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Reference Manual

Model 2120 and Model 2120A Series


Single-Channel and Dual-Channel
Machinery Analyzer

CSI Part # 97047 Rev.10


Copyright Model 2120 and Model 2120A Series Reference Manual
© 2001 by Computational Systems, Incorporated. This document was written, illustrated, and produced
All rights reserved. by CSI’s Engineering Publications Group on Power
Macintosh™ workstations using Adobe™ FrameMaker®,
No part of this publication may be reproduced, trans- Adobe PhotoShop®, and Macromedia® FreeHand™.
mitted, transcribed, stored in a retrieval system, or Printed copies are produced using the Xerox™
translated into any language in any form by any means DocuTech™ publishing system.
without the written permission of Computational
Systems, Incorporated (CSI). Trademarks and Servicemarks
AccuTrend; Changing the way the world performs
Disclaimer
maintenance, and CSI logo; CSIRBM‚(Mexico); Doctor
This manual is provided for informational purposes. Know; Infranalysis; InfraRoute; Levels of Awareness
COMPUTATIONAL SYSTEMS, INCORPORATED MAKES NO Training; M&D; MachineGuard; MachineView;
WARRANTY OF ANY KIND WITH REGARD TO THIS MasterNet; MotorView; Nspectr; O&M Workstation;
MATERIAL, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE OilView (Japan); RBMware; Reliability-Based Mainte-
IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND nance, and logo; RollView; StarterTrend; STATUS
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Computational Technologies; TrendSetter; Tribology Minilab;
Systems, Incorporated shall not be liable for errors, UltrasSpec; and WAVEPAK are registered trademarks
omissions, or inconsistencies that may be contained of Computational Systems, Incorporated.
herein or for incidental or consequential damages in
CSI (China, Japan, Venezuela, Australia); CSIRBM (Vene-
connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of
zuela); Status Condition Monitor; PeakVue; RBMview;
this material. Information in this document is subject
RBMware (Australia, China, Japan); RBMwizard; Reli-
to change without notice and does not represent a
ability-Based Maintenance (Venezuela); SonicScan;
commitment on the part of Computational Systems,
SonicView; SST; STATUS RF SmartSensor; STATUS RF
Incorporated. The information in this manual is not all-
Transceiver; VersaBal; VibPro; VibView; and Weld-
inclusive and cannot cover all unique situations.
watch are pending trademarks of Computational
Product Support Systems, Incorporated.
Should you have any comments on this documenta- Lubricant Profile and Trivector are registered service-
tion or questions concerning the Agreement on the marks of Computational Systems, Incorporated.
following pages, please contact CSI’s Product Support RBM; RBMware (China); Reliability-Based Mainte-
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Address: design are pending servicemarks of Computational
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Worldwide Web: The product(s) described in this manual are covered
http://www.CSImeansReliability.com under existing and pending patents.

ii
License Agreement Transfer
IMPORTANT: CAREFULLY READ ALL THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF THIS You may transfer the software and license to another party only with the
AGREEMENT BEFORE OPENING THE PACKAGE OR PROCEEDING WITH INSTAL- written consent of CSI and only if the other party agrees to accept the
LATION. OPENING THE PACKAGE OR COMPLETING THE INSTALLATION INDI- terms and conditions of this Agreement. If you transfer the program, you
CATES YOUR ACCEPTANCE OF THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS CONTAINED IN must transfer the documentation and any backup copies or transfer only
THIS AGREEMENT. the documentation and destroy any backup copies.
IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS CONTAINED IN Copyright
THIS AGREEMENT, CANCEL ANY INSTALLATION AND PROMPTLY RETURN THIS The software and documentation are copyrighted. All rights are reserved.
PRODUCT AND THE ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTATION TO CSI, AND YOUR Termination
MONEY WILL BE REFUNDED. NO REFUNDS WILL BE GIVEN FOR PRODUCTS
If you commit a material breach of this Agreement, CSI may terminate
WITH DAMAGED OR MISSING COMPONENTS.
the Agreement by written notice.
Definition of Software
Virus Disclaimer
As used herein, software refers to any computer program contained on
CSI uses the latest virus checking technologies to test all its software.
any medium. Software includes downloadable firmware for use in
However, since no anti-virus system is 100% reliable, we strongly advise
devices such as analyzers or MotorStatus units and it includes computer
that you use and anti-virus system in which have confidence to verify the
programs executable on computers or computer networks.
software is virus-free. CSI makes no representations or warranties to the
Software License effect that the licensed software is virus-free.
You have the non-exclusive right to use this software on only one device NO WARRANTY
at a time. You may back-up the software for archival purposes. For
THE PROGRAM IS PROVIDED “AS-IS” WITHOUT ANY WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR
network systems, you have the non-exclusive right to install this software
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTIES OR MERCHANT-
on only one server. Read/write access is limited to the number of licenses
ABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
purchased. The number of read-only accesses is not limited.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY AND REMEDIES
Software Updates
IN NO EVENT WILL CSI BE LIABLE TO YOU OR ANY THIRD
CSI agrees to provide Purchaser, at no charge except for media, prepara-
PARTY FOR ANY DAMAGES, INCLUDING ANY LOST
tion and shipping charges, for one (1) year from the date of purchase,
PROFITS, LOST SAVINGS, OR OTHER INCIDENTAL OR
updates to the software made at the sole discretion of CSI. Should
CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR
Purchaser desire to purchase software maintenance for the next
THE INABILITY TO USE THIS PROGRAM. THE LICENSEE'S
succeeding year following the first year from the date of purchase, and
SOLE AND EXCLUSIVE REMEDY IN THE EVENT OF A DEFECT
thereafter on an annual basis, and if CSI is still providing maintenance,
IN WORKMANSHIP OR MATERIAL IS EXPRESSLY LIMITED TO
Purchaser may purchase the same, annually, at the existing rate.
THE REPLACEMENT OF THE DISKETTES. IN NO EVENT WILL
Updates/Upgrades CSI'S LIABILITY EXCEED THE PURCHASE PRICE OF THE
Upon receipt of new CSI software replacing older CSI software, you have PRODUCT.
30 days to install and test the new CSI software on the same or a different Export Restrictions
device. At the end of the 30-day test period, you must both remove and
You agree to comply fully with all laws, regulations, decrees and orders
return the new CSI software or remove the older CSI software.
of the Unites States of America that restrict or prohibit the exportation (or
Ownership reexportation) of technical data and/or the direct product of it to other
The licensed software and all derivatives are the sole property of CSI countries, including, without limitation, the U.S. Export Administration
Technology, Inc. You may not disassemble, decompile, reverse engineer Regulations.
or otherwise translate the licensed program. You may not distribute
copies of the program or documentation, in whole or in part, to another U.S. Government Rights
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or any part of the documentation without prior written consent from CSI. RIGHTS”. Use, duplication or disclosure by the U.S. Government is
subject to restrictions set forth in the Federal Acquisition Regulations and
its Supplements.

iii
Hardware Technical Help Software Technical Help
1. Please have the number of the current version of 1. Please have the number of the current version of
your firmware ready when you call. The version your software ready when you call. The version
of the firmware in CSI’s Model 2100 series, Model number for software operating under MS-DOS®
2400, and other analyzers appears on the power- appears at the top of every menu screen. The
up screen that is displayed when the analyzer is version number for software operating under
turned on. Windows® is displayed by selecting “About” under
2. If you have a problem, explain the exact nature of the Help menu bar item.
your problem. For example, what are the error 2. If you have a problem, explain the exact nature of
messages? When do they occur? Know what you your problem. For example, what are the error
were doing when the problem occurred. For messages? (If possible, make a printout of the error
example, what mode were you in? What steps did message.) When do they occur? Know what you
you go through? Try to determine before you call were doing when the problem occurred. For
whether the problem is repeatable. example, what mode were you in? What steps did
you go through? Try to determine before you call
Hardware Repair whether the problem is repeatable.
CSI repairs and updates its hardware products free for 3. Please be at your computer when you call. We can
one year from the date of purchase. This service serve you better when we can work through the
warranty includes hardware improvement, modifica- problem together.
tion, correction, recalibration, update, and mainte-
nance for normal wear. This service warranty excludes Software Technical Support
repair of damage from misuse, abuse, neglect, care- CSI provides technical support through the following
lessness, or modification performed by anyone other for those under maintenance contract:
than CSI.
• Telephone assistance and communication via the
After the one year service warranty expires, each Internet.
return of a CSI hardware product is subject to a
• Mass updates that are released during that time.
minimum service fee. If the cost of repair exceeds this
minimum fee, we will call you with an estimate before • Interim updates upon request. Please contact CSI
performing any work. Contact CSI’s Product Support Customer Services for more information.
Department for information concerning the current
rates. Returning Items
1. Call Product Support (see page 2) to obtain a return
Obsolete Hardware authorization number. Please write it clearly and
Although CSI will honor all contractual agreements prominently on the outside of the shipping
and will make every effort to ensure that its software container.
packages are “backward compatible,” to take advan- 2. If returning for credit, return all accessories
tage of advances in newer hardware platforms and to originally shipped with the item(s). Include cables,
keep our programs reasonably small, CSI reserves the software diskettes, manuals, etc.
right to discontinue support for old or out-of-date 3. Enclose a note that describes the reason(s) you are
hardware items. returning the item(s).
4. Insure your package for return shipment. Shipping
costs and any losses during shipment are your
responsibility. COD packages cannot be accepted
and will be returned unopened.

iv
CE Notice
CSI products bearing the symbol on the product
or in the user’s manual are in compliance with appli-
cable EMC and Safety Directives of the European Union.
In accordance with CENELEC standard EN 50082-2,
normal intended operation is specified as follows:
1. The product must not pose a safety hazard.
2. The product must not sustain damage as a result of
use under environmental conditions specified in
the user documentation.
3. The product must stay in or default to an operating
mode that is restorable by the user.
4. The product must not lose program memory, user-
configured memory (e.g., routes), or previously
stored data memory. When apparent, the user may
need to initiate a reset and/or restart of a data
acquisition in progress.

User Responsibility
It is CSI’s expressed goal to offer our customers the
highest possible level of performance. Consistent with
this goal, CSI has developed a series of adapters and
accessories to address the broadest possible range of
applications. CSI makes no claims and offers no guar-
antee about the performance of connecting CSI equip-
ment to other equipment not supplied by CSI. It
remain the full responsibility of the end user to verity
appropriateness and safety before connecting any CSI
equipment to any external measurement device or to
any electrically charged system.

Continuous Monitoring/Shutdown Systems


If the Model 2120A is used to collect data from a
Continuous Monitoring/Shutdown System, a Model
A0623BF or A0628BV adaptor should be used to
avoid introducing any voltage from the analyzer into
the system that could exceed the vibration alarm level
voltages and cause the shutdown system to trip the
machine off-line.

v
vi
Contents

Chapter 1 • Read This First


Model 2120 Versions · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-1
Special Text· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-1
RBMware/MasterTrend Software and Prerequisites· · · · · · · · · · ·1-2
Precautions · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-3
Standard Equipment and Options · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-4
Assembling the Case and Strap · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-4
Battery Use and Care · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-5
Recharging the Battery Pack · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-6
Changing the Battery Pack · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-8
Battery Maintenance· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·1-10

Chapter 2 • Analyzer Overview


Top Panel · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-2
Front Panel · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-4
Command Keys · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-5
Function Keys · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-7
Control Keys · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-8
Keypad · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-9
User Interface · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-12
Menu Item Selection· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-12
Response Fields· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-13
Alphanumeric Keys · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-15
Numerical Values · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-16
Memory Card · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-17
Installing a Card · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-18
Removing a Card · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-19
Memory Card Write Protect · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·2-21

vii
Memory Card Battery · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2-22

Chapter 3 • Using the Model 2120


Date and Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-2
Communications Setup · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-3
Accessing RBMware/MasterTrend· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-4
Selecting the Memory Card · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-5
Loading a Route · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-6
Basic Operation · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11
Connecting Sensors · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-11
Dual-Channel Sensors · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-12
Buffered Adapters · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-14
The Measurement Point Display· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-15
Measurement Point Display Function Keys · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-19
Collecting Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-20
Selecting Measurement Points· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-22
Storing Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-24
Displaying Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-25
Spectral Plots · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-26
Plot Display Control Keys· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-27
Plot Display Function Keys · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-32
Notes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-41
Equipment Out of Service · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-42
User Defined Notes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-42
Predefined Notes · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-44
Dumping Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-46
Transferring Data Via Modem · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-48
To Establish Communications · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-49
Diagnosing Modem Communications Problems · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-50
Printing Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-52
Dual-Channel Considerations (Model 2120-2)· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-54
Making Dual-Channel Measurements · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-54
Dual Channel and RBMware/MasterTrend· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-54
Simultaneous Data Acquisition · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 3-57

viii
Chapter 4 • Utility Functions
Communications · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-2
Load Route and Dump Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-2
Remote Connect · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-2
Configure Port · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-3
Set Modem Commands · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-4
Load Downloadable Program (DLP) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-5
Select Route · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-7
Change Setup · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-9
Date and Time · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-9
Operational Parameters · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-13
Sensor Type · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-16
Data Units · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-23
Display Control· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-27
Measurement Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-32
Expert Options · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-39
Master Reset · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-42
Check Battery · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-43
Special Functions · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-44
Generate Report · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-45
Set Calibration · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-46
Meter Test · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-46
Discharge Battery · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-46
Software Type · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-47
Memory Card · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·4-48

Chapter 5 • Off Route Program


Accessing the Off Route Program · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·5-3
Modify Off Route Point · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·5-4
Enter Off Route Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·5-4
Exit Off Route Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·5-4
Define Off Route Point · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·5-5
Off Route Measurement Point Parameters · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·5-6

ix
Chapter 6 • Analysis Expert
Analysis Expert Tests· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-2
Running the Tests · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-3
When To Use the Expert Analyses· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-6
The Expert Analysis Menu Options · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-8
High Frequency Analysis · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-8
High Resolution Analysis · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-9
Bearing/Gear Analysis - PeakVue· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-10
Low Frequency Analysis - SST · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-11
Order Tracking · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-12
Synchronous Analysis · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-13
Bump Test (Equip Running) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-14
Bump Test (Equip Off) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-15
Coastdown (PeakHold) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-16
Coastdown (Peak/Phase) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-17
Turning Speed Detection· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-18
Rotor Bar Test (Current) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-19
Cross-Channel Amplitude/Phase · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-20
Orbit Plot · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 6-21

Chapter 7 • Analyze Mode


Display Spectrum/Display Waveform · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-2
Plot Display Control Keys· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-5
Plot Display Function Keys · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-11
Display Parameters · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-20
Store Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-21
Acquire Spectrum · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-23
Frequency and Low Cutoff · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-24
Lines · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-25
Window · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-26
Averages· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-26
Init Setup · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-26
Units/Integration · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-27
Average Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-28
Trigger Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-29
Trigger Level · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-31
Percent Pre-Trigger · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 7-31

x
Full-Scale Range · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-31
SST · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-32
A-Weighting · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-33
Triax Control · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-33
Active Channel (Model 2120-2) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-34
Demodulate· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-35
PeakVue · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-36
PreFilter· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-36
Monitor (Live) Mode · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-38
Monitor Spectrum· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-39
Monitor Waveform· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-42
Monitor Overall · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-45
Monitor Temperature· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-49
Monitor Peak/Phase · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-50
Peak/Phase Display Functions · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-55
Displaying Stored Data· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-58
Monitor DC · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-59
Monitor Battery · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-61
Monitor “Filtered” Orbit · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-61
Zoom Analysis · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-69
Setting up Zoom Analysis· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-69
Acquiring and Displaying Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-71
Cross Channel Phase (Model 2120-2) · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-75
Single Frequency Monitor · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-75
Full Plot Acquire · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·7-77

Chapter 8 • Advanced Techniques


Acoustic Noise Monitoring· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-1
Microphone Inputs · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-1
Calibrating The Microphone · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-5
A-Weighting · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-6
Third Octave Analysis · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-7
A-Weighting · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-8
Synchronous Time Averaging · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-9
Order Tracking · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-11
Impact Testing · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·8-13
Measurement Procedure (for single-channel method) · · · · · · · ·8-14

xi
Chapter 9 • Technical Notes
Overall Calculation · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-3
Downloading Firmware · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-4
Download Procedure· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-5
Calibration · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-6
Store Calibration Values · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 9-9

Chapter 10 • Cascade Special Function Program


Entering the Cascade Special-Function Program · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-2
Program Restart · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-2
Starting the Cascade Program· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-3
Cascade Setup Menu—Page One· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-4
Cascade Setup Menu—Page Two· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-6
Cascade Setup Menu—Page Three · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-9
Collecting Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-11
Displaying Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-12
Paging and Scrolling Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-13
Additional Display Control Keys · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-14
Viewing a Single Spectrum · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-15
Saving Data · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-16
Error Messages · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 10-18

Appendix A • Sensor Button/Enter Key Operation

Appendix B • Technical Specifications


Hardware Specifications · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · B-1
Input Specifications · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · B-2
Measurement Specifications · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · B-5
Output · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · B-6

Appendix C • Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams


Auxiliary Connector Pinout · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·C-1

xii
Multifunction Input Connector Pinout · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · C-2
Model 630 9-to-25 Pin Adapter Cable· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · C-3
Model 631 Sensor Cable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · C-3
Model 633 Communications Cable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · C-4
Model 635 Modem Cable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · C-4
Model 639 Communications Cable · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · C-5

Glossary

Index

xiii
xiv
Chapter 1

Read This First

Model 2120 Versions


This manual describes both the single-channel Model 2120A and the dual-
channel Model 2120A-2. Descriptions of dual-channel functions apply to
the Model 2120A-2 only.
This manual also applies to the original Model 2120 series analyzers except
for the Expert menus described in Chapter 6.
This manual is also supplied with the corrective-only analyzer models;
however, these models only allow operation of the balancing and align-
ment programs. They do not allow access to any of the Route, Off Route,
or Analysis mode functions.

