEPHUIS D R . L A N N Y J. R E E D
D O N A L D S. M A C P H E R S O N D R . M A N G AT R. T H A PA R

22 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 11

Basic Geophysics Principles of 3-D Seismic Interpretation


Seismic Interpretation
and Applications
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. GERHARD DIEPHUIS, DONALD S. MACPHERSON DR. MANGAT R. THAPAR DR. JOHN BURRELL
OR DR. LANNY J. REED
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
DESIGNED FOR Interpreters, geophysicists, geologists, technical Geologists, geophysicists, and engineers
Geoscientists, engineers, team leaders, geoscience support personnel, seismic processors, who want to use seismic data for petroleum
technicians, asset managers, and anyone involved in exploration and data processing managers, and exploration and/or production – familiarity
using seismic data that needs to understand and use data acquisition managers.
this data as a communication vehicle
with geological terminology will be helpful
This is a basic level course for 3-D, includes YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
seismic topics of intermediate level. See the • Understand the seismic process, to interpret
• Understand how seismic data represents subsurface
rock parameters including the relative structure, course requirements at the bottom. seismic sections, to develop a geologic

GEOPHYSICS
lithology, and pore filling material YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
model, and to prepare maps
• Gain a knowledge of how seismic data is acquired • Apply principles of stratigraphic and • Relate the subsurface stratigraphy to well
and processed to produce a three dimensional data
seismic image structural interpretation
• Apply S-waves in fractured reservoirs • Identify different structural styles from
• Understand the limits of vertical and horizontal seismic data
resolution inherent in the seismic data • Estimate thickness of thin beds in 3-D
• How seismic data is used to define reservoir • Make use of reservoir characterization and • Create a basic stratigraphic framework
parameters and how it relates to reservoir compartmentalization tools using seismic stratigraphy
development; this includes a detailed discussion of • Conduct risk analysis of 4-D ABOUT THE COURSE
AVO and other seismic attributes
• Understand the various approaches to seismic imag- ABOUT THE COURSE
Can I observe the reservoir on seismic?
ing and how the velocity model relates to this image Companies that use 3-D seismic surveys have How large is the reservoir? Did the well cut a
• How new technology including seismic inversion found them to be an extremely prudent invest- fault? Can seismic help me tie a set of wells?
have helped us to define rock properties including ment. Costing less than a few cents/barrel of oil, What kind of a structural trap did I drill
pore filling material, pore pressure, water such surveys not only reduce the risk in explo- into? Is the structure valid or a seismic artifact?
saturation, and fracture orientation Are these reflections real or multiples? How
• Value the recent focus on developments such as ration and production, they also help increase
production from existing fields. Certainly, the can I combine structural and stratigraphic
time lapse seismic surveys for reservoir monitoring interpretations to develop a structural and
purposes degree of "success" of a 3-D seismic interpretation
depends strongly on the techniques employed to depositional history? How does seismic data
ABOUT THE COURSE acquire, process, and analyze the data. But this acquisition and processing impact my
The course is designed to familiarize anyone using seismic course also emphasizes an aspect that is just as interpretation? Will my well encounter hazards
data with the nature of the data and what exactly it repre- important – the principles and pitfalls. This such as abnormal pressure or shallow gas?
sents. One of the key goals of the course is to explain the The participant learns to answer these and
large and confusing amount of “jargon” that is used by the course will benefit all geo-science professionals
and not just the geophysical interpreter. related questions by gaining an understanding
Geophysical community when they use seismic data as a of the seismic system, its limitations and pitfalls,
communication vehicle. The course is supplemented by a Exercises: Interpretation using horizontal slice
large number of case histories that graphically illustrate the data utilizing reservoir models, 3-D survey design, and by interpreting 2-D and 3-D seismic examples
principles in the course material. These are updated with thickness estimation from amplitude of seismic of structural and stratigraphic features associated
every course presentation to keep up with the rapidly dev- data using a reservoir model, along with other with actively producing hydrocarbon areas.
eloping technology in this field. The course participants exercises on seismic wave propagation properties COURSE CONTENT
are given a data disk with several executable programs for
parameter calculation and seismic modeling. The data related to 3-D Basics: geological controls on the propagation, reflection,
and refraction of seismic waves • Data acquisition and
disk also contains all of the course slides and exercises. COURSE CONTENT processing with emphasis on its potential impact on
COURSE CONTENT
Overview of 3-D data acquisition and processing • interpretation • 2-D and 3-D interpretation techniques •
The nature of seismic data, what is propagating • What causes Principles of 3-D migration, horizontal and horizon slices, Seismic interpretation of different structural styles:
seismic reflections and how they relate to rock properties including and modeling • 3-D seismic technologies • Reduced risk extensional, compressional, strike-slip, inverted, salt and
pore filling material • The wavelet in the seismic data and its limit using 4-D • Successful applications of 3-D in E&P • gravity dominated basins • Seismic velocities, sequence
of resolution • Seismic velocities as they relate to rock properties Geostatistical Kriging and Variorgram • Anisotropy, 3-D, stratigraphy and seismic facies analysis • Acoustic
and the imaging process • The relationship between seismic veloc- 3-C, S-waves • Principles of stratigraphic and structural impedance • DHIS • AVO
ities and pore pressure • Pore pressure prediction • Seismic data interpretation • Application of seismic attributes •
processing and seismic migration • Prestack, poststack, time and Thickness from amplitude, frequency • Reservoir
depth imaging • Direct hydrocarbon indicators and AVO • management using 3-D • Summary of 3-D case histories
Seismic inversion for rock and fluid properties • Seismic attributes from around the world
• Time lapse reservoir monitoring • Recent developments in seis-
mic acquisition, processing, and interpretation Participants should have taken Seismic Survey Design, Data
Acquisition and Processing course; AVO and Seismic
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Attributes: Principles and Applications or equivalent
HOUSTON, TEXAS Participants are encouraged to bring data examples or
Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 displays, and problems related to this course for one-on-one
CALGARY, CANADA or group discussion.
Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA


HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100
Feb. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 LONDON, U.K.
May 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
PERTH, AUSTRALIA NEW DELHI, INDIA 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,150 Nov. 28-Dec. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 HOUSTON, TEXAS
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S May 8-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Jun. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100
LONDON, U.K. HOUSTON, TEXAS LONDON, U.K.
Sept. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
CALGARY, CANADA LONDON, U.K. KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST Aug. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT Nov. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 2 3


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 12

Seismic Survey Design, Data AVO and Seismic Attributes: Introduction to Seismic
Acquisition, and Processing Principles and Applications Stratigraphy: An Exploration
Workshop
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. MANGAT R. THAPAR DR. MANGAT R. THAPAR DR. JOHN D. PIGOTT
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Geologists, geophysicists, engineers, supervisors, Interpreters, geophysicists, geologists, technical Geophysicists, geologists, explorationists, and
executives and managers who will be involved support personnel, seismic processors, exploration managers who desire an introduction or review
in the design/execution and monitoring of seismic and data processing managers, and data acquisition of the theory and application of contemporary
data acquisition and processing managers seismic stratigraphic techniques to exploration
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Design 2-D and 3-D surveys to overcome- • Analyze and apply AVO and seismic attributes • Utilize seismic stratigraphic methods to
some of the limitations and avoid pitfalls • Recognize pros and cons of AVO determine seismic facies
GEOPHYSICS

• Calculate, execute, and quality control • Determine when AVO is applicable • Build geohistory analysis of exploration basins
design parameters • Select interpretation-relevant attributes • Predict potential reservoirs and seals
• Optimize seismic processing flows and • Resolve the effect of processing on AVO
and seismic attributes ABOUT THE COURSE
parameters to overcome some limitations
• Avoid pitfalls in AVO and attributes One of the most revolutionary, most effective, yet
and avoid pitfalls. Select, execute, and most under-utilized tools introduced into exploration
quality control processing parameters ABOUT THE COURSE recently is that of seismic stratigraphy. It is not a tool
ABOUT THE COURSE How reliable and successful is your AVO or exclusive to geophysicists, nor is it a tool only for
By the end of the course, participants will be able seismic attribute analysis? Did you know that not geologists. Seismic stratigraphic techniques are based
to contribute to effective planning, execution, and all AVO/seismic attribute anomalies are caused by upon an integration of firm, well-established geological
quality control of seismic data acquisition and oil and gas reservoirs? And that there is a whole and geophysical fundamentals. When properly applied,
processing. The success of oil and gas exploration range of natural and artificial factors that can seismic stratigraphy provides a powerful foundation
depends on the success of design, acquisition and influence AVO and attribute results? This course for geohistory analysis, helping describe a basin’s
processing. Acquisition is given equal importance presents the basic principles of AVO and attribute evolution and the resulting effects upon its spatial
with processing through a simple presentation of analysis. The participant is guided in: (i) selecting and temporal variation in hydrocarbon potential.
fundamental principles. Case histories and simple the correct processing techniques, (ii) determining Seismic stratigraphy chronostratigraphically
calculations of design parameters are used to whether an AVO analysis is at all applicable, and constrains both the sedimentological and fault-
explain the limitations and pitfalls. Seismic survey (iii) choosing the appropriate attributes for analysis. mechanical stratigraphy of a basin. Furthermore, it
design and processing flow for AVO or attribute can provide a predictive model extrapolated beyond
Exercises: on rock properties, AVO interpretation the borehole as to aspects of the quality of potential
analysis is discussed. Proper use of amplitude and crossplotting techniques, thin bed thickness, reservoirs and seals, their sedimentary environments of
scaling and deconvolution is explained for AVO absorption due to reservoir thickness, attribute deposition, and in some cases, even their paragenesis.
and attributes. Improving data with static and selection, many other topics In this rigorous workshop, participants learn and
dynamic corrections is demonstrated. A presenta- apply the basic theory and methods of seismic strati-
COURSE CONTENT
tion of correlation, convolution, deconvolution, fil- AVO concept and related factors • AVO pitfalls and graphic analysis to seismic profiles representing a
tering, and frequency spectra is included. Also, assumptions • Petrophysics and AVO • Rock properties variety of rock types, structural styles, and tectonic
explanations of seismic attributes, VSP, and Taup and wave propagation • Hydrocarbon detection using AVO settings worldwide. The projects include borehole-
are given. • AVO modeling and processing • Impact of processing on
AVO analysis • Techniques for interpretation of AVO • AVO constrained seismic data drawn from such regions as
Exercises: 3-D survey design, Groundroll, P and Cross-plotting techniques • Case studies of AVO • Seismic the Alaska North Slope, Gulf of Mexico, Red Sea,
S waves, Aliasing, Vibroseis sweep, Correlation attributes and wave factors • Decon and scaling effect on Southeast Asia, South America and Western Africa.
attributes • Time and frequency domain attributes •
and Convolution, Absorption, Migration Thickness using amplitude • Thin bed thickness from fre- COURSE CONTENT
Aperture, Velocities, DMO. Participants should quency • Applications of amplitude, energy, and frequency Historical development • Review of geophysical
have taken Basic Geophysics course or equiva- related attributes • Pitfalls of attributes fundamentals • Direct hydrocarbon indicators • Sequence
lent. Participants are encouraged to bring data analysis • Chronostratigraphic charts • Sea level curve •
Participants should have taken Seismic Survey Construction • Seismic facies analysis • Seismic
samples or displays related to this course for a Design, Data Acquisition, and Processing characterization of carbonates • Seismic classification of
group/one-on-one discussion. course or equivalent and are encouraged to deltas • Seismic characterization of turbidites •
bring data examples related to this course. Recognition of highstand and lowstand system tracts •
COURSE CONTENT Mechanical (structural) stratigraphy • Geohistory analysis
Data acquisition field work • Data processing theory •
Data processing exercises • Theory: the convolution model
of the seismic trace, acoustic impedance and reflectivity,
reflection and amplitudes, diffraction geometry, CMP
method, NMO and stacking, aliasing and sampling
requirements, convolution and correlation, velocities •
Imaging: DMO, time and depth migration, data acquisition 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
operations and survey design principles
CALGARY, CANADA
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST
NEW DELHI, INDIA NEW DELHI, INDIA 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Nov. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 Nov. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,200
DUBAI, UAE
DUBAI, UAE DUBAI, UAE Feb. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125
Dec. 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 Dec. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125
MIAMI, FLORIDA
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S May 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA LONDON, U.K.
Mar. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 Mar. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,200 June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT
HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 July 31-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,200
LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K. HOUSTON, TEXAS
July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT July 31-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT Oct. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
DUBAI, UAE DUBAI, UAE CALGARY, CANADA
Dec. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 Dec. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125 Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST

24 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 13

Advanced Seismic Stratigraphy:


A 2-D, 3-D Sequence and
Wavelet Analysis Workshop
PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR
DR. JOHN D. PIGOTT
COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED If it happens out there,
DESIGNED FOR
Geophysicists, geologists, and explorationists
who have completed PetroSkills’ Introduction
to Seismic Stratigraphy course or comparable
it’s taught here.
training
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Separate fact from artifact in seismic
stratigraphy processing and interpretation

GEOPHYSICS
• Characterize reservoir rocks and their fluids
from stacked and unstacked AVO data
• Apply 3-D seismic stratigraphy to field
development
• Interpret salt structures and their associated
hydrocarbon potential
• Predict intra-basinal reservoir seal quality
as a function of sea level position
ABOUT THE COURSE
Seismic stratigraphy is a powerful tool for
exploration and exploitation, especially when
the rock-fluid information within seismic
wavelet (reflection character analysis) is
integrated with the lithofacies-stratigraphic
information determined from reflection group
geometry (sequence analysis). In this rigorous,
problem-oriented, hands-on workshop,
participants learn how to make seismic
modeling-interpretation judgments as a basis
for seismic-facies and reflection character
analysis. Case studies for exploration and
development incorporate 2-D and 3-D seismic
with well data from diverse tectonic settings Delivering quality. All over the world.
and a wide variety of carbonate and clastic
depositional environments. PetroSkills is committed to making training as convenient as possible.
COURSE CONTENT That’s why we offer our courses in dozens of cities across the world as
Historical perspectives of the science and the seismic
stratigraphy algorithm • Geophysical fundamentals • well as regional hubs in the United States, Europe, Middle East, South
Wavelet Analysis I: optimizing exploration - intracratonic America and Southeast Asia. Minimizing your travel and other related
basins • Wavelet Analysis II: optimizing exploitation -
intracratonic basins • Wavelet Analysis III: seismic costs is just another way that PetroSkills adds value to its courses. After
reservoir characterization • Seismic Sequence Analysis I:
modus operandi - divergent-margin case study • Seismic all, maximizing convenience is a key function of the PetroSkills alliance.
Sequence Analysis II: chronostratigraphy and sea level
analysis • Seismic Sequence Analysis III: facies analysis In addition to delivering over 500 public course sessions in 30
and abc maps • Seismic Sequence Analysis IV: 2-D and
3-D applications to salt and subsalt imagery • Seismic different cities this year, PetroSkills also offers most public courses as
Sequence Analysis V: integrated geohistory analysis - private, on-site seminars. A number of special courses are also available
polyhistory basins • Review of seismic stratigraphy
algorithm and class discussion as in-house sessions only.
In-house courses allow participants to receive comprehensive training
and individualized attention from our world-renowned instructors.
Some courses are even available in languages other than English. Using
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S our resources, we can develop training programs on virtually any
CALGARY, CANADA petroleum-related subject while incorporating a company’s own data into
Dec. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,495+GST the curriculum – the ultimate test of training practicality.
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

MIAMI, FLORIDA
Convenient. Frequent. Cost Competitive.
May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625
LONDON, U.K.
June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,995+VAT ®

KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA


Aug. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,400 An OGCI Company
CALGARY, CANADA
Dec. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,495+GST

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 2 5


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 14

P ETROPHYSICS
The courses in this section are Petrophysics courses offered publicly through PetroSkills and OGCI are designed to develop your skills and
competency in this discipline. The Course Progression Matrix below shows how these courses relate to each other and provides an easy way to
construct a training plan with coursework that specifically relates to present or future job requirements. Likewise, managers can use the matrices to
develop training plans for their team.
Petrophysicists can also benefit from courses that provide an understanding of other petroleum-related functions and disciplines. Such
cross-training courses are recommended in the lighter-shaded columns on either side of the Petrophysics courses shown on the matrix.
INSTRUCTORS

DR. ANDREW CHEN D R . A. D A N I E L H I L L RICHARD PIGGIN


PETROPHYSICS

D R . D AV I D K. D AV I E S D R . N E I L F. H U R L E Y D R . R O B E RT A. S K O P E C
E R I C A. F O S T E R D AV I D P AT R I C K M U R P H Y D R . J O H N S. S N E I D E R

26 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 15

Foundations of Coring and Core Analysis Well Log Interpretation


Petrophysics
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. DAVID K. DAVIES OR ERIC A. FOSTER DR. ROBERT A. SKOPEC RICHARD H. PIGGIN OR ERIC A. FOSTER
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Petrophysicists with less than three months Reservoir engineers, exploration and development Petrophysicists, geologists, geophysicists,
experience as well as geoscientists, engineers geologists, core and log analysts, geophysicists, engineers, technicians, or anyone interested in
and other technical staff of all experience levels drilling and completion engineers, and oil a solid understanding of the principles of
that require a better understanding of applied company research and development staff borehole geophysics
petrophysical technologies
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Design coring programs and maximize recovery • Identify reservoirs
• Analyze open hole logs and integrate log • Preserve core to minimize rock alteration • Determine mineralogy, porosity and saturation
and core data to obtain porosity, saturation • Take and analyze sidewall cores in various lithologies
and permeability for well and field • Use cores to estimate porosity, permeability, and • Highlight oil mobility
development projects fluid saturation (basic core analysis) • Interpret pressure profiles
• Determine which logging tools are most • Understand special core analysis, e.g., • Develop optimum tools and logging programs
effective for specific applications wettabililty, relative permeability, capillary • Apply quicklook methods of formation evaluation
• Use petrophysics to optimize the effort of pressure, and reservoir fluid distribution for

PETROPHYSICS
integrated, multi-disciplinary teams reservoir engineering and petrophysical evaluation ABOUT THE COURSE
• Apply basic cased-hole logging and well • Prevent/spot errors in core analysis vendor The most universal, comprehensive and concise
bore seismic analytical techniques reports (quality control) descriptive documents on oil and gas wells are
• Select samples for special core studies logs. Familiarity with the purposes and optimum
ABOUT THE COURSE applications of well logs is therefore essential for
A knowledge of petrophysics is of fundamental • Correlate core and log data
people forging their careers in exploration and
importance in all aspects of the petroleum busi- ABOUT THE COURSE production. General principles of physics are
ness. There is no discipline that cannot benefit More than three-quarters of current additions to developed to explain the behavior of modern
from a basic understanding of petrophysics. This the world's reserves come from better management logging tools. A feature of this course is the large
course provides an overview of the principles and of existing reserves. Core-based measurements number of actual log examples used to illustrate
applications used in reservoir description including offer the most tangible and direct means of and describe reservoir properties. Participants gain
log and core analysis for technical staff from all dis- determining critical reservoir parameters. Core realistic experience by working in teams on com-
ciplines. At the end of the course, participants will analysis can play a vital role in field equity or
have obtained sufficient understanding to perform prehensive log interpretation exercises.
basic log analysis and integrate log and core data to unitization and is often considered to be the
COURSE CONTENT
allow them to work effectively in integrated teams. ground truth to which other measurements are Logging objectives • Invasion profile • Passive electrical
The course is developed around a large number of compared, e.g. wireline logging. Using a multi- properties of earth materials • Resistivity measuring tools •
practical exercises using actual logs and core data disciplinary approach, participants are taken through Reservoir/non-reservoir discrimination • Matrix-sensitive
the stepsnecessaryto obtain reliable core analysis logs • Depth measurements • Borehole calipers • Porosity-
from various parts of the world. mineralogy logs, density, neutron, sonic • Porosity
data and solve formation evaluation problems. determination in clean formations • Formation resistivity
COURSE CONTENT Throughout the course, participants are given factor • Conductivity of shales • Mineralogy identification •
Principles and applications of petrophysical methods • hands-on problems and practical laboratory and Saturation and archie equation • Linear movable oil plot •
Role of petrophysics in integrated reservoir analysis • Reconnaissance techniques • Logarithmic mop • Porosity-
Mud logging • Open hole log analysis and formation eval- field examples, which reinforce the instruction. resistivity crossplots • Permeability relationships • Nuclear
uation, caliper, gamma ray, SP, density-neutron, sonic, magnetic resonance • Use of pressure measurements •
Archie's equation, resistivity logs • Coring and core analy- COURSE CONTENT
Computerized log evaluation • Sidewall coring •
sis, types of cores, sample selection, core gamma, core CT, Coring and core analysis objectives • Coring hardware and Recommended logging programs
porosity, permeability, saturation, grain density, wettability, maximizing core recovery • Core-handling, wellsite
capillary pressure, relative permeability • Porosity-perme- procedures, and preservation methods • Sidewall coring
ability relationships in sandstone and carbonate reservoirs and analysis • Organizing effective laboratory programs • 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
and prediction of permeability from core and log data • Porosity, permeability and fluid saturation • Quality control in THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS
Introduction to the analysis of shaly sands and complex core analysis • Petrography and mineralogy • Special core
lithologies • Interpretation of specialized logs, image logs analysis sample selection and statistical data analysis • Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775
and nuclear magnetic resonance logs • Introduction to Core-log correlation (includes NMR log calibration, acoustic, HOUSTON, TEXAS
cased-hole log evaluation • Systematic integration of nuclear, and electrical properties) • An introduction to rock Dec. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
petrophysical methods into other geological and petrole- mechanics • Wettability, relative permeability, capillary
um engineering disciplines pressure, and reservoir fluid distribution • Data integration 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
in reservoir simulation • Final problem: design of coring
and core analysis program • Lab tour ABERDEEN, U.K.
Feb. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS
HOUSTON, TEXAS Mar. 27-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
HOUSTON, TEXAS DUBAI, UAE
Jan. 30-Feb. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 May 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S CALGARY, CANADA
HOUSTON, TEXAS May 29-June 2 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
MUSCAT, OMAN Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
Mar. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
VIENNA, AUSTRIA
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775
May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 HOUSTON, TEXAS LONDON, U.K.
WARRI, NIGERIA Mar. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 June 26-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,175 Nov. 27-Dec. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Nov. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K. COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO
Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
Oct. 2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775 Aug. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 Aug. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 2 7


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:35 PM Page 16

Capillarity in Rocks Carbonate Petrophysics Integration of Rocks, Log


and Test Data
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DAVID PATRICK MURPHY DR. NEIL F. HURLEY DR. JOHN S. SNEIDER
NEW
C O U R S E L E V E L : INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Geoscientists, petrophysicists, reservoir Petrophysicists, geologists, reservoir engineers, Petrophysicists, reservoir engineers, and
engineers and research and development staff geophysicists, and research scientists geoscientists that have a basic understanding of
who want to gain fundamental insight into the petrophysics, geology and engineering and need
capillary properties and hydrocarbon distribution YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
to fully integrate data sets to completely under-
in reservoir rocks • Understand, recognize, and quantify distinctive stand reservoir performance
petrophysical properties of carbonate rocks
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Maximize the value of commercially available YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Calculate pore throat sizes from a cap well logs using practical illustrations, exercises, • Identify clastic and carbonate rock types
pressure curve and case studies based on productivity differences
• Convert mercury/air capillary pressure • Improve estimates of proven reserves, discover • Determine key reservoir rock parameters
curves to hydrocarbon/water capillary bypassed pay, and upscale log data for 3D used for more accurate evaluation
pressure curves models and flow simulation • Learn how to use cuttings and cores to
• Determine irreducible water saturation determine reservoir parameters
• Estimate the length of a transition zone • Design an integrated interpretation
PETROPHYSICS

• Obtain values for interphase tension ABOUT THE COURSE


• Calculate Vclay
• Determine the maximum column of Carbonate rocks contain more than half of the • Calculate porosity using logs in complex
hydrocarbon that a specific “sealing” world’s oil and gas supply. Rock properties include lithologies
layer can sustain without leaking unique pore types, permeability heterogeneity, • Determine what percentage of porosity
• Determine saturation distribution in a variable Archie exponents (m and n), and contributes to production
single-pore-system rock or in a multiple distinctive capillary pressure, wettability, and • Calculate SW using different methods
pore-system rock nuclear magnetic resonance behavior. • Determine pay and pay classes
• Determine the representativeness of a Conventional and specialized logging tools are • Tie rock and well log information to
set of capillary pressure curves compared used to identify and evaluate complex carbonate production performance
to a zone of interest reservoirs. Participants work with examples from • Understand basics of Pressure transient
• Estimate permeability from a mercury/ oil and gas fields of the Middle East, North Africa, analysis
air capillary pressure curve North and South America, and Europe. Special
• Create a synthetic capillary pressure emphasis is placed on borehole-image logs and ABOUT THE COURSE
curve and estimate the air permeability their applications in faulted, fractured, and vuggy This course provides the background necessary to
from a petrographic analysis carbonate reservoirs. Other topics include solve complex reservoir evaluation and
sequence-stratigraphic correlations, flow-unit productivity problems in exploration, appraisal
ABOUT THE COURSE definition, and upscaling of petrophysical data for and field development. The fundamentals of rock
This course provides a detailed knowledge of 3D models and flow simulation. properties, logging tools and engineering data
how capillarity affects hydrocarbon distribution needed to solve these problems are reviewed. The
in a reservoir rock, and how the magnitude COURSE CONTENT
Carbonate rocks and sediments • Rock properties •
concepts are illustrated with a series of real world
of capillary forces can be used to deduce Borehole environment • Openhole logs – Lithology, problems that become increasingly complex as
valuable information about sizes of pore porosity, resistivity • Data aquisition, correction • Complex knowledge is gained in the class. Emphasis is
throats and the geometry and volume of the lithologies • Pressure measurements • Sequence statigra- placed on solving problems in a workshop format.
pore network. phy • Borehole images - sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and
structural interpretation • Fractured/faulted reservoirs • COURSE CONTENT
COURSE CONTENT Present-day stress • Horizontal wells • Vug detection • Objectives of integration • Key rock properties for
Surface phenomena, capillarity, and interphase tension • Flow-unit determination • Sonic logs in carbonates • formation evaluation • Impact of depositional
Wettability • Pressure difference across a surface film Integrated studies • Nuclear magnetic resonance • Chalk environment and rock properties • Petrophysical rock type
• Capillary forces in reservoir rocks; their measurement • reservoirs • Karsted reservoirs • Emerging technologies/ • Texture and porosity and permeability • Clay impact •
Mercury/air capillary pressures • The competition between innovative applications Basic logging tool summary • Rock sampling • Pressure
capillary and gravity forces • Relationships between initial data evaluation • Capillary pressure and pay determination
and residual saturations • Seal capacity • Mercury/air cap • Basic methodology for an integrated interpretation •
pressure versus bulk volume occupied by mercury • Rock typing • Catalog approach • Clastic and carbonate
Calculation of saturation from cap curves rock types • Relative permeability • Cementation and
saturation exponents - CEC - fluid sensitivity •
Vclay/Vshale calibration • Porosity in complex lithologies
• What is effective porosity? • SW calculations •
Determining pay and pay classes • Review of production
profiles • Overview of pressure transient analysis

2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL
Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Feb. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
DUBAI, UAE DUBAI, UAE
Apr. 29-May 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125 Mar. 25-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125
LONDON, U.K. HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 2 D AY S Aug. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT June 26-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
HOUSTON, TEXAS CALGARY, CANADA LONDON, U.K.
June 1-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,435 Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT

28 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 8/2/05 4:37 PM Page 17

Production Logging Shaly Sand Petrophysics


Formerly: Reservoir Monitoring and
Production Log Evaluation
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. A. DANIEL HILL DR. DAVID K. DAVIES OR PETROSKILLS SPECIALIST
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE C O U R S E L E V E L : INTERMEDIATE

DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR


Petroleum and drilling engineers and managers, Petrophysicists, geologists, geophysicists, engineers
reservoir engineers, production engineers/technol- and explorationists involved in all phases of
ogists, petrophysicists, log analysts, and anyone reservoir evaluation in shaly sand provinces
interested in understanding what production logs YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
and cased-hole surveys can tell us • Determine the nature, volume and
distribution of clays and shales, and their

Petrophysics
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Select the most appropriate production impact on the analysis of cores and logs
logging services for well diagnosis and • Integrate petrographic, core and log data to
reservoir surveillance significantly improve reservoir evaluation

Program • Define injection well profiles using


temperature, radioactive tracer, and
spinner flowmeters
• Measure zonal inflows in production wells
in shaly sands
• Evaluate effective porosity and saturation
and producibility of shaly sands using
specific methods

