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PORTABLE IMAGE

WHEEL ALIGNER

PORTABLE IMAGE WHEEL ALIGNER Service Manual
Service Manual
Service Manual

All information contained or disclosed in this document is con- sidered confidential and proprietary by Snap-on Equipment. All manufacturing, use, reproduction, and sales rights are reserved by Snap-on Equipment and the information contained herein shall not be used in whole or in part without the express written consent of Snap-on Equipment.

Revisions

Release A

Date

Changes

Page

05/07/08

Original Release

Release B

05/13/08

Added Rear Target 12 o’clock

3-3

05/13/08

Removed LH/RH Identification

3-5

5/29/08

Added Backup/Restore information

3-7

6/5/08

Added warning to battery removal procedure

2-8

6/12/08

Added PC TCP/IP settings

2-3

Revision

This page is left blank intentionally

Table of Contents

INTRODUCTION

GENERAL

I

FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION

I

MAINTENANCE FUNCTIONS

II

IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS

III

LOCKOUT AND/OR TAGOUT SYSTEM PROCEDURE

Iv

ELECTRICAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

Iv

HANDLING STATIC SENSITIVE PCB’S

v

SERVICE

GUIDELINES

v

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

AC THEORY OF OPERATION

1-1

AC DISTRIBUTION

1-1

COMPONENT IDENTIFICATION

1-1

MAIN BOARD

1-1

CAMERA MODULE

1-3

STROBE/RADIO MODULE

1-3

TOE SENSOR MODULE

1-4

INCLINOMETER/ENCODER MODULE

1-5

COMPONENT LOCATION

1-6

BLOCK DIAGRAM

1-7

WIRING DIAGRAM

1-8

CHAPTER 2 CHECkOUT AND mAINTENANCE

GENERAL

2-1

UNIT CHECKOUT PROCEDURE ALL VERSIONS

2-1

VERIFYING COMPONENTS

2-2

POWERING UP THE PODS

2-3

CHARGING SYSTEM

2-4

SIDEWINDER WHEEL CLAMP ASSEMBLY & MAINTENANCE

2-5

MASTER POD RESET

2-8

BATTERY REPLACEMENT

2-8

CHAPTER 3 CALIBRATION

CALIBRATION

3-1

CALIBRATION FUNCTIONS

3-4

POD IDENTIFICATION

3-4

CALIBRATION FACTORS

3-6

CALIBRATION HISTORY

3-6

CALIBRATION UTILITIES

3-7

CHAPTER 4 DIAgNOsTICs

DATA ExAMINATION MODE

4-2

FIRMWARE DOWNLOAD

4-4

POD ExTENDED DIAGNOSTICS

4-5

POD ExTENDED DIAGNOSTICS (PAGE 2)

4-6

POD POWER SUPPLY DATA

4-8

POD RUNTIME DATA

4-9

POD CHARGE INFORMATION

4-10

POD TOE DIAGNOSTICS

4-11

TOE ExT DATA

4-12

TOE CAL DATA

4-13

STROBE/RADIO DIAGNOSTICS

4-14

POD ENCODER CAMBER/SAI

4-15

ENCODER CALIBRATION DATA

4-16

ENCODER CAM/SAI DATA

4-16

WAP DIAGNOSTICS

4-17

POD

CAMERA DIAGNOSTICS

4-18

POD POWER OPTIONS

4-19

INTRODUCTION

GENERAL

The “Portable Image Wheel Aligner” system consist of two targets attached to a vehicle’s front wheels and

two companion, battery powered sensor pods attached to vehicle’s rear wheels.

metal housing and five intelligent modules; Main board, Camera module, Strobe/Radio module, Toe Sensor

module, and Inclinometer/Encoder module. Each module is somewhat self-contained in regards to assembly,

testing, calibration and function.

and operational reliability. Modules are designed with on-board controllers that take full advantage of deep sleep states, consuming power only during brief moments to acquire and communicate data. All modules communicate over the standard Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) to one of two redundant master devices. Each module’s SPI connects to the master through a custom SPI multiplexer (Mux) device. The SPI Mux is a programmable logic device (CPLD) specially designed to ensure the isolation of each interface. In this way, no one faulty module can cause signal contention and failure of the shared SPI interface to the master. In ad- dition, the design allows the master device to control the power supply to each module therefore disabling any module that has failed in such a way that could result in substantially shortened battery life. In the “off” mode, all power supplies and modules are shutdown with the exception of a single low power “Supervisor” controller which is placed in a deep sleep mode. When a key is pressed on the keypad or the external AC/DC power supply is connected, the Supervisor controller wakes, runs extensive self tests and powers up the pod system for operation.

Each pod is composed of a

Each module is optimized for power consumption, effective communications

The system design has also been optimized for communications to the user. The intent is to provide redun-

dant communications paths so as to insure that an operator is always informed about the state of the “Por-

table Image Wheel Aligner” system.

Aligner” pod to the console via the Bluetooth radio on the Strobe module as well as 9 LEDs on the keypad of each pod. An IR communications link is included across the rear cross toe path so that each pod may

independently share information with the other companion pod. This allows each pod to communicate the set

full information from both pods independently over each pod’s Bluetooth radio.

is faulty then that pod’s information continues to be available via the other pod’s radio connection. Power is supply to each pod through a 7.2Ahr rechargeable Lithium Ion battery pack design for at least 24 hours of continuous pod runtime. The pod’s on board battery charger uses a standard 6 to 24 volt AC to DC adapter to charge the battery pack within a maximum of 12 hours. The Main board includes a battery “gas gauge” to continuously track and monitor the battery pack in order to very precisely provide critical battery informa- tion such as remaining runtime, time to fully charge, and number of charge/discharge cycles incurred. The battery pack is designed to provide a lifetime of at least 500 charge/discharge cycles or over 5 years of typical

use. The on-board charger can be controlled to adaptively charge the battery based on various predetermine conditions; for instance the battery is only charged if the battery gas gauge indicates that a predetermined discharge level has been reached.

The primary communications path is from each “Portable Image Wheel

In this way if one pod’s radio

FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION

The main menu (Advanced Software) of the aligner is the control center for the unit. It offers the operator easy control of the basic alignment features. Moving the mouse pointer over the icon gives the operator a short description of the icon function. See the opera- tors manual for a more detailed list and description of the many features and functions of the aligner.

See the opera - tors manual for a more detailed list and description of the many

INTRODUCTION

The “Run Wizard” icon steps the operator through a complete alignment. The alignment ma- the operator through a complete alignment. The alignment ma chine offers many factory default wizards that chine offers many factory default wizards that can be edited by the operator to either add or delete certain steps.

The “Vehicle Selection” icon allows the operator to select a particular vehicle for an alignment. This selection can be made at any point in the alignment by clicking on the “Home” icon and selecting the “Vehicle Selection” icon.by the operator to either add or delete certain steps. The “Vehicle Specification” icon allows the

The “Vehicle Specification” icon allows the operator to view the specifications for the vehicle chosen from the vehicle selection icon. The operator has the ability to edit the specifications and save the edit specification to a custom specification database.icon and selecting the “Vehicle Selection” icon. The “Inspection” menu offers a variety of inspection

The “Inspection” menu offers a variety of inspection menu allowing the operator to perform predetermined inspections. Six Inspection screen are available under Inspections as well as a Diagnostics icon. These are Pre-Alignment Inspection, Tire Inspection, Brake Inspection, Under Car Inspection, Under Hood Inspection, and Courtesy Inspection.the edit specification to a custom specification database. The “Measurement” icon offers quick access to several

Inspection, Under Hood Inspection, and Courtesy Inspection. The “Measurement” icon offers quick access to several

The “Measurement” icon offers quick access to several angular measurement screens such as Caster, SAI, Steering Angles, and Vehicle Dimensions.

The “Adjustment” icon offers access to a variety of features that assist the technician with ad- to a variety of features that assist the technician with ad justment of alignment angles. Some justment of alignment angles. Some of these features include Live Caster, A-Arm Adjust, Rear Shim Programs, and Cradle Adjust.

The “Customer Data” icon offers the operator easy control for finding, adding or editing any customer data that has been previously saved from past alignments. Information can then be retrieved and sorted through a myriad of different options.Caster, A-Arm Adjust, Rear Shim Programs, and Cradle Adjust. MAINTENANCE FUNCTIONS The aligner offers diagnostic tools

MAINTENANCE FUNCTIONS

The aligner offers diagnostic tools to assist in troubleshoot- ing. The maintenance menu is accessed from the “Main Menu” screen by clicking on the “Maintenance” tab.

Menu” screen by clicking on the “Maintenance” tab. The “Calibration” icon steps the user through a

The “Calibration” icon steps the user through a simple calibration.

