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 Kimberly R.

Maravillas

BSED III

T-Th 1:00-2:30

CHAPTER 10

Question:

1. Give examples on how values inherent in Math can be integrated in the

teaching of math.

Answer:

 Presenting a problem and developing the skills needed to solve that problem is

more motivational than teaching the skills without a context. It allows the

students to see a reason for learning the mathematics, and hence to become

more deeply involved in learning it. Teaching through problem solving can

enhance logical reasoning, helping people to be able to decide what rule, if any,

a situation requires, or if necessary to develop their own rules in a situation

where an existing rule cannot be directly applied. Problem solving can also allow

the whole person to develop by experiencing the full range of emotions

associated with various stages of the solution process.

Mathematics disciplines the mind. "The main design of studying mathematics should be to call
into exercise, to discipline, to invigorate the powers of the mind. It is the logic of the
mathematics, which constitutes their principal value as a part of a course of collegiate
instruction. The time and attention devoted to them is for the purpose of forming sound
reasoners, rather than expert mathematicians".

Mathematics is done because of the great amount of practice it affords the mind; it is a sort of
mental jogging to build up the mind and keep it fit. Accordingly, mathematics textbooks–the
barbells and skipping ropes for the mind–were designed to provide this needed exercise.
There is disciplinary value in the study of mathematics–in the development of sound work
habits, the capacity to work independently, and the acquiring of problem-solving skills and
strategies. There is indeed a wealth of self-discipline, which attends the analysis of a problem,
the identification of what is given and what is to be solved, the selection of a strategy to solve
the problem, and the interpretation of the obtained results. The resulting sense of
accomplishment can be enormously satisfying to student and teacher alike.

In teaching mathematics, "Let the child and the youth be taught that every mistake, every fault,
every difficulty, conquered, becomes a stepping-stone to better and higher things. It is through
such experiences that all who have ever made life worth living have achieved success." In
learning mathematics, patience and accuracy are developed.

Question:
2. Illustrate the spiral progression approach in teaching math with a concrete example
from the math curriculum guide.

Answer:

GRADE LEVEL GRADE LEVEL STANDARDS


The learner demonstrates understanding of key concepts and principles of
numbers and number sense (sets and real number system); measurement
(conversion of units of measurement);patterns and algebra (algebraic
expressions and properties of real numbers as applied in linear equations and
GRADE 7 inequalities in one variable); geometry (sides and angles of polygons); and
statistics and probability (data collection and presentation, and measures of
central tendency and variability) as applied - using appropriate technology - in
critical thinking, problem solving, reasoning, communicating, making
connections, representations, and decisions in real life.
The learner demonstrates understanding of key concepts and principles of
patterns and algebra (factors of polynomials, rational algebraic expressions,
linear equations and inequalities in two variables, systems of linear equations
GRADE 8 and inequalities in two variables); geometry (axiomatic structure of
geometry, triangle congruence, inequalities in a triangle, and parallel and
perpendicular lines); and statistics and probability (probability of simple
events) as applied - using appropriate technology - in critical thinking,
problem solving, reasoning, communicating, making connections,
representations, and decisions in real life.
The learner demonstrates understanding of key concepts and principles of
patterns and algebra (quadratic equations and inequalities, quadratic
functions, rational algebraic equations, variations, and radicals) and
GRADE 9 geometry (parallelograms and triangle similarities and basic concepts of
trigonometry) as applied - using appropriate technology - in critical thinking,
problem solving, reasoning, communicating, making connections,
representations, and decisions in real life.
The learner demonstrates understanding of key concepts and principles of
patterns and algebra (sequences, series, polynomials, polynomial
equations, and polynomial functions); geometry (circles and coordinate
GRADE 10 geometry); and statistics and probability (combinatorics and probability,
and measures of position) as applied - using appropriate technology - in
critical thinking, problem solving, reasoning, communicating, making
connections, representations, and decisions in real life.
Spiral Progression:
Grades 7-10
At the end of the lesson the
learner demonstrates
understanding and
appreciation of key
concepts and skills
involving numbers and
number sense (sets and
real numbers);
measurement (conversion
of units); patterns and
algebra (linear equations
and inequalities in one and
two variables, linear
functions.
Grades 4-6
At the end of Grade 6, the
learner demonstrates
understanding and appreciation
of key concepts and skills
involving numbers and number
sense. Measurement ( time,
speed, perimeter circumference
and area of palne figures,
volume and surface area of
solid/space figures, temperature
and meter reading.

Grades 1-3
At the end of Grade 3, the
learner demonstrates
understanding and appreciation
of key concepts and skills
involving numbers and number
sense. Measurement(time,
length, mass, capacity, area of
square and rectangle).

K-Algebra, Geometry,
Statistics and
Probability