PETROPHYSICS
using temperature logs • Develop optimum logging programs in
• Locate behind-pipe channels with different types of shaly sand reservoirs
temperature, tracer, or noise logs • Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of
In response to changing need in • Apply combinations of flowmeters, fluid advanced logging tools in shaly sand
the industry, PetroSkills density, and fluid capacitance logs to ABOUT THE COURSE
Petrophysics courses have under- measure multiphase flow profiles This course tackles the important and non-
gone an extensive review recently. • Interpret cement bond logs and ultrasonic trivial problem of practical formation evaluation
logs to determine cement quality in shaly sand provinces. The presence of
The result is a deeper, broader, and • Measure flow inside and outside casing shale strongly affects the physical properties
more complete program of courses. with pulsed neutron tools of the reservoir rock and induces a significant
• Apply specialty tools for flow profiling in effect on the response of most logging tools.
Course material has been added horizontal wells
and others rewritten – all with the This results in low resistivity/low contrast
ABOUT THE COURSE pay zones that can be significant hydrocarbon
focus on delivering specific Production logging refers to a suite of logs that are producers. A properly designed analytical
competencies at a specific level. You normally run on completed injection or produc- program (cores and logs) for the evaluation
will see that each of the course tion wells to evaluate the performance of the well of shaly sands can add significant reserves in
instructors has extensive practical itself or of the reservoir as a whole. Other produc- existing fields and can allow for the rapid
tion logs can evaluate the well completion or look identification of potential bypassed pay zones
experience – experience you will in exploration wells. The course is practical
behind pipe to evaluate the formation and its flu-
benefit from when you return to ids in the near-well vicinity. Production logs are and participants are given laboratory and field
work. playing an increasing role in modern reservoir problems to emphasize the instruction. At the
management by providing the only means of end of the course, the participants will be
Recent changes include: directly identifying downhole fluid movements. able to identify and evaluate pay intervals in
This course will cover fluid flow in pipes (both shaly sands.
S HALY S AND P ETROPHYSICS single and multiphase flow), the theoretical bases COURSE CONTENT
Dr. David K. Davies of production logging techniques, production log Review of log interpretation techniques in clean
interpretation, and operational considerations. formations • Core analysis and applications of specific core
I NTEGRATION OF R OCKS , L OG AND Numerous field examples are used to illustrate the tests • Petrographic analysis (thin section, X-ray diffraction
SEM/EDS) for shaly sand evaluation • The nature of shale
T EST D ATA principles of production log interpretation. and clay: clay minerals: influence of clay/shale on
Dr. John S. Sneider One personal computer is provided, at additional petrophysical properties • Clay/shale occurrence in
reservoir rocks related to depositional environment and
cost, for each two participants.
W IRELINE F ORMATION T ESTING AND diagenesis • Integration of petrographic, core and log data
for evaluation • Effects of shale on log responses in shaly
I NTERPRETATION COURSE CONTENT
sands: various methods of shale content evaluation •
Dr. Andrew Chen Problem identification and solution with production logs Models for porosity and saturation determination: single
• Temperature Logs • Radioactive tracer logs • Spinner and double layer models: CEC comparison with Archie
flowmeter logs • Log combinations for injection well pro-
C ARBONATE P ETROPHYSICS filing • Multiphase flow effects • Deflector or basket
saturation and with core measurements • Prediction of
permeability and producibility from logs in shaly sands:
Dr. Neil F. Hurley flowmeters • Fluid density logs • Fluid capacitance logs • identification of bypassed pay • Use of advanced
Slip velocity correlations • Multiphase log interpretation • logs-NMR, FMI, Array Induction-integration for purposes
S TRUCTURAL AND S TRATIGRAPHIC Noise logs • Cement bond logs • Ultrasonic pulse-echo of evaluation
I NTERPRETATION OF D IPMETERS AND logs • Pulsed neutron logs for flow identification •
B OREHOLE I MAGING L OGS Horizontal well production logs
Dr. Neil F. Hurley 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

HOUSTON, TEXAS
Dec. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL
® LONDON, U.K. Nov. 28-Dec. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775
July 31-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT*
An OGCI Company HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Dec. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
HOUSTON, TEXAS
w w w. p e t ro s k i l l s . c o m Aug. 28-Sept. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
*plus computer charge

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 2 9


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 18

Structural and Stratigraphic Wireline Formation Testing Applied Rock Mechanics


Interpretation of Dipmeters
and Borehole-Imaging Logs and Interpretation
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. NEIL F. HURLEY DR. ANDREW CHEN DR. ROBERT A. SKOPEC
C O U R S E L E V E L : INTERMEDIATE C O U R S E L E V E L : INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Petrophysicists, geologists, geophysicists, Geologists, petrophysicists, wellsite supervisors, Drilling engineers, completion engineers,
reservoir engineers, and research scientists hydrodynamic specialists, reservoir engineers, exploration and development geologists, reservoir
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
geophysicists, and geodata interpretation technologists engineers, core and log analysts, geophysicists,
• Interpret dipmeters and borehole-imaging YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
and oil company R&D staff
logs and understand the physical principles • Understand wireline formation testing YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
behind them technologies, applications, and limitations • Determine the stress, strain, and failure
• Detect and quantify faults and fractures, • Assemble wireline testing programs, tool mechanics of rocks
determine in-situ stress orientations, configurations • Apply rock mechanics concepts and generate
improve horizontal well placement, • QC pressure and fluid ID tests in the wellsite for economic benefits in all phases of reservoir
provide input into flow simulations the best quality data development
• Determine paleocurrent orientations, • Interpret pressure gradient data for in-situ fluid
define stratigraphic compartments, ABOUT THE COURSE
densities, fluid contact levels
quantify vuggy porosity, discover bypassed • Compare two gradient lines for reservoir Participants are provided with basic theory,
laboratory demonstrations, hands-on exercises,
PETROPHYSICS

pay, detect thin beds, increase proven connectivity / continuity


reserves • Perform error analysis and quantify uncertainties computer modeling demonstrations, and a one
of P/D slopes and free water levels day field trip to examine rock outcrops that
ABOUT THE COURSE
• Design and interpret pressure transient data for demonstrate geomechanical concepts. In
Dipmeters are microresistivity logs that addition to a comprehensive manual, software
detect the orientations of bed boundaries and permeability
is provided for the participant to perform well-
borehole elongations. Borehole-imaging logs ABOUT THE COURSE bore stability calculations. The practical
provide video, acoustic and/or electrical During the past fifteen years wireline formation testing application of rock mechanics is emphasized.
images of the borehole face. They are used to (WFT) has emerged as one of the critical formation Applied Rock Mechanics is designed to familiar-
detect, orient, and quantify natural, induced, evaluation means in the upstream hydrocarbon ize engineers and geoscientists with the neces-
and healed fractures, faults, fold axes, exploration activities. While old RFT tools are still fre- sary tools for immediate field application.
unconformities, paleocurrent directions, quently used primarily for pressure measurements,
bounding surfaces, thin beds, net-sand modern wireline testers (MDT, RDT, MFT and, RCI) COURSE CONTENT
have gradually but increasingly claimed some of the Rock mechanics and geomechanical principals • Rock
counts, in-situ stress, and secondary porosity. mechanical properties • Pressure, stresses, and loads,
Dipmeters and borehole images can be run duties of conventional drill-stem test programs, as a principal stresses, in-situ stresses, total- and effective-stress,
in water-based or oil-based muds. The key result of high drilling cost, environmental protection, temperature effects, nature and origin of pore pressure •
objective of dipmeter and borehole-image operational safety, and WFT technology advances. Geomechanics and structural geology • Wellbore and field
interpretation is to describe structural and Discussions on the “WFT vs. DST” topic have widely measurement of in-situ (earth) stresses • Introduction to
stratigraphic features encountered by a been held in a variety of professional and technical are- coring • Basic rock properties • Common rock mechanics
nas, from pressure applications to fluid typing and sam- tests (lab demo) • Stress orientation techniques • Elastic,
wellbore, commonly in the absence of core. plastic, and viscous models of rock behavior • Borehole
This course provides numerous hands-on pling. This course is tailored to satisfy the interdiscipli-
stability: borehole stresses, wellbore placement, shale
exercises and case studies that emphasize nary need of geologists, petrophysicists, and reservoir characterization, borehole stability models, high angle and
sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and structural engineers, who have basic understanding of wireline horizontal drilling, pilot hole evaluation, multi-lateral well-
applications of these widely run, but testers, but have an increasing use of wireline testers or bores, borehole breakouts, fluid-related instability, drilling
generally under-utilized logging tools. deal with WFT data and want to become more knowl- through depleted zones and casing shoe decisions, stuck
edgeable on this subject. Eight practical class exercises pipe, and case histories (software demo) • Sand control:
COURSE CONTENT are worked during the course. At the end of the review of sand production mechanisms, gravel pack
Types of dipmeters and borehole images • Data acquisition course, the participants are expected to apply the skills design, and case histories • Fracture mechanics •
• Data processing • Artifacts • Bed boundaries • Fractures and lessons learned in designing better test programs, Reservoir engineering applications: compaction drive,
• Faults • Microfaults • Stereonets • Rose diagrams • reservoir compaction and compressibility factors, surface
Cumulative dip plots • Vector plots • Scat plots • Fracture
maximizing probabilities of getting quality tests, and subsidence, depletion and effective stress, case history •
spacing • Fracture porosity • Subseismic scale faults • In- benchmarking confidence levels to enhance results. Log predicted mechanical properties, bio theory, seismic
situ stress • Borehole breakouts • Net-sand counts • Thin COURSE CONTENT data and amplitude versus offset (AVO), and shear- and
beds • Sequence stratigraphy • Unconformities • Review of wireline formation testers and technologies • compressional-wave anisotropy (lab demonstration) • Data
Bounding surfaces • Stacking Measurement principles • Test types (probe pretest, extend- integration
ed flow with probes and dual packers), testing depleted
zones • Drawdown mobility and its significance • Data
quality coding and screening • Pressure gradient analysis
principles, surface and subsurface fluid density/pressure
gradient, error analysis • Free water level interpretation and
uncertainty quantification, gas/oil/water contact hydrody-
namics • Gradient line comparisons for single well and
multiple wells • Mud filtration phenomena
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S (wettability/capillary effect, supercharging) • Fluid identifi- 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
cation with optical sensors and NMR, fluid sampling proce-
DUBAI, UAE dures • Permeability test and interpretation from short and HOUSTON, TEXAS†
Nov. 26-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125 extended flows • Other measurements • Test program Nov. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,750
design • Class exercises
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS†
Feb. 27-Mar. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA Apr. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,750
CALGARY, CANADA Nov. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,200 Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,750
Mar. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH†
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
May 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,750
DUBAI, UAE HOUSTON, TEXAS LONDON, U.K.†
May 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125 Mar. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,245+VAT
LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
Aug. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT Aug. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT † includes field trip

30 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 19

D RILLING
The courses in this section are Well Construction/Drilling courses offered publicly through PetroSkills and OGCI are designed to develop
your skills and competency in this discipline. The Course Progression Matrix below shows how these courses relate to each other and provides an
easy way to construct a training plan with coursework that specifically relates to present or future job requirements. Likewise, managers can use the
matrices to develop training plans for their team.
Drillers can also benefit from courses that provide an understanding of other petroleum-related functions and disciplines. Such cross-training
courses are recommended in the lighter-shaded columns on either side of the Well Construction/Drilling courses shown on the matrix.
INSTRUCTORS

D R . T E D G. B Y R O M G E O R G E E. H I L L M A R K S. R A M S E Y
D.G. (J E R RY ) C A LV E RT M O R G A N L. J O N E S BILL REHM
R I C H A R D S. C A R D E N R O B E RT G. K N O L L D R . L E O N H. R O B I N S O N
R O B E RT D. G R A C E CARLOS DIAZ MORALES R O B E RT (B O B ) V. W E S T E R M A R K

WELL CONSTRUCTION / DRILLING

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 3 1


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 20

Basic Drilling Technology Casing and Cementing Drilling Fluids Technology

PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. LEON H. ROBINSON, RICHARD S. CARDEN, DR. TED G. BYROM CARLOS DIAZ MORALES AND/OR GEORGE E. HILL
ROBERT G. KNOLL OR MARK S. RAMSEY
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
DESIGNED FOR Personnel responsible for planning, overseeing, Drilling supervisors, drilling engineers, tool-
Geologists, geophysicists, petroleum and and conducting casing and cementing pushers, managers and technical support
production engineers, managers, technical operations; operator and service personnel personnel involved with drilling operations
supervisors, service and support personnel,
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
entry level drilling staff
• Select casing sizes and setting depths to • Use clay and polymers to achieve desired
YOU WILL LEARN achieve well objectives mud properties
• Drilling equipment and how it is used • Determine casing loads for design purposes • Apply water chemistry to the treatment of
• Common drilling problems and how to • Design casing properties to meet burst, col- drilling fluids
avoid them lapse, and tensile strength requirements • Perform complete API water-base mud
• Keys to planning a successful well • Conduct casing running operations safely and non-aqueous drilling fluids tests
• The role of key players in an efficient and successfully • Evaluate the information on an API water
drilling operation • Specify cement slurry properties and based and non-aqueous drilling fluid report
• Drilling terminology volumes to meet well objectives • Identify drilling fluid contaminants and
• How to read a morning report • Determine best procedures for attaining prescribe corrective treatments
ABOUT THE COURSE
successful primary cementing • Select water phase salinity and activity for
Time is money. Drilling time is big money. • Conduct stage jobs, squeeze jobs and set bore hole stability
Technical and managerial decision makers must cement plugs • Select non-aqueous fluids to meet drilling
grasp the language and technology of drilling requirements and environmental concerns
operations in order to minimize expenditures • Manage non-aqueous drilling fluid systems
WELL CONSTRUCTION / DRILLING

ABOUT THE COURSE


throughout the producing life of a well. This course builds a firm foundation in the ABOUT THE COURSE

Successful drilling requires blending many principles and practices of designing, plan- The course is designed for engineers and
technologies. Drilling equipment and procedures ning and conducting successful casing and field personnel involved in the planning and
have a unique language that must be conquered cement jobs. The course uses a process-based implementation of drilling programs. The
for maximum benefit. Clear, understandable perspective that takes participants from seminar covers all aspects of drilling fluids
explanations of drilling rig equipment, defining well goals through post-job critical technology, emphasizing both theory and
procedures, and their complex interactions evaluation. In addition to the necessary tech- practical application. Hands-on laboratory
provide an excellent basis to organize cross- nical information and procedures, the course exercises are included in the five-day
trained team efforts. Activities around the rig and is laced with considerable practical, experi- Houston sessions.
well planning are demystified. Subtle and blatant ence-based content. Participants will be
given computer spreadsheets to facilitate Drilling is a complex operation requiring
common errors are accentuated to enhance this the marriage of different technologies and
understanding. routine calculations.
disciplines. Today's drilling personnel must
This course includes the use of computers, have a working knowledge of drilling fluid
COURSE CONTENT which are provided at additional cost, for each
The overall drilling process • Drillers' language: in order to effectively drill a well. This course
understanding their terminologies • Rig equipment: two participants. provides the fundamentals necessary to monitor
rig types, drill bits, MWD, drill strings, solids control, well and evaluate drilling fluid performance necessary
control, special equipment • Rig operations: drilling fluids,
COURSE CONTENT
to drill a well, whether it is a shallow well or a
cementing casing design • Understanding morning reports complex, high pressure well.
• Hole problems: stuck pipe, lost returns, well control • Selecting casing and hole sizes • Setting depths • Casing
Directional drilling operations and tools • Safety • loads • Selecting casing and connections • Casing stress
COURSE CONTENT
Philosophies of drilling operations • Drilling trends and calculations • Cement and cement additives • Selecting
Composition and properties of water-based drilling fluids
new technology appropriate slurries • Mud removal and cement placement
• Analysis of API water-base mud and non-aqueous
• Stage cementing, squeezes, and plugs • Preventing gas
drilling fluid report • Identification and treatment of
migration • Cementing calculations • Cementing
drilling fluid contaminants • Composition and properties
equipment • Well head equipment
of water-based and non-aqueous drilling fluid systems •
Selection of water phase salinity for borehole stability •
API water based and non-aqueous drilling mud tests •
Adjustment of non-aqueous drilling fluid properties •
Managing invert emulsion fluid systems: rig preparation
and displacement • Non-aqueous drilling fluids designed
for environmental compliance
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS
Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS CALGARY, CANADA
Feb. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST* 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS
Nov. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325* Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
DUBAI, UAE
Mar. 25-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
DENVER, COLORADO
Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 DENVER, COLORADO DUBAI, UAE
June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325* Feb. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
CALGARY, CANADA
Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS
Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325* June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
LONDON, U.K. Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Oct. 2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT *plus computer charge Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325

32 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 21

Drilling Practices Solids Control Systems Directional, Horizontal, and


Multilateral Drilling
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


RICHARD S. CARDEN OR ROBERT D. GRACE DR. LEON H. ROBINSON RICHARD S. CARDEN
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Drilling supervisors, drilling engineers, toolpushers, Drilling engineers, supervisors, managers, tool- Drilling, production and operations engineers;
managers and technical support personnel pushers, reservoir engineers, technical field supervisors; toolpushers; managers; and
managers and service company personnel technical support personnel
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Review drilling data and plan a well YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Incorporate the completion plans into the • Select and design a solids control system • Make survey calculations
drilling plan that minimizes total well costs • Interpret TVD, polar and rectangular
• Drill a well cost-effectively and maximize • Ensure that solids control equipment coordinates and vertical section
penetration rate operates efficiently • Interpret dogleg severity and its problems
• Evaluate stuck pipe problem and avoid • Plan a directional and horizontal well based on
ABOUT THE COURSE well objectives
potential problems
• Evaluate and maintain drilling fluids Drilling fluid is one of the most important • Determine the best multi-lateral completion
• Optimize hole cleaning factors in achieving cost-effective drilling under for an application
• Design casing and drill string specified conditions. This course addresses the • Determine declination and non-magnetic
• Evaluate cementing programs fundamentals as well as the latest developments drilling collar selection
• Design and implement bit and hydraulics of drilling fluids technology. Participants will • Apply the best survey instrument for the job
programs learn the key concepts of drilling fluid functions, • Directionally drill with various directional
• Incorporate directional drilling and develop an understanding of the impact of the assemblies
deviation control physical and chemical properties of drilling • Drill horizontally underbalanced
• Recognize and evaluate well control problems fluids on drilling performance, and gain some • Interpret torque and drag
practical insight into the methods and materials

WELL CONSTRUCTION / DRILLING


• Specify cementing requirements for directional
ABOUT THE COURSE currently used to control drilling fluid properties wells
The two-week course is designed for and hole problems. Some exercises will be
ABOUT THE COURSE
engineers and field personnel involved in given to diagnose drilling fluid problems.
planning and implementation of drilling Various drilling fluid systems will be introduced This course builds a firm foundation in the
programs. The seminar covers all aspects of and their pros and cons will be discussed. principles and practices of directional drilling,
drilling technology, emphasizing both theory calculations, and planning for directional and
Solids control equipment, and its proper horizontal wells. Specific problems associated
and practical application. arrangement and operation, will be described with directional/horizontal drilling such as torque,
Drilling is a complex operation requiring and discussed in depth. This course discusses drag, hole cleaning, logging and drill string
the marriage of different technologies and the equipment as well as philosophy needed component design are included. Participants
disciplines. Today’s drilling personnel must to properly apply state-of-the-art technology receive instruction on planning and evaluating
have a working knowledge of all these to manage mud solids and to drill as horizontal wells based on the objectives of the
disciplines in order to effectively drill a well. economically as possible. horizontal well. The basic applications and
This course provides all the fundamentals Upon the completion of the course, participants techniques for multi-lateral wells are covered in
necessary to drill a well whether it is a shallow will be equipped to objectively plan, implement, the course. Additionally, they become familiar with
well or a complex, high pressure well. and analyze a successful mud program that the tools and techniques used in directional
can help achieve the greatest degree of drilling such as survey instruments, bottomhole
COURSE CONTENT assemblies, motors, steerable motors and steerable
Planning, including requirements for the completion and drilling efficiency possible.
testing • AFE preparation • HSE at the rig site • Cost con-
rotary systems. Participants will be able to predict
This course is especially effective taken wellbore path based on historical data and
trol • Maximizing penetration rate • Sloughing shale • Lost immediately after Drilling Fluids Technology.
circulation • Stuck pipe • Fishing operations • Drilling determine the requirements to hit the target.
fluids • Hole cleaning • Pressure losses in the circulating
COURSE CONTENT COURSE CONTENT
system • ECD • Maximizing hydraulics in the planning
Definition and functions of drilling fluids • Field tested Applications for directional drilling • Directional profiles
phase and at the rig • Bit selection and application • • Extended reach wells • Survey calculations and accuracy •
Casing and drill string design • Selection of casing seats • properties and their control • Engineering calculations
• Rheology and hydraulics • Clay chemistry and applications • Dogleg severity calculations and problems associated with
BOP and wellhead equipment • Cement • Cement addi- doglegs • Planning directional and horizontal wells •
tives • Displacement mechanics • Deviation control • Filtration and fluid loss control additives • Drilling fluid
Horizontal drilling methods and applications • Logging
Directional drilling • Horizontal drilling • Pressure control contamination and solids control • Wellbore instability • high angle wells • Hole cleaning • Multi-laterals • Types of
Various drilling fluids and their applications • Some case survey instruments • Tools used to deflect a wellbore •
studies to identify problems of drilling fluid systems Torque and drag calculations • Cementing

2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
LONDON, U.K.
Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT
MIDLAND, TEXAS
Nov. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 1 0 D AY S
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
CALGARY, CANADA HOUSTON, TEXAS
Mar. 27-Apr. 7 . . . . . . . . . .US$3,850+GST May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
HOUSTON, TEXAS DUBAI, UAE
May 8-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,075 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Sept. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125
DUBAI, UAE HOUSTON, TEXAS MIDLAND, TEXAS
Aug. 26-Sept. 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$5,300 June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 3 3


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 22

Managing Wellsite Practical Drilling Skills Well Engineering


Operations
PETROSKILLS OGCI OGCI

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


MORGAN L. JONES OR ROBERT V. WESTERMARK DR. LEON H. ROBINSON OR MARK S. RAMSEY ROBERT V. WESTERMARK
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE C O U R S E L E V E L : INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Operations managers, drilling managers Drilling engineers, company men, supervisors, Drilling engineers, senior foremen, senior
drilling superintendents, drilling supervisors, toolpushers, drillers and technical managers drilling and service company personnel involved
wellsite drilling engineers, rig managers, rig responsible for improving drilling performance in developing and executing well plans
superintendents, contract drilling engineers at the rig site
ABOUT THE COURSE
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO ABOUT THE COURSE Good drilling operations aren’t luck – they
• Define a well’s technical limit and imple- Simply described, this is a very practical are planned to be that way. This course builds
ment a plan that will work to reach it drilling course. Many of the techniques the skills necessary to ensure that well plans
• Identify and mitigate hidden risks to presented include specific ways to tailor your lead to the lowest well costs while still
reduce lost time well for improved performance, and virtually achieving production or exploration goals.
• Apply practical organizational learning all of the technologies and examples and Risks and uncertainties are inherent in any
techniques to benefit from lessons learned problems are based on real world situations, drilling operation; this course helps you
• Build effective rig site teams not something dreamed up by academics! identify and manage these risks.
This course concentrates on calculations This course uses a balanced combination of
ABOUT THE COURSE made from rig-floor measurements. Many lecture, discussion and case studies where
Drilling and service personnel struggle daily with of these calculations are not available with participants will learn how to apply technical
the oil and gas industry's inexperienced current computer technology because the limit principles to guide well planning; develop
labor force. This inexperience at the well site input data and proper equations do not exist. a risk-weighted well cost estimate; create well
results in excessive non-productive time, trouble Unscheduled events sabotage many plans that explicitly identify and manage risks;
time, and invisible lost time. Managing Wellsite
WELL CONSTRUCTION / DRILLING

drilling budgets. Learn to recognize the audit and select rigs; create contingency plans
Operations offers practical, time proven signals when the well is “talking to you” (oil spill contingency plans, safety cases, and
approaches to improve efficiency of wellsite before downtime events occur. When these joint operations manuals) using that well's
rotary operations and individual wellsite tasks. unscheduled events do occur, know what specific objectives, plans and previous filings;
This course brings together a documented immediate steps should be taken to minimize and conduct post analysis that documents
planning and design process that maximizes their economic effect. A successful drilling the root cause of unscheduled events and
drilling efficiency, and reliably transfers the operation requires knowledge of many lessons learned.
execution plan to the wellsite for implemen- factors other than increasing penetration
tation. Numerous real life case studies are rates. A thorough understanding of the COURSE CONTENT
used to demonstrate how to build a team to Well planning • Performance planning and technical limit
drilling process and theory, highlighted with • Well construction risk identification and management •
benefit from the skills of the company repre- calculations and practical experiences, will Risk-weighted AFE generation • Procurement processes and
sentative, drilling contractor and service give you the tools to minimize drilling costs. systems • Oil spill contingency planning • Safety cases and
company personnel. Critical issues are iden- Successful participants will be able to joint operations manuals • Managing post analysis and
tified and analyzed to maximize safety and decrease non-productive drilling time. lessons learned
reduce drilling costs. Similarly, engineering,
technical service and drilling contract per- A working knowledge of drilling or the EXAMPLES
sonnel learn to analyze inefficient practices at successful completion of the OGCI course, The instructor is willing to consider examples
the wellsite and utilize their new-found Basic Drilling Technology, is required to from your company for class analysis as one
skills to improve the operation. achieve the maximum course benefit. of the demonstration exercises. Please contact
OGCI for the information and support data
COURSE CONTENT required, as well as the necessary lead-time.
COURSE CONTENT Pore pressure determination • Well control procedures:
Critical elements of effective planning and management of mudlogger data, killing well, barite plugs • Hole cleaning
drilling operations • Design and implement a program and rheology • Drilling fluid: polymers, biocide, water-
“checklist” for critical well drilling operations • Mitigating base, oil-base • Controlling drilled solids to reduce drilling
visible and hidden risk • Investigating and performing an problems and waste volumes • Pressure integrity tests •
analysis of trouble time events, non-productive time Hydraulic optimization (onsite “ocho” technique) •
occurrences and invisible lost time for a drilling operation • Optimized weight-on-bit/rotary speed (onsite) • Hole
Drilling operation planning and total task analysis for problems: ballooning, hole stability, pipe sticking, lost
wellsite activities • Organizational learning systems and returns • Operation guidelines • Operation problems •
transferring lessons learned • Technical limit analysis to Drilling trends and new technology
improve wellsite performance • Performance monitoring
of the drilling operation • Maximizing the inexperienced
resources through total task analysis in a case study to
reduce drilling costs and improve safety

2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

HOUSTON, TEXAS
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS Mar. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
HOUSTON, TEXAS
Mar. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 LONDON, U.K. June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 Oct. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425

34 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 23

Advanced Well Control Cementing Practices Managed Pressure Drilling:


Application, Design and
Execution
OGCI OGCI OGCI

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


RICHARD S. CARDEN D.G. (JERRY) CALVERT ROBERT G. KNOLL AND/OR BILL REHM
COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Drilling, production and operations engineers, Operating company and service company Drilling/completion/production engineers, company
field supervisors, toolpushers and managers personnel responsible for planning, overseeing, men, supervisors and service company personnel
with a good understanding of classic well and executing cementing operations who will be applying Managed Pressure Drilling
control procedures (MPD) and completion operations. The course
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
requires a good understanding of basic well con-
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Use cementing additives properly to struction and conventional well control operations.
• Properly design surface equipment improve and reduce job costs
• Apply classic pressure control procedures • Interpret laboratory test results YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Recognize and control kicks • Perform primary cementing operations to • Determine the best type of MPD applica-
• Apply pressure control procedures while include: casing cementing, liner cementing, tions for any given setting
tripping and multi-stage cementing • Identify the potential challenges and risks
• Recognize non-classic well control • Conduct squeeze jobs and selection of • Design the equipment setup required
• Design and evaluate non-classic well squeeze tools • Deal with the drilling fluid and corrosion
control procedures • Perform cement plug operations to aspects of the system
• Interpret surface pressures improve overall job success • Draw up the detailed procedures for the
• Apply fluid dynamics to well control • Interpret cement sheath evaluation logs operation
• Evaluate and kill wells with underground • Troubleshoot problems that occur
ABOUT THE COURSE
blowouts Cementing is a very important phase of the ABOUT THE COURSE
• Design relief well operations well construction plan. Operating company MPD well construction methodologies are evolving
personnel must have a good working knowledge rapidly in the global industry. They offer tremendous

WELL CONSTRUCTION / DRILLING


ABOUT THE COURSE
This course is designed to go a step beyond of cements, cementing additives and placement value added potential in both exploration and
normal well control courses. It reviews classic procedures. The use of temperature modeling, exploitation applications; however, there exist many
pressure control procedures and covers computer programs used for job design, and misconceptions and operational concerns regarding
non-classic well control procedures. After placement of the cement has caused some these various novel well construction practices. MPD
completing the course, the participant should operating companies to retain a cement service construction and completions involves controlling
not only know classic well control procedure company representative on a full time basis to the well bore pressure to maximize P-rate and offer
but should thoroughly understand it. The assist in the overall cementing operations. “evaluation-while-drilling” capability while avoiding
instruction received in this seminar will enable The desire of the operator is 100 percent of or limiting: damage to a reservoir, lost circulation or
the job being placed on the cement sheath controlled loss in mud-cap applications, differential
the participants to evaluate kick situations to pressure sticking and well kicks. There are a number
determine the safest means to handle the integrity during the life of the well. This has
required that additional mechanical properties of fluid regimes that can be used (mud, oil mud,
kick with equipment on hand, and handle gaseated mud, foam, etc.) in MPD. Participants will
confidently both principles of gas expansion of the set cement be obtained other than the
compressive strength. The parameters that learn how to judge the various systems and where
and pressure and proper hands-on response they are best employed. The risk of controlling the
on the chokes. All material contains the most the cement sheath will be subjected to must
pressure will be reviewed along with the potential
up-to-date technology available in pressure be considered. There are a number of joint gains. The barriers will be considered as part of iden-
control, both in theory and from hands-on industry projects addressing this area of tifying the best techniques. Special equipment is a
experience, and comes from the instructors’ work. The course will cover the use of critical aspect of MPD application, the various setups
extensive education and numerous experiences cement formulations, cement additives, will be discussed and outlined. With MPD, a good
in well control. casing hardware, cement blending, on-site understanding of ECD and pressure reduction due to
mixing equipment and a well-planned job gas injection is a necessity. When gases containing
COURSE CONTENT procedure. Cementing guidelines will be
Equipment • Causes and indications of kicks • Drillers and oxygen are added to a fluid, corrosion is always a
weight methods • Tripping • Stripping • Snubbing •
covered that aid in overall job performance. concern, and corrosion will be addressed as part of
Understanding classic well control • Killing a well off COURSE CONTENT the fluid planning system. Developing the detailed
bottom • Annular pressure profiles • Other well control The overall cementing operation • Primary cementing • procedures for these special operations is a critical
methods • Slim holes • Gas migration • Oil-base mud • Remedial cementing • Plug cementing • The use of cement part of operations and a major focus of this program.
Subsea operations • Volumetric kill, dynamic kill, additives • Laboratory testing • Casing hardware • The procedures are the basis for avoiding unsched-
momentum kill, relief wells • Underground blowouts • Cement sheath integrity • Cement sheath evaluation •
Surface blowouts • The oil fires of Kuwait
uled events and troubleshooting them when they
Mixing equipment • Special cement systems • Cement occur. This new introductory program deals with
guidelines • Current documents novel well construction practices being pursued
globally. The course relies heavily on case histories of
the most recent MPD field experiences, as well as
daily quizzes and exercises based on real field set-
tings and parameter data. (Laptop exercises are
optional.) The course is totally independent of all
service providers involved in this new market. The
PetroSkills Well Planning and Operations course is an
excellent pre-requisite for this program.