The “Measurement Data” icon is the location for troubleshooting. The screens within this subsys- tem will aid a technician in the proper diagnosing and trouble shooting of all - tem will aid a technician in the proper diagnosing and trouble shooting of all of the wheel sensors.

this subsys - tem will aid a technician in the proper diagnosing and trouble shooting of

INTRODUCTION

IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS

when using this equipment, basic safety precautions should always be followed, including the following:

1. Read all instructions.

2. Do not operate equipment with a damaged power cord or if the equipment has been damaged until it has been examined by a qualified authorized service technician.

3. If an extension cord is used, a cord with a current rating equal to or more than that of the machine should be used. Cords rated for less current than the equipment may overheat. Care should be taken to arrange the cord so that it will not be tripped over or pulled.

4. Always unplug equipment from electrical outlet when not in use. Never use the cord to pull the plug from the outlet. grasp plug and pull to disconnect.

5. To reduce the risk of fire, do not operate equipment in the vicinity of open containers of flammable liquids (gasoline).

6. Keep hair, loose fitting clothing, fingers and all parts of the body away from moving parts.

7. Adequate ventilation should be provided when working on operating internalcombus- tion engines.

8. To reduce the risk of electric shock, do not use on wet surfaces or expose to rain.

9. Do not allow unauthorized personnel to operate the equipment.

10. Use only as described in this manual. Use only manufacturer’s recommended attachments.

11. ALwAYs wEAR sAfETY gLAssEs. Everyday eyeglasses only have impact resistant lenses, they are NOT safety glasses.

SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS

INTRODUCTION

LOCKOUT AND/OR TAGOUT SYSTEM PROCEDURE

1. Notify all affected employees that a lockout or tagout system is going to be utilized and the reason thereof. The authorized employee shall know the type and magnitude of energy that the machine or equipment utilized and shall understand the hazards thereof.

2. If the machine or equipment is operating, shut it down by the normal stopping procedure (depress the stop button, open toggle switch, etc.)

3. Operate the switch, valve, or other energy isolating device(s) so that the equipment is isolated from its energy source(s). Stored energy (such as that in springs, elevated machine members, rotating flywheels, hydraulic systems, and air gas, steam or water pressure, etc.) must be dissipated or restrained by meth- ods such as repositioning, blocking, bleeding down, etc.

4. Lockout and/or tagout the energy isolating devices with individual lock(s) or tag(s).

5. After ensuring that no personnel are exposed, and as a check on having disconnected the energy sourc- es, operate the push button or other normal operating controls to make certain the equipment will not op- erate. CAUTION: RETURN OPERATING CONTROL(S) TO “NEUTRAL” OR “OFF” POSITION AFTER THE TEST [DE-ENERGIZED STATE].

6. The equipment is now locked out or tagged out.

ELECTRICAL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

Make sure the aligner is unplugged before disconnecting any wires in preparation for replacing any boards, cables or other items within the unit. Use the “Lockout and/or Tagout” procedure.

When working on this aligner, keep three points in mind:

! THIS UNIT MUST BE PLUGGED IN TO A PROPER AC OUTLET FOR THE UNIT
!
THIS UNIT MUST BE PLUGGED IN TO A PROPER AC OUTLET FOR
THE UNIT TO OPERATE CORRECTLY. REFER TO THE UNIT ID
PLATE LOCATED ON THE BACK OF THE UNIT. ExTENSION CORDS
ARE NOT RECOMMENDED, BUT IF AN ExTENSION CORD MUST BE
USED, USE A CORD THAT IS LESS THAN 50 FEET WITH A 16 AWG,
OR ABOVE 50 FEET AND LESS THAN 100 WITH A 14 AWG.

1. Aligner voltages refer to the “return” (white) side of the AC line. Yet sometimes outlet wiring is reversed. In that case, electrical neutral connects to the “hot” side of the line. The aligner operates normally, but the PC board floats 110/220 VAC above safety ground. Assume that points inside the aligner console are at 110/220vAC; observe all safety precautions. If you make measurements with grounded test equip- ment, use an isolation transformer. An oscilloscope is an example of such test equipment.

2. The aligner is susceptible to power line spikes and noise. You must connect the equipment to safety ground. Does your machine do “strange things” or exhibit intermittent problems? Check for a proper ground at the machine and the power outlet. If you’re using an extension cord, check that, too. It must be constructed of at least 16 gauge wire and under 50 feet long.

3. Schematic voltages refer to the “return” side of the line, not safety ground. When measuring voltage, use the white wire on the line power terminal block as ground. Don’t use the third, center safety ground ter- minal. Another place to access ground is at the shield. The black wire in the shielded transducer cables also connects to the ground return.

INTRODUCTION

HANDLING STATIC SENSITIVE PCB’S

Electrostatic discharge can destroy high impedance ICs if uncontrolled. Use the fol- lowing techniques to avoid damaging ICs:

- Leave new circuit boards in their antistatic bags until ready for use.

- When replacing boards, proms, etc. be sure to turn off power to the machine first

- Use an anti-static wrist strap. Connect it to chassis ground on the equipment or to an available raw ground.

- Touch the chassis of the equipment to put yourself at the same static potential as the equipment.

- Grasp the PCB from opposite sides using your fingertips. Do not grasp the components on the board.

!
!
!
!
!

UsE sTANDARD ANT-sTATIC PROCEDUREs wHILE PERfORmINg THEsE INsTRUCTIONs

when inserting PCB’s:

- Place boards on a grounded static mat after removal.

- Remove the new PCB from the original package onto a grounded static mat. Save packaging to use when returning defective boards.

- Remove power from the machine (un-plug from wall) before installing the PCB.

- Avoid handling components needlessly.

- Do not set PCBs on insulating surfaces such as paper, glass, rubber, or plastic.

- Static is generated by friction. The following actions promote static generation:

- Wearing silk or nylon clothing.

- Walking on carpets.

- Walking with rubber soled shoes.

Static generation is increased when certain environmental conditions exist. Conditions of low humidity com- bined with wearing silks or nylons, walking on carpets, or walking with rubber soled shoes may create large electrostatic charges on your person, capable of blowing a hole in the substrate of an IC.

SERVICE GUIDELINES

4. BEfORE REPLACINg circuit boards, verify that the main power supply operates within specifications.

5. vERIfY that board connectors are fully seated.

6. NEvER remove boards or disconnect a connector with the power on!

7. mAkE sURE that you completely understand what the aligner does. (If it works, you can’t fix it!) Refer to the Aligner Operator’s Manual, application notes, and flow diagrams.

8. BE CAREfUL when handling circuit boards! Wear an anti-static wrist strap.

9. wHEN TRANsPORTINg circuit boards, use anti-static bags.

NOTE:

RELATIvE HUmIDITy HAS A DIRECT EFFECT ON STATIC CHARGE bUILDUP. AS HUmIDITy DECREASES, STATIC bUILDUP USUALLy INCREASES.

INTRODUCTION

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

AC THEORY OF OPERATION

!
!

DANGEROUS HIGH VOLTAGES ARE PRESENT IN THIS EQUIPMENT

Always use the “One Hand Rule” when working with AC voltages by keeping one hand in your pocket or be- hind your back. Before removing wires from the Aligner, always verify that the unit is “OFF”. Turn off the Main Power Switch on the back and unplug the AC power cord from the AC outlet.

AC DISTRIBUTION

The primary voltage applies 110/220VAC, 60/50Hz AC to the ALIGNER via the hot side (Black Wire) of the AC power cable. The Main Power routes to one power strip. The power strip distributes 115’/220V AC to the PC, Monitor, Printer.

COMPONENT IDENTIFICATION

MAIN BOARD

The Main board is design to functions as the system master and contains the image processing DSP, the “Supervisor” ARM processor, SPI bus multiplexer, connections for each module as well as power supplies for each processor and module. Each power supply is designed and optimized for power conversion efficiency greater than 95% in-order to provide extended battery life. The Main board can be thought of as two boards or primary functions combined into one board. These two primary functions relate to the image processing DSP and system management by the Supervisor. The Supervisor and DSP communicate through the DSP Host Port Interface which gives the Supervisor complete access to the DSP’s on-chip registers and external RAM and Flash memory space.