Special Text
The following conventions are used throughout this manual to call special
attention to the associated text:

Note
The Note paragraph indicates special comments or instruc-
tions.

Caution!
The Caution paragraph alerts you to actions that could have an effect
on the equipment or the collected data.

1-1
RBMware/MasterTrend Software and Prerequisites
In order to use the Model 2120A with RBMware/MasterTrend software,
the software must be compatible as shown in the following table:

Model 2120A Model 2120 MasterTrend


RBMware
Firmware Firmware DOS Windows
version version version version

7.00 2.73 (or later) 3.03 (or later)


7.01 2.73 (or later) 3.03 (or later)
7.02 (or later) 2.74 (or later) 3.04 (or later)
7.44 (or later) 7.40 (or later) 2.74 (or later) 3.04 (or later) 4.0 (or later)

RBMware/MasterTrend requires a substantial amount of planning and


setup before routes can be downloaded into the Model 2120. For example,
a predictive maintenance database must be set up to define all machines,
measurement points, alarm limits, and route formation. All of this informa-
tion should be completely defined before you begin data collection.

1-2 Read This First


Precautions
Please follow these precautions carefully. Any product damage due to these
conditions may void the warranty.
• Do not change the battery pack with the battery charger connected
as damage may occur to the analyzer.
• Use only CSI-supplied battery chargers that have been approved for
use with the Model 2120A Machinery Analyzer. The use of any other
charger will most likely damage the analyzer.
• Do not use CSI battery chargers with anything other than their cor-
responding CSI product.
• Do not use the Model 93140 Battery Charger Power Supply with
older CSI Model 2100-series analyzers.
• Do not connect a signal larger than ± 21 volts into the input of the
analyzer.

Caution!
CSI does not warrant compatibility or fitness for application of this
product with any device not specifically recommended in CSI litera-
ture. In some applications, special adapters may be required for inter-
connectivity with other products. This includes the unbuffered outputs
of some older on-line monitoring systems, particularly if configured
with shutdown protection. If connected improperly to CSI equipment,
systems can experience transient voltage conditions resulting in false
vibration readings or system shutdown.

Precautions 1-3
Standard Equipment and Options
Unpack the Model 2120A Machinery Analyzer and compare the contents
of the package with your shipping invoice. If you should find a discrepancy,
contact CSI Customer Support.

Assembling the Case and Strap


A leather case with a shoulder strap and a clear vinyl jacket are provided to
protect the Model 2120. Insert the top of the analyzer into the bottom of the
leather case, making sure that the front display and keypad are visible
through the cutouts in the case. Snap the bottom of the case shut, then clip
on the leather straps and adjust them for your comfort.

When the analyzer must be used in a wet or humid environment, the clear
vinyl cover can be used to help protect the face plate.

1-4 Read This First


Battery Use and Care
A rechargeable battery pack is used to power the Model 2120. Before using
the analyzer, verify that the battery has enough charge to operate properly.
The battery needs to be recharged if the analyzer will not power up, or if
the analyzer displays a low battery warning and turns itself off.
The Battery Capacity function will give an approximate indication (in per-
cent) of the battery’s condition. To access this function, press the Utility key
and select Check Battery from the menu. Alternatively, the battery capacity
can be checked using the F1 Battery Check function that is available while
in the normal route mode.

This display presents approximate values and should only be used as a guide-
line in determining the amount of remaining battery charge. When the per-
cent value first reaches zero, a built-in safety margin allows approximately
10 minutes of additional use before the analyzer turns itself off in order to
protect the memory.

Note
If the analyzer should display the low battery warning screen
and turn itself off, the analyzer’s memory will remain intact for
approximately two weeks. Therefore, the collected data is
retained in memory and can be accessed after the analyzer’s
battery has been recharged.

Battery Use and Care 1-5


Recharging the Battery Pack
The Model 93140 battery charger power supply is used to charge the ana-
lyzer’s battery pack. To recharge the battery pack:
1·····Make sure that the Model 2120A analyzer is turned off.
2·····Plug the Model 93140 power supply’s AC power cord into a standard
AC outlet.

to AC
wall outlet

power
supply

3·····Insert the power supply’s output plug into the battery charger jack
located on the top panel of the analyzer.

1-6 Read This First


The battery charger will recharge a fully discharged battery pack in approx-
imately two and one half hours. After the battery pack has been fully
charged, the battery charger will automatically switch to a trickle charge
mode to maintain full charge.

Caution!
Do not use the Model 93140 Battery Charger Power Supply with older
CSI Model 2115 analyzers.

The Model 2120A, with a fully charged battery, will operate continuously
for approximately 12 to 14 hours, depending on the use of screen/keypad
backlighting. Operational time can be increased by turning the analyzer off
when not in use, and limiting the use of backlighting.

Note
The original Model 2120 will operate continuously for approx-
imately eight to 10 hours.

Note
To prevent loss of memory, install a charged battery within
four hours after removing a discharged battery.

Note
The Model 93140 power supply can operate from any AC
outlet ranging from 100 VAC to 250 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz.

Note
It is normal for the bottom of the analyzer’s case to become
warm to the touch towards the end of the charging cycle.

Battery Use and Care 1-7


Changing the Battery Pack
To change the Model 2120A analyzer’s battery pack:
1·····Make sure that the analyzer is Off, and that the battery charger power
supply is not connected to the analyzer.
2·····On the bottom of the analyzer, remove the two screws on the bottom
panel as shown below. Then remove the panel.

3·····Using the tabs on the sides of the battery pack, carefully remove the
battery pack from the battery compartment.
4·····Insert the new battery pack into the analyzer case, ensuring that the
strip contacts on the battery pack line up with the connection pins
inside the battery compartment.

battery pins

1-8 Read This First


strip contacts
7

5···· Tuck the battery pack tabs into the case on the sides of the battery pack.
Make sure that the tabs do not interfere with the installation of the
bottom panel.
6···· Replace the bottom panel and screws.

Note
The battery packs from the Model 2120A and the original
Model 2120 are not interchangeable.

Battery Use and Care 1-9


Battery Maintenance
The Model 2120A analyzer includes a function that allows you to automat-
ically discharge the battery pack and then fully charge it. Although not
absolutely necessary, this discharge/charge cycle helps the battery pack
maintain a strong charge and should be performed after every 25 to 35
charge cycles (or about once every six weeks).
If the battery pack is at or near a fully charged state, this function may take
up to 10 hours to completely discharge the battery and an additional three
hours to return the battery to a full charge. At some point in the discharge/
charge cycle, the battery pack will be totally discharged and incapable of
powering the analyzer should the need arise where the analyzer must be
used. To prevent such a situation, either:
• make sure that you have at least 13 hours before the analyzer must
be used, or
• begin the discharge/charge cycle when the analyzer’s battery is
nearly fully discharged; that is, after the analyzer has been used for
11 to 14 hours (this can reduce the cycle time to four or five hours).

Discharging the Battery Pack


To initiate the discharge/charge cycle for the analyzer’s battery pack, first
connect the Model 93140 power supply as described in “Recharging the
Battery Pack” on page 1-6. Press the analyzer’s Utility key, select Special
Functions, and then select Discharge Batt from the Special Functions menu.
A verification screen will then be displayed to make sure that you wish to
continue, toggle any numerical key to change the answer to “Yes,” and then
press the Enter key. The analyzer will then display a screen informing you
that the process has begun and then automatically turn itself off.

Note
The Model 93140 power supply must be connected to the ana-
lyzer throughout the discharge/charge cycle.

1-10 Read This First


Chapter 2

Analyzer Overview

When the analyzer is turned on, the “Power Up” screen will display first.
This screen temporarily displays the current date and time, the presently
installed firmware version, and the version number of the installed
EPROM.
If no routes have previously been loaded onto the selected memory card,
the “No Routes Active” screen will display next as shown below. However,
if route or off-route information has been entered, the analyzer will display
the measurement point screen that was displayed before the analyzer was
turned off.

2-1
Top Panel
Charger
Input

Tachometer Mulitfunction Input


Input Connector
Auxiliary
Connector
Model 2120A top panel.

Multifunction Input Connector


• Provides connection for data communications between the Model
2120A and the host computer.
• Provides input for an accelerometer and other sensors.
• Provides for connection to an external modem (via the Model 706
Modem Kit).
• Provides output to an external printer (via the Model 720 Printer
Interface) or to a computer monitor (via the Virtual Printer software).
• Provides for connection of a triaxial accelerometer.
• Provides for connection of dual-channel adapters (Model 2120A-2
only).
• Provides for connection to the Model 444 Strobe Light.

Charger Input
Input for the Model 93140 battery charger power supply (see “Recharging
the Battery Pack” on page 1-6).

2-2 Analyzer Overview


Tachometer Input
Connection for once-per-revolution pulse signals (greater than one volt),
such as a tachometer, to measure RPM.

Auxiliary Connector
• Provides for connection of the Model 346 bar code scanner to the
analyzer.
• Provides for connection of the Model 430 Speed Sensor.

Caution!
Do not connect non-CSI supplied cables to the analyzer’s Multifunc-
tion Input Connector. To do so seriously risks damaging the analyzer,
as this connector contains many other signals and voltages in addition
to what is normally found on RS232 connectors.

Top Panel 2-3


Front Panel
The following are brief descriptions of the functions located on the front
panel of the Model 2120A. These functions are discussed in greater detail
in later sections of this manual.

On/Off
key

Command keys LED

Function
keys
Control
keys

Keypad

On
On/Off
Off Press the On/Off key once to turn on the analyzer (key must be pressed and
held for a minimum of one-half second); press it again to turn it off.

LED
The front panel LED flashes to provide visual confirmation of keyboard
entries.

2-4 Analyzer Overview


Command Keys

Utility
Utility The Utility key accesses the Utility Functions menu which is used to select
from six functions that define and control the operation of the analyzer.
Utility functions are described in detail in Chapter 4.

PROGRAM
Program Select
SELECT The Program Select key allows you to select which program you wish the
analyzer to use:

10

• Data Collector program - the normal route data collection program.


This program is used to load routes, collect data, and to dump the
collected data to the host computer. Select Data Collector program
when you wish to restore the analyzer to its normal operational
mode.
• Off Route program - enables you to define and modify measure-
ment points in the analyzer that are not included in the loaded route.
Data can be collected on these off route points whenever the ana-
lyzer is in the off route mode. See Chapter 5 for more information.
• a Special Function program - these optional programs can be
downloaded from the host computer onto a memory card and enable
you to perform special functions such as balancing, alignment, etc.

Front Panel 2-5


Note
When using a special function program, the normal route
mode is disabled—pressing the Reset key returns the analyzer
to the special function program’s main menu. Use the Program
Select key to select the data collector program and return to
normal route mode operation, or to select another special func-
tion program.

Help
Help The Help key displays on-line help messages pertaining to the currently
highlighted screen item. Some help messages contain more than one page
of text. For these messages, you can use the Page Down key to display the
next page of text, and the Page Up key to display the previous page of text.
Pressing the Help key again (or the Enter key) returns to the previously dis-
played screen.

11

Analysis/Expert
Analysis
Expert This key is used to access the automated Expert analysis menus, as well as
the user-defined real-time analysis and diagnostic functions of the Model
2120A. The Analyze mode is described in detail in Chapter 6.

Notes
Notes The Notes key is used to access the notepad screen which provides a list of
preprogrammed or user-defined observations concerning the status of
monitored equipment. See “Notes” on page 3-41 for more information.

2-6 Analyzer Overview


Function Keys
Various functions of the analyzer are controlled by or accessed with the F1
through F6 function keys. The actual functions of these keys vary
depending on the menu or screen currently being displayed. A key’s cur-
rent function is indicated with an associated ID label displayed at the
bottom of the LCD screen.

F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6
12

Front Panel 2-7


Control Keys

Enter
Enter • Accepts menu selections.
• Initiates data collection for the measurement point during data
acquisition.

Reset
Reset • Returns to the route collection mode from any other mode.
• Aborts any analyzer function in progress.

Up/Down Arrows
• Moves the highlighting cursor through menu selections.
• Moves through measurement point screens of a route.
• Expands and contracts the vertical scale of a spectral plot or wave-
form display by a factor of two with each press.
• Scrolls the text screen up or down when more selections are avail-
able than will fit on the screen.

Note
To rapidly move through measurement point screens, press
and hold the appropriate arrow key. The analyzer will then
step through the screens at an increased rate.

2-8 Analyzer Overview


Keypad

Left/Right Arrows
• While in route mode, jumps from the currently displayed machine to
the first measurement point of the previous/next machine on the
route.
• Scrolls text screen left and right when lines of text are wider than the
screen.
• Moves the cursor left and right across a spectral plot or waveform
display.
• Moves the cursor left and right across Route Summary menus.
• Scrolls through the offset in hours of Local Time Zone when 2120A
is in RBMware mode.

Home
Home • The Home key moves to the first page on menus and lists that con-
tain more than one page.
• On spectral and waveform plots, this key will move the cursor to the
first point on the plot.
• Toggles the keypad backlight on and off.

End
End • The End key moves to the last page on menus and lists that contain
more than one page.
• On spectral and waveform plots, this key will move the cursor to the
last point on the plot.

Print
Print • Provides a hardcopy of text or graphic displays on an external dot
matrix printer (via the Model 720A Printer Adapter) or sends data to
the Virtual Printer program.

Exp
,;\%
Exp • Expands the horizontal scale of a spectral or waveform plot.
• The Exp key is used for exponential entry of numerical values.

Front Panel 2-9


Dec
*#&@
Dec • Decreases the horizontal scale of a spectral or waveform plot.

Insert
Insert • Allows you to insert alphanumeric characters into a response field at
the cursor location.

Delete
Delete • Allows you to delete characters from an alphanumeric field.

Page Up
Page
Up • Returns to the previous page on menus and lists that contain more
than one page.
• Displays a list of stored trend data when using the analyzer’s Monitor
function (the Page Down key also performs this function).

Page Down
Page
Down • Advances to the next page on menus and lists that contain more than
one page.

Mark
Mark • Provides a more accurate readout of the frequency and amplitude at
the current cursor position on a spectral plot.
• Pressing this key twice marks the cursor position as the fundamental
frequency and activates the harmonic markers.
• Pressing this key three times enables the harmonic cursors to move
using the left/right arrow keys.
• Pressing this key four times enables the sideband cursor mode.
• From the measurement point display screen, inserts a note to mark
the point for special analysis attention.

Clear
Clear • Clears alphanumeric entries from menu fields and the notepad.
• Removes the cursor and/or harmonic markers from a spectral or
waveform plot.

