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HPE OneView 3.0 User Guide Abstract This guide describes HPE OneView features, interfaces, resource model
HPE OneView 3.0 User Guide Abstract This guide describes HPE OneView features, interfaces, resource model

HPE OneView 3.0 User Guide

Abstract

This guide describes HPE OneView features, interfaces, resource model design, and secure working environment. It describes up-front planning considerations and how to use the HPE OneView appliance UI or REST APIs to configure, manage, monitor, and troubleshoot your data center infrastructure. It also includes information about the SCMB (State-Change Message Bus). It is intended for infrastructure administrators, network administrators, and server administrators that plan, configure, and manage data center hardware and software throughout its lifecycle, and for backup administrators and operations personnel that monitor and troubleshoot data center hardware and software.

Part Number: 5200-1735 Published: October 2016 Edition: 1

© Copyright 2013-2016 Hewlett Packard Enterprise Development LP Confidential computer software. Valid license from Hewlett Packard Enterprise required for possession, use or copying. Consistent with FAR 12.211 and 12.212, Commercial Computer Software, Computer Software Documentation, and Technical Data for Commercial Items are licensed to the U.S. Government under vendor's standard commercial license. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. The only warranties for Hewlett Packard Enterprise products and services are set forth in the express warranty statements accompanying such products and services. Nothing herein should be construed as constituting an additional warranty. Hewlett Packard Enterprise shall not be liable for technical or editorial errors or omissions contained herein.

Acknowledgements

Google® is a registered trademark of Google Inc. Java® is a trademark of Oracle or its affiliates. Microsoft®, Windows®, and Windows Server®

are trademarks of the Microsoft Group of companies.Linux® is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States and other countries.

VMware® is a registered trademark of VMware Inc.

Warranty

Hewlett Packard Enterprise will replace defective delivery media for a period of 90 days from the date of purchase.

Contents

I Learning about HPE OneView

19

1 Learning about HPE OneView

21

1.1 HPE OneView for converged infrastructure management

21

1.2 HPE OneView licensing

23

1.3 Managing, monitoring, or migrating server hardware on c7000 enclosures

24

1.4 Provisioning features

24

1.4.1 Resource templates, groups, and sets

25

1.4.2 Server profiles and server profile templates

27

1.4.3 Streamlined process for bringing hardware under management

27

1.4.4 Operating system deployment

28

1.4.5 Storage provisioning and management

28

1.5 Firmware and configuration change management features

29

1.5.1 Simplified firmware management

29

1.5.2 Simplified configuration change management

30

1.6 Monitoring the environment and responding to issues

30

1.6.1 Data center environmental management

32

1.6.2 Resource utilization monitoring

32

1.6.3 Activity and health management

32

1.6.4 Hardware and firmware inventory information

33

1.6.5 Remote Support

33

1.7 Backup and restore features

33

1.8 Security features

34

1.9 High availability features

35

1.10

Graphical and programmatic interfaces

35

1.11

Integration with other management software

36

1.11.1 Other management software warnings

37

1.12 Open integration

38

1.13 Networking features

38

1.14 HPE Smart Update Tools features

39

2 Understanding the resource model

41

2.1 Resource model summary diagram

42

2.2 Appliance

42

2.3 Connections

43

2.4 Connection templates

44

2.5 Data centers

44

2.6 Domains

45

2.7 Enclosures

46

2.8 Enclosure groups

46

2.9 Enclosure types

47

2.10 Interconnects

47

2.11 Interconnect types

48

2.12 Logical enclosures

48

2.13 Logical interconnects

49

2.14 Logical interconnect groups

50

2.15 Logical switches

51

2.16 Logical switch groups

52

2.17 Networks

52

2.18 Network sets

53

2.19

Power delivery devices

53

2.20 Racks

54

2.21 SAN Managers

55

2.22 SANs

55

2.23 Server hardware

56

2.24 Server hardware types

57

2.25 Server profiles

57

2.26 Server profile templates

58

2.27 Storage Pools

59

2.28 Storage Systems

60

2.29 Switches

60

2.30 Unmanaged devices

61

2.31 Uplink sets

61

2.32 Volumes

62

2.33 Volume Templates

62

3 Understanding the security features of the appliance

65

3.1 Securing the appliance

65

3.2 Best practices for maintaining a secure appliance

67

3.3 Creating a login session

68

3.4 Authentication for appliance access

69

3.5 Controlling access for authorized users

69

3.5.1 Specifying user accounts and roles

69

3.5.2 Mapping of SSO roles for iLO and OA

69

3.5.3 Mapping appliance interactions with iLO, OA, and iPDU

70

3.6 Protecting credentials

70

3.7 Understanding the audit log

71

3.8 Choosing a policy for the audit log

72

3.9 Appliance access over SSL

72

3.10

Managing certificates from a browser

72

3.10.1 Self-signed certificate

73

3.10.2 Using a certificate authority

73

3.10.3 Create a certificate signing request

73

3.10.4 Create a self-signed certificate

74

3.10.5 Import a certificate

74

3.10.6 View the Certificate settings

75

3.10.7 Downloading and importing a self-signed certificate into a browser

75

3.10.8 Verifying a certificate

75

3.11

Nonbrowser clients

76

3.11.1 Passwords

76

3.11.2 SSL connection

76

3.12 Ports required for HPE OneView

76

3.13 Controlling access to the appliance console

77

3.13.1 Enable or disable authorized services access

77

3.13.2 Restricting console access

78

3.14

Files you can download from the appliance

78

4 Navigating the graphical user interface

79

4.1 About the graphical user interface

79

4.2 Activity sidebar

80

4.2.1 About the Activity sidebar

80

4.2.2 Activity sidebar details

80

4.2.3 Expand or collapse the Activity sidebar

80

4.3

Audit tracking

80

4.4 Banner and main menu

81

 