Main board; Supervisor (ARM 9 microcontroller) The Supervisor’s main functions are power conservation, data communications, system integrity and user interface. The Supervisor continuously configures and initiates each phase of operation and then cycles the pod through systematic sleep periods. By choreographing and limiting the precise time that each module as well as the DSP is awake and consuming power, the Supervisor can dramatically extend the runtime from

each battery charge.

cy if no change has been detected for a pre-determined amount of time. In this way the pod can conserve power if the user has walked away or forgotten to turn the system off. The data acquisition frequency can be

reduced on a schedule such that the longer the system senses no activity the longer the sleep state duration. The moment any angle movement is detected the system can acquire data at full rate thereby maintaining the responsiveness required for wheel alignment. The Supervisor may also be configured to reduce the data acquisition frequency on a critically low battery condition thereby moderately sacrificing measurement read- ing update rate for an extended battery life. The Supervisor monitors temperature, power supply voltages, current, and communications data integrity to ensure that all systems are working properly. Data from the DSP, modules, power monitoring systems, and keypad are consolidated, packetized and sent to the compan-

ion head via the IR link and to the console via the Bluetooth radio.

communications with the console (Bluetooth), companion head (IR Comm) and keypad (LEDs). The intent is to validate any failures to the extent that the pod or system can indicate the need for service without fear or

The Supervisor can monitor angle change activity and reduce data acquisition frequen-

All failures are reported to the user by

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

doubt of false failure indication. This operational confidence can also assist the user in discerning procedural or training issues from real pod or system failure modes.

Main board; DSP Image processor (TMS320DM642) The DSP executes firmware independent of the Supervisor and therefore operates autonomously. By imple-

menting the Host Port Interface (HPI) the Supervisor can coordinate when the DSP is active or in sleep mode in order to conserver power. The DSP’s primary function is to acquire image data from the image sensor and

derive the target plane orientation using Snap-on proprietary image processing algorithms.

DSP can perform many of the Supervisor’s functions as an alternate system controller, including radio com-

munications, in case the Supervisor has failed.

send all failure data to the user by communications with the console (Bluetooth), companion head (IR Comm) and keypad (LED). In addition, the DSP can operate in a “limp mode”, performing all alignment functions, although at a much greater current drain. This would allow the user to operate for a short time in-order to complete an alignment should the Supervisor fail completely.

In addition, the

As required, the DSP can take control of the system and

should the Supervisor fail completely. In addition, the As required, the DSP can take control of

1-2

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

CAMERA MODULE

The Camera module implements the Omnivision OV9121 image sensor with 1280x1024 pixel image reso- lution. The image sensor setup, exposure time, gain settings and image acquisition is controlled by an on-board Freescale MC9S08 low power microcontroller. The MC9S08 communicates with the Main board Supervisor ARM 9 microcontroller via the SPI communications bus. The Supervisor directs the MC9S08 and thereby controls the image sensor operation. The Supervisor may command the camera to take both a back- ground frame (no illumination) followed immediately by an illuminated frame or simply one or the other types of frames. The image sensor data signals are connected to the DSP Video Port where images are acquired at a rate of 24 or 48 MegaPixels/sec. The full image can be acquired at a 48 MegaPixels/sec rate in-order to find the target at high speed then the image sensor can be switched to the 24 MegaPixel/sec rate for precise image processing at lower image noise levels. The on-board controller can also monitor various functions of the image sensor, temperature, image frame pixel count and power supply voltages to ensure proper opera- tion. The image sensor can be commanded by the on board controller to generate an overlay test pattern. The DSP can analyze this test image to evaluate the image sensor functional integrity. Any failures or vari- ances from nominal will be reported by the Camera module controller to the Supervisor on the Main board by the inter-module SPI communications interface.

Main board by the inter-module SPI communications interface. STROBE/RADIO MODULE The Strobe/Radio module performs two

STROBE/RADIO MODULE

The Strobe/Radio module performs two independent functions; image illumination (strobe) and Bluetooth communications. Each function has a dedicated on-board Freescale MC9S08 low power microcontroller for independent operation. Image illumination is performed by two strings of six each, high efficiency, high output Infrared LEDs. Two constant current power supplies can instantaneously deliver 300mAs of current to each string independently for a maximum strobe duration of 10 milliseconds. In normal operation, only one string of LEDs is required for a much shorter duration than 10 milliseconds, therefore each string can be used alter- nately thereby increasing the lifetime of each string. In addition, failure of an LED or a string power supply will only limit the use of the pod, not render the pod totally unusable. An MC9S08 microcontroller communicates with the Supervisor ARM microcontroller via the SPI bus to setup and control image illumination. The strobe signal from the Camera board is used to synchronize image illumination with the image sensor exposure duration. In addition, a Class 1 Bluetooth module with an external Centurion D-Puck high gain antenna is implemented on the Strobe/Radio module. A second MC9208 microcontroller bridges the standard Bluetooth HCI UART interface of the Bluetooth module with the custom highly reliable SPI communications bus used for all HawkEye inter-module communications. The Bluetooth module can be programmed to enter the Bluetooth defined Hold, Sniff or Park modes to conserve power during times of low usage. The strobe section controller monitors the various functions such as temperature, power supply voltages and LED current to ensure proper operation. The radio section controller monitors various functions such as radio interface communications and power supply voltages to ensure proper operation. Any failures or variances from nominal will be report- ed to the Supervisor on the Main board.

1-3

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

TOE SENSOR MODULE

Two toe sensors are used in the portable alignment system as a functional pair. One sensor is located in each pod. The sensor has a +/-7 degree cone of operation. The sensors are placed across from each other within each others cone of operation. The sensor reports the angle to the opposite sensor. This angle is associated with the rear cross toe. The toe sensor uses a CCD imager to measure the position of the oppo- site units toe LED. The CCD is exposed to light for a period of time called the exposure time. This number is reported in the diagnostic screen with units of sensor clocks periods. Maximum exposure is 12000. Two images are taken for each toe sample, one with the opposite LED on and the other with the opposite LED off. The two images are subtracted one from the other to remove light from the environment. The image of

the LED that results from the subtraction is called a centroid. The position of the centroid in the sensor array is used to calculate the angle to the opposite sensor. The centroid is checked for intensity and shape. If no centroid is found, then the No Peak error is returned. If the centroid is distorted a shape error is returned. If the centroid is too small, a Low Exposure error is returned. If the centroid is too large, a High Exposure error is returned. All of these errors can be seen in normal operation of the sensor. They represent a problem with an individual sensor sample and the sensor will automatically take action to correct the error. If these errors appear frequently or do not resolve themselves then they can be used to help diagnose toe faults. The toe sensor has special operating modes to deal with high ambient light. If the sensor is compensating for a high ambient light condition, the sunlight condition is returned. If the CCD array is over exposed such that no image can be recorded, it is said to be in saturation. If a portion of the image is saturated, then a Clipped condition is returned. The sensor uses an IR communication link to check the optical path between the two sensors. If the IR com- munication link can not function the senor will report a Sensor blocked error. Within a pod the Toe sensor communicates using a SPI interface. If there is a fault in the Toe SPI communications within the pod a sPI

Communication fault is returned.

flag. When the toe sensor is first turned on, it performs a self diagnostic. The results of this diagnostic are reported in the Board Error and Arm Error flags. In addition to the error flags, when in the diagnostic screen in the aligner live centroid images for both toe sensors are displayed. These can be used to visualize the er- ror states shown in the CCD error flag. On the extended diagnostics screen the board error and arm error flags can be viewed along with live voltage diagnostic data for the toe boards.

Errors resulting from normal operation are reported in the CCD Error

from normal operation are reported in the CCD Error Front of vehicle Toe In Left Rear
from normal operation are reported in the CCD Error Front of vehicle Toe In Left Rear

Front of

vehicle

from normal operation are reported in the CCD Error Front of vehicle Toe In Left Rear
from normal operation are reported in the CCD Error Front of vehicle Toe In Left Rear

Toe In

Left Rear Reference Toe Out Zero Toe
Left Rear
Reference
Toe Out
Zero Toe

1-4

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

INCLINOMETER/ENCODER MODULE

The Inclinometer module implements a MEMS type inclinometer. This device was selected due to the ex- ceptional accuracy and repeatability specifications for a MEMS device. The MEMS type inclinometer is

a two plane sensor giving us the ability to measure both camber and pod pitch in the same device.

Texas Instruments MPS430 ultra low power microcontrollers each with a Sigma Delta 16 bit Analog to Digital converter, integrated temperature sensor and integrated SPI communications bus interface was selected to process and communicate the angle data from each inclinometer sensor outputs to the Main board via the

inter-module SPI communications interface. In addition, the specific controller dedicated to the inclinometer pod pitch output can be made to operate in a pod wake-up mode. In this mode the inclinometer pitch output

is constantly monitored for change. If a predetermined level of change should occur, signaling vibrations or

activity around the vehicle, then the controller can toggle the SPI bus slave out data line (MISO) while the SPI interface is not active in-order to interrupt and wake the Main board Supervisor from sleep. During low or no activity (angle change) the Supervisor may successively reduce the frequency of the data acquisition cycles. Between cycles the Supervisor and other modules may be in a sleep state for long periods of time. The in- clinometer can detect very slight movements of the pod indicating potential activity around the vehicle. Upon detecting this movement, the controller can signal the Supervisor to wake and quickly begin data acquisition cycles.