2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

HOUSTON, TEXAS
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625
CALGARY, CANADA
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Aug. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,495+GST
HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS LONDON, U.K.
July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625 July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625 Nov. 27-Dec. 1 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,995+VAT

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 3 5


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 24

R ESERVOIR
The courses in this section are Reservoir Engineering courses offered publicly through PetroSkills and OGCI are designed to develop your skills
and competency in this discipline. The Course Progression Matrix below shows how these courses relate to each other and provides an easy way to
construct a training plan with coursework that specifically relates to present or future job requirements. Likewise, managers can use the matrices to
develop training plans for their team.
Reservoir Engineers can also benefit from courses that provide an understanding of other petroleum-related functions and disciplines. Such
cross-training courses are recommended in the lighter-shaded columns on either side of the Reservoir Engineering courses shown on the matrix.

INSTRUCTORS

D R . K IRK E. B OATRIGHT D R . M OHAN G. K ELKAR DR. L AWRENCE W. T EUFEL


D R . J. R OBERT G OCHNOUR L OUIS M ATTAR DR. M ICHAEL I. T REESH
D R . W. G REG H AZLETT L ARRY T. N ELMS DR. D AVID W ALDREN
D R . A. D ANIEL H ILL D R . S AMMI H. R AZA DR. D ING Z HU
MHA P ETROLEUM C ONSULTANTS R ICHARD H. S CHROEDER
RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

36 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 25

Basic Reservoir Engineering Basic Reservoir Simulation Applied Reservoir


Engineering
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. KIRK E. BOATRIGHT, RICHARD H. SCHROEDER DR. J. ROBERT GOCHNOUR OR DR. DAVID WALDREN MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS OR
OR DR. W. GREG HAZLETT DR. W. GREG HAZLETT
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR
DESIGNED FOR Those who have had little exposure to this DESIGNED FOR
Geologists, geophysicists, engineers, engineer- technology and need a “quick start” on the Engineers or geoscientists who will occupy the
ing trainees, technical managers and assistants, learning curve position of reservoir engineer, any other technical-
technicians, chemists, physicists, service ly trained individual that desires a more in-depth
company personnel, sales representatives, data YOU WILL LEARN foundation in reservoir engineering than is offered
processing personnel, and support staff working • Why and how a model is built and the in the one-week Basic Reservoir Engineering and
with reservoir definition, development, and sources of data Reservoir Engineering for Other Disciplines
production • How wells are modeled and what to look courses
YOU WILL LEARN for in a reservoir simulation study
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• The fundamentals of fluid flow in porous media • The various phases (from model building
• How reservoirs are characterized by fluid type and through prediction) and types (single-well, • Calculate hydrocarbons initially in place
drive mechanisms pattern, sector, full-field) of models • Apply dynamic techniques for assessing
• The basis for reservoir fluid distribution reservoir performance
• About oil and gas well performance and pressure ABOUT THE COURSE • Identify parameters that impact well/reservoir
buildup analysis The purpose of this seminar is to introduce, in performance over time
• About oil displacement and optimizing reservoir overview fashion, the fundamental concepts • Apply well testing principles and techniques
performance and elements of reservoir simulation. Those • Determine reservoir drive mechanisms
• The basics of enhanced oil recovery who want to get an overview of this technology • Create field development plans
• How oil- and gas-in-place can be estimated and should attend. • Forecast production
recovery predicted • Determine the critical properties of reservoir
COURSE CONTENT
ABOUT THE COURSE The elements of a reservoir simulation model • Types of rocks and develop fluid PVT relationships
The intent of Basic Reservoir Engineering is develop- reservoir simulations • Coordinate geometries and model ABOUT THE COURSE
ment of a more complete “understanding” of the types • Reservoir simulator features • Well modeling This course represents the core of our reservoir
characteristics of oil and gas reservoirs, from fluid overview • Building the model • Managing the simulation engineering program and the foundation for all
and rock characteristics through reservoir definition, run • Defining initial conditions • History matching •
Prediction • Process and specialty • Simulators used in future studies in this subject. The course is
delineation, classification, development plan, and presented in the context of a modern, multi-
industry

RESERVOIR ENGINEERING
production. Data collection, integration and disciplinary team effort using supporting computer
application directed toward maximizing recovery are technology. An extensive manual and set of refer-
stressed. Basic reservoir engineering equations are ences are included. Numerous exercises using
introduced with emphasis directed to parameter
significance and an understanding of the results. 3-D computers are also included. This course has been
and 4-D seismic concepts are introduced. For nearly taught for many years on a worldwide basis and
30 years this has been one of OGCI’s most popular has been continuously updated and improved.
and successful courses.
COURSE CONTENT
One personal computer is provided, at additional
Reservoir fluid properties • Coring practices and rock properties • cost, for each two participants.
Fundamentals of fluid flow • Reservoir fluid distribution, COURSE CONTENT
classification and drive mechanisms • Oil and gas well Sources of data • Rock properties • Fluid properties •
performance • Pressure buildup analysis • Oil displacement Volumetrics • Material balance • Oil well testing • Gas
concepts • Estimation of oil- and gas-in-place • Recovery well testing • Aquifers • Immiscible displacement • Coning,
cusping • Horizontal wells • Reservoir types and drive
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S mechanisms • Oil field development planning • Gas field
CALGARY, CANADA development planning • Reservoir simulation • Production
Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST forecasting decline curves • Enhanced oil recovery
ABERDEEN, U.K.
Nov. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT
HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 1 0 D AY S
Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 CALGARY, CANADA
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Oct. 24-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . .US$3,850+GST*
HOUSTON, TEXAS DUBAI, UAE
Feb. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Dec. 3-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$5,300*
June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Sept. 25-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 1 0 D AY S
Nov. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 HOUSTON, TEXAS
ABU DHABI, UAE Mar. 6-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,075*
Feb. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025 Oct. 2-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,075*
ABERDEEN, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
Feb. 27-Mar. 3 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT June 5-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,725+VAT*
Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT July 24-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . .US$4,725+VAT*
LONDON, U.K. Oct. 16-27 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,725+VAT*
Mar. 27-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT DENVER, COLORADO
June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
Aug. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT July 17-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,075*
CALGARY, CANADA THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS
Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST Aug. 7-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,850*
Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST CALGARY, CANADA
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA Nov. 6-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,850+GST*
June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 1 D AY MUSCAT, OMAN
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO HOUSTON, TEXAS Dec. 9-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$5,300*
Aug. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 *plus computer charge
Sept. 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$950

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 3 7


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 26

Oil Recovery Enhancement Reservoir Fluid Properties: Waterflooding A to Z


Techniques Preparation for Reservoir Engineering
and Simulation Studies
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. SAMMI H. RAZA PETROSKILLS SPECIALIST DR. SAMMI H. RAZA
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Engineers responsible for sustaining or Reservoir, production and facilities engineers Reservoir, production, facilities, R&D, and
increasing oil and gas production rates and who have a need to determine values of reservoir operations engineers who are involved with
enhancing oil recovery from maturing fluid properties for engineering studies and some aspect of a new or existing waterflood
reservoirs under primary depletion and/or reservoir simulation project; geoscientists, and professionals who
under pressure maintenance by water or gas want to get a better feel for the entire process of
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
injection; professionals participating in the planning, development, management, and
above effort on a multidisciplinary team who • Identify the type and fluid in a particular recovery optimization of a waterflood project
want to gain some familiarity with the reservoir and in general how that fluid will
terminology, concepts, practices, benefits, behave during production YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO

and limitations of the improved oil recovery • Use laboratory data to determine values of • Distinguish rock characteristics and fluid
(IOR/EOR) methods fluid properties for use in engineering properties that control displacement of oil
calculations and thereby influence oil recovery
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Use correlations to determine values of • Predict incremental oil recovery and
• Select appropriate rate and recovery fluid properties in the absence of develop production profiles
enhancement techniques laboratory data • Specify the components of a well-designed
• Set expectations on incremental recovery • Select the best available fluid property waterflood plan
and on changes in production behavior correlations for oils, gases and oilfield • Estimate injection water requirements,
• Determine impact of new methods on waters incremental oil production, and volumes of
production facilities and personnel training produced water using different techniques
• Critique potential applications of proven ABOUT THE COURSE • Monitor waterflood performance and
and emerging technologies This course goes beyond the usual description optimize oil recovery through new technology
of reservoir fluid properties. The underlying • Screen waterflooded oil reservoirs for
ABOUT THE COURSE purpose is to be able to prepare the most selecting suitable EOR processes
For most current projects, oil recovery is accurate possible set of values of fluid properties
ABOUT THE COURSE
generally lower than expected due to some for use in other engineering calculations.
combination of natural and man-made factors. Waterflooding has long been proven as the sim-
An understanding of the advantages and plest and the lowest cost approach to maintaining
RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

As a result, about 1/3 to 1/2 of the original oil- disadvantages of the application of both
in-place remains left in a reservoir when it reach- production and increasing oil recovery from an
laboratory data and correlations will be oil reservoir. However, these benefits may fall
es its economic limit abandonment. Recovery provided. Exercises that utilize actual field
from such projects can be substantially enhanced short of expectations unless the time-tested concepts
and laboratory data are used to illustrate the and practices are clearly understood and
without much effort and expense through better principles and to ensure understanding of the
understanding of these factors. Additional judiciously implemented. These concepts and
applications of the procedures. Participants practices aim at process optimization – reducing
improvement in recovery is possible thereafter who successfully complete the course will
through the application of a suitable Enhanced production cost while minimizing waste and
become proficient with fluid property and maximizing oil recovery and income.
Oil Recovery (EOR) method. This overview able to assist other engineers with fluid
course covers recovery enhancement methods property problems - true assets to their co- This course is light on theory but heavy on
that may be considered during all stages in the workers and employers. proven and successful practices. Published case
reservoir life cycle - primary production, water- histories of projects around the world are
flood, and gas injection periods. Example case COURSE CONTENT reviewed to provide an understanding of diver-
studies are presented on projects from around The origin of oil • Basic phase behavior • The five gent points-of-view, what works where, what fails
the world; these enable participants to under- reservoir fluids; definitions, identification using field
data, producing characteristics, exercises • Properties of when, and why.
stand the technical and financial strengths and dry gases; definitions, trends with changes in reservoir
COURSE CONTENT
limitations of the methods. pressure, best available correlations to determine values,
Why is water and/or gas injection needed? • Reservoir
exercises • Properties of wet gases, recombination
COURSE CONTENT calculations, exercises • Properties of gas condensates; characterization and aquifer influence • Water-displacing
Reservoir life cycle and recovery process • Recovery laboratory procedures, reserve calculations using oil flood mechanisms • Design aspects • Recovery
limitations of depletion and pressure maintenance projects laboratory data, correlations, exercises • Volatile oils; expectations and production forecast • Production
and possible rate/recovery enhancement approaches • laboratory procedures • Black oils; definitions, trends engineering aspects and performance indices • Associated
Modified waterfloods: approaches, designs, pros and cons, with changes in reservoir pressure, laboratory procedures, problems/risks and ways to minimize impact • Reservoir
performance • EOR (enhanced oil recovery) methods, use of laboratory data to determine values, use of field data monitoring • Optimization of oil recovery • Review of case
mechanisms, and limitations • Miscible and thermal to prepare input for correlations, best available correlations histories • Oil recovery enhancement beyond waterflood
methods • Design procedures: analogy, laboratory tests, field to determine values, exercises • Reservoir water properties;
pilots • Facilities modifications and personnel training composition, definitions, trends with changes in reservoir
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
pressure, determination of input data for correlations,
correlations for determining values, exercises CALGARY, CANADA
Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
MIDLAND, TEXAS
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
CALGARY, CANADA 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
ABU DHABI, UAE
HOUSTON, TEXAS Mar. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
Nov. 28-Dec. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
CALGARY, CANADA CALGARY, CANADA
Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
HOUSTON, TEXAS Dates being finalized. Please visit MIDLAND, TEXAS
Nov. 27-Dec. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 www.petroskills.com for scheduled public classes. Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325

38 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 27

Well Test Design and Integrated Reservoir


Analysis Modeling
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


LOUIS MATTAR DR. MOHAN G. KELKAR
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Engineers and geoscientists who want to Geologists, geophysicists, engineers,
understand well testing principles and petrophysicists or others involved in reservoir
interpretation techniques to design, analyze, modeling
report, evaluate results or intelligently participate
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
in the well testing process. Previous experience
in well testing, production operations and reservoir • Develop the work flow in the reservoir Course Progression Matrices
engineering is helpful but is not required. integration process
• Evaluate and quantify uncertainties in have been designed to provide a
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO various sources of data systematic foundation for structuring
• Design well tests and specify equipment • Build a geo-cellular model using
requirements geostatistical tools and upscale it to capture professional development programs.
• Set up and analyze well tests for oil and gas essential heterogeneities Each of these matrices shows how
wells using traditional and modern well • Develop criterion for objective history matching
testing analysis techniques • Utilize seismic data in different phases of courses relate to each other and
• Perform QC analysis of pressure data; reservoir description and integrate them provides an easy way to help you
identify and discard "bad" data using geostatistics
• Identify various wellbore and reservoir • Use various description tools in a judicious
select the right course or construct
characteristics and choose the appropriate manner a logical sequence of courses. In
model for analysis • Use public domain software to apply many addition to showing the courses
• Apply analysis principles using commercial of the techniques discussed in class
well test analysis software within each discipline, the matrices
ABOUT THE COURSE
As the oil companies define business units and also show recommended cross-
ABOUT THE COURSE
This course emphasizes the practical application of asset teams, it is becoming increasingly important training courses to further your
well test theory to the solution of real well testing that all the team members understand the work
flow in developing integrated reservoir description professional development.
problems from design through interpretation for
for that asset. Integration involves using all the

RESERVOIR ENGINEERING
oil, gas and water injection wells. Participants
will be introduced to a systematic approach to available information about the reservoir to The matrix can then function as a
well test analysis and will apply it using modern develop better understanding of the reservoir.
This process is inherently interdisciplinary. Personal Course Planner to map
well test analysis software. Numerous data sets
with non-ideal behavior will be reviewed and Although soft skills are important when working a customized training plan that
analyzed to allow participants to gain experience in an interdisciplinary team, this course concen-
trates on the hard skills required to develop a specifically relates to present or
with real world problems. Participants will be
able to apply their newly acquired skills in their realistic reservoir description. future job requirements. Likewise,
job assignments immediately upon course Starting with collecting information and assessing managers can use the matrices to
completion. the need for additional data, the course will
cover all the topics from structural and geological develop training plans for their team.
One personal computer is provided, at modeling, estimation of reservoir petrophysical
additional cost, for each two participants. properties using geostatistical tools, upscaling to
COURSE CONTENT simulator model and finally, proper history
Types of well tests • Behavior of simple, ideal systems • matching and future predictions in the presence
Wellbore skin • Wellbore storage mechanisms • Semi-log of uncertainties. This course is important to
analysis • Type curves • Hydraulically fractured wells •
Superposition and horner plots • Average reservoir reservoir modelers involved in any phase of the
pressure • Data preparation and QC procedures • Well test description work. The course will develop
design • Pattern recognition and model selection • improved appreciation of the other disciplines’
Complex reservoir models • Multilayer reservoirs • needs as well as the necessity of the feed back
Horizontal wells • Back pressure tests for gas wells •
Reality checks during the integration process.
One personal computer is provided, at additional
cost, for each two participants.
COURSE CONTENT
Basic statistical principles • Spacial modeling • Structural
modeling • Estimation of properties at well locations •
Conditional simulation • Facies/rock type modeling •
Petrophysical properties simulation • Ranking of
realizations • Construction of simulator input model •
See the Course Progression
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
History matching • Future predictions and quantification Matrices at the beginning of each
HOUSTON, TEXAS of uncertainty
Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325* course description section.
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S These course planners will also
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS assist you in cross-training.
HOUSTON, TEXAS Dec. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
Apr. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325*
Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325* 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
®
LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT* May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT*
CALGARY, CANADA HOUSTON, TEXAS An OGCI Company
Nov. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST* Dec. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
*plus computer charge *plus computer charge

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 3 9


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 28

Reservoir Characterization: Reservoir Engineering for


Oil and Gas Reserves A Multi-Disciplinary Team
Evaluation Other Disciplines
Approach
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


LARRY T. NELMS DR. MICHAEL I. TREESH MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS OR
DR. W. GREG HAZLETT
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Geologists, geophysicists, reservoir engineers Geologists, geophysicists, reservoir engineers, DESIGNED FOR
and managers involved in reserve reporting production engineers, petrophysicists, exploration Engineers and geoscientists now working in an
and production managers, team leaders, and asset environment where they need to better
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
research scientists understand the practices and limitations of the
• Describe the differences in the various methods and procedures employed by the reservoir
published reserve definitions YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
engineers with whom they work. Participants
• Apply the reserve definitions as well as • Use the modern team approach to reservoir should have three or more years of technical
published guidelines to correctly classify characterization to interpret productive experience in the upstream petroleum industry
reserves zones more reliably through the integration
• Use traditional methods and supplemental of disciplines, technology and data YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
techniques to estimate reserves and • Increase your proven reserves, discover • Utilize the tools and techniques of the
determine the impact of economics on by-passed pay, reduce development time reservoir engineer
those estimates and costs, improve production rates, and • Apply the principles of reservoir engineering
• Use reserves estimates for a variety of rejuvenate old fields • Develop reservoir, well performance and
financial and economic purposes • Develop models based on the application asset management options
of state-of-the-art technical applications ABOUT THE COURSE
ABOUT THE COURSE
within the framework of a multi-disciplinary This course gives the non-reservoir engineer
Key objectives of Oil and Gas Reserves team approach
Evaluation is to learn the various methods of a better understanding of reservoir engineering
preparing reserve estimates, determine the ABOUT THE COURSE practices and limitations. The course is
impact of economics on those estimates and Key objectives of reservoir characterization designed to provide a good understanding of
properly classify those reserves using the vari- focus on modeling each reservoir unit, reservoir engineering processes, the required
ous reserve definitions. Case studies and class predicting well behavior, understanding past data, and the limitations on the engineers’
problems will be used to develop an under- reservoir performance, and forecasting future analysis and interpretations. The course also
standing of those skills. The various uses of reservoir performance. Such factors, in provides persons who are already well trained
reserve reports will be covered. Ethical dilem- addition to staffing needs and expenditures, in the other upstream petroleum industry
assert a strong impact on plans for the technical disciplines with an understanding
RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

mas that arise in common practice will be dis-


cussed. The class is taught based on decades development and performance of a field. of the current state-of-the-art practice of
of industry experience, best practices, and not Numerous team exercises provide hands-on reservoir engineering.
based on any specific company’s internal practice to understand the needs of other One personal computer is provided, at additional
“practices” that may or may not actually con- professionals to collect data, integrate data cost, for each two participants.
form to SEC and WPC guidelines. As such, across disciplines, appreciate the needs of
this course will count for at least one day of other disciplines and to develop new reservoir COURSE CONTENT
characterization skills. Innovative data sheets Distribution of reservoir properties • Rock and fluid
Professional Engineering ethics requirements. properties • Volumetric calculation of reservoir fluids in
are provided to the participants to categorize place • Material balance methods • Fluid flow / well
One personal computer is provided, at additional their interpretations within the context of performance • Immiscible displacement • Coning,
cost, for each two participants. the RC problem. The generic process-based, cusping, horizontal wells • Reservoir types and drive
mechanisms: gas reservoirs, volumetric, water drive and
COURSE CONTENT procedural outline of reservoir characterization compaction drive - oil reservoirs, water drive, water flood,
Purpose of reserves • Reserve studies • Reserve reports • enables and enhances learning throughout gravity drainage, gas cap expansion, combination drive,
Reserve definitions – History, SEC, SPE/WPC • Reserve an organization. naturally fractured and critical reservoir fluid reservoirs •
estimation methods – analogies, volumetrics and perform- Reservoir simulation
ance analasis • Supplemental techniques • Economics and COURSE CONTENT
reserves • Special topics – reserves management, software, Data for reservoir characterization: sources, scale of the
regional uniqueness, FMV, risk, yardsticks, financing • data/extrapolation to other areas, cross-disciplinary
Ethics applications/integration; quality/error minimization, data
management • Reservoir models: sequence stratigraphic,
lithologic, petrophysical, geostatistical approaches,
geophysical, reservoir engineering • Economics and risking:
volumetrics, probability of success, financial returns of
project • Organizational structure: team styles, 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
organizational management, team communications, THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS
assessment and evaluation • Problems, pitfalls and the
future of reservoir characterization: the holistic model Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,875*
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS
Apr. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
LONDON, U.K.
May 8-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT*
DENVER, COLORADO
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S ABERDEEN, U.K.
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,750+VAT*
ABU DHABI, UAE
HOUSTON, TEXAS Mar. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125 KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
Mar. 27-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* Sept. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,200*
LONDON, U.K.
LONDON, U.K. July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT MUSCAT, OMAN
June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT* Sept. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125*
DENVER, COLORADO
DENVER, COLORADO Aug. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS
July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,875*
* plus computer charge Oct. 2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 * plus computer charge

40 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 29

Reservoir Management Reservoir Simulation Gas Reservoir Management


Strategies
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. SAMMI H. RAZA OR DR. DAVID WALDREN MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS
MHA PETROLEUM CONSULTANTS
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
DESIGNED FOR Experienced engineers and geoscientists that plan Engineers actively involved with the operation
Reservoir, production and operations engineers; to carry out or review reservoir simulation studies and management of gas reservoirs; geoscientists
geologists; geophysicists; managers; experienced working with gas reservoirs in field development
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
technicians; and service company personnel and expansion planning would also benefit from
responsible for improving the performance of • Apply the principles of reservoir engineering attending this course
petroleum reservoirs to numerical modeling
• Set up, run, and analyze the results for YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO single well, pattern and full-field models • Evaluate gas reservoir data and prepare this
• Apply the principles of sound reservoir • Prepare fluid and rock property data in the
management data for engineering calculations
manner required for simulation studies • Apply frequently used gas reservoir
• Use the interdisciplinary synergistic • Perform numerical well test analysis
approach to efficient reservoir management engineering techniques
• History match an existing pattern • Perform production decline type curve
• Include each reservoir management
component and the importance of timing ABOUT THE COURSE analysis and use other advanced reservoir
and cost/benefit analysis Reservoir Simulation Strategies is an applied calculations such as simulation
• Develop checks and balances simulation course. The course stresses preparing • Solve reservoir engineering calculations
and critiquing the data that is input into a through the use of many practical exercises
ABOUT THE COURSE simulator, and running and analyzing several ABOUT THE COURSE
The principles of sound reservoir management types of field cases. You will analyze past
are presented with emphasis on practical Natural gas production has become a major
reservoir behavior and predict future perform- part of every petroleum company's asset base
applications. Actual case histories are used ance. This course, for both the neophyte and
to study both successes and failures. An and continues to grow in importance throughout
the experienced person, will enable you to the world. This course will help participants
interdisciplinary synergistic approach to apply reservoir engineering principles to
efficient reservoir management is detailed understand the engineering drivers on gas
black-oil and dry gas reservoir problems that reservoir management and how a gas reservoir's
with the goal of optimized profitability. are better solved with simulation techniques.
The significance of each component and the value can be maximized through sound
The intent is to chart a path toward the use of engineering practices. A full spectrum of gas
importance of timing and cost/benefit analysis any simulator, but more importantly, toward

RESERVOIR ENGINEERING
are emphasized. Reservoir management reservoir engineering techniques is addressed
its intelligent use. The course is not a theoretical and their application to a large variety of gas
models for optimum field development or mathematical simulation course. Equations
and field operating plans are analyzed. resource management options is discussed.
will only be presented when necessary for a
The interdisciplinary reservoir management particular application. The course provides One personal computer is provided, at
approach shows how each technology or hands-on use of one or more simulators with additional cost, for each two participants.
function contributes to the plan and how data sets prepared by the participant.
COURSE CONTENT
checks and balances are developed.
One personal computer is provided, at Gas reservoir fluid properties: gas condensate sampling
COURSE CONTENT additional cost, for each two participants. and understanding laboratory reports • Gas reservoir fluid
Definition of reservoir management: an integrated, flow and well testing: deliverability testing and non-darcy
interdisciplinary team effort • Goal setting, planning, COURSE CONTENT flow, testing for hydraulically fractured wells, horizontal
implementing, monitoring, and evaluating reservoir Synopsis and general principles • Types of models • wells, and gas condensate reservoirs • Determination of
performance • Field development and field operating Preparation of input data • Data assessment and checking • original gas-in-place: material balance techniques for
plans to optimize profitability • Efficient monitoring of Treatment of wells • Single, pattern and full-field models • various drive mechanisms and reservoir types, alternate
reservoir performance • Minimizing the drilling of Pseudo functions • Local grid refinement • History plotting techniques, production decline type curves • Gas
unnecessary wells • Wellbore and surface systems • Well matching • Numerical well test analysis • Predicting
testing and automated production systems • Economic reservoir performance with confidence • Development flow in wellbores and pipelines: the gas production
impact of operating plans • Identifying and acquiring planning with a simulator system, pressure drop in wellbores and flowlines,
critical data, data acquisition, and analysis • Maximizing restrictions to gas production • Prediction of future
economic recovery and minimizing capital investment, performance and ultimate recovery: decline curves,
risk and operating expenses • Timing of field coupled material balance and deliverability techniques,
implementation of reservoir management plan • Case reservoir simulation, gas well spacing and infill drilling •
histories and analysis • Importance of reservoir Special topics • Reservoir management of water-drive gas
characterization and drilling and operating plans • Primary reservoirs, predicting gas condensate reservoir
recovery, pressure maintenance, and secondary and tertiary performance, coalbed methane reservoirs
recovery • Responsibilities for team members

2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

HOUSTON, TEXAS CALGARY, CANADA


Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,495+GST*
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S HOUSTON, TEXAS
Nov. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775 ABERDEEN, U.K. Nov. 28-Dec. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625*
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . .US$2,750+VAT* 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S LONDON, U.K.
Feb. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 HOUSTON, TEXAS Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,995+VAT*
Oct. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* DENVER, COLORADO
ABU DHABI, UAE Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* Aug. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625*
Mar. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125 LONDON, U.K. CALGARY, CANADA
LONDON, U.K. Aug. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT* Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,495+GST*
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT ABERDEEN, U.K. HOUSTON, TEXAS
DENVER, COLORADO Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . .US$2,750+VAT* Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625*
Aug. 28-Sept. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 *plus computer charge *plus computer charge

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 4 1


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 30

Naturally Fractured
Horizontal and Multilateral Reservoirs: Geologic and
Wells: Analysis and Design Engineering Analysis
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. A. DANIEL HILL OR DR. DING ZHU DR. LAWRENCE W. TEUFEL
COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Geologists; reservoir engineers; petroleum and Engineers and geoscientists interested in a
production engineers; and development, asset, multi-disciplinary approach in evaluating and
and project managers predicting the overall effect of natural fractures
on subsurface fluid-flow and subsequent
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
reservoir performance
• Identify the benefits and constraints of the
available well options and select appropriate YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
well geometries and trajectories • Detect and predict subsurface natural
• Make complex, interdisciplinary decisions fracture occurrence and intensity from
on advanced well projects cores and well logs
• Determine performance and benefits of • Determine fractured rock properties
horizontal and multilateral wells from affecting reservoir performance
case histories • Design and analyze pressure transient tests
in naturally-fractured reservoirs
ABOUT THE COURSE
• Evaluate reservoir performance in
The course is designed as a companion naturally-fractured reservoirs
course to Horizontal and Multilateral Wells: • Develop and apply numerical simulation
Drilling and Completions. Advanced well models to fluid-flow in naturally-fractured
concepts including horizontal and multilateral reservoirs
wells have become a dominant feature of • Apply coupled geomechanics/fluid-flow
new field development and redevelopment behavior to reservoir management strategies
opportunities. They can, when used in naturally-fractured reservoirs
appropriately, dramatically improve the • Evaluate the impact of natural fractures on
economic profitability of field development hydraulic fracture stimulation
operations. However, their successful
ABOUT THE COURSE
deployment largely depends on the
effectiveness of the initial screening of This course covers geologic and engineering
RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

candidate fields/wells and an assessment of concepts, methodology, and technology


the longer term production dynamics essential used to characterize, evaluate, and manage
to ensuring “life of well” design criteria and naturally-fractured reservoirs. Applications
effective reservoir management. and limitations of geologic and engineering
procedures and tools are discussed. Field
PetroSkills Website One personal computer is provided, at examples and case studies demonstrate
additional cost, for each two participants. the importance of integrated geologic and
This catalog is good. engineering studies in developing effective,
COURSE CONTENT
Our website is better! Benefit of horizontal and multilateral wells • Limitations of economical reservoir management strategies
At www.petroskills.com you can: risk • Well configuration options • Reservoir applications for different types of reservoirs.
for various well types • Well costs and production
COURSE CONTENT
performance indicators • Screening of applications •
■ Quickly and easily search for Geologic characteristics • Reservoir flow and geometrical Characterization of natural fractures and fracture systems •
Influence of mechanical stratigraphy and structure on
courses by Discipline, Location, issues • Impact and importance of reservoir description •
fracture development • Detection and prediction of
Well construction constraints in drilling and completion •
Instructor, Content or Date Well placement/positioning • Steady state and semi-steady subsurface natural-fracture occurrence and intensity from
state inflow performance • Coning and cresting prediction cores and well logs • Fractured rock properties affecting
■ Register for courses on-line, • Well decline analysis • Well flow interference • Reservoir reservoir performance • Classification of naturally-fractured
reservoirs with reservoir examples and potential production
using our quick and easy simulation considerations • Evaluation using well tests •
problems • Fluid-flow in naturally-fractured reservoirs •
Well design considerations • "Life of well" design criteria •
registration wizard Completions, intervention, and production requirements Well performance and well testing in naturally-fractured
for reservoir management • Multilateral system capabilities reservoirs • Reservoir performance in naturally-fractured
■ Get more detailed information and their screening • Wellbore flow issues in horizontal reservoirs • Numerical simulation of fluid-flow in naturally-
fractured reservoirs • Geomechanics/fluid-flow • Behavior
about our courses and and multilateral wells • Productivity impairment and
of naturally-fractured reservoirs • Stimulation of naturally-
clean-up considerations • Risk identification, assessment,
instructors and minimization • Case studies • Trajectory guidelines fractured reservoirs • Effects of natural fractures on
for well placement in various reservoir environments reservoir permeability anisotropy, drainage area and
■ Order from our library of waterflood sweep efficiency
books and publications
■ Learn what’s new, and much

more
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S

HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Dec. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625*
HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625
LONDON, U.K. 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
July 31-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . .US$2,995+VAT*
LONDON, U.K.
HOUSTON, TEXAS July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,995+VAT
Dec. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625*
HOUSTON, TEXAS
*plus computer charge Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625

42 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 31

A ttention D rilling & C ompletions E ngineers!