4.5 Browsers

81

4.5.1 Browser best practices for a secure environment

82

4.5.2 Commonly used browser features and settings

82

4.5.3 Browser requirements

83

4.5.4 Set the browser for US or metric units of measurement

83

4.6 Button functions

83

4.7 Filters sidebar

84

4.8 Help sidebar

84

4.8.1 View the End-User License agreement

85

4.8.2 View the Written Offer

85

4.9 Appliance status screens

85

4.9.1 Starting

86

4.9.2 Oops

86

4.9.3 Updating the appliance

86

4.9.4 Temporarily unavailable

86

 

4.9.5

Resetting

86

4.9.6 Waiting

86

4.10

Icon descriptions

87

4.10.1 Status and severity icons

87

4.10.2 User control icons

87

4.10.3 Informational icons

88

4.11 Labels screen details

88

4.12 Map view screen details

4.12 Map view screen details

88

4.13 Notifications area

89

4.14 Log out of the appliance

90

4.15 Organizing resources into groups by assigning labels

90

 

4.15.1

View resources by label

92

4.16 Performing an action on multiple resources

92

4.17 Search help topics

93

 

4.17.1

Help search features and limitations

94

4.18

Search resources

95

4.18.1

Clear the Smart Search box

97

4.19

View resources according to their health status

98

4.19.1

Reset the health status view

98

5 Using the REST APIs and other programmatic interfaces

99

5.1 Resource operations

99

5.2 Return codes

99

5.3 URI format

99

5.4 Resource model format

100

5.5 Log in to the appliance using REST APIs

100

5.6 REST API version and backward compatibility

100

5.7 Asynchronous versus synchronous operations

101

5.8 Task resource

102

5.9 Error handling

102

5.10 Concurrency control using etags

102

5.11 Querying resources and pagination using common REST API parameters

103

5.12 State-Change Message Bus

104

5.13 Metric Streaming Message Bus

104

5.14 Analysis and troubleshooting

104

5.14.1

HPE Operations Analytics integration with HPE OneView

104

5.15

Developer tools in a web browser

105

5.16

PowerShell and Python code sample libraries

105

6 Accessing documentation and help

107

6.1 Online help—conceptual and task information as you need it

107

6.2 This user guide supplements the online help

107

6.3 Where to find HPE OneView documentation

108

6.4 Enable off-appliance browsing of UI help and REST API help

108

II Planning tasks

109

7 Planning your data center resources

111

7.1 How many data centers?

111

7.1.1

Managing, monitoring, or migrating server hardware?

111

7.2 Security planning

111

7.3 Preparing your data center network switches

111

7.4 Planning for a dual-stack implementation

112

7.5 Planning your resource names

112

7.6 Planning the appliance configuration

113

7.6.1 Appliance VM and host requirements

113

7.6.2 Planning for high availability

115

7.6.3 Separate networks for data and management

115

7.6.4 Time clocks and NTP

115

7.6.5 IP addresses

115

8 Planning for configuration changes

117

8.1 Configuration changes that require or result in resource outages

117

8.2 Configuration changes that might require changes to multiple resources

118

8.2.1 Adding a network

118

8.2.2 Adding an enclosure

119

9 Planning for enclosure migration from VCM into HPE OneView

121

9.1 Timing and type of migration

121

9.2 Understanding the migration process

121

9.2.1

Warning issues

123

III Configuration quick starts

125

10 Quick Start: Initial configuration of HPE OneView

127

10.1

Initial configuration of resources in HPE OneView

127

10.1.1 Prerequisites

127

10.1.2

Configure resources in HPE OneView

127

10.2

Define physical dimensions and power systems in HPE OneView

128

11 Quick Starts for networks, enclosures, and storage

131

11.1

Quick Start: Add a network and associate it with an existing server

131

11.1.1

Adding a network and associating it with an existing server

131

11.2

Quick Start: Add an active/active network configuration for single or multiple logical

interconnect groups

133

11.2.1

Adding an active/active network configuration for single or multiple logical interconnect

 

groups

134

11.3

Quick Start: Migrate from an active/standby to an active/active configuration

135

11.3.1

Migrating from an active/standby to an active/active configuration

136

11.4

Quick Start: Add a c7000 enclosure with a single logical interconnect group and connect

its server blades to networks

137

11.4.1 Scenario 1: Adding a c7000 enclosure to manage to an existing enclosure group

137

11.4.2 Scenario 2: Defining network connectivity before adding a c7000 enclosure to

 

manage

138

11.4.3

Scenario 3: Defining network connectivity as you add the enclosure to manage

140

11.5 Quick Start: Add a c7000 enclosure with multiple logical interconnect groups and connect

its server hardware to networks

142

11.6

Quick Start: Add an HPE ProLiant DL rack mount server to manage

144

11.6.1

Adding an HPE ProLiant DL rack mount server to manage

145

11.7

Quick Start: Configure a c7000 enclosure and server blade for direct attach to an HPE

3PAR Storage System

145

 

11.7.1

Configuring a c7000 enclosure and server blade for direct attach to an HPE 3PAR

Storage System

147

11.8 Quick Start: Configuring an HPE 5900 for management by HPE OneView

148

11.9 Quick Start: Configuring a Cisco switch to be added as a SAN manager for management

by HPE OneView

149

11.10 Quick Start: Configure server hardware MAC address binding for FCoE server profiles

150

11.10.1 Prerequisites

150

11.10.2 Configuring server hardware MAC address binding for FCoE server profiles

150

IV Configuration and management

153

12 Best practices

155

13 Managing server hardware, server profiles, and server profile templates.157

13.1

Managing server hardware

157

13.1.1 Roles

158

13.1.2 Tasks for server hardware

158

13.1.3 Server hardware management features

158

13.1.4 Server hardware monitoring features

159

13.1.5 Prerequisites for bringing server hardware into an appliance

160

13.1.6 About server hardware

160

 