Two

A rotary potentiometer is used to encode the angle of the pod shaft relative to the wheel/wheel clamp assem-

bly. A third and independent MPS430 that will convert the pot position into shaft angle and communicate the data to the Supervisor processor via the SPI bus.

An optional shock or drop detection circuit utilizing a digital smart MEMs device can detect a free fall and sig- nal a fourth MPS430 to begin acquiring acceleration data from the smart MEMS device as well as record the

time duration of the drop.

celeration from the impact can calculated and used to evaluate the damage potential to the pod from the fall. Factory and field calibration factors are calculated and stored in each MPS430 controller for each inclinom- eter output as well as the rotary potentiometer output. Each controller monitors various functions of the board including temperature and power supply voltages to ensure operation. The MEMS inclinometer can be placed in a test mode that deflects the internal micromachined silicon beam by a constant amount. Evaluating this deflection by measuring the angle output change can determine if the inclinometer is defective or out of cali- brations. Any failures or variances from nominal will be reported to the Supervisor on the Main board.

In this way, a drop can be detected instantaneously, the time of fall and/or peak ac-

Supervisor on the Main board. In this way, a drop can be detected instantaneously, the time

1-5

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

COMPONENT LOCATION Keypad Main Board Toe Sensor Module Inclinometer\Encoder Battery Camera\Strobe\Radio
COMPONENT LOCATION
Keypad
Main Board
Toe Sensor Module
Inclinometer\Encoder
Battery
Camera\Strobe\Radio

1-6

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

EAP0263J70A

BLOCK DIAGRAM

Inclinometer (2 Plane) & Encoder

EAP0263J64A Encoder
EAP0263J64A
Encoder

Toe

Sensor

(Spilt Rx)

IR

Comm

(Custom)

Sensor (Spilt Rx) IR C o m m (Custom) EAP0263J54A SDRAM 4M x 64 Flash 4M
EAP0263J54A SDRAM 4M x 64 Flash 4M x 16 Flash 4M x16 Image Sensor VP
EAP0263J54A
SDRAM
4M x 64
Flash
4M x 16
Flash
4M x16
Image Sensor
VP
DSP
SPI
1.3 MPixel
TI DM642
Supervisor
SPI
(Omnivision)
Memory Bus
SPI
Mux
SPI
SPI
SPI
Strobe trigger
Strobe
from camera
(12 LEDs)
HDQ
Power Supply
Bluetooth
Radio
Charger
Gas Gauge
Antenna
EAP0263J50A
Chip (internal)
EAP0263J60A
Charging
Reset Switch
Connector
Batteries
3 x 2.4Ah

Keypad/LEDs

Charging Reset Switch Connector Batteries 3 x 2.4Ah Keypad/LEDs Block Diagram HawkEye Pod Portable 1-7

Block Diagram

HawkEye Pod

Portable

1-7

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw

WIRING DIAGRAM

CHAPTER 1 COmPONENT OvERvIEw WIRING DIAGRAM 1-8

1-8

CHAPTER 2 CHECkOUT AND mAINTENANCE

GENERAL

An efficient and proper troubleshooting method of repair is to analyze the logical order of events. Recognition of symptoms which naturally occur in a certain sequence (depending on failure) will aid in the quick location of system errors. This method of logical deduction has been used for years by the most successful technicians. During the power up sequence the aligner is first a computer, the software load transforms the machine into an alignment instrument. Even as an aligner, things must execute in a certain fashion. When this order is known we can determine the system malfunction easily by observing the symptoms.

The following checks (in order) will aid in determining which section of the aligner a failure occurs.

UNIT CHECKOUT PROCEDURE ALL VERSIONS

1. Check for 115VAC 220VAC Europe power at the wall outlet and at the terminal strip inside the back door assembly. 230V 1ph 3amp - 115V 1ph 6amp

2. Power on check, listen for fail code beeps, system messages the unit should begin the boot up process and load the alignment software.

NOTE:

THE ROm bIOS ALSO CONTAINS A SImPLE SySTEm CHECk PROGRAm wHICH ExECUTES

jUST AFTER TURN-ON.

AS wELL AS THOROUGH mICROPROCESSOR DIAGNOSTIC TOOL.

DOS/wINDOwS DIAGNOSTICS SOFTwARE. THIS IS A vERy GOOD

3. Check 110-220 VAC power at the Power Supply PCB inside the Electrical Box P1 pins 1 and 2.

4. Check 10VDC power at the Power Supply PCB P2 pins 1, 2 and 3.

5. Aligner software download. Check to make sure that the alignment software loads both the Software sup- port and the alignment database.

6. Communications

Check

under the Network Connections to make sure that the WAP Pod is communicat-

ing with the PC.

7. Assuming all console display functions are OK, go to the Maintenance - Aligner Diagnostic - Rack Check screen. Monitor the activity of the pods by turning on one pod at a time. See that the pod is communi- cating with the console by looking at the “Pod connection Status”.

8. Continue by powering up the opposite pod and to verify communication from console to pod.

9. Verify Pod battery life by viewing the LED’s on each pod. Explanation of LED’s are explained later.

10. Move the pod in the camber plane to verify camber output.

11. Valid camber. With the pods on the calibration bar, check for valid camber. With the sensors mounted on the calibration bar the camber output on the Raw Values only screen should not exceed ± 1.50 degrees.

12. Move one end of the calibration bar to the lower cutout on the calibration stands. Verify that the camber reading changes 4 degrees in the direction of camber change. Repeat this step with the opposite side.

13. Valid SAI. With the pods on the calibration bar, check for valid SAI. With the sensors mounted and leveled on the calibration bar the SAI output on the Raw Values only screen should not exceed ±3.00 degrees. Tilting the wheel sensor up should make the values go negative and tilting it down should make the values go positive.

14. Valid CrossToe. Again with both front sensors mounted on the calibration bar check for a good cross toe reading. Using the raw values only screen, and a level bar. The raw value should not exceed ± 2.00 degrees.

15. Validate rear camera operation by viewing the “Data Examination Mode” under the diagnostics.

16. Mechanical - Wheel clamps and turntables. Check for variances in camber readings as the clamps are rotated. Note any camber change. Using the same wheel sensor mount a different wheel clamp to the same tire and wheel in the same location and rotate the assembly 360 degrees and note any camber change. Complete this procedure with all 4 wheel clamps using the process of elimination.

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

VERIFYING COMPONENTS

Before the unit can operate as alignment system it first has to be a working PC. This manual does not include PC troubleshooting techniques. It is assumed that all service personnel working with these systems have some basic PC skills.

The system uses a Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) that acts as a liaison between the PC and the Pods.

(WAP) that acts as a liaison between the PC and the Pods. The WAP component is

The WAP component is powered by a standalone 9VDC power supply and connects to the back of the PC’s Ethernet connection using and standard CAT 5 wire. With all connections made power can be verified by observing a green and amber light that will illuminate.

Pod Charger

Ethernet

Power

1. To easily verify that the WAP is communicating click on the “Network and Internet Connection under the control panel.

2. Click on the “Network Connections” Icon.

panel. 2. Click on the “Network Connections” Icon. 3. Double click the “Local Area Connection” icon.

3. Double click the “Local Area Connection” icon.

Icon. 3. Double click the “Local Area Connection” icon. 4. Verify that the area connection status

4. Verify that the area connection status is both sending and receiving data packets.

status is both sending and receiving data packets. 5. If the connection status is not both

5. If the connection status is not both sending and receiving data check to make sure that the PC’s “Internet Protocol” is set up correctly. This setup procedure will also be used anytime a PC is replaced in a unit.

will also be used anytime a PC is replaced in a unit. 6. Click the “Properties”

6. Click the “Properties” button in the “Local Area Con- nection Status” box.

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

7. Under the “General” tab double click on the “Internet Protocol {TCP/IP} (blue arrow) button.

on the “Internet Protocol {TCP/IP} (blue arrow) button. 8. The radio button (red arrow) “Use the

8. The radio button (red arrow) “Use the following IP address” should be selected with the following IP ad- dress entered 192.168.0.61 after entering the IP address click the mouse in the Subnet mask, the PC will auto enter 255.255.255.0. Click on the OK button to accept these values.

9. The user can also open a DOS prompt and ping the WAP by typing “Ping 192.168.0.50” and pressing the <ENTER> key. The system will go out and ping the WAP and return packets.

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

POWERING UP THE PODS

On top of both Pods are a series of LED’s. These LED’s are multifunctional. During different times of an alignment LED’s will either 1) Remain illuminated 2) Flash 3) Flash Rapidly 4) Turn OFF.