IT’S HERE – A WELL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM THAT DELIVERS THE INFORMATION


TO MANAGE DRILLING & COMPLETIONS PROJECTS USING STATE OF THE ART TOOLS!
The WELL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (WMS) enables compilation CONTENT LIBRARY: General procedures,
guidelines, policies and technical materials
of relevant well project data into a user-friendly management system governing drilling and completions operations
designed for quick access and functionality. Now you can more efficiently FIND: A quick search, retrieval and content
navigation system to access the Content
retrieve guidelines and policies, capture regional and project data, share Library
experiences across the organization, conduct knowledge inventory PERFORM: A knowledge assessment tool to
identify an individual’s understanding of
assessments and manage staff development. the WMS content. Also tracks the status
Use an extensive content library comprised of over 1000 web browser- of required training
style pages of drilling and completions practices, policies, technology and CAPTURE: A centralized database to capture
relevant data and learning points during the
guidelines across 15 core topic elements. These elements include HS&E, life cycle of a well, across a variety of
projects and regions
Well Planning and Integrity, Contracting Processes, Drilling Operations, Well
COMPETENCY ASSESSMENT TOOL (CAT):
Control, Equipment Standard and Inspection, Cost Control and much more. A career guidance and development tool that
identifies skill gaps and creates a training and
The WMS features the tools and resources you need for all aspects of development plan
well construction project and resource management, and the navigation is GENERAL DRILLING PROGRAMS (GDP): Contains
project and regional specific guidelines, policies,
simple and straightforward. The system consists of the six primary procedures and technical material based on
components shown to the right. actual experience

Contact us today at wms@petroskills.com for a hands-on


®
demonstration of the WMS on your site. See how this tool can streamline
the flow of information and improve your overall efficiency! An OGCI Company
OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 32

P RODUCTION
The courses in this section are Production Engineering courses offered publicly through PetroSkills and OGCI are designed to develop your
skills and competency in this discipline. The Course Progression Matrix below shows how these courses relate to each other and provides an easy
way to construct a training plan with coursework that specifically relates to present or future job requirements. Likewise, managers can use the matrices
to develop training plans for their team.
Production Engineers can also benefit from courses that provide an understanding of other petroleum-related functions and disciplines. Such
cross-training courses are recommended in the lighter-shaded columns on either side of the Production Engineering courses shown on the matrix.

INSTRUCTORS

P A U L M. B A R RY A L F R E D R. J E N N I N G S , J R . R I C H A R D H. S C H R O E D E R
D R . T E D G. B Y R O M D R . M O H A N G. K E L K A R D R . M U K U L M. S H A R M A
G E R A L D R. C O U LT E R D R . J A M E S F. L E A , J R . S C O T T J. W I L S O N
C L E O N L. D U N H A M D R . H O WA R D L. M C K I N Z I E
D R . A. D A N I E L H I L L D R . J. M. P E D E N
PRODUCTION ENGINEERING

44 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 33

Well Stimulation: Practical Artificial Lift Systems Completions and Workovers


and Applied
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


GERALD R. COULTER DR. JAMES F. LEA, JR. OR CLEON L. DUNHAM DR. J. M. PEDEN, PAUL M. BARRY OR
ALFRED R. JENNINGS, JR.
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Production, completion, reservoir, and drilling Engineers, technicians, field supervisors, and DESIGNED FOR
engineers; field supervisors; production others who select, design, install, evaluate, or Beginning level drilling operations, production
foremen; engineering technicians and operate artificial lift systems operations, workover and completions personnel;
geologists. This course is also designed for petroleum engineers; drilling and completion
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO contractor personnel; service company personnel
others involved in the planning and evaluation • Make basic PVT properties and inflow
of well stimulation treatments. Information performance calculations related to YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
presented and examples used are applicable to artificial lift • Develop a completion strategy for wells in a
vertical and horizontal wells • Understand and apply multiphase tubing variety of situations
and pipe flow principles • Select tubing, packers, and completion flow
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO control equipment
• Select stimulation techniques best suited • Select the appropriate artificial lift system
• Compare systems to determine what • Appraise/design a suitable flow barrier strategy
for various formation types • Make recommendations on installation retrieval
• Successfully apply basic acidizing concepts system is most economically feasible
• Specify components and auxiliary practices for tubing, packers, etc.
• Successfully apply basics hydraulic equipment needed for each system • Identify key design features for horizontal,
fracturing concepts • Identify what best practices are available to multilateral, HPHT wells, etc.
• Select an appropriate intervention strategy/equipment
ABOUT THE COURSE extend the life of equipment and installed • Identify key features/applicability of the main sand
Too often in today’s dynamic oil and gas industry, lift systems control, fracpack and well stimulation options
not enough attention is paid to details of well • Apply basic design and analysis concepts • Assess/specify concerns/remedial measures for
stimulation treatments. This can result in poor or • Design system features that allow for gassy formation damage/skin removal, develop and
less than optimum results. Those involved in the production, production with solids, outline overall strategy for a completion program
planning, execution, and evaluation of stimulation viscous production, and for other harsh
environments ABOUT THE COURSE
treatments, as well as the operator representative The Completions and Workovers course is an
on location, need to have the background and ABOUT THE COURSE introduction to many facets of completion and
training in the basics so better decisions can be This course blends lecture, hands-on exercises, and intervention technology. The material progresses
made, resulting in more gas down the line and oil seminar teaching styles to enhance learning. through each of the major design, diagnostic and
in the tank! Participants work with software that allows them to intervention technologies, ending with effect of
design and analyze artificial lift designs. Such operations on surface facilities and finally plug and
This practical course is designed for those involved programs should improve performance and result in abandonment requirements. The course focuses on
with all aspects of well stimulation, as well as those higher production rates and/or reduced operating the practical aspects of each of the technologies,
actually carrying out well stimulation treatments. costs. Participants learn how to design and using design examples and both successes and
To be able to make better decisions, it is important troubleshoot rod pumping, continuous gas lift, and failures to illustrate the points of the design and the
to have a basic understanding of the types of electric submersible pump systems. Other methods risks involved with the entire process. The overall
such as PCP, plunger lift, jet pump, hydraulic pump,

PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
formations and basic reservoir properties with objectives of the course are to focus on delivering
which we deal. For this reason, time is spent in the and intermittent gas lift will also be addressed. and maintaining "well quality". The course can be
early portion of the course setting the geological Participants gain experience in solving problems by
hand and also by using advanced computer customized for specific locations and conditions.
and reservoir property stage for vertical, horizontal programs. Troubleshooting is an important part of COURSE CONTENT
and multilateral wells prior to developing the basic artificial lift operations and several typical surveillance Basic well completion design and practices • Completion
formation damage, acidizing, and hydraulic problems are solved. The class includes pictures and strategies • Well quality and integrity • Safety aspects of
fracturing concepts. The course includes acidizing well design • Packer selection and tubing forces •
videos of most important equipment components while Wellheads/ chokes/ subsurface safety valves and flow
and fracturing quality control, conducting the being applied. With increased prices, more emphasis is control equipment • Corrosion and erosion • Inflow and
treatment, monitoring pressures, and other critical placed on techniques to maximize production. new tubing performance • Tubing design and selection •
parameters during and after the treatment. An developments at various stages of development and Materials selection • Deviated/ multiple zone/subsea/
important part of the course is class teamwork application are also covered. horizontal/ multilateral and HPHT completion
considerations • Perforating design • Causes and
whereby the attendees divide into teams to One personal computer is provided, at additional cost, prevention of formation damage • Stimulation design
evaluate and design stimulation treatments. These for each two participants. considerations • Sand control • Wireline/coiled tubing/
exercises bring out many important parameters workover rig operations • Snubbing
COURSE CONTENT
discussed during the course. Overview of artificial lift technology • Criteria for selection of
COURSE CONTENT artificial lift system • Reservoir performance: inflow and
Geological review • Basic reservoir properties • Formation outflow relationships • Artificial lift screening • Introduction
to rod-pumping, gas lift, and ESP systems • Rod-pump
damage: how and why it happens • Non-acid damage
design: pumping unit, rods, pump, prime movers, gas
removal techniques • Acidizing: objectives, types, additives anchor, pump-off controls • Gas lift design: mandrels, valves, 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
• Acidizing placement techniques and the pressure chart • injection gas requirements, temperature, chokes, spacing,
Quality control and safety • Hydraulic fracturing: objectives equilibrium curve, continuous flow design • ESP design: ABERDEEN, U.K.
and concepts • Hydraulic fracturing materials and their pump performance curves, pump intake curves, typical Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT
importance to job success • The frac chart • Hydraulic problems, installation, troubleshooting • Best practices for MIDLAND, TEXAS
fracturing quality control and safety • Energized fluids: installation and maintenance • Economic analysis Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
application and safety
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
MIDLAND, TEXAS DUBAI, UAE
Mar. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325* Mar. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
CALGARY, CANADA HOUSTON, TEXAS
May 29-June 2 . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST* Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Aug. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325* LONDON, U.K.
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S LONDON, U.K. June 26-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT* ABERDEEN, U.K.
Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 *plus computer charge Dec. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,650+VAT

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 4 5


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 34

Production Operations 1 Production Optimization Surface Production


Using NODAL™ Analysis Operations
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


GERALD R. COULTER, DR. J. M. PEDEN, SCOTT J. WILSON RICHARD H. SCHROEDER OR DR. OMAR BARKAT
ALFRED R. JENNINGS, JR. OR PAUL M. BARRY
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
DESIGNED FOR Production, operations, and reservoir engineers; Beginning level production, operations, facilities and
Petroleum, production, reservoir, facility, drilling and senior technicians and field supervisors with an petroleum engineers; production managers and field
research engineers; geologists; field supervisors and engineering background production supervisors; surface equipment
managers; service company engineers and managers technicians; and technical or supervisory personnel
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO who interact with field facility engineers/operators
• Plan and implement well completions workovers, • Apply NODAL™ analysis concepts viewing
the total producing system as a whole from YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
stimulation treatments, and routine production • Use the physical properties and phase
operations with an efficiency that increases profits reservoir rock through the completion,
well bore and gathering system, to the behavior of crude oil and natural gas that
• Evaluate the flow capacity of a well govern production operations
• Achieve reliable zonal isolation by efficient market while honoring system rate/pressure
primary cementing constraints • Choose from the wide range of production
• Devise an integrated plan for efficient well handling and treating equipment used to
• Avoid improper design where any one condition produced fluids for sales or final
completion and treatments component, or a mismatch of components,
• Select and plan an appropriate perforating disposition
adversely affects the performance of the • Determine and minimize pressure drop in
operation using underbalanced or extreme entire system
overbalance procedures pipelines, valves and pressured vessels
• Perform a system-wide analysis to increase • Understand the internal workings of
• Ascertain why formations are damaged and well rates by identifying bottlenecks and
how to prevent or correct such damage separators, pumps, compressors, valves
• Learn about paraffin, asphaltenes and scale design an efficient field-wide flow system, and other treating equipment
problems and solutions including wells, artificial lift, gathering lines • Prevent and treat oilfield corrosion
• Find out which stimulation is best and how and manifolds • Select and use appropriate production
to perform these jobs and learn about the • Use NODAL™ analysis, together with measurement and metering devices for
roll of rock mechanics in well completions reservoir simulation and analytical tools, for produced fluids and gases
• Review current practices to improve productivity planning new field development ABOUT THE COURSE
• Apply proven technologies and recent The purpose of this course is to present an overview
innovations in production operations ABOUT THE COURSE
Initially, this technology was applied using and fundamental understanding of a wide variety of
ABOUT THE COURSE oilfield production, processing and treating equipment.
pressure traverse curves and simple PI models. Emphasis is on understanding the “what” and the
This course represents the core of our production Now, state-of-the-art software programs have
engineering program and is the foundation for all “how” workings inside the piping, valves and vessels.
future studies in this subject. The participant will enabled a well-trained engineer to concentrate Fluid treating equipment is covered whether located
become familiar with the procedures and techniques on matching field data, interpreting results, downhole, on the surface, offshore platform or sea
that increase production and cut operating costs. The and understanding a system's interdependen- floor. A major goal of this course is to improve com-
course provides a fundamental and integrated under- cies. Software is used extensively during the munication among the technical disciplines, field and
standing of wells, their design, operation and treat- class and the participant is encouraged to office in order to enhance operational efficiencies,
PRODUCTION ENGINEERING

ments. This is one of PetroSkills' most popular courses. bring their own laptop and Nodal software. lower costs and improve production economics.
However, if the participant chooses not to Example step-by-step exercises are worked together
COURSE CONTENT with the instructor to drive home the important points.
Geological and reservoir fundamentals • Well testing • supply their own software, a one-year license
Inflow • Primary and remedial cementing • Well to commercial quality Nodal analysis and gas COURSE CONTENT
completions • Outflow • Workovers and workover fluids • deliverability planning programs will be Properties of produced fluids • Valves • Safety systems •
Perforating • Completion equipment: tubing, packers, flow Flowlines, manifolds and gathering systems • Field gas
control devices • Production logging • Formation damage • provided at no extra charge. separation, compression and field processing • Oil and
Surfactants • Paraffin and asphaltenes • Hydraulic water separation and treatment • Fluid measurement and
One personal computer is provided, at additional cost, instrumentation • Gathering and processing facilities •
fracturing • Acidizing • Sand control • Scale control
for each two participants. Corrrosion control • Pumps • Compressors • Pressure
drop considerations • Hydrate prevention and treatment •
COURSE CONTENT Handling of acid gases • Innovations in full wellstream and
Inflow/outflow • Reservoir and completion IPRs • Wellbore subsea fluid treatment • Corrosion control fundamentals
performance • Wellhead deliverability curves • Flow line
performance curves • System deliverability curves • 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Matching well behavior • Pressure drop components: static,
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 1 0 D AY S friction, and acceleration • Future inflow/outflow diagrams • MIDLAND, TEXAS
Gas lift design • ESP and jet pumps • Gas well behavior • Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
HOUSTON, TEXAS Wellbore loading • System-wide optimization of
Oct. 31-Nov. 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,075 DUBAI, UAE
completions/wells/flowlines/compressors/gathering points Nov. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
CALGARY, CANADA NODAL™ is a registered trademark of Schlumberger, Inc.
Nov. 7-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,850+GST DALLAS, TEXAS
Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
LONDON, U.K.
Dec. 5-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,725+VAT 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 1 0 D AY S CALGARY, CANADA
DENVER, COLORADO Mar. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST
DUBAI, UAE Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325*
Mar. 4-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$5,300 HOUSTON, TEXAS
May 8-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Apr. 17-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,075 KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
HOUSTON, TEXAS May 29-June 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100
July 24-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,075 May 1-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325*
Oct. 23-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,075 LONDON, U.K.
LONDON, U.K. July 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
CALGARY, CANADA June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT*
May 1-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,850+GST MIDLAND, TEXAS
Oct. 30-Nov. 10 . . . . . . . . .US$3,850+GST CALGARY, CANADA Oct. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,195+GST*
LONDON, U.K. DUBAI, UAE
July 3-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,725+VAT DENVER, COLORADO Nov. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
Dec. 4-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$4,725+VAT Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325* DALLAS, TEXAS
*plus computer charge Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325

46 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 35

Acidizing Applications in Beam Pumps Electrical Submersible


Sandstones and Carbonates Pumps
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


ALFRED R. JENNINGS, JR. DR. JAMES F. LEA, JR. NEW DR. JAMES F. LEA, JR. NEW
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Engineers and other personnel involved with the Engineers and field technicians who are Engineers and field technicians who are respon-
daily operation and management of producing responsible for the selection, operation, and sible for the selection, operation and mainte-
oil and gas wells; production engineers and maintenance of beam pumping systems nance of ESP systems
reservoir engineers involved with well stimulation YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
applications would also benefit from attending • Identify all components of the system beam pump • Identify components of the ESP system
this course system • Design and analyze a system using up-to-date
• Compare designs to other artificial lift methods computer programs
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Best practices for longer system life
• Assess a well’s need for stimulation • Design and analyze a system using up-to-date
computer programs, and know why different • Improve power efficiency of the system
• Recognize the strengths and limitations program can provide different results • Combat gas, solids, corrosion and viscosity in the
of acidizing • Apply best practices for longer system life produced fluids
• Investigate production problems from the • Improve efficiency of the system • Compare to other artificial lift methods
standpoint of damage removal and • Combat gas, solids, corrosion and viscosity in the ABOUT THE COURSE
improvement in well production produce fluids ESP’s are one of the higher volume methods of lift. ESPs
• Apply acid treatments strategically to • Combat rod compression near the pump have advantages over some other high volume methods
improve success • Use record failures and data so as to best solve future since they can create a higher drawdown on the forma-
• Approach acidizing applications from a problems tion and achieve more production, if problems such as
gas interference and sand production can be solved.
practical viewpoint ABOUT THE COURSE
• Recognize opportunities for enhancement Beam pumping systems are the most common method of This course will allow the user to become familiar with
artificial lift in the US and some other parts of the world. the ESP system and when it should be used. All compo-
of acidizing treatments using non-acid fluids nents will be described in detail. Design and analysis
This course will allow the user to become familiar with problems will be done using advanced computer pro-
ABOUT THE COURSE the system and when it should be used. Participants grams. Some films will be show mostly illustrating
Although acidizing is the oldest method learn how to compare to other systems to select the best installation, operation and removal of failed equipment,
of well stimulation, it is often applied with system for a given well whether it may be beam pumping new products and best practices. Problems will be
mixed results. It remains, however, a valuable or another method of lift. All components will be solved by the class members each day and will be dis-
tool for improving well productivity. The key described in detail. Design and analysis will be done cussed with the class. Discussion is encouraged con-
to acidizing success is in the understanding using advanced computer programs. Some films will be cerning experiences of successes and failures.
shown mostly illustrating either new products or best Problems addressing solids, gas handling and viscosity
of how it works, the optimum conditions for practices. A few problems will be solved by the class
its application, and proper evaluation of well are addressed. Best practices are stressed throughout so a
members each day. At the end of the course the attendee long lasting system can be developed for maximum
response after the acidizing treatment. This will know the best applications for beam pumps and profit. SCADA controls and VSD’s are discussed. The
course will teach many of the practical what rates can be produced from a given depth. The user attendee will learn the function of the various compo-
aspects of acidizing applications and help will know how to combat specific problems with specific nents, and the concerns about installation, operation,
equipment used in the system. The user will know what and removal of failed equipment. The participant will be

PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
provide a better understanding of acidizing
as a tool for enhancing well performance. power efficiency is, how to design a system with high able to evaluate the design a system for current and
efficiency and how to analyze a system to determine the future conditions, analyze an installed system, and
COURSE CONTENT current efficiency. The attendee will see how companies many other operational concerns of the ESP system.
Well stimulation objectives • Types of formation damage • have kept records of operations so as to achieve constant New developments are added to the course as they
Influence of skin factor • Production improvement with improvement in operations. become available to the industry.
skin removal • Well stimulation and reservoir management •
Although computer programs are used for design and Although the course contains use of advanced computer
Perforating techniques and well stimulation • Acidizing for
analysis, the course contains material which is programs for design and analysis, much of the material
well stimulation • Chemistry of sandstone acidizing • is devoted to best practices, which is usable by both
Chemistry of carbonate acidizing • Acid additives • instrumental in maintaining a profitable artificial lift pro- engineers and technicians.
Treatment diversion • Acid fracturing • Rules of thumb • gram using beam pump systems. Beam pumping is said
Types of acids • Sandstone acidizing guidelines • Carbonate by many to be the artificial lift system of choice when it One personal computer is provided, at additional cost,
acidizing guidelines • Re-stimulation of acidized wells • is applicable and one should have a reason for not for each two participants.
QA/QC in acidizing applications • Safety precautions applying the beam pump system.
COURSE CONTENT
Problems addressing solids, gas handling and viscosity Introduction to artificial lift • Introduction to electrical sub-
are addressed. Best practices are stressed throughout so a mersible pumping • Introduction for reservoir and production
long lasting system can be developed for maximum prof- considerations • Description of all components of the electrical
it. SCADA controls and POC are discussed to monitor submersible system starting at the surface to the pump: trans-
equipment loading and to achieve maximum production formers; controllers/VSD; wellhead; tubing; cable; cable guards;
motor lead cable; pump; intake/gas separator; equalizer/protector;
from a given installation. motor; instrumentation • Installation considerations and cautions
• Design of an ESP system to fit current and future well condi-
One personal computer is provided, at additional cost, tions • Operation of a given design • Analysis of an ESP system
for each two participants. using diagnostics from installed instrumentation and using diag-
nostic computer programs • Removal of failed equipment •
COURSE CONTENT Controls for ESP systems including variable speed drives • ESP
Reservoir considerations • Overview of artificial lift • instrumentation available in the industry • Failure analysis •
Design and analysis of the beam pump system • Prime Data keeping • Maintenance and monitoring
mover • Belts • Sheaves • Gear box • Unit • Polished rod
• Wellhead/stuffing box • Rods • Pump • Tubing •
Artificial lift efficiency • Heavy oil considerations • Gas
• Separation/handling • Best practices for operation •
Component design • System analysis • Pump off controllers

2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
May 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* Aug. 28-Sept. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
HOUSTON, TEXAS
May 22-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 *plus computer charge *plus computer charge

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 4 7


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:36 PM Page 36

Formation Damage: Causes, Gas Lift Gas Production Engineering


Prevention, and Remediation
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


GERALD R. COULTER DR. JAMES F. LEA, JR. OR CLEON L. DUNHAM DR. MOHAN G. KELKAR
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Production, completion, reservoir, and drilling Production engineers and operations staff Production, reservoir and facilities engineers and
engineers; geologists concerned with well responsible for designing gas lift installations and/ others involved in gas production, transportation
performance and production enhancement; field or performing surveillance and optimization on and storage, including field supervisors
supervisors, production foremen, engineering wells using gas lift; appropriate for staff at all
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
technicians; production and exploration levels of gas lift expertise and has been given with
managers; those involved in vertical, good results to both production engineers new • Apply proven techniques to field problems
horizontal, and multilateral wells to gas lift as well as industry gas lift consultants to increase profitability
• Calculate gas well performance from the
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO reservoir to the sales line
• Recognize formation damage mechanisms • Select the appropriate gas lift systems and • Optimize gas well production
in carbonates and sandstones equipment • Relate reservoir and well performance to time
• Prevent damage • Design continuous-flow gas lift systems • Predict when a well will die due to liquid
• Overcome damage, when it exists, through • Analyze operating gas lift systems loading using best procedures
the application of non-acid approaches, • Increase production from your wells using
acidizing and small hydraulic fracturing gas lift technology and optimization ABOUT THE COURSE

treatments • Improve the economics of gas lift operation Meet the demand for natural gas and expand
your expertise in gas engineering technology.
ABOUT THE COURSE This course balances theory and application,
ABOUT THE COURSE
Formation damage seems to be inevitable and Gas lift is one of the most widely used and trains participants for immediate application
it is costing you and your company money! artificial lift techniques. Participants will inves- of acquired techniques to field problems. You
Whether it can be prevented, removed eco- tigate the impact of tubing sizing, gas lift valve will learn the latest methods for calculating
nomically, or must be accepted as the price for selection, gas lift mandrel spacing, gas lift valve
design, casing pressure, surface choke size, gas gas well performance. Performance of tight
drilling and producing a well will depend formations, horizontal wells, fractured wells,
upon many factors. The activity with horizontal volume, etc., on well design and operation.
Participants practice mandrel spacing design and methods for estimating gas reserves will
and multilateral wells has brought about a and gas lift valve design, surveillance and opti- be discussed. Pipeline and compressor designs
renewed interest in this subject. Many are try- mization at the well and field level using actual will be covered.
ing to prevent formation damage during drilling field data including the use of software programs.
and completion through the application of One personal computer is provided, at additional
After attending this course, participants will be cost, for each two participants.
underbalanced drilling. This approach cannot able to identify, diagnose, analyze and solve gas
work for everyone and some are beginning to lift problems. Up-to-date computer programs COURSE CONTENT
question the validity of expecting no formation will be used/ demonstrated during the course. Gas properties: real gas behavior, impurities, mixtures, phase
damage when underbalanced drilling is used. The class includes pictures and videos of most behavior-dew point, retrograde behavior, flash calculations,
Others are using the newer drill-in/completion important equipment components while being presence of liquid; classifying gas reservoirs • Reservoir
PRODUCTION ENGINEERING

fluids in hopes of getting the formation damage applied, to further participant understanding. performance: flow after flow, isochronal, stabilized inflow
problem under control. This renewed interest performance; turbulence and skin effects; perforation effects;
With increased prices, more emphasis is placed tight well analysis; horizontal wells; hydraulically fractured
points out that the industry realizes we have a on techniques to maximize production. New wells • Reserve calculations: P/Z plots, water influx,
long way to go to overcome formation damage. developments at various stages of development abnormal pressure effects; diagnostic testing based on
These subjects and many more are addressed and application are also covered. production data • Flow in pipes and restrictions: pressure
in this fast-paced, informative course covering loss intubing, flowlines, chokes, safety valves; effects of liquids
all aspects of formation damage. Examples, One personal computer is provided, at additional - liquid loading, liquid removal methods, multiphase flow
case histories, and class team exercises are cost, for each two participants. correlations; erosional velocity • Compression: types of
used throughout the course to bring out key COURSE CONTENT
compressors; compressor selection - reciprocating and
points on this important industry subject. Gas lift concepts and data • Inflow • Outflow • Nodal centrifugal; effects of variables; capacity and horsepower •
analysis • Equilibrium curves • Gas lift equipment and Total system analysis: tubing and flowline size effects;
COURSE CONTENT valve mechanics • Valve selection • Gas lift equipment perforating effects; relating deliverability to time; evaluating
Geological/depositional environment review • How demo • Valve calibration • Unloading • Mandrel spacing compressor installations; analyzing injection wells • Flow
homogeneous or heterogeneous are these formations from and step-by-step, complete gas lift design for a well • measuring: orifice metering-design, accuracy, troubleshooting;
which we produce and what is the influence on formation Temperature effects on valves • Determine the Ptro • other metering methods • Condensate reservoir types - wet
damage? • Reservoir properties review • What properties Orifice sizing techniques • Lift gas rates for best gas, retrograde; reserve estimates, laboratory simulation
most influence the effect of formation damage? • Is your economics • Causes and solutions of instability • Gas lift
reservoir performance influenced by stress sensitivity? • surveillance • Gas measurement • Analysis of flowing
Damage mechanisms • How are sandstones and carbonates pressure gradient surveys • Analysis of GL surface charts
damaged? • How do formation mineralogy and clay chem- and measurements • Gas allocation and field optimization
istry influence damage? What about scale, paraffin, • Use of computer programs for gas lift design, trouble-
asphaltenes? • Damage prevention • Drilling, completion, shooting and optimization
and production methods, drilling/completion fluid and
additive selection, clay control • Evaluation of damage • 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Production performance, logging, pressure analysis review •
Damage removal • Acidizing materials and methods, non- NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA CALGARY, CANADA
acid approaches, such as wellbore washes, perforating Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* Nov. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST*
techniques, and hydraulic fracturing to bypass damage DUBAI, UAE
Dec. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125* 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS
HOUSTON, TEXAS Mar. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
Nov. 28-Dec. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 ABERDEEN, U.K.
Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,750+VAT* TULSA, OKLAHOMA
May 8-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S HOUSTON, TEXAS
LONDON, U.K. Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* CALGARY, CANADA
July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST*
DUBAI, UAE Nov. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST*
HOUSTON, TEXAS Dec. 9-13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125*
Nov. 27-Dec. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 *plus computer charge *plus computer charge