2-10 Analyzer Overview


• Clears the most recent measurement data from the currently selected
point—returning the measurement point to the “Not Measured”
status.
• Clears the previous averaged data when using the Averager function
in the Monitor Peak/Phase mode.

Space
Space
0 • Inserts a space into alphanumeric text.

Plus/Minus
+- • Changes the sign (+ -) of a numerical value.
• While in the analyzer’s route mode, decreases the contrast of the
LCD screen.

Decimal Point
• • Inserts a decimal point (.) in a numerical field or a period in a text
field.
• While in the analyzer’s route mode, increases the contrast of the
LCD screen.

Front Panel 2-11


User Interface

Menu Item Selection


For menus that do not contain entry fields, such as the Utility Functions
menu shown below, there are two methods that you may use to select the
desired function. The first method is to use the analyzer’s up/down arrow
keys to highlight the desired function, then press the Enter key.

13

The second method allows you to quickly select a menu item by pressing
the numerical key corresponding to the menu item number. The menu item
will be automatically selected and the analyzer will then advance to the
next screen.

2-12 Analyzer Overview


Response Fields
Many of the functions of the Model 2120A require data entry by the oper-
ator which is accomplished with response fields.
Some response fields provide a predefined set of selections. Pressing any
key on the keypad will step through these selections as shown in the fol-
lowing example.

115.2K
57.6K
38.4K
19.2K
9600
4800
2400
1200
600
300
14

Note
On some of these types of fields, the left arrow key will step
down the list and the other keys will step up the list.

User Interface 2-13


Other response fields offer only two selections, for example “One” or
“Two” in the following illustration. Pressing any key on the keypad will
alternate between these two selections.

ONE
TWO

15

Another type of response field requires numerical value or alphabetical


character entry and is discussed in the following sections.

2-14 Analyzer Overview


Alphanumeric Keys
The alphanumeric keys are used to enter alphanumeric characters into
response fields that do not have predefined selections. Each key is assigned
up to four characters, and is designed to allow single-finger keyboard
entries.

Home Mark Clear

ABC DEF GHI ,:\%


End Exp
7 8 9
Print JKL MNO PQR *#&@
4 5 6 Dec

Page STU VWX YZ Insert


Up 1 2 3
Page Space
Down +- 0 • Delete

16

To enter a character, repeatedly press a key to step through its assigned


characters (for example, D E F 8) until the desired character is displayed.
The cursor will automatically advance to the next space after a one-second
pause or after another key has been pressed. The left arrow key may be
used to backspace the cursor to correct errors.
A blank space in the field may be entered in one of three ways:
• Press the right arrow key after the cursor has advanced one space.
• Press the right arrow key immediately after entering the last char-
acter before the space. The cursor will then advance two spaces.
• Press the Space key to advance the cursor one space and/or delete
an existing character.

User Interface 2-15


For example, to enter the phrase “MOT #6” press:

M M N O S T
MNO MNO MNO MNO STU STU
5 (pause) 5 5 5 1 1
* # P Q R 6
Space *#&@ *#&@ PQR PQR PQR PQR
0 Dec Dec 6 6 6 6 17

Note
The Delete key will delete an individual character as well as the
space it occupies. The Clear key will clear the entire field.

Numerical Values
For fields that require numerical entry only, the alphabetic characters of the
keys are disabled. Only one key press is required to enter a number. The
“+-” key can be used to toggle between a positive and negative number and
the “.” (decimal point) key can be used to enter decimal fractions.
Numbers can be entered in exponential or scientific notation using the Exp
key. For example the number 1.56 x 10-3 would be entered by pressing:

STU MNO PQR ,:\% YZ


• +-
1 5 6 Exp 3
18

2-16 Analyzer Overview


Memory Card
The Model 2120A analyzer includes an internal 384 KB memory card that
can be used to store routes, collected data, and special-purpose programs.
The analyzer’s storage capacity can be expanded using plug-in SRAM
(PCMCIA) memory cards. A memory card is included as standard equip-
ment and additional cards, in various memory configurations from 0.5 MB
to 8 MB, may be purchased as required.

19

Note
Before a new memory card can be used in the Model 2120A, it
must first be initialized. See “Initialize Memory Card” on page
4-49.

Note
On additional cards (purchased separately from the analyzer),
the memory card battery may have a tape disc to preserve the
battery until the card is placed into service. Before using, take
the battery out of the card (see “Memory Card Battery” on
page 2-22), remove the tape disc, and then reinsert the battery.

Memory Card 2-17


Installing a Card
To place a memory card into the analyzer, slide the latch cover on the
bottom of the analyzer case all the way to the right, as shown below, to
expose the memory card slot.

card eject latch


slot button cover

20

With the front panel of the analyzer facing you, the memory card face up,
and the arrow on the card pointing toward the analyzer, slide the card into
the slot as far as possible by hand.

21

Caution!
The analyzer should be turned off when inserting or removing a
memory card.

2-18 Analyzer Overview


Then, place the tip of the supplied memory card tool into the slot on the
left side of the card, and push the tool toward the analyzer (using the tool
as a lever) to firmly seat the card into the connector. Finally, slide the latch
cover back to the left-hand side, covering the card slot opening.

22

Removing a Card
To remove a card from the analyzer, slide the latch cover all the way to the
right, and press the eject button with the memory card tool. Then holding
the tool at an angle, pry the card from the compartment until it is exposed
enough for you to grasp it with your fingers. Remove the card and slide the
latch cover back to the left-hand side.

23

Memory Card 2-19


Note
Memory card command functions are explained in the section
of this manual entitled “Memory Card” on page 4-48.

Note
The memory card tool is stored in the compartment located on
the bottom flap of the carrying case.

24

2-20 Analyzer Overview


Memory Card Write Protect
The memory card contains a write protect feature that can be used to “lock”
the data on the card. With the tab in the write protect position, no data can
be written to the card and no changes can be made to the existing data.
Make sure that the tab is not in the write protect position when you wish to
use the card in the analyzer.

Write Protect
Tab
25

Memory Card 2-21


Memory Card Battery
The memory card contains a battery that is used to preserve it’s memory
when the card is not in the analyzer. The newer style memory cards use a
rechargeable battery that is kept charged by the analyzer. This battery type
cannot be removed from the memory card.
Older style memory cards use a lithium battery that, under normal condi-
tions, should last for several years before requiring replacement. This type
of memory card can be identified by the battery release tab shown in the
following illustration.

26
Battery Release Battery Tray

If the memory card exhibits erratic operation after having been removed
from the analyzer, or if the battery test function reports a bad battery (see
“Check Card Battery” on page 4-52), then the battery needs to be replaced.
To remove the old battery, use a small, pointed object to slide the battery
release tab while at the same time using your fingernail to slide the battery
tray out of the card.

2-22 Analyzer Overview


Remove the old battery from the tray and replace with a new battery—
making sure that the positive (+) side of the battery faces up as shown
below—then push the tray back into the card.

+ Side Up

27

Note
The new memory cards available from CSI have a non-remov-
able battery. When the memory card is installed in the 2120,
the battery is being charged.

Memory Card 2-23


2-24 Analyzer Overview
Chapter 3

Using the Model 2120

Communications With the Host Computer


A special 25- to 9-pin communications cable (Model 639) is supplied with
the Model 2120A to connect the analyzer with the host computer. Connect
the male end of this cable to the multifunction input connector on top of
the analyzer and the female end to the COM port on the computer (nor-
mally COM1 as specified in RBMware/MasterTrend).
Multifunction Input
Connector

HJP #4635891

COM 1 or COM 2

Model 639
communications cable
28

If the host computer uses a 25-pin COM port, you must use an optional 9-
to 25-pin adapter between the computer and the Model 639 communica-
tions cable as shown in the following illustration.
Multifunction Input
Connector

HJP #4635891

COM 1 or COM 2
9–25 Pin
Adapter
Model 639
communications cable
29

3-1
Note
The normal RBMware/MasterTrend setup requires the use of
COM1 using the IRQ4 interrupt line.

Note
If you are switching from MasterTrend to RBMware or if you
are using RBMware for the first time, the analyzer will need to
be set to the correct software compatibility mode. See “Soft-
ware Type” on page 4-47.)

Date and Time


When using RBMware, the date and time settings on the Model 2120A and
the host computer must be within 15 minutes of each other or an error mes-
sage will be displayed. When using MasterTrend, the Model 2120A and the
host computer must be within three hours of each other. To check and/or
reset the date and time on the Model 2120:
1··· Press the Utility key,
2··· select Change Setup,
3··· select Date and Time.
Use the up/down arrow keys and the numeric keypad to make any required
changes, and press the Enter key to accept the displayed date and time. (For
more details see “Date and Time” on page 4-9.)

3-2 Using the Model 2120


Communications Setup
The Baud Rate and Stop Bit selection settings on the Model 2120A must
match those on the host computer (as specified in RBMware/Master-
Trend). If these settings do not match, the analyzer will display a communi-
cations error message when attempting to load or dump a route. To check
or modify the analyzer’s port configuration:
1 ···Press the Utility key,
2 ···highlight Communications, press the Enter key.
3 ···Highlight Configure Port and press the Enter key.
For more information concerning the communications port, see “Commu-
nications” on page 4-2.

3-3
Accessing RBMware/MasterTrend
To establish communications between the Model 2120A and the computer,
access the CSICOM program on the computer. If the control parameters
need to be modified, select Setup Communications from the main menu.
Refer to the RBMware/MasterTrend User’s manual for more information
on editing these parameters.
After setting up the parameters, click on the OK button to return to the
main menu. Click the Initiate button to initiate contact with the analyzer.
At this point, no further operations are required at the computer. All further
control functions will be performed with the analyzer.

MasterTrend Communications screen.

RBMware Analyzer Data Transfer screen.

3-4 Using the Model 2120


Selecting the Memory Card
The Model 2120A analyzer allows you to store route data and special func-
tion programs in either the internal 384 KB memory card and/or the
external memory card. In most cases, the external memory card will be
larger than the internal card and should therefore be used to store collected
route data.
Before loading a route, you need to instruct the analyzer which card is to
contain the route data. Press the Utility key to access the Utility Functions
menu, then select Memory Card. From the Memory Card Functions
menu, highlight Select Card for Route and press the Enter key.

30

On the Active Card For Route menu, highlight the desired card, and press
the Enter key. Routes and collected data will now be stored on the selected
memory card.

31

Selecting the Memory Card 3-5


Loading a Route
Press the Utility key on the Model 2120A, select Communications, and then
select Load Route. The analyzer will then display the Load Route screen
that contains the option Delete All Routes.
Answering “Yes” to Delete All Routes will clear all data and routes present
in the selected memory card before the new route is loaded. Press any
alphanumeric key to toggle between Yes and No. If you answer “Yes,” the
analyzer will prompt you for verification before proceeding.

Note
Answering “Yes” to Delete All Routes does not affect any spe-
cial function programs that are stored on the selected memory
card.

When the analyzer is in RBMware software compatible mode (see “Soft-


ware Type” on page 4-47), this screen also allows you to specify the Mes-
sage Pause Time which is the amount of time (in seconds) that the
analyzer will pause to display a message sent by the host computer. This
function can be turned off by entering a value of zero (0).

3-6 Using the Model 2120


Select Database
If you are using more than one database with RBMware/MasterTrend, the
analyzer will then display the Select Database screen where you select the
database containing the desired route. Select the database name or select
“D-Base Setup Now In MT” to select the database that is currently selected
in RBMware/MasterTrend. Press the analyzer’s Enter key to continue.

32

Note
If you are using network RBMware, you may have to select a
server before you can select the desired database.

Note
The Database Name Support function needs to be enabled to
use the Select Database function (see “DBase Name Support”
on page 4-35).

Note
Databases listed in RBMware/MasterTrend but not found on
the computer’s storage media are marked with an asterisk (*)
on the Select Database menu.

Loading a Route 3-7


The F6 function key can be used to specify a user-defined database. After
F6 pressing the F6 key, type in the new database name and press the Enter key.

33

Select Area/Station
If the database contains more than one area (station in MasterTrend), the
Select Area screen will be displayed next allowing you to choose an area.
Press the Enter key after making the selection.

Note
If only one station is defined in the database, the analyzer will
skip the Select Station screen.

Select Route
Select a route from the Select Route For Load screen (only one route may
be selected and loaded at a time) and press the Enter key.

Note
If there are more stations or routes than can be displayed on
the analyzer screen, use the down arrow key to scroll past the
last selection on the list and then continue to scroll through the
remaining selections.

3-8 Using the Model 2120


After you have pressed the Enter key for the Select Route screen, the ana-
lyzer will then download the route onto the selected memory card, dis-
playing the points as they load. When the route has been loaded, the
analyzer will display: “Route Load Complete, Press Enter To Continue.”
Press the Enter Key to return to the Communications menu. Another route
may then be loaded onto a memory card by following the same procedure.
After all of the desired routes have been loaded, press the Reset key. The
analyzer will then reset to the first point of the last route loaded. Another
route may be selected by using Select Route on the Utility Functions menu.
See “Select Route” on page 4-7 for more details.

Note
The Model 2120A can accommodate up to 65 separate routes
on any one memory card. However, depending on the number
of machines and measurement points in the individual routes,
and the actual amount of spectral and waveform data collected,
there may not be enough room on the selected memory card
to accommodate this maximum.
If the selected memory card should run out of memory while
collecting data, you can load the remaining route information
onto the other memory card using the Copy Route File func-
tion (see -52) and continue collecting data.

Loading a Route 3-9


Communications Error
If an interruption should occur during the route load process, the analyzer
will attempt to reestablish communications with the computer for a prede-
termined length of time. This time allotment, designated “Timeout,” can be
specified in the Communications Setup menu accessed with Configure Port
(see page -3). After timeout, the analyzer will display a Communications
Error screen. Press the Reset key, check the following items, and repeat the
Load Route procedure.
If problems or communications error messages are encountered during the
route load process, recheck:
• the baud rate and stop bit setting on both the analyzer and the
computer,
• the cable connection between the analyzer and the computer, and
• the date and time on both the analyzer and the host computer.

3-10 Using the Model 2120


Basic Operation

Connecting Sensors

34

The Model D24042 coiled cable, included with the Model 2120A
machinery analyzer, is used to connect the accelerometer to the analyzer.
Plug the 2-pin end of the cable into the accelerometer, making sure that the
cable and accelerometer are lined up, and then twist the connector’s outer
ring clockwise. Plug the 25-pin end into the multifunction input connector
on the top panel of the Model 2120.
To disconnect the cable from the accelerometer, twist the connector’s outer
ring counter-clockwise before removing. Similarly, to remove the con-
nector from the analyzer, push the tab in toward the connector before
removing.

Basic Operation 3-11


Dual-Channel Sensors

Model 628 Adapters


When using the Model 2120A-2 in the dual-channel mode, the Model 628
(or Model 628V for volts input) Dual Channel adapter must be used to con-
nect the sensors to the machinery analyzer.
If you are using the older Model 628 switchable adapter, the toggle switch
should be set according to the Channel A setup. Set the toggle switch to
“Accel” when providing sensor power or to “Volts” when not providing
sensor power to Channel A.

The older Model 628 switchable adapter.

Note
For the older Model 628, Channel B is software controlled and
is not affected by the switch. Channel B data acquisition is lim-
ited to dynamic (AC) signals only, such as those from acceler-
ometers, velometers, and displacement probes only.

3-12 Using the Model 2120


Model 624V and 624A
The Model 624A (for accelerometers and other sensors that require power)
and the Model 624V (for sensors that do not require power) adapters allow
a single sensor to provide signals to both channels simultaneously. See
“Simultaneous Data Acquisition” on page 3-57 for more information.

Model 624A

Model 624V

Basic Operation 3-13


Buffered Adapters

Model 623BF
When using the Model 2120A with a system that has shutdown protection
on the probe signal, the Model 623BF should be used to connect the sensor
to the machinery analyzer. The Model 623BF contains buffering elec-
tronics on the “Volts” input that reduce the likelihood of transient voltage
conditions that can occur when connecting equipment to unbuffered
voltage output sensors.

Note
The “Accel” input should be used to connect to devices that
require power from the Model 2120A (i.e. accelerometers). It
must not be used to connect to unbuffered shutdown systems.