It’s possible for the batteries to reach a level that will not allow a pod to run and operate any components inside the pod. Should this occur none of the LED’s will illuminate. A hard reset is necessary to reset the system. Plug the charging wire into the pod and press and hold the reset button located on the side of the pod for 10 seconds. The reset process will take approximately 3 minutes. After the pod resets the lowest charging light should begin to blink. Allow the pod to fully charge before using.

By clicking on the “Sensor Voltage” icon on the toolbar the user can quickly obtain valuable information about the bat- tery voltage.

obtain valuable information about the bat - tery voltage. BATTERY POwER Battery 100% to 80% Battery

BATTERY POwER

Battery 100% to 80%

Battery 80% to 60%

Battery 60% to 40%

Battery 40% to 20%

Battery 20% to 10%

If flashing 10% remains and must be charged

Diagnostics Runout Power Battery
Diagnostics
Runout
Power
Battery
Battery 40% to 20% Battery 20% to 10% If flashing 10% remains and must be charged
Battery 40% to 20% Battery 20% to 10% If flashing 10% remains and must be charged
Battery 40% to 20% Battery 20% to 10% If flashing 10% remains and must be charged

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

CHARGING SYSTEM

The Aligners WAP system is equipped with a charging system. Each POD contains a Lithium Ion Battery. Lithium-ion batteries are popular because they have a number of important advantages over compet- ing technologies:

1. They’re generally much lighter than other types of rechargeable batteries of the same size. This light weight transfers to the POD making them much lighter than previous sensors.

2. They hold their charge. A lithium-ion battery pack loses only about 5 percent of its charge per month, compared to a 20 per- cent loss per month for NiMH batteries.

3. They have no memory effect, which means that you do not have to completely discharge them before recharging, as with some other battery chemistries.

4. Lithium-ion batteries can handle hundreds of charge/discharge cycles.

Every shop is different and there is no way to say how often a POD should be charged. Because the batteries are lithium ion it does not hurt to charge them at the end of every day. It will not affect the life of the battery charging them daily nor will it affect them or help them by totally discharging them. To charge the batteries plug the charger into the side of the POD and place the opposite end of the charging cable into either of the charging ports on the WAP.

charging cable into either of the charging ports on the WAP. Charged 90% Charged 50% Charged
charging cable into either of the charging ports on the WAP. Charged 90% Charged 50% Charged
charging cable into either of the charging ports on the WAP. Charged 90% Charged 50% Charged

Charged 90%

Charged 50%

Charged 10%

Charged 70%

Charged 30%

WAP
WAP

Charging

Ports

of the charging ports on the WAP. Charged 90% Charged 50% Charged 10% Charged 70% Charged
of the charging ports on the WAP. Charged 90% Charged 50% Charged 10% Charged 70% Charged
of the charging ports on the WAP. Charged 90% Charged 50% Charged 10% Charged 70% Charged

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

SIDEWINDER WHEEL CLAMP ASSEMBLY & MAINTENANCE

The Sidewinder wheel clamp requires little maintenance however the correct assembly is important so that it will be able to attach to most wheels on the market today. In the past most service calls were to correct is- sues with components after they were dropped. The portable aligner is no different, however the Sidewinder wheel clamp was designed to absorb most of the impact should the Pod assembly get dropped. The guide rod bracket in most cases be the part that would absorb the impact of a accidental drop and would probably break before other components. Should the guide rod bracket break remove the parts listed below to replace the guide rod.

5 6 4 3 2 1 1. 2. 3.
5
6
4
3
2
1
1.
2.
3.

Snap Ring

Guide Rod

Spacer Ring

4. Washer 5. Screw 6. Knob 1 2 3 4 5
4. Washer
5. Screw
6. Knob
1
2
3
4
5

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

Both the upper and lower bracket on the wheel clamp contains a brass threaded bushing that allows the upper/lower grabbers to move up and down the threaded rod. There is an upper and lower bushing so if replacement is required make sure that the correct bushing is ordered. The bushing is a split bushing (2 pieces) that must be replaced as a set. When the bushings are made they are made as one and then cut at the factory to make it a split bushing making it a matched set.

1. Remove the components listed in the illustration on the previous page.

2. Remove the bushing cover and slide the cover (red arrow) towards the center of the clamp.

slide the cover (red arrow) towards the center of the clamp. Bushing Cover 3. Slide the

Bushing Cover

3. Slide the lower/upper part of the bracket (blue arrow) off of the brass bushing.

4. Measure the distance from point A to point B of the opposite end of the wheel clamp and place the new bushing end at the measured distance.

point B of the opposite end of the wheel clamp and place the new bushing end

Point A

Point B

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

5. Place the split bushing on the threaded rod at the same distance from the end as measured in step 4. The castle part of the bushing goes towards the center of the wheel clamp.

of the bushing goes towards the center of the wheel clamp. Point A Point B 6.

Point A

Point B

6. Slide the lower/upper part of the wheel clamp up over the bushing and re-attach the bushing cover.

clamp up over the bushing and re-attach the bushing cover. 7. Install all hardware in figure

7. Install all hardware in figure below.

1 2 3 4 5
1
2
3
4
5

1. Snap Ring

2. Guide Rod

3. Spacer Ring

4. Washer

5. Screw

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

MASTER POD RESET

Each POD has a reset button located on the back side of the POD opposite charging side. This reset button should never have to be used but has been installed in case a major malfunction occur. Just as if a hand held palm device requires a reset so does the POD. To execute the reset, press and hold the button for at least 3 seconds. All LED’s on top of the POD will flash at the same time and then the power only LED will come on and remain on until the entire reset process has taken place. A grid file located on the camera PCB is re-writ- ten to the main processor. This reset takes from 2 to 4 minutes. This reset only resets the firmware on the PCB’s. A re-calibration or POD identification is not needed after a hard reset.

or POD identification is not needed after a hard reset. BATTERY REPLACEMENT The batteries used to

BATTERY REPLACEMENT

The batteries used to power the pods are Li-Ion. These batteries have a great track record in many devices that are used in everyday applications. Follow the steps below should replacement of the batteries be re- quired.

1. Remove the rubber bumper from the bottom side of the pod.

1. Remove the rubber bumper from the bottom side of the pod. 2. Remove the two

2. Remove the two screws securing the battery.

3. Carefully extract the battery from the pod.

wARNING:

DO NOT ATTACH THE CHARGING CAbLE wITH THE

bATTERy REmOvED AS THIS wILL CAUSE DAmAGE TO COmPONENTS INSIDE THE PODS.

4. Un-plug the harness connected to the pod making sure that the har- ness does not fall back into the pod.

5. Remove the Velcro strap securing the battery.

6. The battery is secured using double sided tape.

7. Reverse procedure for installation. Follow the charging instructions to fully charge the batteries before alignment use.

procedure for installation. Follow the charging instructions to fully charge the batteries before alignment use. 2-9
procedure for installation. Follow the charging instructions to fully charge the batteries before alignment use. 2-9

Chapter 2 Checkout and Maintenance

Page left blank intentionally

CHAPTER 3 CALIBRATION

CALIBRATION

Before an alignment is performed it is highly recommended that the unit be calibrated to the rack that align- ments are done on. Although the unit is shipped from the factory calibrated to zero we can not assume that all racks are exactly level in the field.

1. Raise the alignment rack to a comfortable working height.

2. From the Main Menu select the “Maintenance” Icon.

2. From the Main Menu select the “Maintenance” Icon. 3. Select the Calibration button from the

3. Select the Calibration button from the Maintenance menu.

3. Select the Calibration button from the Maintenance menu. 4. Select the “Pod Calibration” button from

4. Select the “Pod Calibration” button from the Calibration menu.

the “Pod Calibration” button from the Calibration menu. 5. A “Warning” message appears instructing the user

5. A “Warning” message appears instructing the user that the calibration process should be performed by trained individuals. Click on “OK” to continue.

the user that the calibration process should be performed by trained individuals. Click on “OK” to
the user that the calibration process should be performed by trained individuals. Click on “OK” to
the user that the calibration process should be performed by trained individuals. Click on “OK” to
the user that the calibration process should be performed by trained individuals. Click on “OK” to

Chapter 3 Calibration

6. Place the calibration bar and stands on the rear of the rack as shown in the figure.

NOTE:

stands on the rear of the rack as shown in the figure. NOTE: IT WILL BE

IT WILL BE NECESSARY TO INSTALL THE CALIBRA- TION BAR ADAPTER (EAK0289J42A)ON THE END OF THE CALIBRATION BAR WITH THE FLAT SPOTS. THIS WILL ENSURE A SMOOTH ROTATION OF THE BAR DURING CALIBRATION.

WILL ENSURE A SMOOTH ROTATION OF THE BAR DURING CALIBRATION. step1 7. Place the left pod
step1
step1

7. Place the left pod on the calibration bar so that the boom faces the rear of the rack.

8. Place the right pod on the calibration bar so that the boom faces the rear of the rack.

9. Place the targets on the front turn plates and orient them so that they are facing the pods. It will be necessary to leave the targets mounted to the wheel clamps.