48 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:37 PM Page 37

Hydraulic Fracturing Oilfield Water Production,


Gas Well Deliquification
Applications Handling and Injection
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. JAMES F. LEA, JR. NEW ALFRED R. JENNINGS, JR. DR. MUKUL SHARMA NEW
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Engineers, field technicians, field supervisors, Production, reservoir, and drilling engineers, as Reservoir, production and surface facilities engineers
and others who select, design, install, evaluate, well as others who need a better understanding responsible for providing reservoir engineering sup-
port, facilities planning and drilling/completions rec-
or operate artificial lift systems for use in de- of fracturing applications ommendations for oil and gas assets, engineers and
watering gas wells other personnel involved in providing equipment and
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
chemicals for diagnosing / reducing water production,
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Design hydraulic fracture treatments for improving injector performance and treating pro-
• Recognize liquid loading in a gas well typical field situations duced water.
using field symptoms, critical velocity and • Apply the concepts of well stimulation by
Nodal analysis hydraulic fracturing to various types of YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Specify water quality requirements for a water
• Recognize the advantages and disadvan- reservoir conditions to optimize well injection project
tages of various methods of liquid removal productivity • Simulate the impact of water quality on injector
• Install and trouble shoot several of • Recognize opportunities for substantial performance
methods production improvement by application of • Make facilities decisions to ensure good
• Understand economics of each method effective hydraulic fracturing long-term well injectivity
covered • Gather pertinent well data and information • Conduct diagnosis of water production problems
• Identify potential sources of produced water
to plan, design, implement, and evaluate • Select possible remediation methods for water
ABOUT THE COURSE fracturing treatments for all types of reservoirs shutoff
As gas wells deplete, the velocity in the • Realize the strengths and limitations of • Choose facilities to better handle produced water
tubing drops and eventually liquids from the hydraulic fracture theory as it relates to • Test injection wells to identify injection profiles
well and from condensation begin to accu- field applications of fracturing • Select injection well patterns for optimizing
• Become a participant in each fracturing waterfloods
mulate in the tubing. This increase of liquids • Simulate the impact of thermal effects on
in the tubing adds back pressure on the treatment rather than just a technical injection well performance
formation, which in turn reduces flow or observer • Evaluate the impact of growing fractures on
even stops flow altogether. The course waterflood performance
introduces this problem and discusses how ABOUT THE COURSE
ABOUT THE COURSE
to recognize liquid loading as opposed to The course takes a practical approach tothe For every barrel of oil produced we produce 3 barrels of
other possible well problems. applications of hydraulic fracturing. Fracturing water. Water handling, treatment and disposal represents
technology is explained to show its benefits the biggest operating cost for most oilfield operators. In
The course will then cover the various meth- and limitations in all types of sandstone and addition to produced water, large quantities of seawater
ods of solving the problem of liquid loading, carbonate reservoirs. Fracture modeling is and water from other sources is treated and injected.
showing how to apply the various solutions used as a tool to demonstrate how modeling The economic success of oil and gas development
and the advantages and disadvantages of each projects depends very much on our ability to successfully
software can be used effectively in practical manage water. This course discusses methods, equipment
method. Solution methods include use of sur-

PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
applications. All aspects of the planning, and tools used for testing, diagnosing, and minimizing
factants, velocity strings, compression, use of designing, and implementation of fracturing water production from oil and gas wells. Reservoir
plunger lift, various other pumping methods, treatments are covered. In addition to the engineering and surface facility aspects of water handling,
gas lift, and the injection of fluids below a technical presentation, the course contains treatment, re-injection and injection well fracturing are
packer so gas can flow up the annulus. extensively discussed. The impact of the growth of
many practical exercises and class problems thermal fractures and fractures driven by particle
The attendee should be able to recognize the based on case histories. You will take home a plugging on injector performance and oil recovery by
problem of liquid loading and have a good fresh approach to hydraulic fracturing, eager waterflood are discussed. Significant cost savings can be
idea of which methods can solve the to select viable candidates for more effective achieved in all aspects of water production, handling
problem and select the best methods for fracturing applications. and disposal through better diagnostic tools, better
water handling and better treatment and re-injection
solution after attending the course. There are strategies. The course covers the fundamental theory,
about 400,000 gas wells in the USA and COURSE CONTENT and the latest technological developments. It particularly
most are liquid loaded. Solving this problem Introduction to the fracturing process • Fracture mechanics emphasizes field application through lots of practical
may on the average increase production by • Practical fracture design • Fracturing fluid additives and field examples, exercises and case studies.
proppant • Strengths and limitations of fracturing
~40% per well. The course will consist of applications • Production increase • Factors involved in
One personal computer is provided, at additional cost, for
slide presentations, example problems and field implementation • Acid fracturing vs. proppant
each two participants.
discussion. Some films will be shown. fracturing • Frac packs • Waterfracs • Fracturing in COURSE CONTENT
horizontal wells • QA/QC of fracturing treatments • Introduction: Causes of excess water production • Data collection
One personal computer is provided, at additional Evaluation of fracturing treatment success for problem identification • Identifying the causes of excess water
cost, for each two participants. production • Wellbore and near wellbore water shutoff technolo-
gies • Gels for water shutoff • Polymer flooding • Down-hole sink
COURSE CONTENT technology • Selection of water control treatment • Analysis and
Recognize symptoms of liquid loading in gas wells • treatment of produced water • Scale, bacteria and corrosion
Critical velocity • Systems Nodal analysis • Sizing tubing • problems • Injection well testing • Water quality requirements for
re-injection and surface disposal • Fractured injection wells •
Compression • Plunger lift • Use of foam to de-liquefy gas Injection into unconsolidated sands (with sand control) • Impact
wells • Hydraulic pumps • Use of beam pumps to of water re-injection on reservoir performance • Economics and
de-liquefy gas wells • Gas lift • Electrical submersible post-treatment analysis
pumps • Progressive cavity pumps • Other methods to 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
attack liquid loading problems 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS
Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 HOUSTON, TEXAS
Mar. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Nov. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
CALGARY, CANADA LONDON, U.K.
June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST* HOUSTON, TEXAS Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT*
Apr. 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,200*
CALGARY, CANADA
* plus computer charge May 1-5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,295+GST * plus computer charge

w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 4 9
OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:37 PM Page 38

Production Logging Production Technology for Sand Control


Formerly: Reservoir Monitoring and Other Disciplines
Production Log Evaluation
PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. A. DANIEL HILL PAUL M. BARRY OR DR. HOWARD L. MCKINZIE DR. HOWARD L. MCKINZIE
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Petroleum and drilling engineers and managers, Exploration and production technical professionals, Drilling, completion, production and research engi-
reservoir engineers, production engineers/technol- team leaders, managers, and support staff who neers; field supervisors and production foremen; tech-
ogists, petrophysicists, log analysts, and anyone require a more extensive knowledge of production nical personnel who supply services and equipment
interested in understanding what production logs engineering and operations than that acquired in YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
and cased-hole surveys can tell us their own disciplines • Determine the causes of sand production
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO • Determine the need for sand control
• Select the most appropriate production • Apply production engineering principles • Select the best sand control method
logging services for well diagnosis and and practices and make basic calculations • Prepare the well for gravel packs
reservoir surveillance • Identify and incorporate the role of production • Prepack perforations and determine when
• Define injection well profiles using engineering and operations in oil and gas prepacking is appropriate
temperature, radioactive tracer, and exploitation planning and development • Apply “Best Practices” to ensure successful
spinner flowmeters • Maximize team interaction and understand sand control completions
• Measure zonal inflows in production wells the dynamics required between production • Conduct successful "frac packs"
using temperature logs engineering and other disciplines • Evaluate sand control performance
• Locate behind-pipe channels with • Minimize production losses
temperature, tracer, or noise logs ABOUT THE COURSE
• Evaluate new technologies for proper applications
• Apply combinations of flowmeters, fluid This course stresses the production technology
density, and fluid capacitance logs to required to effectively develop and operate an ABOUT THE COURSE
measure multiphase flow profiles asset, and the role of production engineering in Sand causes a wide variety of costly problems
• Interpret cement bond logs and ultrasonic a multi-discipline development project. Practical when oil and gas are produced from unconsolidated
logs to determine cement quality application of production practices is empha- reservoirs. The most costly problem is usually the
• Measure flow inside and outside casing sized. Both theory and actual field examples are loss of production resulting from formation
with pulsed neutron tools presented along with class problems, exercises, damage caused by poorly planned and/or executed
• Apply specialty tools for flow profiling in and related streaming videos. Well completion sand control applications. This course will identify
horizontal wells the parameters that must be considered in selecting
equipment and tools are viewed and discussed. the sand control technique to be used. Each of the
ABOUT THE COURSE
Participants will work several exercises such as various sand control techniques is presented.
Production logging refers to a suite of logs that are a basic continuous gas lift, ESP and stimulation Examples, problems and case histories will be
normally run on completed injection or produc- designs. Nodal analysis problems are set up and examined to illustrate key points. Sand control
tion wells to evaluate the performance of the well solved on the computer and horizontal and failures will be used to illustrate the types of
itself or of the reservoir as a whole. Other produc- multilateral technology is presented. problems that can lead to early well failures. The
tion logs can evaluate the well completion or look One personal computer is provided, at additional cost, course will also teach how to perform quality
control checks during the sand control application
PRODUCTION ENGINEERING

behind pipe to evaluate the formation and its flu- for each two participants.
ids in the near-well vicinity. Production logs are to help insure successful wells. Several new sand
playing an increasing role in modern reservoir COURSE CONTENT control technologies have been introduced in the
management by providing the only means of
Role and tasks of production technology • Completion last few years. The proper application of these
design • Inflow and outflow performance • Sand control • technologies will be thoroughly covered. Attendees
directly identifying downhole fluid movements. Artificial lift systems (gaslift, ESP, beam-pump, PCP) •
This course will cover fluid flow in pipes (both Perforating • Fracturing formation damage and well
will leave this course with a thorough understanding
stimulation • Field surveillance and data • Production of what is necessary to design and implement cost
single and multiphase flow), the theoretical bases effective sand control in producing wells.
of production logging techniques, production log system optimization
interpretation, and operational considerations. COURSE CONTENT
Numerous field examples are used to illustrate the Sand control techniques • Radial flow and formation dam-
principles of production log interpretation. age • Causes and effects of sand production • Predicting
sand production • Gravel pack design • Slotted liners and
One personal computer is provided, at additional wire wrapped screens • Gravel pack completion equipment
cost, for each two participants. and service tools • Well preparation for gravel packing •
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Perforating for gravel placement techniques • Perforation
COURSE CONTENT HOUSTON, TEXAS prepacking and enhanced prepacking • Frac packing •
Open hole gravel packing • Expandable screens • Gravel
Problem identification and solution with production logs Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* pack performance •Horizontal well completions
• Temperature logs • Radioactive tracer logs • Spinner
flowmeter logs • Log combinations for injection well pro-
THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS
filing • Multiphase flow effects • Deflector or basket Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,875*
flowmeters • Fluid density logs • Fluid capacitance logs • 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Slip velocity correlations • Multiphase log interpretation •
Noise logs • Cement bond logs • Ultrasonic pulse-echo HOUSTON, TEXAS
logs • Pulsed neutron logs for flow identification • Mar. 20-24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
Horizontal well production logs Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
PERTH, AUSTRALIA
Apr. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,250*
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S WARRI, NIGERIA
HOUSTON, TEXAS May 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,275* 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Dec. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* MUSCAT, OMAN HOUSTON, TEXAS
June 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125* Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
THE HAGUE, NETHERLANDS
LONDON, U.K. 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,875*
July 31-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT* Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,875* LONDON, U.K.
HOUSTON, TEXAS MIRI, MALAYSIA July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT
Dec. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* Aug. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,200* HOUSTON, TEXAS
*plus computer charge *plus computer charge Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425

50 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:37 PM Page 39

Horizontal and Multilateral


Advanced Hydraulic Wells: Drilling and
Fracturing
Training PETROSKILLS
Completions
PETROSKILLS

On Demand.
COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR
ALFRED R. JENNINGS, JR. DR. TED G. BYROM
COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Production, operations, and completions Drilling, completion, production, reservoir, and research
engineers who are actively involved in engineers; geologists; managers in drilling, completion,
hydraulic fracturing applications and desire a production, and exploration; and others involved in
more in-depth understanding of hydraulic various phases horizontal and multilateral wells or
fracturing theory and applied concepts wanting to gain an interdisciplinary up-to-date
understanding of this continually evolving technology
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
• Better understand rock properties and rock YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
mechanics related to fracturing • Successfully design and optimize horizontal
applications and multilateral wells
• Better understand fracturing fluid • Engineer wells, taking into account
mechanics and proppant transport limitations imposed by well bore stability
• More effectively design fracturing and borehole friction
treatments through better understanding of • Determine the appropriate zonal isolation
factors influencing hydraulic fracturing methods for horizontal and multilateral wells
applications • Design damage removal, stimulation, and
• Use pre-frac injection test data and workover operations
real-time fracturing treatment data in ABOUT THE COURSE
fracturing applications to define fracture Are your horizontal and multilateral wells yielding the
parameters and improve frac treatment expected results? Why are some of these types of
Convenient and Frequent. design wells great successes while others are embarrassing
• Consider factors influencing post-frac failures? Successful multilateral and horizontal wells
Designed Specifically for fracture conductivity and well cleanup require new considerations, interdisciplinary plan-
• Realize the strengths and limitations of
YOUR NEEDS. existing hydraulic fracturing technology
ning, and special techniques. This intense course
addresses the critical need for a proper understanding
Let us know what your training and fracture models of all aspects of horizontal and multilateral well
needs are, and we’ll provide a program • Expand fracturing applications to fit a drilling and completion processes that make these
wider range of reservoir types and wells unique. A combined practical technical theme is
that meets them. Our instructors and conditions employed, with emphasis on economy and efficiency
staff can customize any class to meet in drilling, and on completing horizontal and
ABOUT THE COURSE multilateral wells. Participants develop an apprecia-
your specific training requirements. This advanced course is designed for those
Most of our public courses are tion for the complexity of these wells and learn to
having a practical understanding of the design programs for horizontal and multilateral wells,

PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
available as private, on-site (In-House) applications of hydraulic fracturing and who from drilling through completion and production.
courses. We also have many special want to increase their expertise. It is designed
for engineers that have some fracturing COURSE CONTENT
courses available as In-House ses- Introduction to horizontal and multilateral drilling and
experience or those who have already
sions. In addition there are “public attended the PetroSkills intermediate level
completions • Rock behavior in highly deviated wells •
Reservoir characteristics influencing drilling and completion
In-House” courses at requested sites, Hydraulic Fracturing Applications course. design • Effects of reservoir heterogeneity • Formation
which include participants solicited The course will provide the details and damage • Completion types and methods: adaptability to
reservoir types and management • Zone isolation •
from other companies. discussion of fracturing concepts usually Stimulation and workovers • Borehole trajectories and
accepted or assumed in fracturing friction in multilateral and horizontal wells • Special
Using our resources, we can develop applications. The strengths and limitations of radius, MWD and geosteering, underbalanced drilling,
petroleum related training programs various approaches to fracturing treatment specific multilateral issues • Casing and liners: design,
running, and cementing procedure
that meet your specific needs. We will design will be covered. Attendees should
incorporate your own data and leave the advanced course with a better
understanding of the hydraulic fracturing
examples into a course that delivers process and how it relates to post-frac well
precisely what you need. And best of performance.
all, we’ll deliver that course at your COURSE CONTENT
location – anywhere in the world. Rock properties and fracture mechanics related to the
fracturing process • Fracturing fluid mechanics •
At PetroSkills, our goal is to deliver Proppant transport • Pre-frac injection test analysis •
knowledge that is relevant and practical. Fracture closure • Fracture monitoring and fracture
measurement • Fluid leak-off • Re-fracturing
Knowledge that builds competency. considerations • Review of existing fracture modeling
Competency that adds value. software • Evaluation of post-frac well performance
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
To talk with us about customizing HOUSTON, TEXAS
a course for your training program, 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625
contact inhouse@petroskills.com. CALGARY, CANADA
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,495+GST
DENVER, COLORADO
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625
HOUSTON, TEXAS CALGARY, CANADA
July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625 Oct. 2-6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,495+GST
An OGCI Company
CALGARY, CANADA HOUSTON, TEXAS
Oct. 16-20 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,495+GST Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625

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F ACILITIES
The courses listed on this and the next page are Production Facilities courses offered publicly through PetroSkills and OGCI are designed to
develop your skills and competency in this discipline. The Course Progression Matrix below shows how these courses relate to each other and pro-
vides an easy way to construct a training plan with coursework that specifically relates to present or future job requirements. Likewise, managers can
use the matrix to develop training plans for their team. With over 60 Production Facilities courses this is the most comprehensive collection of train-
ing available in the industry. Course offerings include tried and proven courses from John M. Campbell and Company, including their Gas
Conditioning and Processing (G-4) course (known as The Campbell Gas Course) which has become the industry standard.
P R O D U C T I O N FA C I L I T I E S

52 800.821.5933 w w w. j m c a m p b e l l . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m
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PetroSkills Facilities Course List

Below is a list of the courses currently scheduled in 2005-2006 that are detailed in the facilities
catalog. To receive a copy of the facilities catalog, visit www.jmcampbell.com or email
jmc@jmcampbell.com.

■ Production / Facilities Basics (Technical ■ Fundamentals of Pumps


Managers) ■ Turbomachinery Monitoring and Problem
■ Production / Facilities Fundamentals Analysis
(Non-Facility Eng) ■ Noise Monitoring and Problem Analysis

■ Production / Processing Facilities ■ Mechanical Engineering Support for

■ Production / Facilities Fundamentals Electrical and Instrumentation Systems


(Facility Eng) ■ Fundamentals of Pipeline Engineering

■ Process Vessel Specification and Design ■ Fundamentals of Pipeline Hydraulics

■ Heat Transfer Equipment ■ Fundamentals of Onshore Pipeline Systems

■ Pumps and Compressors ■ Fundamentals of Offshore Pipeline Systems

■ Refinery Gas Treating, Sour Water, Sulfur ■ Principles of Flow Assurance Engineering

and Tail Gas ■ Electrical Engineering Basics

■ CO2 Surface Facilities (Technical Managers)


■ Oilfield Corrosion and Water Treatment ■ Electrical Engineering Fundamentals

■ Applied Water Technology ■ Electrical Engineering Practices for Surface

■ Corrosion Management in Facilities


Production/Processing Operations ■ Instrumentation Engineering Basics

With John M. Campbell & Company ■ Overview of Gas Processing (Technical Managers)
at the helm, PetroSkills Facilities (Non-Technical) ■ Instrumentation and Controls Engineering

■ Overview of Gas Processing (Technical) Fundamentals


offers the industry’s largest program
■ LNG Short Course Technology and the ■ Instrumentation Engineering Practices
of training in production facilities
LNG Chain ■ Offshore Systems Basics for Non-Technical
design, operation and maintenance. ■ Gas Processing Fundamentals Staff
These courses are detailed in full ■ Gas Conditioning and Processing ■ Offshore Systems Basics for Technical Staff

on the John M. Campbell website, (LNG Emphasis) ■ Fundamentals of Civil / Structural

■ Gas Conditioning and Processing Engineering for Offshore Systems


as well as a separate catalog
■ Process / Facility Fundamentals ■ Applied Maintenance Management
published annually. If you would
■ Gas Dehydration and Hydrate Inhibition ■ Project Management for Engineering and
like to receive our PetroSkills ■ Refrigeration and NGL Extraction Construction
Facilities catalog, email us or call ■ Gas Conditioning and Processing (Special) ■ Effective Team Leadership

405.321.1383. ■ Gas Treating and Sulfur Recovery ■ Maintenance Planning and Work Control

■ Gas Conditioning and Processing ■ Optimizing Computerized Maintenance

E-MAIL: (LNG Emphasis) ■ Effective Maintenance Shutdowns

■ Distillation - Design and Operation ■ Contracts-Production Stores System/Stock


jmc@jmcampbell.com
■ Process Simulation in Gas Conditioning Control
WEBSITE: and Processing ■ Effective Stock Control and Warehouse

■ Mechanical Engineering Basics for Operations


www.jmcampbell.com
Technical Staff ■ Case Study in Project Management

■ Fundamentals of Mechanical Engineering ■ Optimizing Equipment Availability

■ Piping Design and Specification ■ Principles of Reliability Engineering

■ Process Vessels (Mechanical) ■ Fire Protection Basics

■ Heat Transfer Equipment (Mechanical) ■ Human Factors

■ Pumps and Compressors ■ Loss Prevention in the Process Industry

■ Mechanical Design of Oil and Products ■ Fundamentals Risk Assessment

®
Terminals ■ Process Safety Management

■ Fundamentals of Compressors

An OGCI Company
w w w. j m c a m p b e l l . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 5 3
Mick_corr-file.qxd 8/2/05 1:26 PM Page 42

JMC Consulting Services.

It’s like having your own personal, top level advisory board.
John M. Campbell and Company provides a business models, hazards analysis and operations, maintenance, and the efficiency of
wide array of consulting services in remediation, sulfur plant design, refinery your facilities. JMC understand the interrelation-
engineering, operations, problem solutions, optimization, and transportation systems ships of facility capacity / capability, reliability,
construction / startup, and safety processes. expansion planning. operational approach and the real world
These services include: limitations faced in the oil and gas industry.
TROUBLESHOOTING AND DEBOTTLENECKING
TECHNICAL ANALYSIS This may be our most popular form of SAFETY PROCESSES
We provide front-end technical support and consulting. We are frequently asked to address JMC prides itself in its safety culture. This
leadership from the earliest conceptual analyses operating problems, bottlenecks, modifications attitude of “safety first” permeates all our work.
through detailed assessments of completed or reliability in existing facilities. Our world- Our safety professionals routinely conduct
designs and equipment selections. Our range wide experience often provides the insight to HAZOP, PSM, and PHA analyses for oil and gas
of expertise includes field developments, allow us to develop innovative and cost facilities. We conduct safety systems
processing plants and refineries, transportation effective solutions. evaluations, prepare safety procedures,
systems, the entire LNG supply chain, and facilitate hazards reviews, and provide the
world scale sulfur plants. As an integral part of INSTRUMENTATION technical expertise in hazards analyses. The
your team or as objective third party reviewer, Selecting the right instruments and controls for safety expertise at JMC is a natural extension
JMC brings focus to design, operations, the plant is the key to good operations. We will of our wide ranging engineering, operations,
construction, and safety as a unified process. assist in the design and specification of your construction and maintenance experience.
instrument system. We can also supervise the
SPECIALIST CONSULTING installation and provide operator training.
The world-wide availability and capability of
JMC provides specialists to meet your needs, OPERATIONS
whether in strategic planning, engineering, The operational experiences of our staff can
technical – scientific areas, construction, bring: added depth to your startup planning
safety, or project / facilities management. and execution; troubleshooting expertise to
Among the areas we have provided this problems in new and long running facilities;
specialist consulting are process simulation, and provide recommendations for improving

54 800.821.5933 w w w. j m c a m p b e l l . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m
Mick_corr-file.qxd 8/2/05 1:28 PM Page 43

Operator Training: Making It Real. Making It Right.

Visit our website at When it comes to training programs for plant and facilities operators, one size doesn’t fit all. JMC
www.jmcampbell.com knows this. That’s why our operator training is designed from the beginning with your company in
for more information.
mind. Starting with a client consultation and/or a more formal needs analysis, we customize the
course material and relate it directly to your facility, incorporating PFD’s, material balance tables and
any other material you supply. And we deliver this training with your audience in mind – whether the
novice or the more seasoned operator.

● Designed to provide operating and trouble-shooting skills


● Presented at your site
● Customized course manual for each client
● Course length depends on course content and objectives
● Lecture and demonstration-based and adaptable to the needs of the audience
● Includes exercises with short-cut calculations and customized problem sets

JMC has long been providing Operator Training to major oil and gas companies worldwide. Because
we stress fundamentals and understanding over rote procedures, our courses have been called
“engineering courses for operators”. Our Operator Training courses have even been popular among
both new engineers and experienced engineers making the switch from other disciplines. Our courses
often fulfill statutory requirements for training and have been used to meet OSHA 1910.119 mandates.

w w w. j m c a m p b e l l . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 5 5
OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:37 PM Page 44

M ANAGEMENT
The courses in this section are Petroleum Business Management courses offered publicly through PetroSkills and OGCI are designed to devel-
op your skills and competency in this discipline. The Course Progression Matrix below shows how these courses relate to each other and provides
an easy way to construct a training plan with coursework that specifically relates to present or future job requirements. Likewise, managers can use
the matrices to develop training plans for their team.
Managers can also benefit from courses that provide an understanding of other petroleum-related functions and disciplines. Such cross-train-
ing courses are recommended in the darker-shaded columns to the left of the Petroleum Business Management courses shown on the matrix.
INSTRUCTORS

R O B E RT E. B O Y D TIM NIEMAN S TA N F O R D D. S I E M E N S
J. F O R D B R E T T D R . D AV I D P E LT O N D R . M I C H A E L I. T R E E S H
D R . T H O M A S L. C O T T R I L L JOHN SCHUYLER JOHN BRUCE WELLS
W I L L I A M E. H U G H E S D R . R I C H A R D D. S E B A
PETROLEUM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

56 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


Mick_corr-file.qxd 8/2/05 2:16 PM Page 45

Basic Petroleum Economics Expanded Basic Petroleum Economics of Worldwide


Economics Petroleum Production
PETROSKILLS OGCI OGCI

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. RICHARD D. SEBA DR. RICHARD D. SEBA DR. RICHARD D. SEBA
COURSE LEVEL: BASIC COURSE LEVEL: BASIC COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Managers, engineers, explorationists, field Managers, engineers, explorationists, field Managers, supervisors and operating personnel
accounting supervisors and other personnel accounting supervisors and other personnel concerned with costs, profitability, budgets, the
who need to develop or improve their skill and who need to develop or improve their skill and company "bottom line" and other aspects of
understanding of basic economic analysis and understanding of basic economic analysis and economic analysis of petroleum production on
profitability of petroleum exploration and profitability of petroleum exploration and a project, corporate, and worldwide basis, who
production production have had some previous experience in this area
ABOUT THE COURSE ABOUT THE COURSE ABOUT THE COURSE
Could you answer the following three questions Could you answer the following three questions In the area of corporate and international
for your next project? (1) What will it cost? (2) for your next project? (1) What will it cost? (2) petroleum production, do you know how to
What is it worth?(3)Willitearn sufficientprofit? What is it worth?(3)Willitearn sufficientprofit? choose the best investments? Can you properly
Before undertaking any project, these questions Before undertaking any project, these questions evaluate investment opportunities? Do you
should be answered. This course will provide should be answered. This course will provide know what investment criteria really mean
the fundamentals necessary to enable you to do the fundamentals necessary to enable you to do and which criteria to use for best results?
so. Contractual arrangements, which also signif- so. Budgeting, financing, and contractual Answers to these questions will greatly
icantly impact the economic viability of a proj- arrangements, which also significantly impact improve your ability to make profitable
ect, are covered. Participants practice cash flow the project economics viability of a project, are decisions. Techniques for predicting profit,
techniques for economic evaluations and covered. Participants practice cash flow production, operating costs, and cash flow
investigate frequently encountered situations. techniques for economic evaluations and enable the analyst to evaluate decision
Each participant will receiveEconomics of investigate frequently encountered situations. alternatives for optimum results. Understanding
Worldwide Petroleum Production, written Participants are invited to submit their own cost of capital, financial structure, risk and
specifically for OGCI courses. Due to similarity economic problems, if appropriate. Each uncertainty, present worth, rate of return,
in content, PetroSkills recommends that partici- participant will receiveEconomics of Worldwide and other economic yardsticks enhances the
pants take either Expanded Basic Petroleum Petroleum Production, written specifically for quality and the value of economic analysis.
Economics or Economics of Worldwide Petroleum OGCI courses. Due to similarity in content, Discover the effects of projects on corporate
Production. OGCI recommends that participants take either profits. Probe economic factors inherent in
Expanded Basic Petroleum Economics or international concessions, contracts, joint
COURSE CONTENT
Forecasting oil production • Defining: "reserves",
Economics of Worldwide Petroleum Production, ventures, and production sharing agree-
operating expenses, capital expenditures, inflation, factors but not both. ments. Practice making cash flow analysis of
effecting oil and gas prices • Cash flow techniques • these contractual arrangements. Discussion of
COURSE CONTENT
Economic criteria: interest, hurdle rate, time value of
Forecasting oil production • Defining: "reserves",
real-life examples with participants from many
money, selection, ranking criteria • Risk, uncertainty:
operating expenses, capital expenditures, inflation, factors different countries enhances their value.
types of risk, mathematical techniques, probabilistic Each participant receives Economics of
effecting oil and gas prices • Cash flow techniques •
models, uncertainty in economic analysis • Tips on eco- Worldwide Petroleum Production written
Economic criteria: interest, hurdle rate, time value of
nomic factors in computer spreadsheet analysis • Ethics in
economic analyses
money, selection, ranking criteria • Risk, uncertainty: specifically for OGCI courses. Due to similarity
types of risk, mathematical techniques, probabilistic in content, OGCI recommends that participants
models, uncertainty in economic analysis • Financing, take either Expanded Basic Petroleum
ownership in the oil and gas industry: business
arrangements between operators, between mineral owners • Economics or Economics of Worldwide
Accounting versus cash flow: accounting principles and Petroleum Production, but not both.
definitions, differences between accounting cash numbers,
COURSE CONTENT
depreciation, depletion, amortization • Budgeting: types,
Pricing: natural gas, marker crudes, OPEC, spot and
processes, selecting of projects for the budget • Economic
futures markets, transportation • Production rate: mathe-
analysis of operations • Computer economics software •
matical models • Cash flow: revenue, capital and operat-
Tips on economic factors in computer spreadsheet analysis •
ing costs, spreadsheet exercises • Economic evaluation:
Ethics in economic analyses

PETROLEUM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT


present value concepts, sensitivity and risk analysis, deci-
sion trees, royalty, sources of capital, incremental econom-
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 3 D AY S
ics, sunk costs, inflation • Budgeting: examples and exercis-
es, long-range planning • Cash versus write-off decision:
TRINIDAD, UTT - POINT LISAS depreciation, depletion, and amortization • How to read an
Oct. 17-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,050 annual report: statements, financial ratios, what is and is
not included, reading between the lines • Worldwide
HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S business operations: concessions, licenses, production
Nov. 7-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750 sharing contracts, joint ventures, cost of capital, sources of
HOUSTON, TEXAS funding, debt and equity • Performance appraisal: buy/sell
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 3 D AY S Nov. 7-11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 assessments • Computer economics software • Tips on
LONDON, U.K. format and inclusion of economic factors in computer
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S spreadsheet analysis • Ethics in economic analyses
Apr. 10-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,050+VAT
Sept. 25-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,050+VAT DUBAI, UAE
Apr. 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
DUBAI, UAE
Apr. 15-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,275 KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA
Apr. 24-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 HOUSTON, TEXAS
May 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
HOUSTON, TEXAS Nov. 6-10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
May 15-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750
July 19-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750 COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO HOUSTON, TEXAS
Nov. 6-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750 June 26-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
June 26-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750 Sept. 25-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT Sept. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 5 7