Model 628BV
When using the Model 2120A-2 for dual channel voltage acquisitions with
unbuffered voltage type sensors, the Model 628BV should be used. A typ-
ical application for the Model 628BV would be measuring orbits using
proximity probes on a system that has shutdown protection on the probe
signal. The Model 628BV contains buffering electronics on both inputs,
which reduce the likelihood of transient voltage conditions that can occur
when connecting equipment to unbuffered voltage output sensors.

Note
The Model 628BV is a voltage only adapter. It may not be used
with sensors that require power from the Model 2120A.

3-14 Using the Model 2120


The Measurement Point Display
The Measurement Point display is an indication that the Model 2120A is in
the normal route mode and ready to acquire data on the selected measure-
ment point.
The Measurement Point display provides you with information concerning
the displayed measurement point as described in the following text. The
display also contains function key designations that are described in “Mea-
surement Point Display Function Keys” on page 3-19.

1 2 3

4
5
6
7
8
9
10

11

12 13
Measurement Point display.

1···· Measurement point number (relative to the first point in the route). Use
the up/down arrows to scroll to the next/previous point.
2···· The 10-character machine ID code.
3···· Three-character measurement point ID code.
4···· The machine description.
5···· The measurement point description.
6···· This line displays the reading for this measurement point (overall
vibration level). If no data have been collected for this point, this line
will be blank.

Basic Operation 3-15


7·····This line displays the units modifier (RMS, Peak, Peak-to-Peak,
Average, or dB) and the type of analysis (Digital, Analog, True Peak, or
Average Peak) that has been used to calculate the overall level.
8·····This line displays the status message concerning the most recent
measurement of the displayed measurement point. The status
messages are:
• Not Measured - No measurements have been made on this point.
• OK - The measurements are within the normal amplitude values
expected for this point.
• Notes - No measurements have been made but notes have been en-
tered for this point.
• Hi Alarm -1 - The Overall Alert Level has been exceeded in a dual
upper-level type alarm.
• Hi Alarm -2 - The Overall Fault Level has been exceeded in a dual
upper-level type alarm.
• Lo Signal - The measured values are less than the Low Signal
alarm level.
• Window Alarm - The measured values were outside the valid
alarm window (if a window type alarm has been set up in the data-
base for this point).
• Lower Alarm-1 - The Alert Level has been exceeded in a dual low-
er-level type alarm.
• Lower Alarm-2 - The Fault Level has been exceeded in a dual low-
er-level type alarm.
• Bad Reading - The measured values were either higher or lower
than the Sensor Validity alarm.
• Vib Alarm - One of the vibration parameters has exceeded its
alarm value.
• Mach Out Ser - The “Machine Out of Service” note has been as-
signed to a point on this machine. (See “Equipment Out of Service”
on page 3-42 for more information.)

3-16 Using the Model 2120


9···· This line indicates the date and the overall value of the last
measurement that has been dumped into the database for this
measurement point. This may be used for comparison with the current
measurement.
10 ·· This section of the bottom line indicates the amount of memory, in
percent of total memory, that is available to store data.
11 ·· This section indicates the type of data that have been stored for this
measurement point. There are four types of data that can be stored as
indicated by the following:

None No data have been stored.

Trend data (overall and up to twelve parameters)


T
have been stored.

S Spectral data have been stored.

W Waveform data have been stored.

N Notepad data have been stored.

12 ·· This section indicates whether the internal or external memory card is


currently being used. If the external card is being used, the volume
name of the card will be displayed.
13 ·· This section indicates the analysis bandwidth (BW) that has been
programmed for this point from the database. This value will typically
be in hertz, CPM, or a multiple of the turning speed.

Basic Operation 3-17


Dual-Channel and Triax Display (Model 2120-2)
When displaying a measurement point that has been set up as a dual-
channel point or a multiple measurement point group (see “Dual Channel
Mode” on page 4-35 and “Group/Chan Enable” on page 4-33), the mea-
surement point display will include additional lines, described below.

14

15

35

14···This line displays the group number and the channel number of the
current measurement point as defined in the RBMware/MasterTrend
database.
15···When displaying a point that has been set up as dual-channel, this line
displays the status message of the other channel.

3-18 Using the Model 2120


Measurement Point Display Function Keys
The Battery Check key indicates battery condition by calculating and dis-
BATT
CHECK playing the percentage of remaining charge of the battery pack. This dis-
play is an approximate value only. When the percent value reaches zero, a
built-in safety margin permits approximately 10 minutes of additional use.

36

Press the F2 key to access the Machine List menu that allows you to select
MACH
LIST other measurement points (see “Selecting Measurement Points” on page
3-22).
Press the F3 key to access the Vibration Parameters screen that shows the
VIBR
PARMS measurement description, measured values, units type, alarm status of each
individual analysis parameter, and the overall level (see “Displaying Data”
on page 3-25).
PLOT Press the F4 Plot Data key to display the spectrum of the current measure-
DATA ment point (see “Spectral Plots” on page 3-26).
Press the F5 Clear Data key to clear the route and analyze-mode data for
CLEAR
DATA the current measurement point. The analyzer will require verification
before the data are actually deleted.
The F6 New RPM key allows you to change machine speed and/or load
NEW
RPM values for a specific machine during route collection. Pressing the new
RPM key will cause the analyzer to ask for the RPM of the machine regard-
less of whether the motor is variable speed or constant speed. Also, pressing
this key will take the user to the next screen, the speed detection screen, as
if the Enter key had been pressed.

Basic Operation 3-19


Collecting Data
The following paragraphs describe a typical collection procedure after a
route has been loaded onto a memory card and then selected.
1·····Press the Reset key to access the normal route mode, then use the up/
down arrows or the F2 Machine List key to select and display the
correct measurement point. (See “Selecting Measurement Points” on
page 3-22.)
2·····Place the sensor at the measurement point on the machine, making
sure that the sensor is in the correct plane. If you are using a hand-held
sensor, hold it steady on the point.
3·····Press the Enter key (or sensor button) to begin the measurement.
4·····The display will indicate that the analyzer is “autoranging” and that
initial data are being acquired. The number of averages remaining will
display on the screen until the measurement process is finished. Then
the display will indicate the overall value of the measurement and
show the status message.
5·····Press the up arrow key to advance to the next measurement point and
follow steps 2 through 4 above to continue data collection.
6·····After a route has been completed, another route may be selected and
the above procedure repeated. After a collection session, establish
communications with the host computer and dump the collected data
into the RBMware/MasterTrend database.

Note
To repeat a measurement, simply confirm that the correct mea-
surement point is displayed and make the measurement again.
The new data will replace the data that were collected in the
last measurement.

Note
To abort a measurement in progress, press the Reset key and
then repeat the measurement.

3-20 Using the Model 2120


Note
If data have been collected on the wrong measurement point,
the Clear Data key can be used to clear the most recent mea-
surement data from the currently selected point. This proce-
dure returns the measurement point to the “Not Measured”
status.

Bad Sensor Warning


When data collection begins on any point where the sensor power is turned
on, the input signal is tested to verify proper sensor bias voltage. If the
sensor or cable is not connected, or is electrically open or shorted, the fol-
lowing screen will be displayed.

37

To collect data when a bad sensor is detected, you must toggle the field to
“Yes” and then press the Enter key. The data will be marked as taken with
a bad sensor. RBMware/MasterTrend’s CSICom program must be set up
to accept bad sensor data before this data can be downloaded to the data-
base.

Note
A non-standard sensor or a measurement with extremely large
vibration amplitudes may also trigger an erroneous warning.

Basic Operation 3-21


Selecting Measurement Points
There are three methods that can be used to select a measurement point
from those in the current route. The first method is to simply scroll sequen-
tially through the measurement points using the up/down arrow keys. This
is the usual procedure when following the order of measurement points in
the route.
The left/right arrows can be used to “jump” to the first measurement point
of the previous or next machine, respectively.

The F2 Machine List function key (on the measurement point display
MACH
LIST screen) can be used to individually select a machine and associated mea-
surement point. After the F2 key has been pressed, the Machine List screen
displays all of the machines within the current route and the measurement
or worst-case alarm status of each machine. Use the up/down and left/right
arrow keys to highlight the desired machine, and press the Enter key.

38

Note
An asterisk (*) appearing before a machine name on the Route
List screen indicates that data have not been collected on one
or more measurement points of that machine.

3-22 Using the Model 2120


The Measurements Points screen then displays all of the measurement
points assigned to the selected machine. The measurement/alarm status of
each measurement point is also displayed. Use the up/down and left/right
arrow keys to highlight the desired measurement point, and press the Enter
key.

39

Note
While displaying the Measurement Points screen, the F5 func-
tion key may be used to return to the Machine List screen.

Note
The F6 key may be used on either the Machine List or Mea-
surements Points screen to return to the measurement point
display screen.

Basic Operation 3-23


Storing Data
During route data collection, the analyzer will store data according to the
instructions loaded with the route from the RBMware/MasterTrend data-
base. For example, the analyzer may be instructed to store spectral and/or
waveform data only on high alarm.
However, you may manually instruct the analyzer to store additional data
regardless of the database instructions. This is accomplished by first dis-
playing the data plot, then pressing the Save Data function key. Select Store
Spectra, Store Waveform, or Store Both, and then press the Enter key.
(See “Store Data” on page 7-21 for more information.)

40

3-24 Using the Model 2120


Displaying Data
Immediately following a measurement (before moving on to the next
point), the spectral and waveform data temporarily remain in memory
regardless of the database storage instructions. These data, in addition to
the analysis parameter values, may be observed at this time using the ana-
lyzer’s functions keys.
Pressing the F3 Vibration Parameters (on the measurement point display
VIBR
PARMS screen) key will display the Vibration Parameters screen that shows the
measurement description, measured values, units type, and alarm status of
each individual analysis parameter as well as the overall level.

41

The Page Up or Page Down key can be pressed to advance to the spectral
plot display (if spectral data are available) or the Enter key can be pressed
to return to the measurement point display.

Note
If more than six analysis parameters have been defined by
RBMware/MasterTrend for the current measurement point,
pressing a Page key while the Vibration Parameters screen is
being displayed will show the extended parameters on a
second page of Vibration Parameters. Pressing a Page key once
again will display the spectral plot (if available).

Displaying Data 3-25


Spectral Plots
Pressing the F4 Plot Data key transfers to the spectral display. Additional
PLOT control and function keys allow you to modify display parameters, display
DATA
the time waveform, and other options.

Single-channel spectral display.

Dual-channel spectral display.

3-26 Using the Model 2120


Plot Display Control Keys

Cursor
The cursor can be moved across the plot using the left/right arrow keys.
The cursor position, indicated at the top of the plot box, indicates frequency
and amplitude for spectral plots, or time and amplitude for waveform plots.
The cursor frequency (or time) increment is equal to the frequency resolu-
tion which is explained in detail in “Acquire Spectrum” on page 7-23.

Expand and Decrease


These keys are used to expand or compress the frequency axis of a spectral
,;\% plot (or the time axis of a waveform) by a factor of two.
Exp
If the cursor is located at the left or right side of the plot, expansion/com-
*#&@ pression will begin from the minimum or maximum displayed frequency,
Dec respectively.

0 to 500 Hz spectral plot expanded to 0 to 250 Hz.

Displaying Data 3-27


If the cursor is located within the approximate shaded area shown in the
following illustration, the cursor location will become the center of an
expanded or compressed plot.

42

The left/right arrow keys can be used to move an expanded spectrum


through the display window. In the following example, a spectrum from 0
to 500 Hz has been expanded to 0 to 250 Hz. With the cursor located at the
right side of the plot box, the right arrow key will cause the remaining 250
Hz to 500 Hz section of the spectrum to move through the display window.

Pressing the right arrow key moves the remaining section


of the spectrum through the display window.

3-28 Using the Model 2120


Home and End
The Home key can be used to move the cursor to the beginning of the plot.
Home Conversely, the End key can be used to move the cursor to the end of the
plot.
End
Home key End key
start of plot end of plot

43

Clear Key
Clear The Clear key is used to remove the cursor, cursor indications, and har-
monic cursors from the screen during display of a spectral or waveform
plot.

Amplitude Scale
The up/down arrow keys can be used to expand or contract the amplitude
axis of the spectral/waveform plot by a factor of two.

Peak Mark
Mark For spectral plots only, the Mark key is used to provide a more accurate
indication of the cursor location. This may be used, for example, to deter-
mine the exact frequency and amplitude of a peak. Place the cursor on top
of the desired peak, press the Mark key and the display will update the
cursor values, giving the exact frequency and amplitude of the peak.

Displaying Data 3-29


Harmonic Markers
By pressing the Mark key twice, the selected peak will be referenced as the
fundamental frequency and its harmonics indicated with harmonic cursors/
markers as shown below.

44

Moveable Harmonic Markers


This harmonic marker mode functions similar to the mode described above
except that the fundamental frequency is not stationary. As the cursor is
moved across the plot, the harmonic markers will also move to reflect the
harmonic frequencies of the current cursor location. To access the move-
able harmonic marker mode, press the Mark key three times.

Sideband Cursor Mode

45

This marker displays Delta-F and Delta-A values between a reference and
an active cursor.

3-30 Using the Model 2120


Note
Because of the number of times required to hit the Mark key,
a message was added to indicate the current cursor type when
the key is pressed.

Waveform Delta-T Cursor Mode


This cursor mode on a waveform plot can be used to determine the time
between events in the waveform and/or calculating the frequency of repet-
itive events. With the cursor located at the desired reference point, press the
Mark key; the cursor readout at the top of the plot will now read 0.00 ∆SEC
and 0.00 Hz.

46

As you move the cursor away from the reference point, the cursor readout
will display the delta time and frequency between the reference point (indi-
cated by a square on the plot) and the current cursor location.
To reset the reference point to the current cursor location, press the Mark
key. Pressing the Mark key again (without moving the cursor) will return to
the normal cursor mode.

Displaying Data 3-31


Plot Display Function Keys
While displaying a spectrum, the function keys can be used to either dis-
play the associated waveform, or to modify display parameters of the spec-
tral plot.

TIME The Waveform key can be used to display the waveform plot of the current
WAVFM measurement.

Single-channel waveform display.

Dual-channel waveform display.

3-32 Using the Model 2120


SPLIT The Split Screen function key (displayed on the waveform plot in single-
SCREN channel mode) can be used to display both the waveform and the spectrum
in a dual-plot format. The Page keys are used to select the active plot (as
indicated by the highlighted plot name) that can be controlled with the
cursor functions and control keys.

47

AVERG The Averaged Spectrum key (displayed on split plots and time waveform
SPCRM dual-channel plots) can be used to return to the spectral display.
SHOW The Show Orbit key (displayed on time waveform dual-channel plots) can
ORBIT be used to display an orbit plot of both channels. See page -61 for informa-
tion of “filtered” orbit plots.

48

Displaying Data 3-33


Note
Spectral data, waveforms, and analysis parameter values may
be observed on any point that contains previously measured
and stored data using the above methods. Since analysis
parameter values are always stored, they may be viewed at any
time.

SHOW The Show A Channel key (displayed in the Model 2120A-2’s dual-channel
A CHN mode) displays channel A in a single-plot format.
SHOW The Show B Channel key (displayed in the Model 2120A-2’s dual-channel
B CHN mode after the Show A Channel key has been pressed) displays channel B
in a single-plot format.
SHOW The Show 2 Channels key (displayed in the Model 2120A-2’s dual-channel
2 CHN mode after the Show B Channel key has been pressed) returns to the dual-
plot format.

3-34 Using the Model 2120


SAVE The Save Data key will be displayed whenever unsaved data can be
DATA attached to an appropriate route point. Pressing this key will display the
Data Storage Options screen where spectrum data, waveform data, or both
may be selected for storage in route memory.

Data Storage Options screen.

Note
The Save Data key will not be displayed if the data has already
been stored.

Displaying Data 3-35


LIST The List Peaks key will display a list of the 20 largest peaks within the cur-
PEAKS rently displayed spectrum and their associated magnitude values. When
you return to the plot (by pressing the Enter key), the cursor will move to
the peak highlighted on the list.

49

Note
The 20 largest peaks are determined by an amplitude criteria
based on the largest peak in the spectrum; therefore, in certain
instances the list may contain less than 20 peaks.

NEXT The Next Peak key will move the cursor on the plot to the next largest peak
PEAK listed in the List Peaks function. The direction of the cursor movement is
determined by which arrow key (left/right) was last pressed when moving
the cursor.