13.1.6.1 How the appliance handles unsupported hardware

161

13.1.6.2 About monitored server hardware

161

13.1.6.3 About unsupported server hardware

161

13.1.6.4 About unmanaged devices

161

13.1.7 Tasks for server hardware types

162

13.1.8 About server hardware types

162

13.1.9 How the iLO is changed as a result of HPE OneView management

162

13.1.10 Launch the iLO console to manage servers remotely

163

13.1.11 Enabling health monitoring for legacy servers

164

13.2

Managing server profiles

165

13.2.1 Roles

165

13.2.2 Tasks for server profiles

165

13.2.3 About server profiles

166

 

13.2.3.1 Capturing best-practice configurations

166

13.2.3.2 About editing a server profile

167

13.2.3.3 About moving a server profile

168

13.2.3.4

About migrating server profiles

169

13.2.3.5 Working with server profiles to control remove-and-replace behavior

169

13.2.3.6 About assigning a server profile to an empty device bay

170

13.2.3.7 About server profile connections

170

13.2.3.8 About server profile connections and changing server hardware types

171

13.2.3.9 About server profiles and local storage

171

13.2.3.10 About attaching SAN volumes to a server profile

173

13.2.3.11 About server profile consistency validation

174

13.2.4

When to use a server profile

175

13.3

Managing server profile templates

176

13.3.1 Roles

176

13.3.2 Tasks for server profile templates

176

13.3.3 About server profile templates

177

13.3.3.1 About creating a server profile template

177

13.3.3.2 About editing a server profile template

177

13.3.4

When to use a server profile template

177

13.4

Learning more

178

14 Managing licenses

179

14.1 UI screens and REST API resources

179

14.2 Roles

179

14.3 Tasks for licenses

179

14.4 About licensing

179

14.4.1

License types

179

14.4.1.1 Server hardware licenses

179

14.4.1.2 Other licenses

180

14.4.2

About HPE OneView Advanced licensing for managing server hardware

181

14.4.2.1 Server blade licensing at the enclosure level

181

14.4.2.2 About rack mount server licensing

182

14.4.3 About HPE OneView Standard licensing for monitoring server hardware

183

14.4.4 Purchasing or obtaining licenses

183

14.4.5 License delivery

183

14.4.6 License key format

183

14.4.7 Licensing and utilization statistics

184

14.4.8 Licensing scenarios

184

14.4.9 License reporting

185

14.5

Learning more

185

15 Managing networks and network resources

187

 

15.1 Roles

187

15.2 Tasks for networks

187

15.2.1 Tasks for Fibre Channel networks

187

15.2.2 Tasks for Ethernet networks

187

15.2.3 Tasks for FCoE networks

188

15.3 About networks

188

15.4 About network sets

188

15.5 About Fibre Channel networks

190

15.5.1 Fibre Channel network types

190

15.5.2 Fabric-attach Fibre Channel networks

190

15.5.3 Direct-attach Fibre Channel networks

191

15.6

About Ethernet networks

191

15.6.1 About tagged Ethernet networks

191

15.6.2 About untagged Ethernet networks

192

15.6.3

About tunnel Ethernet networks

192

15.6.4

About Smart Link

192

15.7 About Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) networks

192

15.8 Data center switch port requirements

193

15.9 Learning more

194

16 Managing interconnects, logical interconnects, and logical interconnect groups

195

16.1

Managing enclosure interconnect hardware

195

16.1.1 Roles

195

16.1.2 Tasks for interconnects

195

16.1.3 About interconnects

195

 

16.1.3.1 About managed and monitored interconnects

195

16.1.3.2 About unmanaged and unsupported interconnects

196

16.1.3.3 FIP snooping

196

16.1.3.4 Connectivity and synchronization with the appliance

196

16.1.4

Learning more

197

16.2

Managing logical interconnects and logical interconnect groups

197

16.2.1 Roles

197

16.2.2 Tasks for logical interconnects

197

16.2.3 Tasks for logical interconnect groups

198

16.2.4 About logical interconnects

198

 

16.2.4.1 About uplink sets

198

16.2.4.2 About internal networks

200

16.2.4.3 About stacking links and stacking health

200

16.2.4.4 Creating or deleting a logical interconnect

201

16.2.5

About logical interconnect groups

202

16.2.5.1 About the logical interconnect group graphical interface

202

16.2.5.2 About multiple logical interconnect groups in an enclosure group

203

16.2.5.3 About copying a logical interconnect group

203

16.2.5.4 About uplink sets in a logical interconnect group

203

16.2.5.5 About Link Layer Discovery Protocol (LLDP) tagging

204

16.2.5.6 About enhanced type-length-value (TLV) structure

204

16.2.6

About firmware associated with a logical interconnect

205

16.2.6.1

About updating firmware for logical interconnects

205

16.2.7

About active/active and active/standby configurations

206

16.2.7.1 About active/standby configurations

206

16.2.7.2 About active/active configurations

206

16.2.8 About loop protection

209

16.2.9 About pause flood protection

209

16.2.10 About SNMP settings

210

16.2.11 About the Virtual Connect FlexFabric–20/40 F8 interconnect module

210

16.2.12 About Quality of Service for network traffic

210

16.2.13 Add an uplink set

211

16.2.14 Update firmware for logical interconnects within enclosures

212

 

16.2.14.1 Stage and activate firmware for update from logical interconnect

212

16.2.14.2 Stage firmware for later activation for update from logical interconnect

212

16.2.14.3 Activate the firmware for update from logical interconnect

213

16.2.15 Update the logical interconnect configuration from the logical interconnect group

214

16.2.16 Create a logical interconnect group

215

16.2.17 Learning more

216

17

Managing enclosures, enclosure groups, and logical enclosures

217

 