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:37 PM Page 46

Meeting Management and


Facilitation for the Personnel Supervision in Petroleum Finance and
Petroleum Industry the Petroleum Industry Accounting
OGCI OGCI PETROSKILLS

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


DR. DAVID PELTON DR. THOMAS L. COTTRILL ROBERT E. BOYD NEW
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Project managers, project supervisors, team Current or soon-to-be-promoted first-line and Personnel new to the oil and gas accounting
leaders, managing directors, general managers, mid-level supervisors responsible for the daily industry, and others desiring to understand or
company executives who run meetings as part of performance of a work unit and the personnel refresh their knowledge of basic finance and
doing business, and company training instructors in that unit accounting concepts and the role financial state-
and facilitators ABOUT THE COURSE
ments play in oil and gas operations including
Why would any company expend hundreds of bankers or CPAs who have oil and gas clients
ABOUT THE COURSE
thousands of dollars to seek, recruit, and hire and other finance and accounting personnel
Meetings remain a boon or curse to needing to understand unique issues as they
corporate communication. Properly planned the best employees then leave their development
and performance to chance through ineffective relate to the petroleum industry. Participants are
and managed, meetings are extremely positive encouraged to bring their company's financial
and dynamic ways to exchange ideas, shape management? Unfortunately this occurs every
time an employee is promoted to a supervisory/ reports. This course may qualify for up to 22
policy, resolve problems, effect change, etc. hours of CPE for US CPAs
However, when poorly designed and managerial position without training in the
implemented, meetings accomplish little. techniques and practices of effective supervision/ ABOUT THE COURSE
They become virtual breeding grounds for management. How can we "assume" that Making the most efficient use of your resources is
confusion, tension, frustration, boredom because one is an excellent engineer, geologist, critical to the success of any company. Finance
and negativity. geophysicist, etc. he/she will somehow and accounting comprise the universal business
automatically just "know" how to supervise language and help you manage those resources
This course is for individuals who plan, and manage personnel? A supervisor, regardless effectively. Planning and decision making that
conduct, manage, and oversee meetings. of technical expertise, can make an error occur in an informal financial context permit
Participants will have a full array of “hands- setting off an uncontrolled and disastrous chain better application of resources and promote com-
on” class experience to practice facilitation reaction unless he/she has command of petitive advantage. The aim of this course is to
skills; to design agendas; to analyze (and principles and practices leading to employee improve delegates’ job performance by enhancing
understand) individual and group behavior effectiveness, productivity, and teamwork. their understanding of current international prac-
types; to chair and run a mock meeting; to tices in finance and accounting within the E&P
improve personal communication skills, i.e., The first-line and mid-level supervisor has industry. This is achieved through an examination
listening, speaking, “reading” non-verbal more direct effect on employees and the of: (a) accounting standards, policies and practices
language; thinking on one’s feet, etc. This productivity of a work group than any other in the oil and gas industry (b) the accounting and
two-day course is divided into two segments single entity in the organization. This course financial management implications of exploring
– the first, an in-class discussion and examina- increases the confidence and productivity of for and producing oil and gas.
tion of meetings, and the second, an in-class supervisors who may be scientific or technical
An understanding of accounting also allows a
practicum during which meetings are planned, specialists, but have minimal training in the company to trace a competitor’s actions from its
conducted, facilitated, and analyzed. Attendees science and art of supervision. Skills in human financial statements and to plan accordingly.
will be videotaped to measure performance and relations, communication, motivation, and lead- These concepts will be presented and reinforced
their progress will be charted to quantifiably ership are essential tools for the using relevant examples and case studies.
show areas in which actual improvement has supervisor/manager. This course provides
taken place. techniques enabling supervisors to efficiently COURSE CONTENT
use one of the greatest resources a company has Getting started: Financial terms and definitions, the lan-
COURSE CONTENT guage of business; Accounting rules, standards and policies
- its people. In the course participants also • Constructing the basic financial statements: Data collec-
Learning how to run efficient meetings • Learning how to study, discuss, and apply core techniques to tion and analysis; constructing the basic financial state-
prepare and implement meeting agendas • Learning about ments; the financial reports; 4 basic statements; cash flow
meeting facilitation techniques and tools • Understanding authentic oil industry personnel crises routine- statement, Profit and loss or Income statement, Balance
meeting roles and responsibilities • Learning how and ly confronting supervisors. sheet, and Statement of equity and retained earnings; the
when to use meeting facilitation tools • Mastering meeting accounting cycle; special accounting elements including
COURSE CONTENT accrual accounting versus cash accounting; tying the state-
management skills, i.e., using time wisely, avoiding topic
confusion, handling personal attack, avoiding "traffic" Profile of a supervisor: how one behaves, what a ments together • Comparing different accounting elements:
PETROLEUM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

supervisor does, self-assessment • Leadership dilemma: Four different sets of accounting books; Identifying and
problems, dealing with individual and group classifying costs - pre-drilling, drilling, development, pro-
communication, maintaining topic focus, being "in popular versus proper, leadership styles, types of leaders •
The supervisor and productivity: quantity or quality, the duction and other costs; Full cost, successful efforts and rev-
command" of the meeting, etc. • Recognizing and enue recognition methods of accounting; profits versus cash
understanding the various roles that a facilitator plays production pyramid, supervisory behavior and production
flows; calculating different methods of depreciation for
during the course of a meeting • Speaking in front of • The need for communication: patterns of assets; capital versus operating leases; criteria for capitaliza-
others miscommunication, the skill of listening • Training tion and expense; consolidating subsidiaries of less than
employees: how people learn, supervisor or coach, five 100%; accounting for joint ventures and joint operating
fundamentals of training • Motivation: the needs of man, agreements (JOA); inventory valuation methods; Disposition
positive and negative factors • Employee morale: of long-term assets (FAS 144) • Sarbanes - Oxley: What
determining, improving, strengthening • Maintaining compliance means for all personnel; internal controls •
discipline: persistence, positive, negative • Evaluating Accounting and reporting: Distinguishing between financial
accounting and managerial accounting; defining Generally
employee performance: types and uses of appraisals, Accepted Accounting Principals of different countries; find-
avoiding errors • Overcoming resistance to change: ing, understanding and incorporating footnotes and other
conflicts from change, articulated and unarticulated gripes disclosures; special issues in oil and gas accounting (FASB
• Group behavior: characteristics of groups, group cohe- 19) • The latest issues: The role of International Financial
sion, the worker and the group • Managing your boss: Reporting Standards (IFRS) in today’s environment; COPAS
assisting, relating, your greatest resource and SORP involvement; intangible drilling costs and their
accounting treatment; minority investments, Present Value
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 10 construction; Standardized Measure of Oil and Gas
(SMOG) disclosures (FAS 69); contractual accounting
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 2 D AY S HOUSTON, TEXAS records such as Production Sharing Agreements (PSA).
HOUSTON, TEXAS Feb. 27-Mar. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 3 D AY S
Oct. 13-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,395
KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 2 D AY S June 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 June 19-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750
HOUSTON, TEXAS LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
Sept. 28-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,395 Sept. 25-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT July 17-19 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,050+VAT

58 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:37 PM Page 47

Petroleum Finance and Petroleum Risks and Presentation Skills for


Accounting Analysis Decision Analysis the Petroleum Industry
OGCI PETROSKILLS OGCI

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


ROBERT E. BOYD JOHN SCHUYLER OR TIM NIEMAN DR. DAVID PELTON
COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION COURSE LEVEL: FOUNDATION
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Personnel new to the oil and gas accounting Engineers, geologists, geophysicists, planning Senior technical personnel, managers and project
industry, and others desiring to understand or analysts, and managers managers who present results of studies, proposals,
refresh their knowledge of basic petroleum YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
budgets, etc.; department managers or heads
accounting concepts including bankers or CPA’s • Express and understand judgments about who report results to upper management;
who have oil and gas clients and other financial risks and uncertainties as probability company managers who share results with
personnel needing to understand unique issues distributions investors, government agencies, or other public
as they relate to the petroleum industry. • Work with probability distributions, including funding sources; industry spokespersons or
revising prior assessments based upon new,
Participants are encouraged to bring their com- imperfect information representatives
pany's financial reports. This course may quali- • Set up decision models to calculate expected ABOUT THE COURSE
fy for up to 34 hours of CPE for US CPA’s value in decision trees, payoff tables, and Monte
Carlo simulation Technical and non-technical personnel often
ABOUT THE COURSE • Use expected value as the cornerstone of find it difficult to clearly express thoughts
Making the most efficient use of your resources forecasting and decision policy and ideas when asked to report findings to,
is critical to the success of any company. or request project expenditure authorization
ABOUT THE COURSE
Finance and accounting comprise the universal Good technical and business decisions are based on com- from, senior management. As well, personnel
business language. Planning and decision petent analysis of project costs, benefits and risks. are often ineffective presenters when asked to
making that occur in an informal financial Attendees learn a practical, systematic process for analyz- explain company policy to, or share company
context permit better application of resources ing decisions under conditions of risk and uncertainty. goals, with boards of directors, government
and promote competitive advantage. The aim of Participants learn to design and solve decision models. committees, fund approving agencies, or other
Probability distributions express professional judgments
this course is to improve delegates’ job about risks and uncertainties and are carried through the public entities. This course is for individuals
performance by enhancing their understanding calculations. Decision tree and influence diagrams pro- who are required, as part of their jobs, to
of current international practices in finance and vide clear communications and the basis for valuing each make presentations in-house or in public,
accounting within the E&P industry. These alternative. The complementary Monte Carlo simulation and who need, therefore, to perfect the fun-
concepts will be presented and reinforced using technique is also presented and experienced in detail in a damentals of dynamic presentation-making.
hand-calculation exercise.
relevant examples and case studies. Project modeling fundamentals and basic probability
Attendees will participate in a variety of
concepts provide the foundation for the calculations. The "hands-on" class experiences to improve
COURSE CONTENT
Getting started: Financial terms and definitions, the lan- mathematics is straightforward and mostly involves only presentation-making skills. Participants will
guage of business; Accounting rules, standards and policies common algebra. The emphasis is on practical tech- also speak in class and be videotaped to
• Constructing the basic financial statements: the finan- niques for immediate application. This is a fast-paced measure performance. Progress will be charted
cial reports • 4 basic statements; the accounting cycle; course and recommended for those with strong English to quantifiably illustrate areas in which actual
listening skills.
special accounting elements including accrual and cash
A semi-custom variant of this course, Economic improvement has taken place.
accounting; tying the statements together • Comparing
different accounting elements: Four sets of accounting Evaluation of Prospects and Producing Properties, is This course can be taught bi-lingually in
books; Identifying and classifying costs – pre-drilling, available for in-house presentation. English, French, German, or Italian.
drilling, development, production and other costs; Full COURSE CONTENT
cost, successful efforts and revenue recognition methods of COURSE CONTENT
Decision Tree Analysis: decision models; low probability, high-
accounting; profits versus cash flows; calculating deprecia- consequence events; valuing additional information and Appearance and demeanor • Conquering nerves and fear •
tion; criteria for capitalization and expense; consolidating control; project threats and opportunities; advantages and Improving language • Overcoming bad speaking habits •
subsidiaries of less than 100%; accounting for joint ven- limitations • Monte Carlo Simulation: Latin hypercube Improving vocal quality, strength, color, expressiveness •
tures and joint operating agreements (JOA); Disposition of sampling; portfolio problems; optimization • Decision Criteria Learning about you and your audience • Thinking on
and Policy: value measures; multiple objectives; HSSE, capital your feet • Using visual aids • Presentation construction
long-term assets (FAS 144) • Sarbanes – Oxley: What constraint and risk aversion • Modeling the Investment:
compliance means for all personnel; internal controls • and production • Presentation management • Preparation
influence diagrams; sensitivity; real options • Basic Probability
Accounting and reporting: Differences in financial and and Statistics: four fundamental rules, including Bayes’ theo- techniques • Proper social etiquette in a trans-national or
managerial accounting; defining Generally Accepted rem; choosing distribution types; “gambler’s ruin”; common multi-national milieu
Accounting Principals of different countries; understand- misconceptions about probability • Expected Value Concept:
ing and incorporating footnotes and other disclosures; oil avoiding biases in estimation • Analysis Methods: guidelines
for good analysis practice • Implementing Decision Analysis:

PETROLEUM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT


and gas accounting (FASB 19) • The latest issues; The team analyses; computer tools; mitigating risks • Evaluating a
role of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) multi-pay prospect (team exercise).
in today’s environment; COPAS and SORP involvement;
intangible drilling costs and their accounting treatment; 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
minority investments, PV10 construction; Standardized
Measure of Oil and Gas (SMOG) disclosures (FAS 69);
LONDON, U.K.
Oct. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
contractual accounting records such as Production Sharing
Agreements (PSA) • Comparative Analysis of Financial RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL
Statements: Integrated versus E&P; Comparing earnings, Nov. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,675
assets, operations; U.S. and international; common sizing; HOUSTON, TEXAS
basic ratios; oil and gas industry standards; trends over Dec. 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
time; comparing energy companies • Valuation methods:
Different methods of determination; strengths and weak- 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
ness of each method; determining the cost of capital; DUBAI, UAE
Which ones NOT to use in the oil business; What to value Jan. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,025
– assets; cash flows, companies, equity, debt; which
method is best for upstream, mid-stream and downstream, LONDON, U.K.
and why; adjusting for uncertainty; intrinsic value of Apr. 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT
stocks Oct. 23-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 3 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS
June 12-16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Oct. 10-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S Dec. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325
HOUSTON, TEXAS COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 3 D AY S
June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 Aug. 21-25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,325 HOUSTON, TEXAS
LONDON, U.K. KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA Mar. 27-29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750
July 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,695+VAT Sept. 4-8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,100 Sept. 25-27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,750

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 5 9


Mick_corr-file.qxd 8/2/05 2:31 PM Page 48

Advanced Decision Analysis Oil and Gas Teams: How to


with Portfolio and Project International Petroleum
Modeling Contracts and Negotiations Make Them Work
OGCI OGCI OGCI
COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR
JOHN SCHUYLER DR. RICHARD D. SEBA DR. MICHAEL I. TREESH
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Evaluation engineers, analysts, managers, Exploration and production managers; national Geologists, geophysicists, petroleum engineers,
planners, economists oil company managers; government representatives landmen, petrophysicists, computer scientists,
YOU WILL LEARN HOW TO
and others in the oil industry who expect to be human resource personnel, training managers,
• Develop more-advanced decision models, espe- involved in negotiating, administering, reviewing, exploration/production managers
cially for value of imperfect information analyses managing, directing, and overseeing international
ABOUT THE COURSE
• Use decision analysis software for Monte Carlo exploration and production contracts between
host governments and outside contractors Successful teams combine competent personnel
simulation and decision tree analysis with new technology, producing results that
• Model portfolio problems such as for evaluating ABOUT THE COURSE meet management’s expectations. Teams
plays, wells in a field, and multi-pay drilling You will learn the philosophy, evolution, and become more effective by removing barriers,
locations fundamentals of international petroleum by maximizing productivity, and by helping
• Express and apply risk policy as a utility function. contracts and have an opportunity to see how organizations move ahead of their competition.
ABOUT THE COURSE each of these actually works. You will take part Participants develop specific plans, skills,
Quality forecasts and evaluations depend upon in life-like negotiating sessions mastering many and role descriptions applicable to their
well-designed project models and decision policy, negotiating techniques, where a mistake is a unique workplace situations. The roles that
in addition to professional judgments. Participants learning experience not a disaster. As you prepare are profiled include: team member, team
learn the methods and practice of building good for each session, you use a computerized leader, manager of teams, and training advisor.
evaluation models. economic model to assess the value of contract Learn what is needed for effective team
This course is intended for professionals involved terms. This enables improved planning of dynamics and avoid the pitfalls associated
with constructing project evaluation and other negotiating strategies to achieve the desired with building and managing teams. Become
forecasting and assessment models. The familiar goals by parties at both sides of the negotiating familiar with the characteristics of successful
MS Excel spreadsheet is the platform project and table. The classes include participants from both innovative companies and gain a working
risk assessment models. Add-in software provides national oil companies and foreign contractors, knowledge of modern teamwork practices.
Monte Carlo and decision tree capabilities. The which adds further realism to the exercises. Host Proven techniques and case studies selected
emphasis is on the evaluation concepts and tech- governments and outside contractors are on from a worldwide search for excellence in
niques, rather than particular software programs. opposite sides of the negotiating table, but they team practices are reviewed. Emphasis is
Intermediate Excel spreadsheet competence (espe- are not adversaries. A win-win business arrange- placed upon maximizing the performance of
cially IF statements) in an MS Windows environ- ment should be the objective of both parties, as
a signed contract makes them partners. A viable existing teams through innovative approaches
ment is required. This fast-paced course is recom- to the oil and gas industry.
mended for those with strong English listening contract cannot be negotiated without an effective
skills. Participants are expected to know the understanding of the underlying economics. Each team experiences a predictable sequence
concepts in the Petroleum Risks and Decision Your negotiating strategies will determine con- of the five stages throughout its progression
Analysis course or have similar substantial tractual terms ultimately defining the economic from startup to being self-directed, its ultimate
background. benefits to be realized. Various contract types capability. Understanding this natural life
have specific "pros" and "cons". Concessions and history clarifies expectations between the
Visit http://www.maxvalue.com/prereq.htm for a list production sharing agreements are two of the team and its management and enables the
of expected pre-course competencies. Enrollment contract types to be evaluated. Each participant team to succeed. Highlighted are the diverse
is limited to approximately 16 participants. receives a disk copy of the spreadsheets used in ways in which team issues can be solved.
One personal computer is supplied, at added cost, for the negotiation workshop and a manual, which
every two participants. explains the fundamental principles of E&P COURSE CONTENT
contracts, presents examples of economic Organizational environment conducive to effective teams •
COURSE CONTENT analysis, and includes a model contract. Practical methods to transform geologists, engineers,
Project Modeling: influence diagrams, correlation, control and geophysicist, and other professionals into an effective,
feedback concepts, sensitivity analysis; documentation and COURSE CONTENT motivated, and creative team • Change processes leading
good modeling practices • Monte Carlo Simulation: prospect Types of international petroleum contracts • Important to teams • Focusing the team's output on its products •
risking, play analysis and discovery process models; choosing principles and terms in all contracts • Host governments Skills necessary to effectively function in a team environment
PETROLEUM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

distribution types; modeling and optimizing portfolios; com- and contractors contract objectives • Specific features of (appropriate workplace behavior, innovation, conflict
petitive bidding and other optimizations; valuing added con- different types of contracts; dividing the production • resolution, problem-solving, leadership) • Defining roles
trol; traditional and Latin hypercube sampling; stopping rules; Outline of a typical contract for E&P • Contract operating and responsibilities of the teams • Measure of team
ways to model correlation • Decision Tree Analysis: value of
information; options • Decision Policy: PV discount rate and issues • Funding petroleum development programs • How effectiveness • Stages in the life of a team • Creating a
risk (CAPM and portfolio theory); portfolio management for the contractor is paid • Contractor's risk • Contract motivational environment within a flat organization •
optimizing shareholder value; real options analysis; multi-cri- economics • Non-financial issues • Analysis of contract Development of a personal or team development plan
teria decisions; HSSE, risk policy as a utility function; insur- provisions • Model contract • Natural gas production
ance and hedging; optimizing working interest • Risk and under international contracts • Negotiations workshop •
Decision Analysis in Projects: project activity networks (CPM, Ethics in international petroleum operations
PERT and PDM); project risk management • Implementation:
presentation formats; balanced scorecards forecasting share-
holder value creation; team processes; alternative and emerg-
ing evaluation technologies, including fuzzy logic, neural net-
works, expert systems, simulated annealing, and genetic algo-
rithms.
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S 2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL HOUSTON, TEXAS
Nov. 28-Dec. 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775* Nov. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Oct. 17-21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
June 19-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 HOUSTON, TEXAS
LONDON, U.K. Nov. 13-17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425 June 26-30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425
Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT*
LONDON, U.K. LONDON, U.K.
*plus computer charge Sept. 18-22 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT July 31-Aug. 4 . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT

60 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:37 PM Page 49

Petroleum Financial Petroleum Project Fundamentals of


Workshop Management: Principles International Oil and Gas
Formerly: Petroleum Financial Management and Practices Law
OGCI OGCI OGCI

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


ROBERT E. BOYD J. FORD BRETT WILLIAM E. HUGHES
COURSE LEVEL: INTERMEDIATE C O U R S E L E V E L : INTERMEDIATE COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Chief Financial Officers, controllers, treasurers, finan- Exploration, production and management Petroleum managers who deal with international
cial analysts, asset team leaders, those moving from personnel interested in applying project oil and gas legal matters in the course of their
technical functional roles to general roles, and person- management techniques to their operations business; legal professionals with little formal,
nel responsible for or affected by the financial health (Facilities engineers are referred to PetroSkills specialized training in oil and gas law, but
of the company as determined by financial decisions of Project Management for Engineering and expect soon to deal with international oil and
the company. Participants must have a good working Construction at www.petroskills.com) gas law matters
knowledge of accounting and finance and should bring
their company's financial reports. ABOUT THE COURSE ABOUT THE COURSE
Running a successful petroleum operation International petroleum transactions occur
ABOUT THE COURSE within a complex legal environment that limits
Financial decisions are made every day and are an requires a blend of technology, business
savvy, and people skills. If you already have what petroleum companies, host governments
integral part of every company's ultimate success and service companies can do, and interprets
or failure. Personnel decisions, drilling for a firm grasp of exploration or production
reserves, production, acquiring or divesting assets; technology, learn to amplify its effectiveness and enforces many of their promises. Petroleum
or forging strategic alliances are all financial in
professionals often lack the broad understanding
with applied project management techniques. of what makes up this legal environment and
nature. A shifting and expanding global oil and gas This course is aimed at helping technical
economy has dramatically changed the role of how it can have an impact on their work. This
financial decisions and the magnitude of their
personnel make the best business decisions - course is designed to give participants a basic
affect throughout the company. Heightened corpo- decisions that lead to lowest project cost while understanding of the legal fundamentals that
rate competition, technological change, price still meeting all production or exploration goals. make their international transactions work,
volatility, inflation and interest rates coupled with ranging from the principles that apply to
worldwide economic uncertainty must be dealt
Petroleum Project Management covers the interpreting and enforcing their agreements,
with on a daily basis. This course will help identify principles and applicationof project to the procedures for resolving their disputes,
the appropriate methods and reinforce them with management to the upstream oil and gas to addressing interpretational issues posed by
relevant examples and group discussions. business. Participants may choose a case common contract provisions, and to avoiding
study from a number of real-life exploration, liability under environmental and bribery laws.
One personal computer is supplied, at added cost, for The course will allow participants to identify
every two participants. production, facilities, and general management
situations, or they may bring the details of confidently potential legal problems, to address
COURSE CONTENT them before they become serious, and to facilitate
Using financial information: Understanding financial state-
one of their own current projects. Because the smooth interaction between oil and gas
ments, identifying and evaluating potential hidden items in of this experiencewith practical situations, professionals, host government representatives,
financial reports and information; evaluation of the oil and participants can use these project management and their lawyers.
gas disclosures; the quality earnings approach; latest meth- principles their first day back on the job.
ods of analysis with the DuPont method, Altman Z-Score, COURSE CONTENT
and Tobin's Q; how to spot trends • Benchmarking: how One personal computer is provided, at Law governing international petroleum transactions
to cut through the clutter - determining which to use,
when each is appropriate; using ratios; Internal versus additional cost, for each two participants. (including significant differences between various national
external; how to determine which ones to use when each legal systems, and the sources, principles and limits of
is appropriate; financial and operating ratios of the oil and COURSE CONTENT international law as applied to petroleum transactions) •
gas industry; sources of industry ratios; when and how to The project management process • Scheduling tools • Interpretation and enforcement of treaties and private
adjust benchmarks • Short-term financial decision mak- Supplier relationships • Manpower resources • Project risk contracts • Effects of international trade (and producing
ing: The cash conversion cycle; building a cash forecast; management • Learning, continuous improvement and country) agreements such as the E.U., NAFTA, Mercosur,
working capital management; effective cash management quality management in projects • Communications, and OPEC • Dispute resolution approaches, including
programs; use of off-balance sheet financing • Planning organization, team management • Case studies and litigation and arbitration • Procedures under and
and Forecasting: The different processes and methods; exercises
why they are important; managing the budgeting process; enforcement of common arbitration provisions • Legal
tying the processes together; analysis of budgets; using the defenses available to foreign companies, states, and
budgeting checklist; using the budgets and forecasts as a state-owned or connected entities, and recognition and
component of the company’s strategy • Long-term finan- enforcement of judgments and arbitration awards • Basic
cial decision making: capital structure - finding the right legal concepts of ownership of mineral rights (onshore,
mix of debt and equity; developing a company’s cost of offshore, and deep sea bed) • Expropriation and
capital; capital budgeting tools and techniques; capital compensation issues • State-owned entities and
budgeting for projects; international capital budgeting;
privatization • Laws bearing on development rights •

PETROLEUM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT


valuing uncertain cash flows; off-balance sheet financing;
strategic alliances; alternative financing opportunities; Legal interpretational issues of common contract
alternative investment choices; evaluating acquisition and provisions • Interpretational issues for service contracts •
divestiture opportunities; tying the company's financial Transfer and protection of technology and confidential
and overall strategy together • Risk and Valuation business information • Operating agreements and unitized
concepts: Determining an appropriate discount rate; operations • Environmental protection laws • Criminal
valuing for uncertain events; using derivatives to manage and civil liability for oil spills • Indemnification and
revenues and costs; when to hedge and when to buy
financial “insurance”; valuing projects including guaranty issues • Bribery laws • Marketing and
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
Production Sharing Contracts; intangible items that factor transportation • Petroleum futures
into financial decisions • Performance Management: RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL
Market Value Added and Economic Value Added EVA®: Oct. 3-7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,775*
How to determine each; how to find the economic profit
of a company; what each means and why they are HOUSTON, TEXAS
important; the Balanced Scorecard as a tool Dec. 5-9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
HOUSTON, TEXAS ABU DHABI, UAE
Oct. 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* Mar. 11-15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,125*
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
LONDON, U.K.
LONDON, U.K. May 15-19 . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT* 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
July 24-28 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,795+VAT*
HOUSTON, TEXAS ABU DHABI, UAE
HOUSTON, TEXAS July 10-14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
Oct. 30-Nov. 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425* Apr. 29-May 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$3,325
Nov. 27-Dec. 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,425*
LONDON, U.K.
*plus computer charge *plus computer charge Aug. 14-18 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,995+VAT

All classes available at your location. Contact us today. w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m 800.821.5933 6 1


OGCI_pg13-62_v2.qxd 7/26/05 9:37 PM Page 50

Fundamentals of U.S. Oil Resolving Conflicts: Social Outreach Strategies:


and Gas Law Preventing and Addressing Principles and Best
Conflicts in Petroleum Organizations Practices
OGCI OGCI OGCI

COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR COURSE INSTRUCTOR


WILLIAM E. HUGHES STANFORD A. SIEMENS JOHN BRUCE WELLS
COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED COURSE LEVEL: SPECIALIZED
DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR DESIGNED FOR
Petroleum technical professionals and managers Supervisors, managers, team leaders, project Managers and practitioners of corporate social
as well as non-U.S. personnel, who deal with managers, project engineers, organizational responsibility/social outreach programs at the
U.S. oil and gas legal matters in the course of specialists, facilitators, negotiators, procurement corporate and field level; environmental, health
their business; legal professionals with little personnel and other individuals who are exposed and safety managers; public and government
formal, specialized training in oil and gas law, to internal or external conflict in their work affairs staff; business unit managers interested
but expect soon to deal with U.S. oil and gas environment in this area of the business.
legal matters ABOUT THE COURSE ABOUT THE COURSE
ABOUT THE COURSE The cost of destructive conflict is often There are increasing requirements and expecta-
No one in the petroleum industry with bottom- misunderstood and usually underestimated. tions for social outreach and community
line responsibility can afford to ignore the legal Unfortunately, effective conflict management and engagement in today's global marketplace. In
aspects of the business. Too many technically training is often inadequate. The consequences developing new projects, oil and gas companies
sound deals have been soured by unidentified of uncontrolled conflict (destructive activities, must comply with social and environmental
or poorly handled legal problems. The purpose wasted time, poor decisions, lost people, safeguard policies imposed by public institu-
of this course is to allow participants confidently unnecessary reorganizations, litigation, safety tions such as the World Bank and by commer-
to identify potential legal problems and to have incidents, and even catastrophic events) can be cial financial institutions that have voluntarily
them addressed before they become serious, as dramatically reduced when conflict is managed committed to respect these same safeguard
well as to facilitate a smooth interaction between effectively. This exciting and timely new course policies. In addition, companies are expected to
oil and gas professionals and their lawyers. is uniquely designed for the petroleum industry support the local communities where they have
This course provides participants with a broad with an emphasis on practical processes and operations. Social outreach has thus become an
overview of U.S. oil and gas law, with particular skills for resolving conflict in major projects, important component of every oil company's
attention to potential areas of concern for a well teams, multidisciplinary teams, petroleum operations around the world. Collectively, oil
production company’s legal environment. operations and other petroleum industry companies spend hundreds of millions of
Participants are provided with pro-forma organizations. Attendees will learn to recognize, dollars a year on a wide range of community
contracts and shown the key terms in each. cost and address interpersonal, structural, and programs. These investments are a necessary
other types of conflict in the most cost-effective cost of doing business and can also be seen as
COURSE CONTENT
way, including prevention as well as resolution. strategic assets. From a business perspective,
Basic U.S. legal concepts relevant to oil and gas rights •
Types of property interests (such as "fee" ownership and This course can be taken as either a three-day social outreach is now recognized as an
mineral, leasehold, surface and royalty interests) • or a five-day course. The three-day course important component for securing/maintaining
Conveyances (deed, lease, inheritance, court-transfer, covers the basic skills and processes and applies a license to operate, ensuring rapid deployment,
adverse possession) • Joint ownership, principles of minimizing the risks of shutdowns or closings,
contract interpretation and of tort and criminal liability • to any supervisor, manager or team leader in
the petroleum industry. The five-day version and generally enhancing local corporate reputa-
Problems and methods of interpreting oil and gas
documents • Oil and gas leases: terms, permitted uses, land includes two additional days of project specific tion. The challenge for oil companies is to
coverage, "production", drilling and delay-rental issues, processes designed specifically for project maximize the value of the resources committed
implied covenants, and transfers of lease interests • Oil personnel. The course relies heavily on petroleum to community engagement initiatives, often in
and gas taxation • Non-lease contracts such as drilling, industry specific case studies including participant countries with difficult socio-economic and
well operating, gas, gas-balancing, division orders, support, political environments. This challenge is often
and farm-out agreements • Transportation and marketing
provided scenarios.
punctuated by the need to balance global
of oil and gas • Environmental protection issues • Relevant
U.S. securities laws, and U.S. policy, regulation, and
COURSE CONTENT corporate positioning with country specific
Recognizing conflict • Personal conflict styles • Essential priorities. This course looks at some of the
operations (including onshore and offshore public lands) • elements for resolving conflict • Estimating the cost of
Offshore leasing operations • Regulation of oil and gas conflict • Interpersonal conflict among subordinates •
emerging models and thinking about social
futures markets Team conflict • Internal company mediation • Analyzing outreach. Special emphasis will be placed on
conflict • Conflict between yourself and another • compliance requirements, approaches and
Continuous mediation methodologies being deployed which can be
PETROLEUM BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

used to better focus existing programs and


LAST TWO DAYS (5-day course only): Project conflict • maximize returns on social outreach spending.
Sources of project conflict • Conflict prevention models •
Processes and key considerations for resolving project
Case studies will be drawn from upstream and
conflict • Principled negotiation • Strategic management downstream operations, as well as from indus-
of organizational conflict trialized and emerging-market countries.
COURSE CONTENT
Emerging trends, new expectations • EHS • Compliance •
Business case for social outreach • Organizational approaches
to social outreach • Social outreach models and best practices
• Social outreach planning • Stakeholder engagement • Risk
mitigation and expectation management, social outreach
Communications strategies • Performance metrics

2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 3 D AY S

HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 5 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S
2006 SCHEDULE AND TUITION Oct. 24-26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,930
HOUSTON, TEXAS HOUSTON, TEXAS 2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 3 D AY S
Oct. 31-Nov. 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625 May 8-10 (3 day) . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,930
May 8-12 (5 day) . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625 HOUSTON, TEXAS
2 0 0 6 S C H E D U L E A N D T U I T I O N / 5 D AY S July 10-12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$1,930
LONDON, U.K.
HOUSTON, TEXAS Oct. 9-11 (3 day) . . . . . . . .US$2,230+VAT LONDON, U.K.
Mar. 27-31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,625 Oct. 9-13 (5 day) . . . . . . . .US$2,995+VAT Aug. 21-23 . . . . . . . . . . . . .US$2,230+VAT

62 800.821.5933 w w w. o g c i . c o m w w w. p e t r o s k i l l s . c o m All classes available at your location. Contact us today.