3-36 Using the Model 2120


SET The Set RPM key can be used to specify a frequency peak as the RPM
RPM value for subsequent measurements on a machine. This feature allows you
to specify the turning speed of the machine without the use of a tachometer.
To use this function, collect data on one of the machine’s measurement
points and display the spectral plot. Use the left/right arrow keys to place
the cursor on the frequency peak representing 1xRPM, and press the Set
RPM key.

50

The next time a measurement is made on this machine, the analyzer will
display the machine speed prompt; however, the value specified with the
Set RPM key will be automatically entered into the field. Press the Enter
key to accept this value and continue with the measurement.
When displaying the frequency axis in orders, the Set RPM key can be
used to specify which frequency peak will be referenced as 1xRPM. The
new RPM value will be automatically entered into the machine speed field
as described above.

Displaying Data 3-37


OTHER The Other FKeys key displays an additional set of function keys.
FKEYS

51

SET The Set Scale key can be used to change the minimum and/or maximum
SCALE (full-scale) values of the amplitude and/or frequency axis.

52

3-38 Using the Model 2120


The X Log Scale key can be used to change the X axis (frequency) of the
X LOG plot to a log format. Press the X Lin key to return to the linear X axis
SCALE
format.

53

The Y Log Scale key can be used to change the Y axis (amplitude) of the
Y LOG plot to a log format. Press the Y Lin key to return to the linear Y axis format.
SCALE

54

Displaying Data 3-39


CPM The CPM Units key displays the frequency axis in CPM units.
UNITS

55

ORDER The Order Units key displays the frequency axis in orders.
UNITS

56

HZ The Hz Units key can be used to return to the Hz frequency display.


UNITS

3-40 Using the Model 2120


Notes
The Notes key is used to access the Notepad screen that provides a list of
Notes predefined or user-created notes. These notes can be used to record obser-
vations concerning the machinery being monitored. The notes are stored
with each machine, and along with the measured data, dumped into the
RBMware/MasterTrend database. When the Note key is pressed, the fol-
lowing options are available:

Notes main menu using MasterTrend.

Notes main menu using RBMware.

Notes 3-41
Equipment Out of Service
If a machine on the route is out of service, you may assign the “Equipment
Out of Service” note to any point on the machine. Using the up/down
arrow keys, highlight the Equipment Out of Service option and press the
Enter key. An asterisk will be placed before the Equipment Out of Service
line to indicate that this option has been chosen.
The status line on the measurement point screen will display this note and
only the first or last point of the machine will be displayed. Machines
assigned this status are essentially removed from the data collection route.
If the “Equipment Out of Service” note is removed from the measurement
point, the machine’s data collection status will return to normal.

User Defined Notes


In addition to predefined notes (described in the next section), you may
create your own notes (using the analyzer’s keypad) and assign them to a
piece of equipment.

User Defined Notes screen.

3-42 Using the Model 2120


To assign a user-defined note observation, press the Notes key and select
the User Defined Notes option. A list of current user-defined notes will be
displayed. To assign one of these notes to the currently displayed measure-
ment point, use the up/down arrow keys to scroll through and highlight the
desired note number, and then press the Enter key. The note will be auto-
matically highlighted indicating that the note has been assigned. To remove
a selected note observation, repeat the highlighting process.
You may assign additional notes from this list in the same manner, press the
Notes key to access the list of predefined notes, or press the Reset key to
return to route collection.
The note observations assigned to a measurement point may be observed
and/or modified any time the analyzer is in a route collection mode. Use
the up/down arrow keys to select the desired measurement point and then
press the Notes key to access the Notepad lists.

Note
If no notes are present in the analyzer’s memory, the Notepad
Data Entry screen (see next section) will automatically be dis-
played after the User Defined Notes option has been selected.

Creating a Note
To create a new note, access the User Defined Notes screen as described
F6 previously. Then press the F6 function key to access the Notepad Data
Entry screen.

Notepad Data Entry screen.

Notes 3-43
Enter the note text using the alphanumeric keypad (32 characters max-
imum) and then press the Enter key to log the note into the Notepad list.
The note will be placed at the end of the notepad list, automatically high-
lighted, and available for use with all measurement points in the analyzer.

Predefined Notes
The RBMware/MasterTrend database includes a list of predefined notes
that can be downloaded to the analyzer along with route information. The
predefined notes with RBMware are divided into “groups” with a max-
imum of 15 notes per group.

Predefined notes using MasterTrend.

Predefined notes using RBMware.

3-44 Using the Model 2120


To store a predefined note or notes for a machine, ensure that the desired
measurement point is displayed on the screen, then press the Notes key.
Highlight the Predefined Notes (or one of the Predefined Notes Group) and
press the Enter key to display the list of predefined notes.
Using the same procedure as for user-defined notes, use the up/down arrow
keys to scroll through the list, highlight the desired note number, and then
press the Enter key. The note text will then highlight automatically, indi-
cating that the note is stored.

Note
The Page Up and Page Down keys may be used to scroll an
entire page (six lines) at a time. The Home key can be used to
move to the beginning of the notes, and the End key can be
used to move to the end of the notes

Note
Notes stored on an off route point will be retained in the ana-
lyzer’s memory but will not be dumped to the RBMware/Mas-
terTrend database.

Note
The names of the predefined groups and the notes that they
contain can be modified within the RBMware software.

Note
An asterisk (*) will be displayed next to any group name that
contains a selected note.

Note
When the Mark key is pressed from the measurement point
display screen, check marks will be displayed, and a “Field
Alert Note” will be tagged to the point; allowing special anal-
ysis in RBMware.

Notes 3-45
Dumping Data
The following paragraphs describe the typical procedure used to dump the
collected data into the host computer.
1·····Establish communications with the host computer and access the
CSICOM program as described in “Communications With the Host
Computer” on page 3-1.
2·····Make sure that the memory card with the desired data has been
selected as described in “Selecting the Memory Card” on page 3-5.
3·····Press the Utility key on the analyzer, select Communications, and then
select Dump Data.
4·····If you are using MasterTrend, skip to step 5. When using RBMware,
select “No” for Reverse Dump Order and set the Message Pause Time
to “5”.

57

Note
Reverse Dump Order allows you to dump data from the end
of the route towards the beginning; which could be used, for
example, to dump points above a bad point. Message Pause
Time is used to set the number of seconds that the analyzer will
pause to display messages from the computer (enter a zero to
suppress these messages).

3-46 Using the Model 2120


5···· From the Select Route For Dmp menu, select an individual route to be
dumped, or select All Routes and then press the Enter key.

58

6···· The analyzer will execute the route dumping process and display the
Rt Dump In Progress screen during the procedure.

Note
In the event of an error message or other difficulty encoun-
tered during the route dumping process, check the cable con-
nections, the Configure Port utility of the analyzer, and the
time and date in both the analyzer and the computer.

Dumping Data 3-47


Transferring Data Via Modem
The CSI Model 706 Modem kit is recommended when using the Model
2120A analyzer to transfer data via telephone line. The kit includes:
• Model 706 56k-baud modem.
• Model 635 analyzer to modem cable.
• Telephone cord - connects the modem to the telephone outlet.
• Two-to-one adapter - permits the modem and an existing telephone
to connect to one telephone outlet.
The host computer will also require an external or internal Hayes®-compat-
ible modem that is connected to the COM port (normally COM1) of the
computer. Consult the appropriate modem and/or computer manual for
additional installation and operating information.

modem
cable telephone
MODEL 2120 ON

jack
OFF
MACHINERY ANALYZER
PROGRAM
UTILITY HELP ANALYZE NOTES
SELECT

to existing
telephone
F1 F2 F3 F4 F5 F6

Enter Reset

Home Mark Clear

ABC DEF GHI ,:\%


End Exp
7 8 9
Print JKL MNO PQR *#&@
4 5 6 Dec

Page STU VWX YZ Insert


Up 1 2 3
Page Space
Down +- 0 • Delete

modem
Model 2120

host computer

telephone
jack
HJP #4635891

to COM1
or COM2

modem 59

3-48 Using the Model 2120


To Establish Communications
1···· Access the RBMware/MasterTrend CSICOM program. The
RBMware/MasterTrend user’s manual contains additional
information on setting up the parameters and using the features of the
CSICOM program.
2···· Ensure that the baud rate and stop bits parameters in the RBMware/
MasterTrend CSICOM program agree with the Configure Port
parameters on the Model 2120. Check the modem command string in
the Set Modem Commands menu of the analyzer (see “Set Modem
Commands” on page 4-4).
3···· Connect the Model 706 modem to the analyzer's multifunction input
connector with the supplied cable. Plug the existing telephone line and
the modem telephone line into the two-to-one adapter. Plug the
adapter into the telephone outlet.
4···· Select the modem commands in the CSICOM program. Click and
send the string that says “Auto Answer.” Then click the OK button
twice.
5···· Select the Remote Connect option from the Communications Menu
(accessed with the Utility key). The analyzer will display the Modem
Connect in Progress screen during the dialing process.
6···· If necessary, the telephone can be monitored during step 4 by picking
up the receiver and listening to make sure that the host computer’s
modem has answered. Do not hang up the receiver as this will usually
cause the modem to hang up also. The receiver may be carefully set
aside without adversely affecting communications.
7···· After communications have been established, the analyzer will display
the Communications menu. Select the Dump Data or Load Route
option and follow the normal operating procedures used to load routes
or dump data.

Transferring Data Via Modem 3-49


Diagnosing Modem Communications Problems
The following tips may be helpful if you are having trouble establishing
modem communications.

Analyzer Does Not Dial Out


• You may not be using the correct cable between modem and anay-
lzer.
• The modem may not be configured properly.
• The phone line may be digital instead of analog (the modem requires
an analog phone line).

Analyzer Dials But the Computer Does Not Answer


• You may be reaching the wrong phone number. Try dialing the com-
puter on a regular telephone. It should at least answer and present a
solid tone signal.
• The timeout setting on the computer is set too low. The computer’s
modem timeout setting should be between 20 to 40 seconds for
modem communications. (Leave the analyzer’s settings at 30 sec-
onds for timeout and five retries).

Note
CSI recommends a timeout of 30 seconds and 5 retries for
both the 2120A and the computer.

• The computer’s modem is not receiving the auto answer command


string from the computer. This command defaults to ATS0=1<0D >
however, sometimes the command needs to be set to ATS0=2<0D>
(the “0” in the above strings are all the numeral zero). This string is
specified in the CSICom program under Modem Control. Select
Auto Answer then select Send String. (Every time the CSICom pro-
gram is exited, the Auto Answer string must be resent when trying to
reconnect).
• The wrong serial port on the computer has been selected or another
application has control of the port.

3-50 Using the Model 2120


The Analyzer Dials, the Computer Answers, But Will Not Load Or Dump Routes
• The baud rate settings on the computer and the analyzer do not
match.
• MasterTrend/RBMware has “locked up” by previous attempts to
communicate. Exit the program and then reenter.
• A function in the analyzer that uses the com port (strobe, thickness
gauge, etc.) is enabled and needs to be turned off.

Transferring Data Via Modem 3-51


Printing Data
A parallel printer can be directly connected to the Model 2120A, via the
Print Model 720A Printer Interface, to obtain hardcopy plots of collected data.

60

To connect a printer to the Model 2120:


1·····Turn the analyzer and the printer off.
2·····Plug one end of the Model 720A Printer Interface directly into the
communications port located on the top panel of the analyzer.
3·····Connect the other end of the Model 720A to the printer via a standard
parallel printer cable.
4·····Turn on the analyzer and the printer.
5·····Press the Model 720A’s reset switch.
6·····With the desired screen being displayed, press the Print key.

Printed output from the analyzer can also be accomplished from a com-
puter running CSI’s Virtual Printer software.

3-52 Using the Model 2120


Note
The Model 2120A can be used with IBM® graphics compatible
printers only. The analyzer is not compatible with printers that
use a serial interface.

Printing Data 3-53


Dual-Channel Considerations (Model 2120-2)

Making Dual-Channel Measurements


• The Measurement Mode menu’s Dual Channel Mode option (see
“Measurement Mode” on page 4-32) must be set to “Yes” in order to
make dual-channel measurements.
• Channel B data acquisition is limited to dynamic AC signals such as
accelerometers, velometers, and displacement probes.
• When making a dual-channel measurement in the normal or off
route mode, the analyzer must be displaying one of the two dual-
channel points. Press the Enter key to begin collecting data in the
same manner as for a single channel. Data for both points will be
acquired at the same time.

Dual Channel and RBMware/MasterTrend


In order to include dual-channel measurements on a normal route, the
applicable measurement points must be set up as dual-channel points in
RBMware/MasterTrend.

3-54 Using the Model 2120


The Measurement Point Information screen allows you to add dual-
channel points or to edit existing points to be defined as dual-channel. This
screen is accessed from the Add/Edit Old Information option in the Data-
base Setup/Management program. In a like manner, dual-channel points
can be added when creating new machines and their associated measure-
ment points.

MasterTrend Measurement Point Information screen.

RBMware Measurement Point Information screen.

A dual-channel measurement is set up as two individual measurement


points that are grouped with the Signal Group field. One of the points is
specified as Channel 1 and the other is specified as Channel 2. These data
are collected on the A Channel and B Channel of the Model 628 Dual
Channel adapter respectively.

Dual-Channel Considerations (Model 2120-2) 3-55


The Signal Group field must specify a group number that can be any
number from 20 to 99 (the same group number cannot be used twice on
the same machine). Both points must be on the same machine; however,
they do not necessarily have to be sequential in the point list.

3-56 Using the Model 2120


Simultaneous Data Acquisition
The Model 2120A-2 has the ability to acquire data on two measurement
points (even when some of the acquisition parameters are different) at the
same time using one sensor connected to both channels. This function also
permits simultaneous data acquisition on two different types of sensors at
the same time when the Model 628 adapter is used.

Hardware Requirement
The Model 624A or the 624V adapter is required to connect one sensor to
both channels for simultaneous data acquisition. Use the Model 624A when
using an accelerometer (sensor power is on). Use the Model 624V when
using a displacement or voltage sensor (sensor power is off).

Note
The Model 2120A does not detect which input adapter is being
used. It is up to you to select the proper adapter.

RBMware/MasterTrend Setup
The two measurement points are set up in RBMware/MasterTrend as
grouped points—the same way as regular dual points. The group number
must be specified as 20 or higher to designate this as a paired data acquisi-
tion.

Measurement Point and Analysis Parameter Rules


The following options can be used for dual points with the exact same anal-
ysis parameter set, but cannot be different for simultaneous points with dif-
ferent analysis parameter sets. If any of these options are different, the
Model 2120A will “disconnect” the two points so that they must be taken
separately.
• Any averaging mode other than Normal averaging. This includes
Peak Hold, Synchronous Time Averaging, and Order Track.
• Third octave measurements
• Temperature, DC, Type In, and Shaft Probe points cannot be done
as dual points or as simultaneous acquisitions.

Dual-Channel Considerations (Model 2120-2) 3-57


The Model 2120A will attempt to take dual points as a simultaneous acqui-
sition. However, if the FMax value of the two points cannot be generated
at the same time, the points will be taken sequentially. You still only have
to press the Enter key once to collect data on both points. If either measure-
ment point is set as PeakVue or Demodulation, both FMax values must
come from the following list:

20 Hz 500 Hz
50 Hz 1 kHz
100 Hz 2 kHz
200 Hz 5 kHz
400 Hz

Different Parameters
The following text describes parameters that can be different in a dual-
channel setup (with exceptions noted)
Measurement point setup:
• Units Type Code (The sensor type must be the same when using
simultaneous acquisition with the same sensor; however, the “con-
vert to” units can be different.)
• Sensor Power (The sensor power setting must be the same when
using simultaneous acquisition with the same sensor.)
• Sensor Sensitivity (The sensor sensitivity setting must be the same
when using simultaneous acquisition with the same sensor.)
• Analysis Parameter set
• Alarm Set

3-58 Using the Model 2120


Analysis Parameter sets:

FMax in either Hz or Orders SST


Flow Demodulation with Filter Setting
Number of Lines PeakVue with Filter Setting
Number of Averages Extra Time Waveform with its
parameters
Window Type Analysis Parameter Bands
A-Weighting

General Comments and Cautions


• The overlap value set in the analyzer will not be honored when a dif-
ferent FMax or Number of Lines is used.
• The Model 2120A will attempt to take “out of main spectra” analysis
parameter set values at the same time. Up to two additional spectra
will be taken to get all “out of main spectra” data for both points.
• Peak and Phase data will be taken simultaneously if all are for the
same order.
• Data taken simultaneously on the same sensor will have the same
date and time so both RBMware/MasterTrend and the analyzer will
allow you to display orbit plots. These plots are not true orbits since
the data came from a single sensor.