17.1 Roles

217

17.2 Managing enclosures

217

17.2.1 Tasks for enclosures

217

17.2.2 About enclosures

218

 

17.2.2.1 About c7000 enclosures

218

17.2.2.2 About managed c7000 enclosures

218

17.2.2.3 About monitored c7000 enclosures

219

17.2.2.4 About migrating c7000 enclosures managed by other management systems

 

220

 

17.2.2.5 About unmanaged and unsupported c7000 enclosures

230

17.2.2.6 Connectivity and synchronization with HPE OneView

231

17.2.3 Prerequisites for bringing a c7000 enclosure into HPE OneView

231

17.2.4 Checklist: connecting a server to a data center network

232

17.2.5 Add a c7000 enclosure

232

17.2.6 Add a c7000 enclosure to monitor the hardware

232

17.2.7 Migrate a c7000 enclosure currently managed by VCM

233

 

17.2.7.1 Prerequisites

233

17.2.7.2 Migrating an enclosure managed by VCM

233

17.2.7.3 Migrating a VCM enclosure using REST APIs

234

17.2.7.4 Perform post-migration tasks

235

17.2.7.5 Resolve compatibility issues

236

17.2.8 Prepare a VCEM enclosure for migration into HPE OneView

236

17.2.9 Effects of managing a c7000 enclosure

237

17.3

Managing enclosure groups

237

17.3.1 Tasks for enclosure groups

237

17.3.2 About enclosure groups

237

 

17.3.2.1

Enclosure groups and logical interconnect groups

237

17.3.3

Create an enclosure group

237

17.3.3.1 Prerequisites

238

17.3.3.2 Creating an enclosure group

238

17.4

Managing logical enclosures

238

17.4.1 Tasks for logical enclosures

238

17.4.2 About logical enclosures

238

 

17.4.2.1 About inconsistent logical enclosures

239

17.4.2.2 About updating firmware from a logical enclosure

239

17.4.3 Create a logical enclosure

239

17.4.4 Update firmware from a logical enclosure

239

17.4.5 Create a logical enclosure support dump file

240

17.5

Learning more

241

18 Managing firmware for managed devices

243

18.1 Tasks for firmware

243

18.2 About firmware bundles

243

18.2.1

About updating firmware

245

18.2.1.1

About managing firmware manually

246

18.3 About unsupported firmware

246

18.4 Maintain availability during Virtual Connect interconnect firmware upgrades

247

18.5 Best practices for managing firmware

248

18.6 Create a custom SPP

249

18.7 Update firmware on managed devices

251

18.7.1 Update firmware on the logical enclosure

251

18.7.2 Update firmware with a server profile

252

18.7.3 Update firmware with a server profile template

253

18.8

Learning more

253

19 Managing power, temperature, and the data center

255

19.1

Managing power

255

19.1.1 Roles

255

19.1.2 Tasks for managing power

255

19.1.3 About power delivery devices

255

19.2

Managing your data center

256

19.2.1 Roles

256

19.2.2 Tasks for data centers

256

19.2.3 About data centers

257

19.3

Managing racks

257

19.3.1 Roles

257

19.3.2 Tasks for racks

257

19.3.3 About racks

257

19.4

Learning more

258

20 Managing storage

259

20.1

Storage systems

259

20.1.1 Roles

 

260

20.1.2 Tasks

260

20.1.3 About storage systems

260

 

20.1.3.1

About HPE 3PAR StoreServ Storage systems

260

20.2

Storage pools

260

20.2.1 Roles

 

261

20.2.2 Tasks

261

20.2.3 About storage pools

261

20.3

Volumes

261

20.3.1 Roles

 

261

20.3.2 Tasks

261

20.3.3 About volumes

261

 

20.3.3.1

About snapshots

261

20.4

Volume templates

262

20.4.1 Roles

 

262

20.4.2 Tasks

262

20.4.3 About volume templates

262

20.5

SAN Managers

262

20.5.1 Roles

 

262

20.5.2 Tasks

262

20.5.3 About SAN managers

262

 

20.5.3.1 About zone sets

263

20.5.3.2 Configuring SAN managers to be managed by HPE OneView

263

20.6

SANs

264

20.6.1 Tasks

 

264

20.6.2 About SANs

264

 

20.6.2.1

About SAN zoning

264

20.7

Learning more

265

21 Managing switches, logical switches, and logical switch groups

267

21.1

Managing switches

267

21.1.1 Roles

267

21.1.2 Tasks for switches

267

21.1.3 About top-of-rack switches

267

21.2

Managing logical switches

268

21.2.1 Roles

268

21.2.2 Tasks for logical switches

268

21.2.3 About logical switches

268

 