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Our Instructors

DR. FRANK ASHFORD of Notre Dame and an M.S.C.E. from Marquette University, courses in over 20 countries. Prior to joining OGCI in
Has 40 years experience in oil and gas producing facilities. and, is a registered Professional Engineer in Colorado. 1991, Mr. Brett was with Amoco where he worked on
Dr. Ashford joined with John M. Campbell & Company in numerous exploration and development drilling projects
1998. He provides instruction fluently in either Spanish or DR. KIRK E. BOATRIGHT in the Bering Sea, North Slope of Alaska, Gulf of Mexico,
English. Prior to joining John M. Campbell & Company, Is President and CEO of Engineering Consultants offshore Trinidad and the Overthrust Belt in Wyoming.
Dr. Ashford was a professor at Central University of International and Training Consultants International. A registered professional engineer, he has been granted
Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, where he taught various Formerly, Dr. Boatright was a drilling research engineer over 25 US patents and is the author or co-author of over
courses in natural gas engineering technology. He has with Exxon, petroleum engineer with Amoco, a roustabout 30 technical publications. For his work on improved oil
authored technical articles published in World Oil, JPT, with Cities Service (OXY), and Dean of the College of Arts well drilling techniques, he was honored in 1996 with a
SPE, Intevep Pub., PDVSA, Pacific Oil World, AAPG, and Sciences at Northeastern Oklahoma State University. nomination for the National Medal of Technology, the US
SPELAC, and GPA. He holds a B.S., a M.S. and a PhD in He is also an engineering and training consultant for vari- Government’s highest technology award. In 2000, he
Petroleum Engineering from the University of Oklahoma. ous major world oil and service companies. Over 10,000 received the American Society for Competitiveness Philip
professionals have participated in Dr. Boatright’s courses. B. Crosby Medal for Global competitiveness through
DR. OMAR BARKAT Dr. Boatright has extensive experience in drilling, comple- Quality in Knowledge Management, Best Practices
tion, fluid flow, and offshore operations. He is listed in the Transfer, and Operations improvement. Mr. Brett has
Is a full professor of chemical engineering at McNeese served as a Distinguished Lecturer for the Society of
State University, in Lake Charles, Louisiana. He is also an "Who's Who Worldwide" and in the "Who's Who Registry
of Global Business Leaders", and is the author of several Petroleum Engineers (SPE); as chairman of the SPE’s
independent consultant in engineering and international Electronic Publishing Committee; and as a review chairman
relations. He has extensive academic and industrial technical publications. He holds a B.S. in Mechanical
Engineering (Petroleum) from Oklahoma State University, for the “Drilling and Completion Engineering Journal.” He
experience in North Africa, Europe and the USA and has holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering and Physics from
taught courses in petroleum processing, process equipment an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Oklahoma State
University, and a Ph.D. in Engineering Science from the Duke University (where he was elected to Phi Beta
design, plant design, process engineering, fluid flow Kappa), an M.B.A. from Oklahoma State University, and an
practices, and computer applications in process design. University of Arkansas.
M.S.E. from Stanford University.
From 1993 to 1996, Dr. Barkat was a professor of chemical
engineering at the University of Tulsa. His main interests JOHN C. BOURDON
DR. JOHN BURRELL
include natural gas and crude oil processing, equipment Is a Vice President of John M. Campbell & Company. He
design, process plant design, single and multiphase flows has more than twenty-nine years experience in hydrocar- Is a petroleum consultant in London, England. He worked
and characterization, and separation technologies. He is a bon processing and specializes in sulfur recovery processes for 21 years with BP as a seismic researcher,
member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, for the petroleum refining industry. Mr. Bourdon has been interpreter and later as an oil and gas field subsurface man-
SPE, and ASEE, and is a registered professional engineer. involved in the development of several sulfur-related ager. He developed BP’s one-dimensional synthetic seismic
He is the author of numerous technical publications and is technologies and mechanical innovations, has authored modeling package and provided 1-D and 2-D modeling
listed in the Who’s Who in Science and Engineering. Dr. several papers and made presentations worldwide. He has support to the North Sea explorationists. He worked on
Barkat holds a Chemical Engineering State Diploma from experience with several E&C firms including extensive AVO modeling in the North Slope of Alaska, China and the
the National Polytechnique School of Algiers, an M.S. and startup and troubleshooting activities. He consults for both North Sea and as a project geophysicist on the Clyde,
a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of North American and international clients. He is a regis- Beatrice, Thistle, Don and Magnus Fields in the North Sea,
Tulsa. (omarbarkat@yahoo.com) tered professional engineer and member of Chi Epsilon laying the foundation for the acquisition of 4-D seismic
Sigma Honor Society. Mr. Bourdon is fluent in English and data over Magnus. Dr. Burrell also worked extensively on
DR. COLIN BARKER Spanish. Mr. Bourdon has a B.S. in Chemical Engineering two phases of development of the Bruce gas condensate
Is the McMan professor in the Geosciences Department at from the Georgia Institute of Technology and advanced field both as a geophysicist and in subsurface operations.
the University of Tulsa and is a research consultant in degrees in other fields. For a year he jointly managed the subsurface development
Tulsa, Oklahoma. Dr. Barker was formerly with the of BP’s dry gas fields in the Southern North Sea. Dr. Burrell
Organic Geochemistry Group at Exxon Production ROBERT E. BOYD has worked as an OGCI/ Petroskills instructor for three
Research in Houston, Texas and has over 30 years years and is a member of the SEG. He holds a B.S. in
CPA, is president of Boston Street Advisors, Inc., an invest- Geology, an M.S. in Geophysics, and a Ph.D. in Marine
experience in organic geochemistry including being a con- ment banking firm in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He has over twen-
sultant to Amoco (five years) and Conoco (12 years). Geophysics, all from the University of Birmingham,
ty years experience in the fields of venture Birmingham, England. He also holds a B.A. in Mathematics
He has been associate editor of both the AAPG Bulletin capital, corporate finance, accounting, risk management,
and Geochimica Cosmochimica Acta, is a past chairman of from Open University in Milton Keynes, England.
strategic business planning and management information
the Organic Geochemistry Division of the Geochemical systems, domestic and international. He has worked as an DR. TED G. BYROM
Society, and is a past Chairman of AAPG’s Visiting accountant for Warren Petroleum Company and as super-
Geologist Program. He received AAPG’s Matson Award visor of accounting and senior financial analyst in the Has been a consulting engineer since 1974 with extensive
twice and was a Distinguished Lecturer. Dr. Barker is the strategic financial planning group of Reading & Bates experience in drilling and completions design and
author of Organic Geochemistry in Petroleum Exploration Corporation. He has also worked in the banking, and operations since 1959. In addition to his petroleum-
(AAPG, 1980) and Thermal Modeling of Petroleum manufacturing industries holding positions as consultant, related activities, he has taught graduate courses in finite
Generation: Theory and Applications (Elsevier, 1996). He financial management, treasurer and chief financial element methods at Texas A&M University and conducted
holds a B.S. in Chemistry and a D.Phil. in Geology from officer. Mr. Boyd's international experience includes research at the Aerothermal Loads Branch of NASA
Oxford University and was a Post-Doctoral Research engagements in Europe, Asia, Canada, South America, and Langley Research Center in computational solid
Fellow at the University of Texas at Austin. the Middle East. Mr. Boyd has successfully negotiated sev- mechanics. He has served as a drilling technology
eral business transactions including serving on a team that consultant to Oryx Energy in horizontal drilling, and prior
planned and restructured over $500 million of to his consulting career he was a District Drilling Manager
NEED A COURSE AT corporate debt for a major multi-national diversified with Unocal in Houston and Midland, Texas.
energy concern, and has served as exclusive financial advi- He is the author of a number of technical papers on
YOUR SITE? sor for the financing and sale of mid-market thermal stress analysis and co-author of two finite
companies across a variety of industries. Since founding element textbooks. He is a member of SPE, ASME, APS,
Contact us at his own firm, Mr. Boyd has advised major energy and serv- and is a licensed professional engineer. He is an SPE
inhouse@petroskills.com ice companies in the area of performance Distinguished Author, and as a Technical Editor for SPE
measurement, and provided consulting for capital Drilling & Completion he received an Outstanding
acquisition, business development, transaction Technical Editor Award. Dr. Byrom holds a B.Sc. in
structuring, valuation services, performance management Petroleum Engineering, M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in
PAUL M. BARRY
and strategic business planning for mid market companies. Aerospace Engineering, all from Texas A&M University.
Currently resides in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, where He currently serves on many industry and community
he is the OGCI/PetroSkills Middle East Office Manager. boards. He has served on the Management Advisory D. G. (JERRY) CALVERT
Mr. Barry is a petroleum engineering consultant specializ- Practice and Legislative committees for the Oklahoma Retired from Mobil in May 2000, and has remained active
ing in production technology and project evaluations. Mr. Society of Certified Public Accountants. Mr. Boyd is a past working with API, SPE, ISO TC67 WC2 and as a
Barry has over 25 years of international upstream oil and president of the Graduate Business Association of the consultant in the areas of cementing and lost circulation.
gas production and reservoir engineering and University of Tulsa. He is a member of the American During his 40 plus years in the oil industry, he worked
management experience in South America, SE Asia, the Institute of Certified Public Accountants and is listed in with DX-Sunray Oil, Dowell, and Mobil. During that time
Middle East, and, the North Sea. Recent experience was as Who's Who of Global Business Leaders. Mr. Boyd is an span he worked in both up-stream and down-stream oper-
field production engineering manager of an onshore oil- adjunct professor of Finance, Strategic Management and ations. He has spent the last 35 years in the area of well
field re-development project for PDVSA and partners International Trade for OSU - Tulsa and finance for the cementing. Mr. Calvert has served on API committee 10
which required a combination of gas lift, submersible University of Tulsa. He is a frequent speaker on businessre- (presently sub-committee 10) on Well cements since 1967
pump, and rod pump artificial lift technology, and, lated topics and has appeared on the business radio and was chairperson form 1988 to 1990. He served a num-
fractured sand control well completions. Previous program Biz World. Mr. Boyd holds a Bachelor of Science ber of work and task groups during his service. He is a 35-
Indonesia experience was in the design and completion of in Business Administration from Phillips University with year plus member of SPE and authored or co-authored
dual string, multiple selective, underbalanced, TCP high majors in Finance and Accounting and a Master of over 20 SPE papers. He also served on the JPT editorial
pressure gas wells, and, exploration well testing and Business Administration from the University of Tulsa, committee. Mr. Calvert is presently serving on a joint
evaluation for Huffco Bontang LNG gas supply operations. graduating with honors. He graduated from the Wharton API/MMS committee to write a series of documents to
As district reservoir engineer for Arco partnered with Executive Development Program of the Wharton School, cover cementing practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The first
Pertamina in Indonesia, Mr. Barry was responsible for the University of Pennsylvania, and is a member of Beta document “Cementing Shallow Water Flows in Deep
Plan of Development and reserves determination and Gamma Sigma, the honor society for collegiate business Water” has been completed and issued as API RP 65 dated
certification for a 1.3 TCF offshore gas field. He has also schools. Mr. Boyd is a Fellow of the Wharton School of the September 2002. He holds a B. S. in Chemistry from
worked as field engineer in Saudi Arabia, responsible for University of Pennsylvania and is a Certified Public Northeastern State at Tahlequah, OK.
injection well performance, injection water quality, well Accountant in the state of Oklahoma.
gravel pack completions, corrosion control systems, and, as RICHARD S. CARDEN
Mobil facilities engineer in the Aramco gas projects depart- J. FORD BRETT
ment. He has represented company technical and com- Earned a B.S. degree in Petroleum Engineering from
mercial interests in UK and Norwegian North Sea sector oil Is President of OGCI/PetroSkills - the world’s largest petro- Montana College of Mineral Science and Technology in
and gas producing fields. Mr. Barry has served as an officer leum technology learning and development 1977. After graduation, he worked as a Drilling and
in the Jakarta SPE section and has been active on various organization. Mr. Brett consults in the area of petroleum Production Engineer for Marathon Oil Company in the
SPE committees. He holds a B.S.C.E. from the University project management, and has delivered workshops/short Rocky Mountain region. He then joined Grace, Shursen,

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Our Instructors

Moore and Associates (GSM) as a drilling and completion supporting his own geological field research campaigns, WILLIAM (BILL) E. FORSTHOFFER
consultant both domestically and overseas. During the first largely independent of Universities. Dr. Cronin has a Ph.D. Joined with John M. Campbell & Company to deliver the
few years working for GSM, he spent most of his time as a from the University of Wales, Cardiff, an M.Sc from the Pumps and Compressors course. Mr. Forsthoffer has over
wellsite consultant drilling and completing wells in the National University of Ireland, Dublin (Petroleum 30 years of pumps and compressors experience including
field. The work included geothermal wells; deep, high- Geology), and a B.Sc. form the National University of establishing his own company, Forsthoffer Associates, Inc.,
pressure gas wells; air drilled wells; directional wells; and, Ireland, Cork. whose objective is “The Optimization of Rotating
horizontal wells. He has been teaching drilling, Equipment Safety and Reliability through Understanding
horizontal drilling and underbalanced drilling seminars in DR. DAVID K. DAVIES and Vendor-User Communication.” Mr. Forsthoffer holds a
the United States and internationally for more than 20 Is a geologist/petrophysicist with more than 30 years expe- B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of
years. He has authored numerous technical papers on rience in the description and evaluation of conventional Detroit, Michigan.
directional drilling and underbalanced drilling. He was a and unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs, worldwide.
contributing author to the Underbalanced Drilling Manual He has received the Levorsen Award of the AAPG in recog- ALAN FOSTER
published by GRI. nition of his contributions to reservoir science and is Is a training consultant with John M. Campbell &
Distinguished Lecturer of the SPE and SPWLA. Dr. Davies Company, he is based in the UK. Mr. Foster spent 25 years
DR. ANDREW CHEN is author of more than 150 publications in professional with Petrolite Corporation and Baker Petrolite, involved in
Is currently a senior engineer of AJM Petroleum journals dealing with petrophysics, geology, geophysics, oilfield and refinery operational problems and their resolu-
Consultants, a Calgary, Canada-based reserve evaluation reservoir and production engineering. He has received sev- tion by chemical treatment programs. Mr. Foster has
and auditing firm. His latest projects include reservoir eral major research awards from the US Department of developed and taught courses on oilfield water treatment,
engineering aspects of oil and gas reserve and resource Energy and National Science Foundation and has been a oilfield and refinery corrosion control, as well as other oil-
estimates, economical forecast and budgeting, acquisition Fulbright Scholar. From 1966-1980, Dr. Davies was field and refinery chemical applications, since 1978. The
and deposition, equity financing, and mid-stream supply Professor of Geology at Texas A&M University, University non-technical courses in which Mr. Foster has experience,
studies. Dr. Chen specializes in formation testing with of Missouri at Columbia and Texas Tech University where include Effective Presentation Skills, Project Management
wireline testers in most aspects of WFT application and he also was Chairman of the Department of Geosciences. and Train the Trainer. He is a Chartered Chemist, Member
interpretation, from pressure gradient error analysis and Since 1980 he has been president of a Houston-based, of the Royal Society of Chemistry and a Fellow of the
fluid contact uncertainty quantification, fluid international consulting and service company specializing Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development. He is a
identification/sampling, to permeability tests, WFT as DST in reservoir description and evaluation. Dr. Davies received qualified trainer, holding a Certificate in Training and
alternatives, and operation program designs. his B.Sc., Ph.D. and D.Sc. degrees from the University of Development and a Diploma in Training Management. Mr.
Between 1986-1991 he was a university lecturer teaching Wales and M.S. degree from Louisiana State University, all Foster received his B.S. in Applied Chemistry from
reservoir engineering before he worked with Schlumberger in Geology. Portsmouth Polytechnic (UK) and his MBA from Leeds
Canada for 6 years, providing a variety of technical and University.
interpretation reservoir engineering support. Dr. Chen DR. GERHARD DIEPHUIS
earned his PhD degree in mechanical engineering at Is based in Assen, The Netherlands, and is an independent ERIC A. FOSTER
University of Manitoba, Canada, and over the years has geophysical consultant. After finishing Geology/
several publications in the SPE proceedings, The Log P. Geol. is a Managing Consultant with PetroSkills-OGCI
Geophysics study at the University of Leiden and a stint as based in Houston. He has 30 years of operations and man-
Analyst, AIChE Journal, and Journal of Petroleum Science Research Assistant to Prof Hagedoorn, he joined Shell
and Engineering. He has worked on consulting projects agement experience in the oil and gas industry. Prior to
International. In a 20 year career, Diephuis worked in joining PetroSkills, he was with Landmark responsible for
from North America land, the Atlantic Canada offshore, Malaysia, Australia, UK, Oman and The Netherlands in a
the Gulf of Mexico, Africa, Southeast Asia, Australia, the managing Geoscience and Engineering consultants, repre-
variety of positions in both Exploration as well as senting Geological, Geophysical and Petrophysical soft-
Central Asia, and the North Sea. Petroleum Engineering Departments in technical as well as ware applications and services for global operations.
managerial functions. He was the main instigator of the Starting as a geologist in field operations in USA, South
DR. THOMAS L. COTTRILL
Natih multi-component survey, a major Shell confidential America, North Sea, Trinidad and Mexico, he then worked
Is Emeritus Professor of Speech Communication and Dean project. The results were published on the 1996 EAGE as Training Instructor and Coordinator for
of the College of Arts and Letters at Northeastern State conference where he co-convended a workshop on multi- worldwide operations at Core Laboratories in Dallas and
University in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Dr. Cottrill has over component techniques. He started his own consultancy subsequently moved to Calgary as Manager, Geological
30 years of experience doing consulting work in supervi- practice in 1997 and since then he undertook a wide vari- Operations. His background has included all aspects of
sion and management, specifically for the advancement ety of assignments from education to university students formation evaluation and the application of software to
and benefit of professionals in education. He is the fea- and industry professionals to large-scale evaluations in geological and drilling engineering data acquisition and
tured speaker at many business, industrial, and education- North Africa and the Middle East and fulfilling a key role interpretation. He has acted as a technical advisor/consult-
al conventions, and has taught for OGCI since 1981. Dr. in design and interpretation of an exceptional hi-res 3D ant on projects throughout the world, and has extensive
Cottrill holds a B.A. and an M.Ed. in Speech survey. Having been Associate Editor for “Geophysical experience in the design and delivery of training programs.
Communication/Human Relations from Northeastern State Prospecting” since 1997, Diephuis took over as Editor-in- He was an instructor of petroleum technology at Mount
University and an Ed.D. from Oklahoma State University. Chief In October 2002, a position he held through 2003. Royal College and SAIT in Calgary and in-house for
Amoco. He was nominated for Distinguished Lecturer
GERALD R. COULTER JOHN F. DILLON award.Eric graduated with a B.Sc. (Honours) degree in
Is a consulting petroleum engineer and president of his Has over 28 years of industry experience working for Geology, from the University of London; he is a registered
own company, which he started in 1994, Coulter Energy major companies such as ConocoPhillips and BP, as well as Professional Geologist and is a member of APEGGA,
International in Gainesville, Texas, near Dallas. Currently, consulting in geoscience, organizational excellence and AAPG, CSPG and SPWLA. He served as Publications
he is actively involved in consulting and technology trans- staff development. He has worked the entire exploration- Chairman and on symposium committees for the CWLS,
fer of well completion technology, production development disposal chain, from early basin analysis, he co-authored the paper on computer data formats (LAS)
operations technology, formation damage, and well through development, to end of field life farm-outs.His and has compiled numerous technical papers and training
stimulation technology. His prior industry experience experience has spanned a wide range of play types, rock materials. He is a certified tutor for online learning.
includes 12 years with Oryx Energy Company working in types, and environments of deposition. His development
the area of well completions, chief completion engineer, experience has taken him to the North Sea, Dubai, West JEREMY (JERRY) J. GILBERT
manager of drilling and completions technology, and man- Coast Africa, and Alaska. His exploration efforts have been Had a distinguished career for over 36 years with BP
ager of the offshore Gulf of Mexico drilling, completion, in Angola, Congo, Libya, Niger, and the Western US. He Exploration, working in a wide variety of reservoir and
marine facilities, and environmental/regulatory group. brings experience to the room beyond the science itself, petroleum engineering posts at technical and management
Previously, he was with Halliburton Services for 16 years including: the management of personnel associated with level. After initial experience in BP’s Research Center he
as a stimulation research and application engineer and the science, project development from conception through worked in Libya, Kuwait and Abu Dhabi before spending
group leader in Duncan, Oklahoma, and technical advisor to high level approval, as well as years of almost ten years in Iran as a Lead Reservoir Engineer and
in London, England. Prior to this, he was with Conoco experience in "how can we get things done" and "why is as Planning Manager. Returning to the UK in 1979 he
working in the area of geological and geochemical this important." He has been deeply involved with the cre- moved to Aberdeen and became Petroleum Engineering
research. Mr. Coulter is a registered professional engineer. ation and refinement of learning and staff development Manager for all of BP’s UKCS and UK Onshore fields.
He was a SPE Distinguished Lecturer (1992-1993 and programs since 1990. He earned a B.S. from Marietta Following a period in San Francisco as Vice President –
1999-2000), and has chaired and served on numerous SPE College, and a M.S. from the University of New Mexico. Production, responsible for Alaskan and Californian fields,
committees. He founded the Completion Engineering he transferred to Wytch Farm, Europe’s largest onshore
Association, served as its first chairman and continues to CLEON L. DUNHAM field as Deputy Development Director. Late in the 1980s
be involved in the CEA. He has authored numerous tech- Is the President of Oilfield Automation Consulting. Mr. Jerry became BP’s Chief Petroleum Engineer with function-
nical papers and patents and has taught well completions Dunham was with Shell Oil Company in artificial lift and al responsibility for all of BP’s petroleum engineering
related schools throughout the world. Mr. Coulter holds a associated systems from 1964-2000. While with Shell, Mr. worldwide. Before retiring from BP, Jerry spent a number
B.S. in Geology and a B.A. in Chemistry from Oklahoma Dunham was also a Production Automation Coordinator of years in Alaska as an advisor on equity negotiation and
State University and an M.S. in Petroleum Engineering in The Netherlands. In this role, Mr. Dunham provided field operational integrity. He served on boards at IMM and
from the University of Oklahoma. training services and implementation support to Shell’s IP; for the SPE he was Chairman of the major London
operations worldwide. Since retiring from Shell, Mr. Section and chaired technical committees. He also partici-
DR. BRYAN T. CRONIN
Dunham has been active with the API and ISO in develop- pated in industrial advisory boards at Heriot-Watt
Has 15 years of technical experience with deep-water clas- ing standards and recommended practices for gas-lift. He University, Imperial College, Robert Gordon’s University
tics (turbidites) at outcrop, on the sea floor and in the sub- has also helped to organize and conduct international and University of Alaska - Fairbanks.
surface as hydrocarbon reservoirs. He has been involved in workshops and conferences for gas-lift, gas well deliquifi-
education and training for 9 years with postgraduate (mas- DR. J. ROBERT GOCHNOUR
cation, electrical submersible pumping, and progressive
ters and PhD) students, oil company employees, and other cavity pumping. Currently, Mr. Dunham is working to Is a Senior Advisor in BP's Upstream Technology Group,
industry professionals. Dr. Cronin has run reservoir field help organize the Artificial Lift Research and development Reservoir Engineering Team, in Houston. He has over 27
courses for 9 years for industry (specialist geology/geo- Council (ALRDC).Mr. Dunham has published numerous years of oil and gas industry and technology experience.
physics; foundation for engineers; asset team integration articles in publications such as the Journal of Petroleum He joined BP Exploration, Shared Petrotechnical Resource
courses and team-building events) in the Alps, Pyrenees, Technology, World Oil and American Oil and Gas. Mr. in Houston in 1997. He currently manages the Excellence
Western Ireland, SE Spain, eastern and southern Turkey). Dunham holds a Bachelor of Engineering from Cornell in Performance Predictions subsurface R&D project. Prior
He also ran a series technical short courses for industry. University, and has done graduate work at Louisiana State to that, he led the Reservoir Performance Prediction
From this year (2005) he is converting all of his energies University and Tulane University. Network and was one of the main technical contacts to
into training for the oil industry, whilst maintaining and vendors who provide reservoir simulation technology to