Dual-Channel Considerations (Model 2120-2) 3-59


3-60 Using the Model 2120
Chapter 4

Utility Functions

Press the Utility key to access the Utility Functions menu shown below. This
menu contains seven utility functions that are described in detail in this
chapter.

61

4-1
Communications
The Communications function menu is used to establish communications
with the host computer and provides utilities for controlling communica-
tion parameters of the analyzer as well as an external modem.

Communications function menu.

The following subsections describe the analyzer’s Communications menu


selections in detail.

Load Route and Dump Data


The Load Route function is used to transfer one or more routes from the
computer database onto the selected memory card of the analyzer. Dump
Data is used to transfer the collected data from the selected memory card
into the computer database. Refer to “Loading a Route” on page 3-6 and
“Dumping Data” on page 3-46 for a detailed description of the route
loading/dumping process, and “Selecting the Memory Card” on page 3-5
for information on selecting a memory card.

Remote Connect
This menu selection is used to transmit the modem command string to the
modem. A detailed discussion on using a modem with the Model 2120A is
presented in “Transferring Data Via Modem” on page 3-48.

4-2 Utility Functions


Configure Port
The Configure Port option accesses the Communications Setup menu that
is used to configure the communications port of the analyzer.

62

Select the Baud Rate from 115.2K, 57.6K, 38.4K, 1 9.2K, 9600, 4800, 2400,
1200, 600, or 300 baud. For rapid data transfer, select the highest baud rate
possible, consistent with the capabilities of the host computer equipment.
Set the Stop Bit option at One or Two.
The Timeout option controls the amount of time (selectable from 0
through 99.9 seconds) that the analyzer will wait for the computer to
respond before aborting the procedure and trying again.
The Retries option specifies the number of times the analyzer will repeat
attempts to establish valid communication. If communication is not estab-
lished, the analyzer will display a communications error message following
the last retry and timeout cycle.

Note
CSI recommends a value of “one” for the Stop Bits setting. A
suggested timeout value of ten seconds, and five retries should
allow sufficient time for the computer to process any commu-
nication errors.

Communications 4-3
Set Modem Commands
This menu selection is used to define the modem command string that
instructs the modem to dial a telephone number.

63

The example Set Modem screen above shows a modem command line for
use with a Hayes-compatible modem which will:
• use tone dialing ATDT (ATDP for pulse dialing)
• dial a 9 to access an outside line
• pause for one second (,)
• dial 1 and the area code 423
• and then dial the number 675-2400.

4-4 Utility Functions


Load Downloadable Program (DLP)
This menu selection is used to load special function programs, that extend
the capabilities of the analyzer, from the computer onto one of the ana-
lyzer’s memory cards.
To load a special function program:
1.···· Connect the Model 2120A analyzer to the COM1 port of the
computer using the supplied communications cable (see
“Communications With the Host Computer” on page 3-1).
2. ··· Run the program downloader. Place the floppy disk containing the
special function program into drive A or B of the computer.
• For Windows - Click Start on the Task Bar, then select Run. Select
LoadFW from the drive where the firmware is located, and then
click on the OK button.
• For DOS - type:
A: (or B:) then type DOWNLOAD,
and press the Enter key.
The computer will display the Program Downloader for CSI Analyzers
screen. You may click on the Config button to change the computer’s com-
munication parameters, if necessary (i.e. make sure the baud rates on both
the analyzer and the computer match). All further actions are handled via
the analyzer.
Select Load Downloadable Program from the Communications menu—the
analyzer’s screen will display a list of all programs available for down-
loading. Select the desired program and press the Enter key. The program
will then download into the analyzer and return to the Communications
menu. Use the Program Select key to enter the special function program
(see “Program Select” on page 2-5).

Communications 4-5
Note
The Model 2120A verifies that its firmware and any special
function programs have compatible version and serial num-
bers. If not compatible, the analyzer will not activate the spe-
cial function program to prevent possible corruption of any
stored data.

Note
The special function program can be downloaded onto either
the analyzer’s internal or external memory card. See “Select
Card For Program” on page 4-48 for more information.

4-6 Utility Functions


Select Route
Select Route is used to select a route if more than one route is available on
the selected memory card. Highlight Select Route from the Utility Func-
tions menu to access the Select Route menu shown below. Highlight the
desired route and then press the Enter key.

64

Note
If there are more stations or routes than can be displayed on
the analyzer screen, use the down arrow key to scroll past the
last selection on the list and then continue to scroll through the
remaining sections.

After selecting a route, press the Reset key to return the analyzer to the
normal route collection mode (or off route mode if Local Route has been
selected)—beginning with the first point of the selected route.

Select Route 4-7


When selecting a route with machines specified as variable speed and a
F6 Speed Type Code of “FPM,” the F6 function key can be used to globally
change the route speed. With the desired route highlighted on the Select
Route screen, press the F6 key and then press the Enter key. The analyzer
will display the following screen where you may enter the new speed.

65

4-8 Utility Functions


Change Setup
Change Setup is used to access the Setup Parameters menu from which var-
ious operational control parameters of the analyzer may be specified.

66

Date and Time


This function sets the current date and time on the Model 2120. When using
the Model 2120A with RBMware, you must first specify the current local
time zone. Select Set Time Zone from the following screen and press the
Enter key.

67

Change Setup 4-9


On this screen, enter the offset (in hours) of your local time relative to Coor-
dinated Universal Time (UTC) and then press the Enter key. The left and
right arrow keys will scroll through all selections available. The map on
page -12 displays the time zones around the world.

68

Setting the Date and Time


To set the date and time, highlight the Set Time and Date option and press
the Enter key. When using RBMware, the following screen allows you to
indicate if your time zone is currently observing Daylight Saving Time.
Answer “Yes” or “No” and press the Enter key.

69

4-10 Utility Functions


This screen is used to enter the actual date and time information. To change
the month, press any alphanumeric key on the keypad to step through the
months. Use the keypad to enter the correct values for the remaining items.
Press the Enter key to accept the values as displayed and return to the Setup
Parameters menu. (For the year 2000, enter 00; for 2001, enter 01, etc.)

Set Time and Date Screen.

Note
When using the analyzer with MasterTrend, the Time Zone
and Daylight Saving Time parameters are not used. The Set
Time and Date screen above will be displayed immediately
after selecting Date and Time from the Setup Parameters
screen.

Change Setup 4-11


4-12
70
-11 -10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10 +11 +12 -12
-11

Franz Josef Severnaya


Land Zemlya
Sunday
Monday

Svalbard
-6 0

-3 Nordvik
Tiksi
-5 Murmansk +7
Novyy Port Igarka +10 Ambarchik
-9 -7 +9 Verkhoyansk
Nome Fairbanks -6 0 +3 +12
ReykjavÌk +2 +11 Anadyr
Anchorage +5 Yakutsk
Whitehorse Oslo Helsinki St. Petersburg Magadan
Juneau Stockholm +4
AS IA -9
Copenhagen Moscow Omsk Novosibirsk Petropavlovsk -10
Edmonton Dublin Kamchatskiy Aleutian Islands
N O RTH Berlin Irkutsk
Winnipeg -31/2 London E U R O P E Kiev +4
Seattle Montréal St. John's
(Greenwich) Paris Vienna +6 Ulaanbaatar
AM E R ICA
Boise Halifax-3 Almaty Vladivostok
Chicago New York Rome Àstanbul +5 Tashkent
Denver Madrid +8 Beijing
San Francisco Washington Lisbon Ankara Ashgabat Seoul
St. Louis Azores Algiers Lanzhou Tokyo
Los Angeles Casablanca Baghdad
Tehran 1 Kabul
+4 /2
Bermuda Is. Tripoli +31/2
Houston New Orleans +53/4 Shanghai
Cairo New Delhi Chongqing
Miami Karachi
Havana Muscat Calcutta Taiwan
Honolulu Mexico Mecca +6 1/2 Hong Kong
+3 Mumbai +51/2 Hanoi
International Date Line

Hawaii City Tombouctou Khartoum


) (Bombay) Yangon
Dakar ( Sanaa (Rangoon) Bangkok Manila
Managua Niamey N'Djamena Guam +12 -12
Panama Caracas Addis Ababa
Georgetown Monrovia Lagos AFRICA Colombo +51/2 +8
-10 Bogotá Caroline Is. Marshall Is.
Paramaribo Mogadishu
Kampala Singapore Nauru
Galpágos Is. Quito Belém Nairobi
-91/2 Manaus Kinshasa
-4 Ascension Diego Garcia Jakarta
SOUTH Luanda Dar es Salaam Seychelles
Marquesas Is. Lima Darwin +13
AM E R ICA Salvador
Lusaka Fiji Is.
Tahiti La Paz BrasÌlia Harare Antananarivo
Sáo Windhoek +91/2
Paulo Rio de Janeiro Mauritius New Caledonia
Pitcairn Is. Asunción Johannesburg
Easter Is. AUSTRALIA Brisbane
Santiago Perth +111/2 +12
-6 Montevideo Cape Sydney
Buenos Aires Town Melbourne +11
-3 Tristan da Cunha
Wellington

+123/4
Falkland
Is.
Punta Arenas
-11 -10 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10 +11 +12 -12

Utility Functions
Operational Parameters
The Operational Parameters menu is used to set up certain operating char-
acteristics of the analyzer and the optional Model A350-1 accelerometer.

71

Key Beeper
This field is used to toggle the audible indicator (beep) function between
On and Off. When on, a single beep indicates that a key has been pressed.
Three quick beeps indicate that a measurement has been completed or that
the Utility, Off Route, Analyze, or Notes key has been pressed. A special
alarm-type beep will sound if a measurement contains a bad reading or an
alarm.

LCD Backlight
The LCD Backlight selection toggles between On and Off to control the
illumination of the display screen. Answer “Yes” to enable the backlight.
When the LCD backlight is on, it will automatically turn itself off after
approximately one minute of inactivity to conserve battery power. When
this happens, the backlight will automatically turn on when any key is
pressed.

Change Setup 4-13


Key Backlight
The Keypad Backlight selection alternates between On and Off to control
the illumination of the analyzer’s front panel keys. Answer “Yes” to enable
the backlight.
When the keypad backlight is on, it will automatically turn itself off after
approximately 30 seconds of inactivity to conserve battery power. When
this happens, the backlight will automatically turn on when any key is
pressed.

Note
The keypad backlight can also be turned on and off via the
Home key while in the route collection mode.

Sensor Button
The Sensor Button selection alternates between On and Off to control the
sensor button located on the CSI Model A350-1 accelerometer. When set
to “On,” the sensor button can then be used as an alternative to the Enter
key on the analyzer—pressing the sensor button starts data collection on the
displayed measurement point.
This feature provides for single-handed operation of the analyzer. The
same hand that is holding the sensor probe on the point to be measured can
start data acquisition by pressing the sensor button.

Control Parameter 1
When the Sensor Button selection is set to “On,” Control Parameter 1 spec-
ifies the function of the accelerometer’s sensor button as follows:
• On - With an uncollected measurement point displayed on the ana-
lyzer, pressing the sensor button will begin data collection. After the
data have been collected, pressing the sensor button again will
advance the analyzer screen to the next measurement point.
• Off - The sensor button functions the same as the Enter key. You
must use the up arrow key to advance to the next measurement point
after making a measurement.

4-14 Utility Functions


Control Parameter 2
Specifies the function of both the sensor button and the Enter key as fol-
lows:
• Off - When the Enter key or the sensor button is pressed to collect
data, the message “Press Enter to Start Data Acquisition” is dis-
played. This allows you to confirm data collection by pressing the
Enter key or the sensor button again.
• On - Data collection begins immediately after pressing the Enter key
or the sensor button.
• Auto - Data collection begins immediately after pressing the Enter
key or the sensor button, the analyzer displays the results of the last
measurement for approximately two seconds and then advances to
the next measurement point.

Note
The control parameters, Sensor Button, and the Chan/
Group Enable option (see “Measurement Mode” on page
4-32) interact to affect how data collection is started and con-
tinued. This is described in detail in Appendix C.

Automatic Poweroff
The Automatic Poweroff feature will turn the analyzer off if there is no user
activity within a specified time period. This time period is defined in min-
utes from 0 to 10. Entering 0 will disable the Automatic Poweroff feature.

Waveform Size
Waveform Size determines the maximum number of points or samples that
are stored in memory for all time waveforms. For firmware version 7.02 or
later, this value can range from 50 to 4096, with the latter value storing the
largest number of points and providing maximum resolution.
A value of 1024 is the default value and is recommended for normal ana-
lyzer operation. However, if a large number of waveforms are to be stored
in the analyzer, a lower value (less resolution) may be required in order to
conserve memory.

Change Setup 4-15


Sensor Type
This menu selection is used to temporarily define or modify a sensor’s char-
acteristics that may be different from those defined in the route. This may
be useful when data are collected in the Analyze mode or when using a spe-
cial-purpose program.

72

These characteristics are retained and used by the analyzer until the Reset
key is pressed, at which time the sensor characteristics revert to the sensor
information loaded in the route.

4-16 Utility Functions


Sensor Type
Press any key on the keypad to step through and select one of the following
sensor types:

ACCEL accelerometer

VELOC velocity probe

DISPLC displacement probe

MICPHN microphone

CURRNT current probe

FLX LF flux, low frequency

FLX SP Flux, slot pass

SHFT V shaft probe, voltage

SC I1 shaft probe, current

SC I2 shaft probe, 10 ohm I

SV PK shaft probe, peak

NONSTD nonstandard

Note
Shaft probe selections are displayed only if the Shaft Probe
option is set to “On” (see “Shaft Probe” on page 4-38).

Note
Changes made through Sensor Type do not modify the sensor
information stored in a route.

Change Setup 4-17


Convert To
This option is used to convert the sensor units to another type for display.
For example, the sensor could be an accelerometer and the results of a mea-
surement displayed in velocity. Select from the following units:

ACCEL acceleration

VELOC velocity

DISPLC displacement

––––– same as sensor (no conversion)

Note
If the Model 2120A is used in the analog integration mode,
“Convert To” will affect all measured data. If the Model 2120A
is used in the digital integration mode, “Convert To” will affect
all measured data except time waveforms which will be dis-
played in direct sensor units.

Note
When using the Acquire Spectra, Monitor Spectra, or Monitor
Waveform functions from the Analyze key, the units selected
in these functions will override the units specified in this field.

4-18 Utility Functions


Sensitivity
The Sensitivity value is the number of volts per unit produced by the sensor
probe. For example, the Model A0760GP accelerometer produces 0.1 volts
per g. Enter the appropriate value for the sensor being used.

Note
When Sensr Type is specified as an accelerometer, units are
always in volts per g. If Sensr Type is a velocity or displacement
probe, a line at the bottom of the screen shows the units that
must be used to enter a sensitivity value.

Note
The sensitivity units used for temperature sensors (volts per
degree F or volts per degree C) is determined by the selection
made for the probe on the Measurement Mode screen (see
“Temperature Probe” on page 4-37.)

Units
This field is used to define the units if the Sensor Type selected above is not
a standard sensor. For example, enter “PSI” when using a pressure sensor
(a non-standard probe). For accelerometer, displacement, velocity, temper-
ature, or microphone probes, use “Standard.”

Change Setup 4-19


Sensitivity and Units For Two-Channel Analyzer
When using the analyzer in the dual-channel mode (Model 2120A-2 only),
the Channel B sensor and units can be set independently of the Channel A
values.

73

4-20 Utility Functions


Sensor Power
Sensor Power is used to select the appropriate sensor input. If the particular
sensor being used does not require power from the analyzer, select the
“Off” setting. For sensors that require power from the analyzer, such as an
accelerometer, select the “On” setting.
The following illustration is a block diagram of the signal input circuitry to
Channel A of the Model 2120. There are two separate signal inputs, each
on a different input pin of the 25-pin connector located on the top panel of
the analyzer.
- + - +

Unpowered Powered
Input Input
Pin Pin Pin Pin
22 23 24 21
DB25
Connector

2 mA
Constant Current
Power Supply

Controlled by - + - +
“Sensor Power” Signal Selector
parameter

Controlled by
“Convert To” Integrators
parameter

FFT Analyzer
74

Change Setup 4-21


The powered input is connected to a 2-milliampere, 20-volt, constant-cur-
rent power supply, and is designed to supply power to most accelerometers
and piezovelocity sensors (check the sensor manual to determine sensor
compatibility). The unpowered input is not connected to any type of power
supply and is used for sensors that do not require power and for general
(AC or DC) voltage signals.
Both of these inputs are connected (inside the analyzer) to a selector switch
that selects the appropriate input according to the Sensor Power parameter.
If Sensor Power is set to On, the selector switches the powered input into
the analyzer. If it is set to Off, the selector switches the unpowered input
into the analyzer.
The integrators are used to convert an accelerometer signal into an equiv-
alent velocity or displacement signal and are controlled by the Convert To
parameter.