21.2.3.1 Managed logical switches

269

21.2.3.2 Monitored logical switches

269

21.2.3.3 Logical switch configuration guidelines

270

21.3

Managing logical switch groups

271

21.3.1 Roles

271

21.3.2 Tasks for logical switch groups

271

21.3.3 About logical switch groups

271

21.4

Learning more

271

22 Managing users and authentication

273

22.1 Roles

273

22.2 Tasks for managing users and groups

273

22.3 About user accounts

273

22.4 About user roles

274

22.5 Action privileges for user roles

275

22.6 About authentication settings

278

22.7 About directory service authentication

279

22.8 Managing user passwords

280

22.9 Reset the administrator password

281

22.10

Learning more

282

23 Backing up an appliance

283

23.1 Roles

283

23.2 About backing up the appliance

283

23.3 Best practices for backing up an appliance

285

23.4 Determining your backup policy

285

23.5 Back up an appliance manually

285

23.6 Using REST APIs to create and download an appliance backup file

286

23.7 Creating a custom script to create and download an appliance backup file

287

23.8 Configure automatic remote backups

287

23.9 Disable automatic remote backups

287

23.10

Learning more

288

24 Restoring an appliance from a backup file

289

24.1 Roles

289

24.2 About restoring the appliance

289

24.3 Best practices for restoring an appliance

291

24.4 Restore an appliance from a backup file

291

24.5 Using REST APIs to restore an appliance from a backup file

294

24.6 Creating a custom script to restore an appliance

294

24.7 Post-restoration tasks

294

25 Managing the appliance

295

25.1

Updating the appliance

295

25.1.1 Roles

295

25.1.2 Tasks

295

25.1.3 About appliance updates

295

25.1.4 Learning more

296

25.2

Managing appliance availability

296

25.2.1 Roles

 

296

25.2.2 Tasks

296

25.2.3 Best practices for managing a VM appliance

296

25.2.4 Shut down the appliance from the UI

297

25.2.5 Restart the appliance from the UI

297

25.2.6 How the appliance handles an unexpected shutdown

298

25.3

Managing settings

298

25.3.1 Roles

 

299

25.3.2 Tasks

299

25.3.3 Reset the appliance to the original factory settings

299

25.3.4 About appliance proxy settings

300

25.3.5 About scopes

300

 

25.3.5.1

Scope-enabled resource categories

300

25.4

Managing addresses and ID pools

300

25.4.1 Roles

 

301

25.4.2 Tasks for addresses and identifiers

301

25.4.3 About ID pools

301

25.4.4 Add an IPv4 subnet and address range

301

25.5 Managing the security features of the appliance

302

25.6 Enabling or disabling Hewlett Packard Enterprise support access to the appliance

302

25.6.1 Roles

 

302

25.6.2 Tasks

302

25.7

Managing TLS certificates

302

25.7.1 Roles

 

303

25.7.2 Tasks

303

25.7.3 Learning more

303

25.8

Managing the Hewlett Packard Enterprise public key

303

25.8.1 Roles

 

303

25.8.2 Tasks

303

25.9

Downloading audit logs

303

25.9.1 Roles

 

303

25.9.2 Tasks

303

25.9.3 Download audit logs

304

25.9.4 Learning more

304

V Monitoring

305

26 Monitoring data center status, health, and performance

307

26.1

Daily monitoring

307

26.1.1 Initial check: the Dashboard

307

26.1.2 Activities

307

26.1.3 Utilization graphs

307

26.1.4 Monitor data center temperature

308

26.2

Best practices for monitoring data centers

308

26.2.1 Best practices for monitoring health with the appliance UI

308

26.2.2 Best practices for monitoring health using SCMB or REST APIs

309

26.3

Managing activities

311

26.3.1 About Activity

311

26.3.2 Activity types: alerts and tasks

312

 

26.3.2.1 About alerts

312

26.3.2.2 About tasks

313

26.3.3

Activity states

314

26.3.4

Activity statuses

315

26.3.5

Service alerts

315

26.4 Managing email notifications

315

26.5 About email notification of alert messages

315

26.6 Configure the appliance for email notification of alerts

316

26.7 Using the Dashboard screen

316

26.7.1 Learning about the Dashboard

316

26.7.2 Dashboard screen details

317

26.7.3 How to interpret the Dashboard charts

317

26.7.4 Customizing the dashboard

319

26.8

Managing remote support

319

26.8.1 About remote support

319

26.8.2 About channel partners

320

26.8.3 About data collection

320

27 Monitoring power and temperature

321

27.1

Monitoring power and temperature with the UI

321

27.1.1

Monitoring data center temperature

321

27.1.1.1

Manipulating the view of the data center visualization

322

27.1.2

Monitoring power and temperature utilization

323

27.1.2.1 About the Utilization panel

323

27.1.2.2 About utilization graphs and meters

323

27.2

REST API power and temperature monitoring

325

27.2.1 Update enclosure power capacity settings

325

27.2.2 Update server hardware power capacity settings

326

28 Using a message bus to send data to subscribers

327

28.1 About accessing HPE OneView message buses

327

28.2 Using the State-Change Message Bus (SCMB)

327

28.2.1 Connect to the SCMB

327

28.2.2 Set up a queue to connect to the HPE OneView SCMB exchange

328

28.2.3 JSON structure of message received from the SCMB

329

28.2.4 Example to connect and subscribe to SCMB using .NET C#

330

28.2.5 Example to connect and subscribe to SCMB using Java

333

28.2.6 Examples to connect and subscribe to SCMB using Python

334

28.2.6.1 Installation

334

28.2.6.2 Pika

335

28.2.6.3 AMQP

336

28.2.7

Re-create the AMQP client certificate

337

28.3

Using the Metric Streaming Message Bus (MSMB)