10. Select the appropriate rack for calibration Rack A, Rack B or Floor

11. With the Pods secured on the bar (needle 12 o’clock) rotate the bar forward 90° to align the needle within the green area. A Stop sign will appear indicating to hold the position until instructed.

12. Continue through the process stopping at each location until the rear pods have been calibrated. Proceed to the next step to complete the target calibration.

step 2 step 3
step 2
step 3

step 4

Chapter 3 Calibration

TARgET CALIBRATION

13. Place the targets in the bar so that the targets face the rear of the rack (needle 12 o’clock).

14. Place the Pods on the rear of the rack so that the boom of the pod points towards the rear of the rack.

the boom of the pod points towards the rear of the rack. 15. The unit will

15. The unit will prompt the user to rotate the bar so that the tar- gets rotate forward 25°. A stop signal will appear.

tar - gets rotate forward 25°. A stop signal will appear. 16. After the information is

16. After the information is taken the user will be prompted to rotate the targets 25° backwards from vertical.

17. When the calibration is complete the user will need to press <OK> button to store the calibration data.

18. CALIBRATION COMPLETE

is complete the user will need to press <OK> button to store the calibration data. 18.

Chapter 3 Calibration

CALIBRATION FUNCTIONS

The calibration menu incorporates other utilities to assist the operator. Below are a list of those utilities.

• Pod Identification

• Calibration Factors

• Calibration History

POD IDENTIFICATION

The portable alignment system uses very sophisticated pods that may periodically require replacement due to failures. In this event a set of pods may need to be exchanged in the field. The alignment system uses “scan and find” process called “pod identification. The Pod Identification is used to marry the pods with the align- ment system. Followed the steps listed to marry a set of exchanged pods to an alignment system.

1. Select the Pod Identification button.

alignment system. 1. Select the Pod Identification button. 2. The user is instructed with a WARNING

2. The user is instructed with a WARNING that this process should be performed by trained individuals. Click on the <OK> button to proceed.

3. Make sure that the pods to be identified are powered up and ready to be located. If multiple aligners are used in the shop it is not necessary to power them down to complete this process. Click on the <OK> button to to activate the scanning process.

4. Using Bluetooth ® technology the WAP searches for any aligner pod in the area. Please be aware that it’s possible for the system to find a pod that may be located at the shop across the street. This will not interfere with the pod identifica- tion process.

that may be located at the shop across the street. This will not interfere with the
that may be located at the shop across the street. This will not interfere with the
that may be located at the shop across the street. This will not interfere with the
that may be located at the shop across the street. This will not interfere with the

Chapter 3 Calibration

5. As the system acquires the different pods in the area it will start

displaying the MAC numbers on the screen.

purposes only the system has located 4 pods in the area, this could happen if there are two or more aligners in the area.

For instructional

6. Once the system has finished finding all the pods the system will then begin the process of marrying the pods to the aligner. This process will start at the top of the list working it’s way down. The system will highlight a pod number and ask the user if the LED’s on any of the pods are flashing.

ask the user if the LED’s on any of the pods are flashing. 7. Look at

7. Look at both pods. If the LED’s on any of the pods are flashing click on <OK>. The system will automatically identify the Pod as either the Left Hand or Right Hand Pod.

8. The system will proceed to the next pod that was located. Each time the system will ask the user if any of the lights are flashing on the pods to be identified. If there are no lights flash- ing click on <NO> and the unit will advance to the next pod.

9. If the system does not locate 2 pods the user is instructed to power down both pods and press the scan button again.

10. If after 3 attempts the system does not locate the pods it will be necessary to manually enter the POD MAC numbers located on the tag behind the rear rubber bumper of each Pod.

11. Press the cancel button to abort automatic pod location. Once cancel button is pressed the “Manual enter Pod ID” button appears.

12. Once entered press the <OK> button. The system will load the the calibration to the new pods.

entered press the <OK> button. The system will load the the calibration to the new pods.
entered press the <OK> button. The system will load the the calibration to the new pods.
entered press the <OK> button. The system will load the the calibration to the new pods.
Manual Entry
Manual
Entry

MAC

ID

entered press the <OK> button. The system will load the the calibration to the new pods.
entered press the <OK> button. The system will load the the calibration to the new pods.

Chapter 3 Calibration

CALIBRATION FACTORS

13. Select the “Calibration Factors” button from the calibration menu.

“Calibration Factors” button from the calibration menu. 14. Each line item represents the current calibration factor

14. Each line item represents the current calibration factor being used by the system during the alignment process. It is impor- tant to note the location of the calibration factors, the choices are Rack A, Rack B or the Floor.

CALIBRATION HISTORY

choices are Rack A, Rack B or the Floor. CALIBRATION HISTORY This function is very useful
choices are Rack A, Rack B or the Floor. CALIBRATION HISTORY This function is very useful

This function is very useful to see how each Pod and Target has maintained consistency from 1 calibration to the next. If either a Pod or Target shows a significant jump or drop on the History line, it may indicate a cata- strophic failure such as a drop to either a Pod or a Target or it may indicate that an incorrect calibration was done at that time.

1. Select the “Calibration History” button from the calibration menu.

“Calibration History” button from the calibration menu. 2. Using the Radio buttons on the left side

2. Using the Radio buttons on the left side of the screen choose LF, RF, LR or RR. The graph will show the amount of change from one calibration to the next. The system will only report back one calibration per day. Click on the “Camber” or “Toe” button to see any special note that may have been entered during calibration.

Click on the “Camber” or “Toe” button to see any special note that may have been
Click on the “Camber” or “Toe” button to see any special note that may have been

Chapter 3 Calibration

CALIBRATION UTILITIES

The alignment software has a calibration backup utility that is recommended after a new calibration is done. The user must be aware however should a the restore function ever be used that it will over write all calibration and user setup data. An 1¼ floppy disk is required to perform this function.

1. From the Calibration menu select the “Calibration Utilities” icon on the tool bar (F6).

the “Calibration Utilities” icon on the tool bar (F6). 2. To backup the calibration/user information select

2. To backup the calibration/user information select the “backup” button.

calibration/user information select the “backup” button. 3. The user is instructed to insert a floppy disk

3. The user is instructed to insert a floppy disk into the drive and press <OK> to continue.

4. After the data is backed up to the floppy it is highly recom- mended that the date be written on the label of the floppy.

5. To use the “restore” function the user can simply insert the backup floppy into the drive and select the “restore” button. All calibration/user information will be over written. There is no recovery of the data that is over written.

button. All calibration/user information will be over written. There is no recovery of the data that
button. All calibration/user information will be over written. There is no recovery of the data that
button. All calibration/user information will be over written. There is no recovery of the data that
button. All calibration/user information will be over written. There is no recovery of the data that
button. All calibration/user information will be over written. There is no recovery of the data that

Chapter 3 Calibration

Page left blank intentionally

CHAPTER 4 DIAgNOsTICs

The software has a diagnostic screen to help troubleshoot and determine possible failed components. It can also be used to help determine operation errors.

1. From the Splash screen choose the “Diagnostic” icon.

1. From the Splash screen choose the “Diagnostic” icon. 2. Choose the “Aligner Diagnostic” Icon from

2. Choose the “Aligner Diagnostic” Icon from the Mainte- nance menu.

“Aligner Diagnostic” Icon from the Mainte - nance menu. From here the technician has a host

From here the technician has a host of utilities to help trou- bleshoot the aligner. To simplify the troubleshooting process we will only outline and explain data useful to a technician for determining aligner problems. As the aligner develops more explanations will be expanded in this manual. Howev- er most of this information will be used in the factory depot for more extensive and in depth troubleshooting of compo- nents on the PCB’s.

will be used in the factory depot for more extensive and in depth troubleshooting of compo
will be used in the factory depot for more extensive and in depth troubleshooting of compo
will be used in the factory depot for more extensive and in depth troubleshooting of compo
will be used in the factory depot for more extensive and in depth troubleshooting of compo

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

DATA ExAMINATION MODE

The Portable aligner has a quick reference utility to view target information. This utility should be used as a quick reference to target and camera information.

From the Maintenance screen choose the “Data Examination” Icon.

Maintenance screen choose the “Data Examination” Icon. 1. Rms - (Root Mean Square) should be .06

1. Rms - (Root Mean Square) should be .06 or less

2. Target Blobs - Number of Fids seen by cam- era, should be no more than 33.

3. Distance - Distance measured from the cam- era lens to the center of the target.

4. Number of Planes - Total number of valid pictures taken by the camera.

- era lens to the center of the target. 4. Number of Planes - Total number
- era lens to the center of the target. 4. Number of Planes - Total number

4-2

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

Left/Right Pod Data

Serial Number inside of Pod

Error

0=Target acquired - 1=No Target

gain:

The amount gain depends on the brightness of the image. The brighter the image the lower the gain value will be.