Note
The Sensor Power setting does not affect the presence or
absence of power at pin 21 of the DB25 connector. The Sensor
Power setting only determines which input is selected for use
by the Signal Selector.

4-22 Utility Functions


Data Units
The Data Units parameters define how the analyzer will display and collect
data.

75

The column identified as “Data Units” lists the available types of converted
data (see “Sensor Type” on page 4-16). The next column, “Data,” is used to
specify how the acquired data will be displayed for each data unit. Press any
key in the lower section of the keypad to step through and select RMS,
Peak, Pk-Pk, Average, or dB. Changes made to the “Data” values only affect
the analyzer display and do not affect data that are dumped into the RBM-
ware/MasterTrend database. Additional information is presented in “Data
Units” on page 9-1.

Decibel Display
The analyzer default values for decibels (dB) are as follows:

For 0 dB equals

Nonstandard 1 unit

g’s 10-6 g’s

Velocity 3.93 X 10-7 in/sec

Displacement 1 mil

Microphone 2.84 X 10-8 Pascals

Change Setup 4-23


When “dB” is selected for a data unit, the above reference values can be
F6 changed, if desired, by pressing the F6 function key. This accesses the dB
Reference Values screen where the values may be modified as required.

76

Note
The reference values can be changed for the normal route
mode using RBMware/MasterTrend’s Database Setup/Man-
agement program. The new values will then be loaded into the
analyzer during Route Load.

Overall Value
The “Overall” column specifies the type of analysis that will be performed
in the analyzer for the overall value of each data unit; select Digital, Analog,
True Peak, or Average Peak.
Analog specifies that the overall parameter is calculated using an analog
RMS-to-DC converter circuit while Digital calculates the overall param-
eter from the spectrum over the specified minimum to maximum fre-
quency range. In both modes, the displayed value is computed using
theoretical factors if Peak or Peak-Peak display is selected.
True Peak specifies that the overall parameter is calculated by holding the
maximum value in the time waveform signal over the entire analysis span.
Average Peak calculates the overall parameter by averaging the max-
imum value in the time waveform signal observed in each block of data.

4-24 Utility Functions


Note
Digital is recommended for normal analyzer operation. Addi-
tional information is presented in the section “Overall Calcula-
tion” on page 9-3.

Note
The global selection of Digital or Analog overall parameter is
established by the Overall Level Mode field of the Measure-
ment Mode screen (Change Setup under the Utility key).

Note
Some combinations of data units and overall calculation
method are not possible and will not be accepted by the ana-
lyzer.

Note
With firmware version 7.4 and above, the Overall selections
can be overridden in RBMware/MasterTrend. In RBMware
the selections can be overridden on a measurement point basis.
In MasterTrend the selections can be overridden on a route by
route basis.

Change Setup 4-25


Units Mode
The Units Mode values specify whether data are to be displayed in English
or Metric, and whether frequency units will be in Hz or CPM (60xHz).
English/Metric displays are as follows:

English Metric

Acceleration g’s g’s

Velocity in/sec mil/sec

Displacement mils microns

Temperature deg-F deg-C

Saving As Default
These values can be used for either the off route or Analyze modes. Nor-
F1 mally, once the Reset key has been pressed to return to the normal route
mode, the reference values return to those that are specified in the RBM-
ware/MasterTrend database. However, the new values can be saved as the
analyzer’s defaults by pressing the F1 key while the Define Data Units
screen is being displayed. The RBMware/MasterTrend database defaults
will be reloaded after performing a Master Reset or after new firmware is
loaded into the analyzer.

4-26 Utility Functions


Display Control
Display Control is used to adjust certain screen display characteristics of the
Model 2120.

77

Plot Y Axis
Select “Linear” or “Log” (logarithmic) for the default amplitude axis of
spectral plots.

Spectrum with linear amplitude axis. Same spectrum with logarithmic


amplitude axis. 78

Note
Most users prefer the linear format, as equal numerical incre-
ments are used for the amplitude axis. However, the Log
option, by using a logarithmic amplitude axis, provides greater
visibility of low-amplitude spectral components.

Change Setup 4-27


Frequency X Axis
Select “Linear” or “Log” for the default frequency axis of spectral plots.

Spectrum with linear frequency axis. Same spectrum with logarithmic


frequency axis. 79

Live Display
The Live Display option can provide a real-time display plot for each
average measurement taken during data collection.
None - Disables the live display—the screen indicates measurement
in process only. This setting can be used to increase the real-time
rate of the analyzer to its maximum.
Status - The screen indicates the number of the average and the
overall signal level during measurement.
Waveform - Displays the waveform plot only. Displays both wave-
form plots in dual-channel mode.
Spectrum - Displays the spectral plot only. Displays both spectral
plots in dual-channel mode.
Dual - Displays spectral and waveform plots in a split screen mode.
Displays spectral and waveform plots of channel A in dual-channel
mode.

4-28 Utility Functions


Contrast
The Contrast function adjusts the contrast between the background and the
text of the analyzer display screen. A value from 0 (maximum contrast)
through 25 (minimum contrast) can be entered in this field. Alternatively,
you can use the right arrow key to advance the contrast values or the left
arrow key to decrease the contrast values.

Note
The screen contrast can also be adjusted when the analyzer is
displaying a measurement point screen using the decimal point
and plus/minus keys on the keypad. When pressed, the dec-
imal point key will continuously step through increasing con-
trast values and then repeat the sequence after reaching
maximum contrast. The plus/minus key will decrease contrast
values in a like manner.

Screen Display/PC Port/PC Speed


These functions enable a computer, with the appropriate hardware and
software, to display the analyzer’s screen on the computer monitor. This
function is intended for demonstration purposes and is not used during
normal operation of the analyzer. Make sure Screen Display is set to “No”
for normal analyzer operation.

Note
To use the WIN32 mode, the user must have a modified model
303-1 (pixel stealer) card and version 2.0 or later of he PC2120
software.

PC Port - can be set to 4-bit, 8-bit, serial, or WIN32. The 4-bit, 8-bit, and
WIN32 selections work with a special hardware card that plugs into the
analyzer’s memory card slot. The card’s cable is then connected to the par-
allel port on a PC that is running CSI’s DOS-based display program called
“demo2120.”
The Serial selection uses the analyzer’s multifunction input connector. The
standard communications cable is connected to the serial port of a PC that
is running CSI’s Windows-based program called “PC2120.”

Change Setup 4-29


Screen Display - can be set to Yes to enable the PC screen display func-
tion. This selection is set to No for normal analyzer operation.
PC Speed - can be used to adjust the speed of the display to match the com-
munications speed of the PC.

4-30 Utility Functions


Print Mode
This function selects the printing mode that you wish to use with the Model
2120.
720 IF - This option allows you to connect the analyzer directly to a printer
using the Model 720A interface. See “Printing Data” on page 3-52.
VRPRNT - This option allows you to display the current analyzer screen
on a computer’s monitor. See the Virtual Printer reference manual for infor-
mation on using the Virtual Printer software.

Change Setup 4-31


Measurement Mode
The Measurement Mode menu selections contain parameters that deter-
mine how the measurements will be made.

Measurement Mode menu - page one.

Overall Level Mode


Overall Level Mode is used to specify whether the overall level will be mea-
sured using digital or analog circuitry. In digital mode, the overall level will
only include frequencies between the lower cutoff frequency and the upper
cutoff frequency as specified in the RBMware/MasterTrend database. In
the analog mode, the overall level will include all frequencies from approx-
imately 1 Hz through 80 kHz. The digital mode is recommended for
normal analyzer operation.

Signal Integrator Mode


Signal Integrator Mode selects whether the conversion from sensor units to
data units is performed by digital or analog integration circuitry. Analog
integration generally provides more accuracy and less low-frequency noise
response. CSI recommends analog integration for normal analyzer opera-
tion. Digital integration is recommended for extensive waveform analysis.

Note
When digital integration is selected, the time waveform will be
stored in the original sensor units (not in converted units).

4-32 Utility Functions


Note
With firmware version 7.4 and above, the Overall and Signal
Integrator Mode selections can be overridden in RBMware/
MasterTrend, in which case the settings on this screen will be
ignored. In RBMware the selections can be overridden on a
measurement point basis. In MasterTrend the selections can be
overridden on a route by route basis.

Data Overlap
Data Overlap controls the amount, in percent, that each new average over-
laps the previous average when taking a measurement. This decreases the
time required to collect and analyze very low frequency data.
The percentage value ranges from 0% (no overlap) to 99% (99 percent
overlap). A standard overlap of 67% is recommended for faster data collec-
tion consistent with adequate data averaging.

HFD Averages
For analysis parameters with HFD or VHFD defined as the parameter
type, this function allows you to specify the number of averages the ana-
lyzer will use when making these measurements. A value of 16 or larger is
recommended.

Group/Chan Enable
This function allows you to use the Group/Channel feature available
through RBMware/MasterTrend where measurement points can be
grouped together; for example, axial, vertical, and horizontal measure-
ments.
This feature is useful when you are using a triaxial sensor attached to the
analyzer’s multifunction input connector; see “Multifunction Input Con-
nector” on page 2-2. It allows the Model 2120A to automatically sequence
from horizontal to vertical to axial measurements without requiring you to
advance and start each individual measurement. This feature requires
RBMware/MasterTrend to define the measurement as a grouped set of
measurement points.

Change Setup 4-33


Grouped measurement points are defined in a route by their Group num-
bers, and can contain up to three normal (single) measurement points having
the same Group number and unique Channel number (1, 2, and/or 3).
There are three selections available for Group/Channel Enable:
• Off - All measurement points are handled as single points.
• On - All measurement points constituting a multiple measurement
point are treated as a group and sequenced as defined by the RBM-
ware/MasterTrend database Group/Channel variables. The Group/
Channel information is displayed on the measurement point display
screen, and the analyzer automatically advances to the next measure-
ment point after data collection.
• TRIAX- This setting is for use with the analyzer’s internal multi-
plexer. Grouped measurement points are sequenced as defined by
the RBMware/MasterTrend database Group/Channel variables.
The Group/Channel information is displayed on the measurement
point display screen (see “Dual-Channel and Triax Display (Model
2120-2)” on page 3-18).
If Control Parameter 2 (see “Operational Parameters” on page 4-13)
is set to “Auto,” all points in the currently displayed group will be au-
tomatically sequenced when using the multiplexer to collect data on
each point.

Note
If an ungrouped measurement point is selected while using the
TRIAX option, channel one of the internal multiplexer is used
for signal input.

Note
Select “TRIAX” only if the analyzer’s internal multiplexer is
going to be used. Using standard sensors with Group/Chan
Enable set to “TRIAX” will result in erroneous measurements.

4-34 Utility Functions


Note
When using a triax accelerometer in the Off Route mode, the
Analyze/Acquire function is required to access the triax
channel control.

DBase Name Support


Enables the database name support option that permits routes from mul-
tiple databases to be loaded into the analyzer (see “Select Database” on
page 3-7).

Dual Channel Mode


This function allows you to enable the dual-channel mode on the Model
2120-2. Select “Yes” for dual-channel operation, select “No” for single-
channel operation.

Note
If the analyzer is in the dual-channel mode and the normal
route contains three points that are set up to use the triaxial
accelerometer and the group number is 20 or above, the ana-
lyzer will acquire data on channels 1 and 2 simultaneously.
Channel 3 data are then acquired as a single point.

Note
The dual-channel mode must be set to “Yes” when using the
optional Advanced Two-Channel special function program.

Change Setup 4-35


Measurement Mode menu - page two.

444 Strobe Enable


Select “On” if the analyzer is being used to transmit peak frequencies to the
Model 444 Strobe Light. Select “Off” when the Model 444 is not being
used.

Note
444 Strobe Enable should be set to “Off” before connecting the
Model 720 printer interface to the analyzer.

CSI 339 Thick Enbl


Select “On” if thickness readings are being taken with the Model 339 thick-
ness gauge. Select “Off” when the Model 339 is not being used.

HP Bar Code Reader


Select “On” when using the CSI Model 346B Bar Code Scanner with the
analyzer. Select “Off” when the Model 346B is not being used.

4-36 Utility Functions


Temperature Probe
Specify the type of temperature probe that is to be used with the Model
2120: Gen (general), Model 505, Model 510, or Model 515.
When the Model 510 is selected, the analyzer will prompt you to press the
F6 function key in order to specify the probe data mode (analog or digital).
When “general” is selected, the analyzer will prompt you to press the F6
function key to select the units (volts per degree C or volts per degree F)
that will be used to enter sensitivity values (see “Sensitivity” on page 4-19).

80

Change Setup 4-37


Shaft Probe
Select “On” if motor readings are being taken with CSI’s Model 348SP
shaft probe. When set to “On,” the analyzer will prompt you to press the
F6 function key to set shaft probe sensitivity and DC offset values. Nor-
mally, these values should be entered from the label attached to the Model
348SP.

81

To calibrate DC levels, press one of the analyzer’s Page keys. Then follow
the on-screen directions to attach the probe and press the Enter key to
begin the calibration procedure.

82

Note
The sensitivity levels should be changed and a new DC level
calibration performed whenever a different shaft probe is used.

4-38 Utility Functions


Low Frequency Self-Powered Accelerometer
When using a self-powered accelerometer attached to the Volts input of the
analyzer (Sensor Power is turned off), this option can be set to “On” to pro-
vide DC coupling of the input signal; useful when making very low fre-
quency measurements. This option applies to the A channel only.

Laser Speed Sensor


For turning speed detection using the model 430 Laser Speed Sensor, select
ON if using the model 430. Select OFF when not in use.

Note
The Model 430 connects to the auxiliary input. See “Top
Panel” on page 2-2 for details.

Expert Options
This screen contains options for the Model 2120A’s Analysis Expert mode
(see Chapter 6 for instructions on using this mode).

83

Change Setup 4-39


Expert Menu
This option allows you to turn the Analysis Expert on or off (the Analysis
Expert is the default mode). To disable the Analysis Expert and return to
the analyzer’s original Analyze menu, press the Utility key, select Change
Setup, select Expert Options, and then select “Off” for the Expert Menu
option.

Pop-Up Help
With this option, the Pop-Up Help messages for the Analysis Expert can be
turned on or off. When on, a help message screen will be displayed after
you have selected a test option from the Analysis Expert menu.

84

Auto-Range Pause
When this option is turned on, the analyzer will pause when you select a
test from the Analysis Expert menu (or after you have pressed the Enter key
from a help message screen if Pop-Up Help is turned on). You will then
have to press the Enter key to begin data acquisition.
When off, the analyzer will begin to collect data as soon as you select a test
(or after you have pressed the Enter key from a help message screen if Pop-
Up Help is turned on).

Note
This option allows the pause to be turned off in both the orig-
inal Analyze mode and in the Expert Analysis mode.

4-40 Utility Functions


Note
Setting the Model 2120A’s Expert Menu to Off will automati-
cally toggle the Auto-range pause to On, because this was the
default in the original Model 2120. However, you may then
turn the Auto-range pause back to Off if desired.

Verify Sensor Info


determines whether or not a verification message appears in cases where
the sensor settings differ from one route point to the next.

85

Note
If the sensor, sensitivity, or the sensor power changes from
point to point, the pop up message will be displayed.

Change Setup 4-41


Master Reset
This function can be used to clear the internal RAM card and to reset all
analyzer parameters, such as data units, measurement mode parameters,
etc. to factory default values. A warning screen is displayed and verification
is required before the parameters are reset and the RAM erased.

86

Caution!
Use extreme caution when using the Master Reset function when the
analyzer contains important collected route data. After answering
“Yes” to the warning screen, the data cannot be retrieved.

Caution!
The Master Reset function will delete all special-purpose programs on
the internal RAM card.