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BP. He is a member of the University Recruiting. He Studies include deep-water Gulf of Mexico oil and gas B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Kansas State University,
received his B.S. (1973), M.S. (1975) and Ph.D. (1976) in fields, a granite gas reservoir offshore India, and steam- and an MBA from Tulane University.
Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering from floods in California. He has also worked for Mobil as a
Pennsylvania State University. He was named a Centennial drilling engineer, and for Texaco as a steamflood project GREGORY HUENI
Fellow of the College of Earth and Mineral Sciences, manager in Colombia, and as a reservoir and simulation Is Vice President and co-founder of MHA Petroleum
Pennsylvania State University, in 1996. Gouchnour has engineer in both research and Kuwait operations. Consultants, a Denver-based petroleum consulting firm.
been associated with the research, development, and appli- Dr. Hazlett was a Lecturer at Texas A&M University and Mr. Hueni has over 29 years petroleum engineering experi-
cation of reservoir simulators, reservoir engineering, and an Associate Professor at New Mexico Tech. He has pub- ence and has held vice presidencies at Intera Information
production technology throughout his career with Gulf Oil lished on petroleum engineering topics, served as SPE Technologies and Jerry R. Bergeson and Associates. Mr.
Corporation (9 years), Chevron (6 years), Scientific coordinator for the Reservoir, Gas Technology, and Fluid Hueni's experience includes managing and conducting
Software-Intercomp (2 years), and Tigress (5 years). He is Mechanics and Oil Recovery Processes committees, and integrated reservoir studies in the United States, Germany,
a member of the Society of Petroleum Engineers and Tau has testified as an expert witness. Dr. Hazlett has B.S., M.S. the North Sea, Kuwait, Australia and Venezuela. He has
Beta Pi. Gouchnour has taught over 100 industry short and Ph.D. degrees in petroleum engineering from Texas provided expert witness testimony on numerous gas
courses as well as graduate petroleum engineering courses A&M University and is a registered Professional Engineer pipeline, marketing and reservoir performance issues. Mr.
at the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia in Texas.
Hueni has published papers regarding dual porosity reser-
University. He has a number of publications, the most voirs, gas cycling in low permeability reservoirs, pressure
recent is SPE 86758, "Integrating Data for the Reservoir DR. A. DANIEL HILL
buildup in hydraulically fractured reservoirs and wellbore
Engineer", which appeared in the June 1996 Journal of Is Professor of Petroleum Engineering and holder of the pressure drops in tubing for high water cut gas wells. Prior
Petroleum Technology. Robert Whiting Endowed Chair at Texas A&M University. to the formation of MHA, Mr. Hueni developed and taught
Previously, he served on the faculty at The University of courses related to reservoir engineering, analysis and simu-
ROBERT D. GRACE Texas at Austin, where he taught for twenty-two years after lation for Jerry R. Bergeson and Associates. He has been
Is President of GSM Enterprises, Inc. Mr. Grace has more spending several years in industry. He holds a B.S. degree instrumental in the development and instruction of MHA's
than 30 years on-site experience as a consultant in from Texas A&M University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees technical courses for BP Amoco.Mr. Hueni received his B.
blowouts, fires, well control, and deep drilling and from The University of Texas at Austin, all in chemical Sc. and M. S. in Mechanical Engineering from Rice
completion operations. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering. He is the author of the SPE monograph, University in 1971. He is an active member of the Society
Production Logging: Theoretical and Interpretive Elements, of Petroleum Engineers and the Society of Petroleum
Petroleum Engineering from the University of Oklahoma, co-author of the textbook, Petroleum Production Systems,
and is a Registered Professional Engineer. He has conduct- Evaluation Engineers.
and author of over eighty technical papers and five
ed seminars worldwide in Well Control and Drilling patents. He has been a SPE Distinguished Lecturer, served
Practices since 1968. He served as Head of the Petroleum WILLIAM E. HUGHES
on numerous SPE committees and was founding
Engineering Department at Montana Tech. Mr. Grace has chairman of the Austin SPE Section. He was named a Is a graduate of Harvard University's law school and a
solved drilling problems in every corner of the globe, both Distinguished Member of SPE in 1999. Professor Hill is an practicing lawyer in Tulsa, Oklahoma, who has handled a
onshore and offshore. As a well control expert, he has spe- expert in the areas of production engineering, well stimu- wide variety of cases involving oil and gas related matters.
cialized in handling and supervising the most complex lation, production logging, and complex well He has studied in France and lived in Morocco and
blowouts the industry has known, including the largest performance, and has presented lectures and courses and received a Fulbright scholarship to teach U.S. and
blowout in Texas history. He designed and supervised the consulted on these topics throughout the world. comparative law at the University of Tunis during the
industry's deepest relief well. As a consultant to Kuwait Oil 2000-2001 academic year. He teaches courses at the
Company following the Gulf War, he was responsible for GEORGE E. HILL University of Tulsa, including courses in comparative and
well control in the Giant Burgan Field. Mr. Grace has international law, European Union law, banking law, U.S.
authored numerous papers on well control and drilling Is a Senior Technical Training Instructor with Halliburton’s Constitutional law, and an introduction to the U.S. law and
practices. He authored Advanced Blowout and Well Energy Services Group in Houston, Texas. He has more legal system for non-U.S. lawyers and graduate students.
Control released in 1994 by Gulf Publishing and than 40 years experience in oil field exploration and devel-
co-authored the industry's standard Drilling Practices, opment with 28 of those years dedicated to the develop- DR. NEIL F. HURLEY
published by Pennwell. ment and presentation of drilling fluids and
engineering technology training programs. Mr. Hill began Is based in Golden, Colorado, and is the Charles Boettcher
his career with Baroid Drilling Fluids as a Drilling Fluid Distinguished Chair in Petroleum Geology at the Colorado
DR. RICHARD H. GROSHONG, JR. Sales Engineer in 1973 responsible for field sales and serv- School of Mines (CSM). Before he joined CSM in 1996, he
Is a structural geologist who heads 3-D Structure Research. ice in the United States Mid Continent Area and Gulf of worked 14 years in the oil and gas industry for Conoco
Previously he worked ten years in the Cities Service Oil Mexico before transferring to the training department in Inc. and Marathon Oil Company. He specializes in multi-
Co. research laboratory and 20 years as professor at the 1979. His responsibilities in training have included devel- disciplinary studies that involve carbonate and sandstone
University of Alabama. He has published numerous papers opment and instruction of training for drilling fluid field sedimentology and diagenesis, fractured reservoirs, forma-
on rock deformation and on structural balancing, restor- service engineers in all phases of drilling engineering and tion evaluation, dipmeters and borehole images, and hori-
ing, and modeling in the AAPG Bulletin, Journal of technology. His education includes a BS degree in Physics zontal drilling. His work includes studies in Egypt,
Structural Geology, Tectonics, Tectonophysics, Eclogae from the University of Texas at Arlington, graduate studies Tunisia, Syria, Abu Dhabi, Turkey, Mexico, Argentina,
Geologicae Helvetiae, and the Transactions of the GCAGS, in Petroleum Engineering at the University of Houston, Australia, China, the North Sea, Texas, New Mexico,
among others. He wrote the book, 3-D Structural Geology, and studies in Education at the University of St. Thomas Alaska, Michigan, and Wyoming. He has been an AAPG
published in 1999 by Springer-Verlag and reprinted in for a Masters Degree in Education. and SPE Distinguished Lecturer, and he is the past Editor
2002.He has been associate editor for Geology and and current Vice President of AAPG. At CSM, he teaches
Tectonophysics, Chairman of the Structure & Tectonics TIMOTHY HOWER beginning and advanced log analysis, reservoir characteri-
division of the Geological Society of America; a visiting Is President of MHA Petroleum Consultants, a Denver- zation, advanced carbonate field seminars, and integrated
professor at the Universite' de Lausanne and at the based petroleum consulting firm. Mr. Hower was formerly exploration courses. Dr. Hurley holds B.S. degrees in
University of Petroleum in Bejing, and an AAPG Engineering Manager for Enron Oil and Gas Company and Petroleum Engineering and Geology from the University
Distinguished Lecturer. He won Best Paper Awards at the Senior Manager of Exploration and Production Studies of Southern California, an M.S. in Geology from the
1995 International Unconventional Gas Symposium and at with the former Intera Petroleum Division (now University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Ph.D. in Geology
the 1998 and 1999 meetings of the GCAGS.He holds a B.S. Schlumberger Holditch Reservoir Technologies). Mr. from the University of Michigan.
from Bucknell University, a M.A. from the University of Hower has over 21 years petroleum engineering experi-
Texas, Austin, and a Ph.D. from Brown University. ence and has conducted technical studies in the North ALFRED R. JENNINGS, JR.
America, South America, Europe, Asia, Australia and Is a well stimulation consultant with Enhanced Well
DAVID HAIRSTON Africa. His recent assignments include serving as Acting Stimulation, Inc., located in Athens, Texas, approximately
Is a senior staff engineer and instructor with John M. Exploitation Manager for the Offshore Australia Business 75 miles southeast of Dallas. He actively provides well
Campbell and Company. Mr. Hairston is a Registered Unit of Santos Ltd. in Adelaide, and in-house consultant stimulation consulting services throughout the world.
Professional Engineer in several U.S. states. With over 30 for the Shell affiliate NAM located in the Netherlands. He Prior to establishing Enhanced Well Stimulation, Inc., in
years of experience in project management, engineering has co-authored Managing Water-Drive Gas Reservoirs, a 1995, he worked for Mobil R&D Corporation and Mobil
and design, material logistics, and construction manage- textbook published by the Gas Research Institute, and E&P Services, Inc. While working for Mobil for almost 14
ment for oil and gas facilities. Project experience includes has been directly involved in the development and years, Mr. Jennings was involved in various applications of
pipeline transportation and production facilities, both instruction of MHA's technical courses for BP Amoco. Mr. well stimulation (acidizing, acid fracturing, and hydraulic
onshore and offshore. Worldwide project and construction Hower received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in petroleum fracturing) throughout Mobil’s worldwide operations. Prior
management experience at all levels including grass-roots engineering from Penn State University in 1981 and to Mobil, he worked 15 years for Halliburton Services in
gathering, processing, and pipeline systems with a capital 1983, respectively. He has been the Chairman of the all aspects of hydraulic fracturing research and field appli-
cost of over USD$ 2.5 billions. Specialized technical Denver SPE section for 2001/2002 and was recently pre- cations. Mr. Jennings is a registered Professional Engineer
expertise includes river and special obstacle crossings sented with the SPE Henry Mattson Technical Service and has authored and co-authored 95 US patents pertain-
using open-cut, bridging and directional drilling methods; Award for innovative contributions in the field of engi- ing to applications and techniques for well stimulation. He
offshore construction and logistics planning. Mr. Hairston neering of gas reservoirs. has written several technical papers and articles and has
has been published in ASCE Magazine, Proceedings of served on numerous SPE Committees. He received a B.S.
Marine Technology, Proceedings of several industry ROBERT A. HUBBARD Degree in Chemistry and an M.S. Degree in Petroleum
Pipeline Conferences, and the Oil and Gas Journal. He Is a training consultant with John M. Campbell & Engineering from the University of Oklahoma.
holds a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering from Texas A&M Company. He is based in Norman, Oklahoma with over 30
University and an M.S. in Civil Engineering for the years experience in oil and gas facilities. Mr. Hubbard spe- MORGAN L. JONES
University of Houston. cializes in gas dehydration and economic evaluation. Mr. Began his engineering career in West Texas with Amoco as
Hubbard joined John M. Campbell & Company in 1980, a field petroleum engineer. He later transferred to Amoco
DR. W. GREG HAZLETT within the company organization he has held the positions International assigned to Trinidad W.I. engaged in the off-
Is Training Director for OGCI/PetroSkills where he designs of Vice President, Chief Operating Officer, President and shore point Radix/Teak exploratory-development program.
competency-based training programs, evaluates course Chief Financial Officer. He now provides consulting and In 1973 he joined Phillips Petroleum Company in Gt.
materials and instructors, teaches training courses, and training services worldwide. Previous to John M. Campbell Yarmouth as Sr. Drilling Engineer-UK. In 1976 he was
consults on technical issues. Prior to joining OGCI, he was & Company he held various engineering and management named Sr. Drilling Engineer on the Worldwide Deepwater
Vice President of Gemini Solutions, Inc., where he was in positions at Texaco Inc. from 1972 to 1980. Mr. Hubbard SEA GAP project engaged in worldwide exploration pro-
charge of the petroleum and geological engineering con- is a member of SPE, AIChE, and GPSA, he has chaired the grams with the Discoverer Seven Seas. In 1978 he trans-
sulting group. Dr. Hazlett specializes in performing reser- SPE Facility Engineering Committee and is a member of ferred to Norway as Drilling Engineering Director-Greater
voir characterization, engineering and simulation studies. the European GPA Management Committee. He holds a Ekofisk Operations. He later became Chief Offshore

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Our Instructors

Engineer-Greater Ekofisk overseeing all offshore engineer- excellent reviews. His multidisciplinary background of DR. JAMES D. LOWELL
ing operations. In 1980 he was named Technical Director engineering, geology, field operations, and management, Offers over forty years of experience in the exploration for
for Phillips Alaska-Prudhoe Bay group. In 1983 he was accompanied by an entertaining talent for explaining com- petroleum reserves. He has been involved in projects
transferred to the panhandle of Texas as Regional plex issues, provides for a uniquely positive and immedi- worldwide, covering a broad range of structural and strati-
Engineering Manager of Drilling, Production, Process and ately applicable learning experience. graphic regimes. His work has involved regional
Reservoir Engineering operations. In 1985 he was named geologic evaluations as well as projects at the prospect
Manager of Drilling – Eastern Division-GOM in Houston. DR. JAMES F. LEA, JR. level. Dr. Lowell has published widely in the field of struc-
In 1992 he was appointed Drilling Manager USA-Alaska. In Is a professor and Chairman of Petroleum Engineering at tural geology, including a book on Structural Styles in
1995 he was named Manager of Drilling Worldwide D&P. Texas Tech University. He spent 20 years with Amoco Petroleum Exploration and has taught industry schools on
Mr. Jones has authored articles on planning/design drilling Corporation and was involved in consulting on flowing/ the subject for 23 years. He was a distinguished lecturer for
organizations, improvements and wellsite supervision lifting wells, testing, and research on lift methods, creating the AAPG and for Esso Australia.
through process management. He chaired and facilitated new computer programs for lifted and flowing wells, teach-
the Phillips Petroleum Company OLS- MAXWELL process. ing production schools and monitoring JIP's on pipeline DONALD S. MACPHERSON
As worldwide Drilling Manager he facilitated under-balance flow, artificial lift, erosion, corrosion, and others.
drilling operations, deep multi-lateral drilling and offshore Is from Edmonton, Alberta. He graduated from the
Dr. Lea is on the API and SPE committees for electrical University of Alberta in 1965 with an MSc. in Geophysics
extended reach drilling operations. Mr. Jones holds a B.Sc. submersible pumps, gas lift, and artificial lift systems, and a
in Industrial Engineering and Management from Oklahoma and Isotope Geochemistry. Upon graduation, he was
member of API committees developing Recommended employed by Mobil Oil Canada in Calgary where he
State University and is a registered Professional Engineer in Practices (RP) for gas lift and ESP’s. He has authored and
the State of Texas. He has served on numerous SPE, API, worked for seven years. He has subsequently worked for
co-authored over 50 technical papers and articles on Mobil in Dallas, New Orleans, London, and Vienna. He has
AADE and IADC committees. artificial lift systems, has been an SPE Distinguished been involved in all aspects of geophysical data acquisition,
Lecturer two times and has presented and organized processing and interpretation. Throughout his career, Don
DR. MOHAN G. KELKAR numerous conferences for artificial lift. He received the SPE has participated in teaching courses in the technical aspects
Is a professor of petroleum engineering at the University of Production Engineering Award in 1996. of geophysics and has always had a keen interest in bring-
Tulsa in Tulsa, Oklahoma. His main research interests Dr. Lea is a Registered Professional Engineer in Texas, has ing clarity and understanding of the tools of the trade to
include reservoir characterization, production optimiza- nine US patents, and holds a B.S. and an M.S. in people that become involved in using and interpreting seis-
tion, and risk analysis. He is involved in several research Mechanical Engineering from the University of Arkansas, mic data. For the last ten years of his career with Mobil,
projects, which are partially funded by various national and and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Southern Don was with Mobil’s Training Department. He was the
international oil companies, the US Department of Energy, Methodist University. manager of the Training Department in Dallas and was the
and Oklahoma Center for Advancement of Science and principle lecturer in the geophysical courses.
Technology. He has taught various short courses for many
oil companies. In addition to teaching courses across the SEARCH COURSES
BY INSTRUCTOR, HARVEY MALINO
United States, he has taught in Canada, Indonesia,
Singapore, Nigeria, Kuwait, Abu Dhabi, Scotland, India, DISCIPLINE, LOCATION Is an Instructor/Consultant for John M. Campbell &
and Denmark. He has been a consultant to many oil com- AND MORE. Company. He has 35 years of experience in the Chemical
panies, as well as to the United Nations. Dr. Kelkar holds a www.petroskills.com and Hydrocarbon Processing Industries. During his 28
B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of years with Union Carbide Corporation/UOP, he held both
Bombay, an M.S. in Petroleum Engineering and a Ph.D. in technical and commercial positions. These included:
Chemical Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, DR. LARRY L. LILLY Molecular Sieve Technical Manager - Design and Field
and a J.D. from the University of Tulsa. Service; Licensing Manager for the Ethylene Oxide
Is Vice President of John M. Campbell & Company with business; Area Sales and Marketing Manager for Southeast
over 30 years experience with Engineering & Consulting Asia; Business Manager for the Gas Processing Business
STANLEY KLEINSTEIBER companies including design, commissioning and startup. Group; and, World Wide Sales Manager for the Gas
Mr. Kleinsteiber’s gas reservoir engineering experience con- Dr. Lilly provides consulting and training services world- Processing Business Group. Mr. Malino has lived and
tains work on several fields that make him qualified to wide including process simulation applications, facilities worked in New Hampshire, Maine, New York, Singapore
present this course to Chevron Texaco Australia. The most operations and detailed project development. Dr. Lilly is a and Chicago. He is currently based in Charleston, South
relevant US example is the Anschutz Ranch East field locat- member of AIChE, GPSA, GPA Europe and numerous local Carolina where he is President of his own consulting busi-
ed in the Western Overthrust Belt along the border technical societies. He has published extensively on gas ness. Mr. Malino is a registered Professional Engineer in the
between the states of Wyoming and Utah. The field con- and liquid properties, world energy economics and process State of New Hampshire. He sits on the Advisory Board of
tained over 2 Tcf of a very rich condensate fluid (average calculations. Dr. Lilly has presented invited papers for the Laurance Reid Gas Conditioning Conference in
yield of 180 bbl condensate / MMscf of wet reservoir gas). international conferences. In addition he has co-authored Norman, OK. Mr. Malino earned a B.S. in Chemical
Mr. Kleinsteiber and his colleagues at Amoco developed numerous operating manuals and equipment selection Engineering from the City College of New York; and, an
the initial plan of depletion for this field using composi- manuals used by major oil companies. Dr. Lilly has also co- M.B.A from Pace University in New York.
tional numerical simulation. Mr. Kleinsteiber’s specific authored three books on Gas Conditioning and Processing
contributions were in the areas of fluid property characteri- and Computer Applications for Production/ Processing. He
holds a B.S., an M.S. and a PhD in Chemical Engineering LOUIS MATTAR
zation, well testing and simulation studies for various
development options. The field was ultimately developed from Oklahoma State University. Was the principal author of the world-renowned E.R.C.B.
by full pressure maintenance using a combination of pro- publication Theory & Practice of the Testing of Gas Wells,
duced hydrocarbon gas and purchased nitrogen as the DR. DAVID A. LINK 1975, which is the authoritative text on the subject. For
injection fluid. The field achieved peak gas production Is a geologist with Dover Technology, Inc. in Houston, several years, Louis was Associate Professor at the
rates of 700 MMscfd, averaging 25 MMscfd of gas and Texas. His domestic and international oil industry experi- University of Calgary where he taught courses in Reservoir
associated liquids per producing well and 41 MMscfd per ence spans more than 25 years, covering areas in North, Engineering and Advanced Well Testing. Since 1981 he has
injection well. Mr. Kleinsteiber’s most relevant international South, and Central America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. been with Fekete Associates, a consulting company that
experience is related to exploration well testing in the His field experience extends from Alaska to Antarctica and specializes in well testing and reservoir engineering. He has
Mediterranean Ocean offshore Israel. He was retained by a South Africa. His teaching experience includes 21 years analyzed and supervised the interpretation of thousands of
client to evaluate DST tests conducted on a high perme- with OGCI plus lecturer positions at Northern Illinois well tests and specializes in the integration of practice with
ability sand (360 md) encountered in the well. Mr. University, Northeastern Illinois University, and the theory. He has appeared as an expert witness in several
Kleinsteiber has also performed field development studies University of Wisconsin-Parkside. Dr. Link has a Ph.D. in Energy Board Hearings. He has conducted studies ranging
for coalbed methane reservoirs in the Bowen Basin of east- Geology from Northwestern University and is co-author of from shallow gas reservoirs to deep sour wells, from small
ern Australia, and well test analyses for exploration wells in Exploration Methods for Sandstone Reservoirs. pools to a 5000-well reservoir/completion/production
Hungary. The Gas Reservoir Management course has been study, and from waterfloods to gas storage. Louis teaches
presented by Mr. Kleinsteiber to in-house clients such as PERRY LOVELACE the CIM course in “Gas Well Testing, Theory and Practice”,
Japan National Oil Company (Tokyo), BP Indonesia as well as “Modern Production Decline Analysis” to the
Is Manager of Facilities Development for John M. SPE and to several companies. He has authored 45 techni-
(Jakarta) and EGPC (Cairo). The course was well rated in Campbell & Company, a PetroSkills member. Mr. Lovelace
each of these locations. The material covers aspects of gas cal publications. He is an adjunct professor at the
specializes in Maintenance Management and Competency- University of Calgary.
reservoir management related both to low permeability based Training Programs and has 25+ years experience in
onshore fields and high deliverability offshore fields. The industrial training and consulting. After graduate studies,
material presented during a specific class will emphasize he worked for a large consulting mechanical/electrical engi-
DR. MARK A. MCCAFFREY
only those aspects of gas reservoir management that are neering firm applying rigorous systems analysis to industri- Co-founded OilTracers, LLC (www.oiltracers.com), a firm
appropriate for the current students. Example fields dis- al facility design and construction. He has dedicated his specializing in the integration of geochemical, geological
cussed during the class that may be similar to the assets career to providing high quality learning experiences, keep- and engineering data to solve oil exploration and
operated by Chevron Texaco Australia include the ing in tune with the changing economic and technological development problems, in 1999. Previously, he spent ten
Goodwyn field (NWS Australia), the Tangguh project environment, especially as applied to long-term facilities years at Chevron and Arco working on these issues.
(Indonesia) and the Mahogany field (Trinidad). All of the and equipment management. He has assisted many organi- Dr. McCaffrey was a 2001-2002 Distinguished Lecturer for
projects deal with large reservoirs, with high deliverability zations through on-site the Society of Petroleum Engineers. He was the 1995 recip-
wells using LNG export. consultation and training. Clients include industrial and ient of the Pieter Schenck Award from the European
utility organizations of different types and sizes in the Association of Organic Geochemists for “outstanding work
ROBERT G. KNOLL on biomarkers in relation to paleoenvironmental studies
United States, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, United Arab
Is one of the world’s leading horizontal/complex well Emirates, Qatar, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Thailand, and petroleum exploration.” In 1998, he received (with
experts. He has more than 29 years of uniquely diverse Malaysia, Singapore, Trinidad/Tobago, UK and Mexico. An project co-workers) the Arco Award of Excellence “for
upstream experience, holding senior operational, technical, engaging and popular speaker/facilitator, Mr. Lovelace con- developing a new charge and migration model for the
and managerial positions in oil and gas projects tinually receives high marks from participants. A member Brookian petroleum system, allowing improved charge risk
worldwide. As project coordinator of the internationally of the Society for Maintenance and Reliability Professionals assessment for prospects on the Central North Slope of
acclaimed DEA-44 Project (Horizontal Technology JIP), he and the Society of Petroleum Engineers, Mr. Lovelace also Alaska. He is a senior or co-author of 26 articles on petro-
has acquired unparalleled exposure in applying modern holds a B.S. in Science Education and an M.S. in Botany leum exploration, reservoir management, oil biodegrada-
exploitation technologies to real-world problems. Since from the University of Oklahoma, with pre-doctoral tion, hazardous waste remediation, paleoenvironmental
1990, he has authored and presented more than 200 studies in Plant Ecology at the University of California. reconstruction, and marine chemistry. He is a California
technical training and management programs in every Registered Geologist (License #5903) and an AAPG
major petroleum province in the world, with consistently Certified Petroleum Geologist (Certificate #5339). Dr.

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McCaffrey received his B.A. degree (1985) from Harvard international journals. His new book, Carbonate development of methods for assessing new basin entry
University, magna cum laude with highest honors in Reservoirs, was published by Elsevier in 2001. He holds a opportunities. Other recent work includes development of
Geological Sciences, and his Ph.D. (1990) in Geochemistry B.S. in Geology from Louisiana State University and an remediation and reuse strategies for impaired properties,
from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods M.S. and a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of Texas including former refineries, manufacturing facilities and
Hole Oceanographic Institute Joint Program. at Austin. pipelines; numerous projects for the Yucca Mountain pro-
posed nuclear waste repository; and cancer causation mod-
KEVIN MCLAUGHLIN CARLOS DIAZ MORALES eling for national health organizations. He teaches various
Is a training consultant with John M. Campbell & Is a Drilling Fluids, TFM, and Engineering instructor for courses on decision analysis and quantitative modeling.
Company, he is based in the UK. Mr. McLaughlin worked the Halliburton Energy Services Group. He has 30 years Mr. Nieman was formerly Director of Operations for
in the UK Chemical industry for 20 years prior to moving experience as a drilling fluids engineer, drilling engineer, Lumina Decision Systems, a decision analysis consulting
into the oil and gas production industry, where he has drilling manager and technical instructor. He has been flu- and software firm. Prior to that, he spent 14 years with
worked for more than 20 years. He has specialized ids engineer, drilling engineer, drilling supervisor or Amoco as a geophysicist, economist, and risk and portfolio
knowledge and experience in water treatment associated drilling manager on numerous difficult and high profile analyst. He has a B.S. in geology and an M.S. in geophysics
with oil and gas production systems. For more than 15 wells and projects. His broad experience has been through- from Michigan State University, and an MBA from Rice
years he was manager of a group of technical specialists for out the countries of Peru, Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, University.
a major Production Chemical Manufacturing company, Mexico, Venezuela and Colombia. Mr. Diaz has been a
DR. J. M. PEDEN
with additional responsibility for product development, drilling engineer and drilling supervisor for Petroperu and
management and application in oil and gas production Bridas Exploration, drilling fluids engineer for Shell E & P Is Professor of Well Technology at the Department of
systems. He has traveled extensively to onshore and off- in Peru, drilling engineer for Baroid Pigmina in Brazil, Petroleum Engineering at Curtin University of Technology
shore locations throughout the Eastern Hemisphere drilling fluids coordinator for Dresser Mexico, drilling in Perth Western Australia; a Principal Technolgist for
solving water treatment and separation problems. Mr. engineer for Occidental- Peru, drilling superintendent for Advanced Well Technologies Pty. in Perth WA and also
McLaughlin has developed and taught courses in oilfield Dresser Kellogg in Venezuela and Halliburton Colombia. Managing Director of PITAC Ltd. in Edinburgh, Scotland
water treatment since 1990. He is a Chartered Chemist, He holds degrees in Industrial Engineering and Petroleum Previously at Heriot Watt University, he was the Shell UK
Member of the Royal Society of Chemistry, London, UK, Engineering from the University of Peru – Lima. Professor of Petroleum Engineering, Chairman and Deputy
and a member of SPE. Chairman of the department from 1982 until 1991. In
D. JOHN MORGAN 1991, he founded the Horizontal Well Technology Unit.
DR. HOWARD L. MCKINZIE Is based in Denver, Colorado, and is President of John M. His specialties are focused primarily on production
Is a petroleum consultant from Sugar Land, Texas. His Campbell & Company with over 30 years experience in technology but he also teaches courses in reservoir and
prior industry experience includes 21 years with Texaco, the design, startup and troubleshooting of oil and gas facil- drilling related topics and was a visiting Professor of
Inc. and Getty Oil Company in numerous areas of ities. He has published extensively on sour gas treating, Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University. He was
production and completions engineering. Specific special- sulfur recovery, CO2 treating, materials of construction, employed by Shell in both the Middle East and the North
ties include sand control, downhole oil/water separation, LNG training, and cryogenic gas processing. He consults Sea. He has consulted internationally for the majority of
compact surface oil/water separation, artificial lift with for both North American and international clients in the major operating and service companies in areas such as
progressive cavity pumps, formation damage, water shut- gas processing industry. He performs training in LNG facil- horizontal wells, sand control, multilaterals and other
off, drag reduction techniques, and well stimulation by ities, oil and gas production facilities, and gas plants aspects of well design and troubleshooting.
acidizing and fracturing. He also worked in the area of sur- around the world. He is very active in industry activities Dr. Peden’s principal areas of expertise are in well
face well logging, and was one of the co-developers of including membership of the Editorial Review Board of the completion design; formation damage; sand control; and,
QGM™ (Qualitative Gas Measurement) and QFT™ Gas Processors Supplier's Association, the Program horizontal and multilateral wells. He has published over
(Qualitative Fluorescene Technique). He holds numerous Advisory Committee of the Laurance Reid Gas 100 technical papers, two textbooks, and contributed to
patents in several of the above areas. Dr. McKinzie was the Conditioning Conference, and had served as Adjunct numerous conferences as a keynote speaker. He has been
Chairman of the Completion Engineering Association in Professor of Petroleum Engineering at Colorado School of an active member of SPE, holding a number of posts
1991-1992, after being vice chairman in 1989-1990. He Mines. Mr. Morgan has many years of experience training including Chairman of the Aberdeen Section in 1986/87.
was a member of the research team that received the non-native English speakers. He holds a B.Sc. (Honours) In 1999/2000 he was an SPE Distinguished Lecturer on
Special Meritorious Award for Engineering Innovation in Chemical Engineering from London University; and an the subject of multilateral wells. He obtained his B.Sc. in
from Petroleum Engineer International (1999). He was M.E. in Chemical & Refinery Engineering from Colorado Chemical Engineering in 1970, returning to University in
also a member of another team that received the Hearst School of Mines, USA. 1976 from Shell, to obtain his M.Eng. in Petroleum
Newspapers Energy Award for Technology in 1998. He has Engineering and was awarded his Ph.D. in 1983.
twice received Texaco’s Corporate Technology Innovation DAVID PATRICK MURPHY
DR. DAVID PELTON
Award. Prior to joining Getty, he was employed by GTE Is Senior Staff Petrophysical Engineer for Shell Interna-
Labs in Waltham, Massachusetts, where he worked prima- tional Exploration and Production. He is also Formation Is the president of the Speakwell Company and has been a
rily in the areas of catalyst development research and Evaluation Lecturer for University of Houston Petroleum professional communicator for over 25 years. Since 1975
developing photo-catalytic techniques. Dr. McKinzie held Engineering Graduate Program. Mr. Murphy has over 30 he has performed for-and spoken to-audiences in the
a post-doctoral appointment in Chemistry at Brown years experience at Shell with emphasis on all aspects of United States, Central and Western Europe, Armenia,
University, and subsequently taught Engineering several petrophysical engineering and 13 years teaching experi- Azerbaijan, Russia, the Ukraine, and Southeast Asia. He
more years at Brown. He received his B.S. degree in ence at UH (concurrent with Shell time). Publications has taught at major colleges and universities and has been
Chemistry and