0 to 45

strobe: 20 to 255

 

Brightness of the LED’s (How long the LED’s are on)

nfids Used:

 

Number of Fids used to generate readings

npBlobs

 

Number of Fids seen by camera. Should be no more than 33. If anymore than 33 the camera is seeing other data. Check for additional spare targets.

flags

To Be Removed

Rms

Background noise, should be .06 or less, .15 is maximum.

Charge

The amount of percentage battery is charged.

Time Left on Battery (min- utes)

The amount of calculated battery life. Depends on power consumption of pod at that time. (Metered screen pods are busy.)

Camber

Calibrated Camber Data

sAI

Calibrated SAI Data

Encoder

 

Calibrated Angle of encoder (Wheel Clamp angle)

Toe (Cross)

 

Cross toe angle (Raw Data)

Connected

 

Pod / WAP connection

Pod Connection status

1 = POD not communicating with WAP

2 = POD and WAP communicating

sCANs

Number of attempts to connect to pod.

roiX

384

Horizontal pixel location of the top corner of the Region of Interest (area where the target is located)

roiY

270

Vertical pixel location of the top corner of the Region of Interest (area where the target is located)

roiNX

308

Horizontal width of the Region of Interest

roiNY

330

vertical height of the Region of Interest

roix roiY roiNY roiNx
roix
roiY
roiNY
roiNx

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

ccX

-3.28

Location of the target relative to the camera x (or horizontal)

ccY

-2.83

Location of the target relative to the camera Y (or vertical)

ccZ

100.27

Location of the target relative to the camera Z (or away)

Ps

Power saving mode aligner is currently in.

 

1

= WAP only

4

= All components on

charging battery = Battery is hooked to the charger.

Camber

To be removed

 

flag

 

sAI flag

To be removed

 

Encoder

To be removed

 

flag

 

Toe Error

0x01

No Peak Shape Exposure High Exposure Low Sensor Blocked SPI Communication Fault Sunlight Clipped

No centroid found Centroid has bad shape Exposure level is to high Exposure level is to low IR communication interface is blocked A Fault occurred in the SPI communications Sensor has identified a high ambient light condition A portion of the sensor array is saturated. Raw Toe Plot

0x02

0x04

0x08

0x10

0x20

0x40

0x80

Toe Expo-

Sensor clock period (0 to 12000, high numbers normally) (Pg 1-4)

sure

Toe Rcvd

0

= No - 1 = Yes

 

DATA RCv

Data being received back from the pods. Should be fairly close to number of SCANS

FIRMWARE DOWNLOAD

As the unit progresses during different stages the hardware each PCB inside the POD’s will require updates. This information is called firmware. These updates come in form of a CD as this information is distributed to our customers. If mandatory firmware updates are required these will be sent out to the field using a Technical Service Bulletin (TSB).

out to the field using a Technical Service Bulletin (TSB). From the “Diagnostic” screen choose the

From the “Diagnostic” screen choose the “Firmware Update” icon from the toolbar.

After software (Alignment Operating System) is in- stalled and the system determines components inside the PODs have updates available these components will display a “red” icon by the component. By simply clicking on the icon the component will download the firmware. NOTE: DURING THE DOWNLOAD- ING PROCESS DO NOT DISTURB THE UNIT. After all updates have been made the icons will display a “green” check mark, meaning the system is up to date with the current firmware.

NOTE: THE SySTEm wILL NOT ExECUTE A DOwNLOAD IF THE POD bATTERy IS LESS THAN 40% CHARGED.

with the current firmware. NOTE: THE SySTEm wILL NOT ExECUTE A DOwNLOAD IF THE POD bATTERy

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

POD ExTENDED DIAGNOSTICS Pod Extended Diagnostics
POD ExTENDED DIAGNOSTICS
Pod Extended Diagnostics

Raw Data - Engineering Use only

These values are accumulative faults during a power cycle. It is very normal that faults will happen, how- ever faults that continually compile will indicate a possible failure on a component inside a pod. Values from left to right pods should be relatively the same. Rebooting the system will restart the fault counts.

Pod Voltage checks while plugged into WAP (charger)

 
 

Minimum

Maximum

Adapter Power

.700

.950

Battery Power

3.000

4.300

PreReg Power

5.000

5.300

Power distribution to PCB’s inside of pods. Compare LH to RH, voltages should be relatively the same. These simple checks should be done without the charger plugged in.

 

Minimum

Maximum

DSP33 Pwr

3.250

4.300

DSP14 Pwr

1.35

1.450

Analog 4 Pwr

3.800

4.100

Analog 5 Pwr

5.100

5.300

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

POD ExTENDED DIAGNOSTICS (PAGE 2)

By clicking on the (next page icon)

DIAGNOSTICS (PAGE 2) By clicking on the (next page icon) page 2 of extended diagnostics are

page 2 of extended diagnostics are displayed.

page icon) page 2 of extended diagnostics are displayed. The information displayed on this screen is

The information displayed on this screen is battery information. The areas outlined are helpful when trouble shooting battery related information. The area outlined in the lower right side of this screen is firmware ver- sions of each component inside the pods. As the product develops these version will change. This display of versions will only update when using the “Firmware Download” described earlier in this chapter. With the evolution of the product detailed diagnostics will be explained.

Temperature

 

Temperature measured in the battery pack

voltage

xxx

Battery voltage in Pod - Pods will only charge if volts below 3.89

Status Flags

0x0

Not charging, battery guage trained

 

0x1?

Inaccurate but in a learning mode

 

0x8?

charging and trained

 

0x9?

battery charging and not trained

 

0x?2

battery drained low enough but did not drain enough with charges in between

 

0x?4

Met condidtion to learn - finish charging

 

0x?6

Met conditions to learn but battery is low

 

0x?0

Not met conditions for learning.

State of Charge (REel)

 

NAC / by Last Discharge

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

Avg Current

 

Average draw of current - battery empty and plug in charger should be high because it is taking a charge.

Strobe Version

0x102

Firmware Version of components in Pod

Camera version

0x102

Firmware Version of components in Pod

Encoder Version

0x101

Firmware Version of components in Pod

Camber Version

0x103

Firmware Version of components in Pod

SAI version

0x103

Firmware Version of components in Pod

Toe version

0x103

Firmware Version of components in Pod

Supervisor Ver-

0x106

Firmware Version of components in Pod

sion

DSP Version

0x102

Firmware Version of components in Pod

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

POD POWER SUPPLY DATA Development stages - NOTE: By clicking on the icon the unit
POD POWER SUPPLY DATA
Development stages - NOTE: By clicking on the icon the unit will retrieve all power
supply data and will not be usable until all information is obtained.
Pod Power s upply Data

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

POD RUNTIME DATA Pod Runtime Data
POD RUNTIME DATA
Pod Runtime Data

Intial Charge %

Percent of Initial charge of Pod(s) before terminating charge

Time Between Charge

Accumulative time between charging times

Average on Time

Average time Pod(s) were powered on (Average of last 5 charge cycles)

Max on Time

Maximum time Pod(s) were on

Cumulative on Time

Total Time Pod(s) have been powered up (Reset to 0 after charge termi- nated)

Cumulative off Time

Total time Pod(s) have been powered off

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

POD CHARGE INFORMATION Pod Charge Information
POD CHARGE INFORMATION
Pod Charge Information

Last Battery Charge Information (Graphs will update after each charge cycle) X axis is equal to value times 5. EX: 37x5=185 equivalent to 3.08 hours

Input Voltage (volts)

Charging input voltage

Temperature

Temperature of charge cycle

Charge Current (amps)

Input amps - Should start high and decline during charge

Battery Votage (volts)

Battery Voltage - Should start low and increase

Battery % Capacity

Capacity of battery - Should start low and increase

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

POD TOE DIAGNOSTICS NOTE: TOE ERRORS COmmON bECAUSE OF REFRESH TImE (RED TExT)
POD TOE DIAGNOSTICS
NOTE: TOE ERRORS COmmON bECAUSE OF REFRESH TImE (RED TExT)

Left Graph

Shape of the centroid from the LH Pod (Should be a clean wave form)

12

to 170

Right Graph

Shape of the centroid from the LH Pod (Should be a clean wave form)

12

to 170

Centroid

Two images are taken for each toe sample, one with the opposite LED on and the other with the opposite LED off. The two images are subtracted one from the other to remove light from the environment. The image of the LED that results from the subtraction is called a centroid.