337

28.3.1 Connect to the MSMB

338

28.3.2 Set up a queue to connect to the HPE OneView MSMB exchange

339

28.3.3 JSON structure of message received from the MSMB

339

28.3.4 Example to connect and subscribe to MSMB using .NET C#

342

28.3.5 Example to connect and subscribe to MSMB using Java

344

28.3.6 Examples to connect and subscribe to MSMB using Python

345

28.3.6.1 Installation

345

28.3.6.2 Pika

346

28.3.6.3 AMQP

347

28.3.7

Re-create the AMQP client certificate

348

29 Generating reports

29.1 Roles

349

349

29.2

Tasks for reports

349

30 Using data services

351

30.1

About data services

351

30.1.1 About metric streaming

351

30.1.2 About log forwarding to a remote syslog server

351

30.2

REST API to enable metric streaming

352

30.2.1 Roles

352

30.2.2 Tasks for metrics REST API

352

30.3

REST API to leverage remote system logs

352

30.3.1 Roles

353

30.3.2 Tasks for remoteSyslog REST API

353

VI Troubleshooting

355

31

Troubleshooting

357

31.1 Basic troubleshooting techniques

357

31.2 About the support dump file

358

31.3 Create a support dump file

359

31.4 Create a support dump for authorized technical support using REST API scripting

360

31.5 Troubleshooting activity

361

31.5.1 Alerts are not generated

361

31.5.2 Alert is locked

361

31.5.3 Alerts are not visible in the user interface

361

31.5.4 Alert status is reported as blank or unexpected

362

31.5.5 Alert state is unexpected

362

31.6

Troubleshooting the appliance

362

31.6.1 Appliance performance is slow

363

31.6.2 Unexpected appliance shutdown

364

31.6.3 Cannot update appliance

364

31.6.4 Appliance update file downloads, but update fails

365

31.6.5 Appliance update is unsuccessful

366

31.6.6 Browser does not display the HPE OneView user interface

366

31.6.7 Icons are not visible on the appliance dashboard

367

31.6.8 Could not retrieve the browser session

367

31.6.9 Cannot create or download a backup file

368

31.6.10 Support dump was not created

369

31.6.11 Support dump file not saved

370

31.6.12 Cannot create unencrypted support dump

370

31.6.13 Unable to import a certificate

370

31.6.14 Certificate was revoked

371

31.6.15 Invalid certificate chain prevents operations

371

31.6.16 Invalid certificate content prevents operations

371

31.6.17 Audit log could not be downloaded

372

31.6.18 Audit entries are not logged

372

31.6.19 Audit log is absent

372

31.6.20 Restore action was unsuccessful

372

31.6.21 Appliance did not shut down

374

31.6.22 Cannot restart the appliance after a shutdown

375

31.6.23 You cannot log in

376

31.6.24 Cannot log in after a factory reset action

376

31.6.25 Reinstall the remote console

376

31.6.26 Appliance is offline, manual action is required

377

31.6.27

Appliance is offline and unusable

378

31.7

Troubleshooting the appliance network setup

379

31.7.1 Appliance cannot access the network

379

31.7.2 Appliance cannot retrieve DNS information from DHCP server

379

31.7.3 DNS server is unreachable

380

31.7.4 Gateway server is unreachable

380

31.7.5 Cannot change network settings

380

31.7.6 NTP synchronization fails

381

31.8

Troubleshooting email notifications

381

31.8.1 Cannot configure email notification of alerts

382

31.8.2 Unable to connect through <sending email address host name>

382

31.8.3 Host does not respond as an SMTP server

382

31.8.4 Unable to deliver email messages to some email IDs

384

31.8.5 Designated recipients are not receiving email notifications of events

384

31.8.6 Frequent, irrelevant email messages

385

31.8.7 Test message could not be sent

386

31.8.8 Some test messages were not received

386

31.9

Troubleshooting enclosures and enclosure groups

387

31.9.1 Add or remove enclosure is unsuccessful

387

31.9.2 Unassigned server profile connections cannot be migrated

389

31.9.3 Migration is unsuccessful

392

31.9.4 Invalid OA certificate

392

31.10

Troubleshooting firmware bundles

393

31.10.1 Incorrect credentials

393

31.10.2 Lost iLO connectivity

393

31.10.3 SUM errors

393

31.10.4 Failed firmware update on enclosure add

394

31.10.5 Failed firmware update on all devices in an enclosure

395

31.11

Troubleshooting interconnects

395

31.11.1 Interconnect edit is unsuccessful

395

31.11.2 Interconnect modules are in an incorrect state

396

31.11.3 Replace an Virtual Connect interconnect in a managed enclosure

397

31.12

Troubleshooting licenses

398

31.12.1

Restore a license key that has been erased from an enclosure Onboard

Administrator

398

31.12.2 The license assigned does not match the type specified

399

31.12.3 Licensing numbers appear to be inaccurate

399

31.12.4 Could not view license details

400

31.12.5 Could not add license

401

31.12.6 Could not add license key

401

31.12.7 Could not apply license

402

31.13 Troubleshooting locale issues

403

31.14 Troubleshooting logical interconnects

403

31.14.1 I/O bay occupancy errors

403

31.14.2 Uplink set warnings or errors

404

31.14.3 Physical interconnect warnings or errors

404

31.14.4 Firmware update errors

404

31.14.5 Pause flood condition detected on a Flex-10 physical port

405

31.15

Troubleshooting logical switches

405

31.15.1

Switch communications

405

31.16

Troubleshooting networks

406

31.16.1

Network create operation is unsuccessful

406

31.17

Troubleshooting reports

406

31.17.1

Cannot view reports

406

31.18

Troubleshooting scopes

407

31.18.1

Cannot add scope

407

 

31.18.2

Cannot edit or delete scope

407

31.19

Troubleshooting server hardware

407

31.19.1 Server add or remove is unsuccessful

408

31.19.2 Cannot control power on server

409

31.19.3 Lost connectivity to server hardware after appliance restarts

410

31.19.4 Replace a server with an assigned server profile

410

31.19.5 Replace a server adapter on server hardware with an assigned server profile

411

31.20

Troubleshooting server profiles

412

31.20.1 Server profile is not created or updated correctly

412

31.20.2 Cannot apply the server profile

414

31.20.3 Profile operations are not successful

415

31.20.4 Cannot update or delete profile

415

31.20.5 Inconsistent firmware versions

417

31.21

Troubleshooting storage

418

31.21.1 Brocade Network Advisor (BNA) SAN manager fails to add

418

31.21.2 Unable to establish connection with Brocade Network Advisor (BNA) SAN

 

manager

419

31.21.3 Volume not available to server hardware

419

31.21.4 Volume is visible from the storage system but not visible on the appliance

421

31.21.5 Target port failure

421

31.21.6 Zone operations fail on Cisco SAN manager

422

31.21.7 Storage system port is in an undesired state

423

31.22

Troubleshooting user accounts

424

31.22.1 Incorrect privileges

424

31.22.2 Cannot modify local user account

424

31.22.3 Cannot delete local user account

425

31.22.4 Unauthenticated user or group

425

31.22.5 User public key is not accepted

425

31.22.6 Directory service not available

426

31.22.7 Cannot add directory service

426

31.22.8 Cannot add server for a directory service

428

31.22.9 Cannot add directory group

429

31.22.10 Cannot find directory group

429

32 Support and other resources

433

32.1 Accessing Hewlett Packard Enterprise Support

433

32.2 Accessing updates

433

32.3 Websites

434

32.4 Remote support

434

32.5 Customer self repair

435

32.6 Documentation feedback

435

A Using the virtual appliance console

A.1 Using the virtual appliance console

B Backup and restore script examples

437

437

439

B.1 Sample backup script

439

B.2 Sample restore script

450

C Authentication directory service

C.1 Microsoft Active Directory configurations

461

461

C.1.1 Users and groups in same OU

461

C.1.2 Users and groups in different OUs, under same parent

461

C.1.3 Users and groups in different OUs, under different parents

462

C.1.4 Built-in groups

463

C.2 OpenLDAP directory configuration

464

C.3 Validate the directory server configuration

465

C.4 LDAP schema object classes

466

D HPE Smart Update Tools installation with HPE Insight Control server

provisioning

469

E

Maintenance console

471

E.1 About the Maintenance console

471

E.2 About the Maintenance console password

473

E.3 About the factory reset operation

474

E.4 Access the Maintenance console

474

E.5 Log in to the Maintenance console

475

E.6 Maintenance console main menu screen details

475

E.7 Maintenance console Details screen details

476

E.8 Maintenance console appliance states

477

E.9 Perform a factory reset using the Maintenance console

478

E.10 Reset the administrator password with the Maintenance console

479

E.11 Reset the Maintenance console password

480

E.12 Restart the appliance using the Maintenance console

480

E.13 Shut down the appliance using the Maintenance console

481

E.14 View the appliance details

481

Index

483

Part I Learning about HPE OneView

This part describes HPE OneView and its model for data center resources and introduces you to the terms and concepts used in this document and the appliance online help.

1 Learning about HPE OneView

Designed for converged infrastructure environments, HPE OneView is a single integrated platform, packaged as an appliance, that implements a software-defined approach to managing your physical infrastructure through its entire life cycle. To learn more about HPE OneView, start with the introduction or select a topic from the following list.

“HPE OneView licensing” (page 23)

“Managing, monitoring, or migrating server hardware on c7000 enclosures” (page 24)

“Provisioning features” (page 24)

“Firmware and configuration change management features” (page 29)

“Monitoring the environment and responding to issues” (page 30)

“Backup and restore features” (page 33)

“Security features” (page 34)

“High availability features” (page 35)

“Graphical and programmatic interfaces” (page 35)

“Integration with other management software ” (page 36)

“Open integration” (page 38)

“Networking features” (page 38)

“HPE Smart Update Tools features” (page 39)

1.1 HPE OneView for converged infrastructure management

Optimized for collaboration, productivity, and reliability, HPE OneView is designed to provide simple, single-pane-of-glass lifecycle management for the complex aspects of enterprise IT—servers, networking, software, power and cooling, and storage.

HPE OneView makes it possible to easily monitor, configure, and manage physical and logical server, network, and storage resources through either a graphical user interface or by using REST (REpresentational State Transfer) APIs.

HPE OneView is designed to manage your converged infrastructure and support key scenarios such as deploying bare-metal servers, deploying hypervisor clusters from bare metal, performing ongoing hardware maintenance, and responding to alerts and outages. It is designed for the physical infrastructure needed to support virtualization, cloud computing, big data, and mixed computing environments.

HPE OneView is delivered as a virtual appliance, a pre-configured virtual machine ready to be

HPE OneView is delivered as a virtual appliance, a pre-configured virtual machine ready to be deployed on a hypervisor host.

HPE OneView is a scalable, resource-oriented solution focused on the entire life cycle—from initial configuration to on-going monitoring and maintenance—of both physical and logical resources:

Physical resources are objects you can touch, such as server hardware, interconnects, top-of-rack switches, enclosures, storage systems and racks.

Logical resources are virtual objects such as templates or groups that when applied to physical resources, provide a common structure across your data center. For example, server profile templates, logical interconnect groups, enclosure groups, server profiles, and volume templates are logical resources.

Software-defined flexibility—your experts design configurations for efficient and consistent deployment

HPE OneView provides several software-defined resources, such as groups and server profiles, to enable you to capture the best practices of your experts across a variety of disciplines, including networking, storage, hardware configuration, and operating system build and configuration. By having your experts define the server profiles and the networking groups and resources, you can eliminate cross-silo disconnects. By using RBAC (role-based access control) and the groups, sets, and server profiles established by your experts, you can enable system administrators to provision and manage hundreds of servers without requiring that your experts be involved with every server deployment.

HPE OneView combines complex and interdependent data center provisioning and management into one simplified and unified interface. You can:

Provision the data center (page 24)

Manage and maintain firmware and configuration changes (page 29)

Monitor the data center and respond to issues (page 30)

The solution also provides core enterprise management capabilities, including:

High availability features (page 35)

Security features (page 34)

Graphical and programmatic interfaces (page 35)

Remote Support (page 33)

HPE OneView manages servers and enclosure networking resources, supports connections from enclosures to storage, and provides information to help you manage data center power and cooling:

Servers are represented and managed through server profiles and server profile templates.