 

Angle

The position of the centroid in the sensor array is used to calculate the angle to the opposite sensor

 

Exposure

If the centroid is too small, a Low Exposure error is returned. If the cen- troid is too large, a High Exposure error is returned. (0 to 12000)

 

Toe Error

Code

Name

Error

0x01

No Peak

No centroid found

0x02

Shape

Centroid has bad shape

0x04

Exposure High

Exposure level is to high

0x08

Exposure Low

Exposure level is to low

0x10

Sensor Blocked

IR communication interface is blocked

0x20

SPI Communication Fault

A Fault occurred in the SPI communications

0x40

Sunlight

Sensor has identified a high ambient light condition

0x80

Clipped

A portion of the sensor array is saturated. Raw Toe Plot

Raw Toe Plot

Toe plot with ambient light (ExCELLENT to check if toe is seeing outside light source

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

TOE ExT DATA

Toe Ext Data
Toe Ext Data

SPI Error count

Reading will increase slowly over time - (will show up on toe error code)

IR Com Error Count

Reading will increase slowly over time - (will show up on toe error code)

Arm Error

Code

Name

Error

0x01

Watch Dog Reset

ARM core fault

0x02

End of Code Reached

ARM core fault

0x04

UART Fault

IR communication interface internal fault

0x08

UART break

IR communication interface internal fault

0x10

UART framing

IR communication interface internal fault

0x20

UART overrun

IR communication interface internal fault

0x40

Calibration Checksum

Calibration data is corrupted.

0x80

Memory Checksum

Firmware download failure

Board Error

Code

Name

Error

0x01

Main Voltage

Main 3.3V power is out of spec

0x02

CCD Voltage

CCD Voltage out of spec

0x04

IR Communication LED fault

IR communication LED current draw is out of spec

0x08

Toe LED fault

LED current draw for toe strobe is out of spec

0x10

IR Communication Voltage fault

IR Communication reference voltage is out of spec

0x20

CCD Fault

CCD is damaged or dirty

0x40

Strobe Fault

Power to strobe circuit out of spec

0x80

Raw Voltage Fault

Power from Prism Main board is out of spec

IR Com Error Count

Primary power supply on the board

vRAW

voltage coming to the PCB

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

TOE CAL DATA

Engineering use only

ToeCal Data
ToeCal Data

Software Revision on the PCB

Software Revision

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

STROBE/RADIO DIAGNOSTICS strobe/Radio Diagnostics
STROBE/RADIO DIAGNOSTICS
strobe/Radio Diagnostics

Status Flags

0x00

No strobes are turned on. No measurements done. (Strobe voltages not valid) Only Strobe Bank 1 is on. No measurements done. (Strobe voltages not valid) Only Strobe Bank 2 is on. No measurements done. (Strobe voltages not valid) Both strobes on. No measurements done. (Strobe voltages not valid) No strobes are turned on. Measurements done. (Strobe voltages valid) Only Strobe Bank 1 is on. Measurements done. (Strobe voltages valid) Only Strobe Bank 2 is on. Measurements done. (Strobe voltages valid) Both strobes on. Measurements done. (Strobe voltages valid) VSYNC was on longer than 20mS. No strobes are turned on. No measurements done. (Strobe voltages not valid) VSYNC was on longer than 20mS. Only Strobe Bank 1 is on. No measurements done. (Strobe voltages not valid) VSYNC was on longer than 20mS. Only Strobe Bank 2 is on. No measurements done. (Strobe voltages not valid) VSYNC was on longer than 20mS. Both strobes on. No measurements done.(Strobe volt- ages not valid) VSYNC was on longer than 20mS. No strobes are turned on. Measurements done. (Strobe voltages valid) VSYNC was on longer than 20mS. Only Strobe Bank 1 is on. Measurements done. (Strobe voltages valid) VSYNC was on longer than 20mS. Only Strobe Bank 2 is on. Measurements done. (Strobe voltages valid) VSYNC was on longer than 20mS. Both strobes on. Measurements done. (Strobe voltages valid)

0x01

 

0x02

0x03

0x04

0x05

0x06

0x07

0x80

0x81

0x82

0x83

0x84

0x85

0x86

0x87

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

SPI Errors

SPI retrys on the radio PCB

Serial Errors

Communication retries between micro controller to radio

Strobe 1 LED Voltage

2

strings of 6 LED's - 8.4v to 10.8

Strobe 2 LED Voltage

2

strings of 6 LED's - 8.4v to 10.8

Strobe Vcc

Volts into the Strobe PCB 3.0 to 3.4

Temperature

Temperature of the Strobe pcb

Strobe 1 Count

Bumps every time the LED's count ( value is accumulative until rollover)

Strobe 2 Count

Bumps every time the LED's count ( value is accumulative until rollover)

Pod Encoder Camber/sAI
Pod Encoder Camber/sAI

POD ENCODER CAMBER/SAI

Development stages

Inclinometer SPI Errors

0

0

Encoder Internal VCC

23700

24700

Camber Internal VCC

44600

45200

Camber External VCC

44600

45200

SAI Internal vCC

44600

45200

SAI External VCC

44600

45200

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

ENCODER CALIBRATION DATA

Engineering Use Only

Chapter 4 Diagnostics ENCODER CALIBRATION DATA Engineering Use Only ENCODER CAM/SAI DATA Engineering Use Only 4-16

ENCODER CAM/SAI DATA

Engineering Use Only

Chapter 4 Diagnostics ENCODER CALIBRATION DATA Engineering Use Only ENCODER CAM/SAI DATA Engineering Use Only 4-16

4-16

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

WAP DIAGNOSTICS Battery will only charge if below 3.90v or below 80%.
WAP DIAGNOSTICS
Battery will only charge if below 3.90v or below 80%.

volts In

Volts in at the AC adapter - Min 8.00 Volts - Max 10.00 Volts

v

Out 1

±

1 volt of “Volts In” value

A

Out 1

.300 Amps

3.00 Amps

v

Out 2

±

1 volt of “Volts In” value

A

Out 2

.300 Amps

3.00 Amps

Temperature

Temperature of WAP PCB

POT Adjust

Engineering only

 

Bay Select

Dip switches for each bay

Discover

Number of Pod(s) located during the search mode

Configured

Number of Pod(s) found and configured after search (should be 2)

POD1 Address (pod1)

Handle

In Developement

Clock

In Developement

Error

In Developement

RSSI

received signal strength from radio

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

POD CAMERA DIAGNOSTICS
POD CAMERA DIAGNOSTICS

Error Flags

0x07 - Camera power problem & I2C Errors from EEPROM & Camera 0x06 - Camera power problem & I2C Errors from EEPROM 0x05 - Camera power problem & I2C Errors from Camera 0x04 - Camera power problem 0x03 - I2C Errors from the EEPROM and the Camera 0x02 - I2C Errors are from the EEPROM 0x01 - I2C Errors are from the Camera. 0x00 - NO PROBLEM FOUND

Camera SPI Errors

Retrys seen by camera (stable but will count up)

Camera 12C Errors

Retrys seen by camera (stable but will count up)

Digital Voltage

3.3

supply to micro contoller (3.0 to 3.4)

Analog voltage

3.3

to camera (3.0 to 3.4)

Camera 25v

2.5

to camera (2.2 to 2.6)

Temperature

Temperature on the camera 15 to 25

Camera Pixel Rate

3700 to 3900

Camera Pixel count

131000 to 1310720

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

POD POWER OPTIONS

The user has the capability to control the POD Power OFF mode to conserve battery life. The software is very intuitive and can be accessed by clicking on the battery icon on the Diagnostic menu.

The following information is displayed. Power Status:

• Percent of battery life.

• Operating time left on battery.

• Pod Mode.

life. • Operating time left on battery. • Pod Mode. • 1 = Power Save Mode

• 1 = Power Save Mode

• 4 = All components running.

• Charging = Pod connected to charger.

components running. • Charging = Pod connected to charger. Power Scheme: All components are programmed to

Power Scheme: All components are programmed to be on,

after set time components will shut down for power saving modes.

Turn Pods Off:

Radio Only After 10 mins After 30 mins After 60 mins Never

All On After 15 mins After 30 mins After 45 mins Never

Depending on the setting the operator will be flagged on any screen that the pods are down to this percent- age of operating time. It is suggested that the pods be plugged in for a full re-charge.

Warning Threshold:

10%

20%

30%

40%

It is suggested that the pods be plugged in for a full re-charge. Warning Threshold: 10%

Chapter 4 Diagnostics

Blank Page

Notice: The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. Snapon Equipment makes no warranty with regard to this material. Snapon Equipment shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental consequential damages in connection with furnishings, performance, or use of this material.

This document contains proprietary information which is protected by copyright and patents. All rights are re- served. No part of this document may be photocopied, reproduced, or translated without prior written consent of Snapon Equipment.

TEEWA557A (Rev B)

06/2008

rjh

Printed in the U.S.A.