Networking is an essential component to provisioning and managing data center servers.

Management software is integrated with HPE OneView for seamless operation.

Environmental management—such as power, cooling, and space planning—requires that you consider all the equipment in the entire data center, including equipment not managed by HPE OneView. HPE OneView consolidates data center power and cooling information into one interface view.

Storage provisioning with automated zoning is available. Storage devices connect to the enclosures using either Fibre Channel fabric attach (SAN switch) connections, Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE) fabric attach (SAN switch) connections, or Fibre Channel direct attach (flat SAN) connections.

1.2 HPE OneView licensing

HPE OneView supports the following license types:

HPE OneView Advanced licensing for managing server hardware

HPE OneView Standard licensing for monitoring server hardware

HPE OneView Standard licensing delivers monitoring, inventory management and reporting for HPE BladeSystem and HPE ProLiant BL and DL servers. HPE OneView Advanced licensing delivers all supported HPE OneView features. The following table provides an overview of the features available for each license type.

Features

HPE OneView Standard HPE OneView Advanced

Partner integrations

Software-defined infrastructure (profiles, groups, sets, and others)

Storage provisioning and SAN zoning

Virtual Connect advanced management

Firmware management

Power management (3D visualization)

OS provisioning

Features

HPE OneView Standard HPE OneView Advanced

Remote management (HPE iLO Advanced)

Map view

Smart search, Activity view, and Dashboard

Health monitoring

Inventory

Reporting

REST API access

Remote Support

Technical support and software updates

1–year 9x5 support (optional)

3–years 24x7 support (included)

More information

“Managing, monitoring, or migrating server hardware on c7000 enclosures” (page 24) “About licensing” (page 179)

1.3 Managing, monitoring, or migrating server hardware on c7000

enclosures

Server hardware such as enclosures and rack mount servers, can be added to HPE OneView in one of the following ways:

Managed

If you add a managed server to HPE OneView, either in an enclosure or rack server, you can apply configurations, deploy server profiles, monitor operation status, collect statistics, and alert users to specific conditions. For more information, see “About managed c7000 enclosures” (page 218) and “Managing server hardware” (page 157). Managing server hardware requires HPE OneView Advanced licensing.

Monitored

If you add a monitored server to HPE OneView, either in an enclosure or rack server, you can monitor it for inventory and hardware status only. For more information, see “About monitored c7000 enclosures” (page 219). Monitoring server hardware uses a free license called HPE OneView Standard.

Migrated

Enclosures from Virtual Connect Manager (VCM) and Virtual Connect Enterprise Manager (VCEM) can be migrated to HPE OneView with the configuration information, so that the enclosure can be managed by HPE OneView. The managed enclosure requires HPE OneView Advanced licensing. For more information about migrating, see “About migrating c7000 enclosures managed by other management systems ” (page 220).

More information

“HPE OneView licensing” (page 23)

1.4 Provisioning features

After you install the HPE OneView appliance and perform the initial configuration tasks, you can quickly bring existing hardware under management, and prepare for and deploy hardware to your data center.

Features for provisioning hardware and bringing resources under management include:

Resource templates, groups, and sets (page 25)

Server profiles and server profile templates (page 27)

Streamlined process for bringing hardware under management (page 27)

Operating system deployment (page 28)

Storage provisioning and management (page 28)

1.4.1 Resource templates, groups, and sets

With the HPE OneView template-driven approach, you can:

Use your experts to define server and networking configurations for specific environments.

Provision hundreds of servers quickly and consistently without requiring that your experts take action for every server you deploy.

Simplify the distribution of configuration changes across your data center.

Resource templates and groups

The following resources are templates your experts define to meet various workload demands. These templates can then be applied over and over again to the physical resources ensuring quick and consistent configurations.

Template or group

Description

Enclosure group

A

template that defines a consistent configuration for an enclosure. An enclosure group

specifies the placement of the various interconnects and the logical interconnect groups that apply to those interconnects.

When an enclosure group is applied to a physical enclosure, HPE OneView creates a logical enclosure which is then ready to perform work. The same enclosure group can be applied to many physical enclosures to create many identically configured logical enclosures.

Logical interconnect group

A

template that defines the desired networking configuration of a physical interconnect

or set of interconnects. Logical interconnect groups are used when defining enclosure groups and represent the networking template of that enclosure group.

When an enclosure group is applied to a physical enclosure, HPE OneView:

Creates a logical enclosure

Uses the logical interconnect groups in that enclosure group to configure the physical interconnects in that enclosure into logical interconnects.

Logical switch group

A template that defines how physical switches are combined to form logical switches.

Logical switches are an aggregation of up to two physical top-of-rack switches.

Once constructed from a logical switch group, a logical switch continues to be associated with its logical switch group. Any change in consistency between the logical switch group and its associated logical switches is monitored and made visible on the associated logical switch screen in HPE OneView.

Server profile templates

A

template that defines the characteristics of a server profile. A server profile template

can be applied to multiple servers creating identically configured servers. A server profile

can be updated to match any server profile template.

Volume templates

A template that defines a standard configuration for storage volumes.

Logical resources

The following logical resources represent the physical, software-defined resources configured to work as needed in your environment. These resources actually run the workloads.

Resource

Description

Logical enclosure

A

logical enclosure represents a logical view of a single enclosure with an enclosure group

serving as a template. By default, you can add a c7000 enclosure and an enclosure group and logical interconnect group are created. Or, you can create multiple logical interconnect groups and an enclosure group before you add the enclosure.

A logical enclosure is automatically created when a c7000 enclosure is added.

Logical interconnects

A logical interconnect is a single administrative entity that consists of the configuration for a