Note
The Master Reset function will not reset data units if changes
have been made and saved using the F1 key save function (see
“Data Units” on page 4-23)

4-42 Utility Functions


Check Battery
This function indicates battery condition by calculating and displaying the
percentage of remaining charge of the battery pack. This display is an
approximate value only. When the percent value reaches zero, a built-in
safety margin permits approximately 10 minutes of additional use.

87

Note
The battery condition can also be checked while in the normal
route or off route mode by pressing the F1 Batt Check function
key.

Check Battery 4-43


Special Functions
The functions available on this menu selection include the ability to print
data to a printer, modify the analyzer’s calibration values, and initiate a bat-
tery discharge cycle.

88

4-44 Utility Functions


Generate Report
This function is used to output stored spectral plots, waveform plots, and
analysis parameter data directly to a parallel printer. An optional printer
interface, the Model 720, is required to convert the analyzer output to the
printer’s standard parallel interface. (See “Printing Data” on page 3-52 for
information on connecting a printer to the Model 2120A.

89

The Starting Point and Ending Point parameters define the measurement
points that will be sent to the printer. The analyzer/printer will print all
points on the current route from the specified Starting Point up to and
including the specified Ending Point. Select “Yes” for Hardcopy Plots to
enable the printing of spectral and waveform plots as well as parameter
data. Select “No” to print parameter data only.

Special Functions 4-45


Set Calibration
This function is used to access the Calibration Functions menu to check
and/or modify calibration values. Use of this function is discussed in detail
in “Calibration” on page 9-6.

Meter Test
This function accesses special diagnostic functions for use by CSI personnel
and is not intended to be used for normal operation of the analyzer.

Caution!
Improper use of diagnostic functions can erase all data stored in the
analyzer.

Discharge Battery
This function allows you to automatically discharge the battery pack and
then fully charge it to help the battery pack maintain a strong charge. This
procedure is described in “Battery Maintenance” on page 1-10.

4-46 Utility Functions


Software Type
This function is used to specify which software package (on the host com-
puter) you will be using the analyzer with: RBMware or MasterTrend.
After you select Software Type, an Access # screen is displayed that
requires a password (CSI) to be entered before proceeding. On the fol-
lowing screen, answer “Yes” to change to the alternate software package.

90

When changing software types, all route data and special-purpose pro-
grams in the analyzer’s internal memory will be deleted. Also, all PCMCIA
cards used with the previous software package must be re-initialized.

Note
The analyzer’s date and time will need to be reset as part of this
procedure (see “Date and Time” on page 4-9).

Caution!
Use extreme caution when using the Software Type function if the ana-
lyzer contains collected data. After answering “Yes” to the warning
screen, the data cannot be retrieved.

Special Functions 4-47


Memory Card
These functions enable you to control various aspects of the analyzer’s
internal and external memory cards.

91

Select Card For Route


The Select Card For Route function allows you to select which card
(internal or external) is the currently active memory. The selected card is
then used to store all data, such as routes, spectra, etc.

Note
The data storage for special-purpose programs is not con-
trolled by this setting. Except for the Transient Analysis pro-
gram, all data collected in a special-purpose program are
stored on the same memory card as the special-purpose pro-
gram. The Transient Analysis program stores all data on the
external memory card.

Select Card For Program


Special-purpose programs can be stored in either the internal or external
memory card. The Select Card For Program function allows you to select a
card before loading the special-purpose program, or to specify which card’s
programs are available for use.

4-48 Utility Functions


Initialize Memory Card
Before a new external memory card can be used in the Model 2120A, it
must first be initialized. When initiated, the Initialize Memory Card func-
tion will first ask for the card’s memory size and then allow you to type in
a volume name for the card. The analyzer will then proceed with the ini-
tializing function.
This feature can also be used to initialize the internal memory card without
resetting the default values as performed with the Master Reset function
(see “Master Reset” on page 4-42).

Caution!
Use caution when re-initializing a memory card as any data on the
card will be completely erased.

Note
When initializing an un-formatted card, the analyzer will
default to the 0.5 MB size—even if the card is larger than 0.5
MB. You may, however, specify the actual size at the External
Card Size screen. When initializing a formatted card, the ana-
lyzer will default to the actual size of the card.

Note
As shipped, the memory card battery has a tape disc to pre-
serve the battery until the card is placed into service. Before
using, take the battery out of the card (see “Memory Card Bat-
tery” on page 2-22), remove the tape disc, and then reinsert the
battery.

Note
CSI recommends that all memory cards be re-initialized after
downloading a numerical revision/upgrade to the analyzer’s
firmware. (This does not apply to the smaller updates to the
firmware noted with letter-based increases.)

Memory Card 4-49


Delete Route File
The Delete Route File function allows you to remove an individual route
(and any associated collected data) from the current memory card.

92

Caution!
Use extreme caution when using the Delete Route File function when
the analyzer contains collected route data. After answering “Yes” to the
warning screen, the data cannot be retrieved.

Delete Program File


The Delete Program File function enables you to remove an individual spe-
cial function program and its associated data from the selected memory
card, or to delete just the data acquired with a special function program.

Caution!
Use extreme caution when using the Delete Program File function
when the analyzer contains important collected route data. After
answering “Yes” to the warning screen, the data cannot be retrieved.

4-50 Utility Functions


Erase All Route Data
This function enables you to clear all of the data from a chosen route on the
selected memory card—the route itself remains in memory. When using this
function, the first screen allows you to select the route containing the data
that you wish to erase. A warning screen is then displayed that allows you
to abort the procedure or to continue and erase the data.

93

Caution!
Use extreme caution when using the Erase All Route Data function
when the analyzer contains important collected route data. After
answering “Yes” to the warning screen, the data cannot be retrieved.

Memory Card 4-51


Copy Route File
This function allows you to copy a route from the other card to the selected
memory card. The first screen allows you to specify whether you wish the
route to be copied complete with collected data (select “Route With Data”)
or for the route to be copied without collected data (select “Empty Route”).
The following screen presents a list of available routes. Highlight the
desired route to be copied and press the Enter key.

94

Clear All Monitor Data


This function will clear all monitor data on the current memory card,
including all peak and phase, DC trend, and overall trend data. A warning
screen is displayed that allows you to abort the procedure or to continue
and erase the data.

Caution!
Use extreme caution when using the Clear All Monitor Data function
when the analyzer contains important collected data. After answering
“Yes” to the warning screen, the data cannot be retrieved.

Check Card Battery


This function tests the internal battery of the external memory card and
reports its condition.

4-52 Utility Functions


Chapter 5

Off Route Program

The Off Route program is used to define measurement locations that are
not included in the normal route mode. These off route measurement
points can then be used to collect and store data. The off route spectra and
waveform data can be dumped into the RBMware/MasterTrend database
and/or observed using the analyzer’s display functions (no trend data is
transferred). Refer to the RBMware/MasterTrend user’s manuals for infor-
mation on how RBMware/MasterTrend handles off route data.
Individual off route points are associated with the normal route that was
selected when the off route points were defined (off route data can only be
dumped to the database containing the normal route). In the following
example, although the off route points of the sample routes share the same
point ID numbers, they are separate and unique.

Sample Sample Sample Local


route #1 route #2 route #3 route

Off route Off route No Off route


point #1 point #1 off route point #1
points
Off route Off route defined Off route
point #2 point #2 point #2

Off route Off route


point #3 point #3
95

Off-route points 1 through 3 of “Sample Route #1” can only be accessed


when “Sample Route #1” has been selected for data collection. Off-route
points 1 and 2 of “Sample Route #2” can be accessed only when “Sample
Route #2” has been selected.
Attempting to enter the off route mode while in “Sample Route #3” would
result in the error message “No off route points have been defined.” The off
route points associated with the other routes can be accessed by selecting
the appropriate route via the Select Route function of the Utility key.

5-1
Note
If an off route point is created while no routes are present in the
analyzer, a “Local Route” is established by the analyzer. Data
collected in the Local Route can be dumped into any appro-
priate RBMware/MasterTrend database.

Note
When the firmware is downloaded into the analyzer, a “Local
Route” is created that contains no defined points. This route
can be used to store data that is not associated with any RBM-
ware/MasterTrend route. If Local Route is entered with no
points defined, the off route definition menu is automatically
displayed by the analyzer.

Note
All of the analyzer functions that apply to normal route data
also apply to off route data.

5-2 Off Route Program


Accessing the Off Route Program
The Off Route program functions are accessed with the analyzer’s Program
PROGRAM

SELECT
Select command key. From the Program Select menu, highlight the
OffRoute Program selection, and press the Enter key to display the Off
Route Functions menu shown below.

96

Accessing the Off Route Program 5-3


Modify Off Route Point
This function is used to modify information on an existing off route point.
The analyzer must be in the Off Route mode in order to modify an off route
point.
With the analyzer in the off route collection mode, select the point to be
modified using the up/down arrows. Press the Program Select key, select
Off Route Program, and then select Modify Off Route Point from the menu.
The Define Off Route Point screens will be displayed for the selected mea-
surement point and changes can then be made to any of the parameters
explained in the next section. Press the Enter key to accept the modifica-
tions.

Enter Off Route Mode


The Enter Off Route Mode function is used to transfer from the normal
route mode to the Off Route mode. The analyzer must be in the Off Route
mode in order to collect off route data.

Exit Off Route Mode


This function is used to exit the Off Route mode and return to normal route
mode.

5-4 Off Route Program


Define Off Route Point
All off route measurement points must be created using the Define Off
Route Point routine that requires up to five parameter screens to fully define
each point. Press the Page Up or Page Down key to advance to each subse-
quent screen.
After the parameters for the new point have been defined, press the Enter
key and the new measurement point will be added to the numbered list of
off route points that have been previously defined.
When creating another measurement point, the next set of Define Off
Route Point menus will retain your responses from the previously created
point except for Point ID (Point ID assumes the next number of the num-
bered list.) This feature facilitates rapid creation of multiple measurement
points with similar characteristics. Any or all of the responses can be
changed as required.

Note
The sensor definition for the new off route point is also
retained from the previous off route definition—not from the
sensor setup in the analyzer's memory.

Define Off Route Point 5-5


Off Route Measurement Point Parameters

Define Off Route Point screen one.

Machine Identification
The Machine Identification field is used to store a machine ID code of up
to ten alphanumeric characters which uniquely identifies each machine.
Usually, multiple points on the same machine will use the same ID code.

Description Fields
This field may contain up to 28 alphanumeric characters that describe the
machine and/or the current measurement point.
The first field, Description 1, may contain up to 16 alphanumeric characters
and are stored in the RBMware/MasterTrend database after route dump.
The Description 2 field (up to 12 characters) is ignored by RBMware/Mas-
terTrend, but can be used as additional text space to describe the measure-
ment within the analyzer.

Point Identification
This field should be assigned an ID code (up to three characters) which is
unique for each measurement point on the machine.

Dual Point (Model 2120-2)


This option allows you to set up a dual-channel off route point. When set
to “Yes,” the analyzer will automatically create two off route points; the first
point will acquire data on Channel A, the second point will acquire data on
Channel B. Set this field to “No” for a single-channel point.

5-6 Off Route Program


SD ID (Model 2120-2)
When creating a dual-channel point (Dual Point field set to “Yes”), this field
is used to enter a unique point identification (up to three characters) of the
second point.

Note
Once an off route point has been defined, you cannot change
a single-channel point to a dual-channel point, or a dual-
channel point to a single-channel point.

Variable RPM
This parameter indicates whether this measurement point is located on a
variable speed machine. If set to Yes, the analyzer will require you to enter
the machine RPM before taking a measurement. Press any key to alternate
between Yes or No.

Variable Load
This parameter indicates whether this measurement point is located on a
variable load machine. If set to Yes, the analyzer will require the operator
to enter the machine load before taking a measurement. Press any key to
alternate between Yes or No.

Analysis Parameter Set


An analysis parameter set can be used to specify the way that data are col-
lected and analyzed. Press any key to step through the analysis parameter
sets that have been downloaded into the analyzer from the RBMware/Mas-
terTrend database. If an analysis parameter set is not required, select
“None.” If no routes have been loaded into the analyzer, “None” will be
automatically selected.
With “None” selected for the analysis parameter set, a 1000 Hz, 400-line
spectrum will be selected for the off route point. A spectrum covering a dif-
ferent frequency range may be specified on page 2 of the Define Off Route
Point menu.

Define Off Route Point 5-7


Note
RBMware/MasterTrend allows for the creation of up to 255
analysis parameter sets per database, although it is common for
only a few unique parameter sets to be required even in a large
database. These parameter sets are downloaded into the ana-
lyzer along with other route information and are available for
use with off route points.

Note
If an analysis parameter set is selected and changes are made
on page 2 of the Define Off Route Point screens, only the last
change is retained (either the analysis parameter set or the
page 2 information—not both). Changes to page 2 are indicated
by the message “Special Record Defined” displayed in the
Analysis Parameter Set field on page one.

5-8 Off Route Program


Define Off Route Point screen 2.

Frequency and Low Cutoff


These two parameters are used to determine the bandwidth of the measure-
ment. For example, to measure a spectrum from 100 to 500 Hz, enter 500
for Frequency and 100 for Low Cutoff. The frequency range does not nec-
essarily have to match the range that has been previously defined for this
measurement point.
Frequency defines the maximum frequency of the measurement
and is specified in Hz or CPM, depending on the Frequency Units
selection of the analyzer’s Setup Parameters.
Low Cutoff defines the minimum frequency of the measurement
that is displayed by the analyzer. Although frequencies below this
value are measured, they are not displayed or used to determine
the overall level.

Note
If a value other than zero is entered for Low Cutoff, the ana-
lyzer may automatically adjust the value to the minimum fre-
quency achievable from the user-specified analysis setup. If a
lower frequency is desired, reduce the value specified for Fre-
quency or increase the number of lines of resolution.

Define Off Route Point 5-9


Note
The Model 2120A uses pre-defined frequency values for data
acquisition. When specifying a value for Frequency and Low
Cutoff, the analyzer will select the next highest pre-defined fre-
quency value.

Lines
This parameter defines the number of lines of resolution used for the FFT
calculation. Frequency resolution determines how close two frequency
peaks can be to each other and still be distinguished as separate peaks. This
is illustrated in the example below.

3200
lines
100
lines

97

For the Model 2120A, resolution (in Hz) is defined as Frequency (Hz)
divided by the number of Lines. (As the maximum frequency is increased,
the number of lines must also be increased in order to maintain the same
resolution.)
The selections for Lines are predetermined as 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600,
3200, 6400, and 3RD Octv. (3rd Octave is explained in detail in “Third
Octave Analysis” on page 8-7.)

5-10 Off Route Program


Window
Select Uniform or Hanning window. The Uniform window is sometimes
used for special applications; however, the Hanning window is recom-
mended for normal analyzer operation.

Amplitude

0
Time
Start of End of
window window
The Hanning window.

Averages
This selection determines the number of data samples or averages that are
collected to perform the FFT calculation.
Four to ten averages are recommended for normal vibration measurement
on rotating machinery.

SST
The SST feature enables the analyzer to make accurate very low frequency
measurements. Normally, low frequency peaks are greatly attenuated when
an accelerometer is used and converted to velocity or displacement due to
the non-linear response of the integrators. The SST feature employs a spe-
cial correction technique that corrects the non-linear response and allows
peaks as low as 10 RPM to be accurately measured.
For very low frequency measurements (down to 10 RPM), a high sensi-
tivity, low frequency sensor should be used. CSI’s Model 760 accelerom-
eter can generally be used down to 40 RPM. For frequencies lower than 40
RPM, please contact CSI for the proper sensor recommendation.

Define Off Route Point 5-11


Note
The analyzer must be set to analog integration in order to use
the SST feature (see “Signal Integrator Mode” on page 4-32).
In normal route mode, the analyzer will automatically switch
to analog integration for the point using the SST feature if dig-
ital integration is being used. When using the SST feature in
the off route or Analyze mode, you must manually set the ana-
lyzer to analog integration if digital integration is being used.

Note
The SST feature cannot be used in conjunction with the
internal demodulator or PeakVue™.

5-12 Off Route Program


Define Off Route Point screen three.

Demodulate
Select “Yes” to use the analyzer’s built-in demodulator. The internal
demodulator uses a user-specified band-pass or high-pass filter to remove
all low frequency components in the signal (see “PreFilter” on page 5-14).
The signal is then amplified and amplitude demodulated resulting in a low
frequency signal that consists of the envelope of the original signal.
The maximum frequency that can be analyzed with the built-in demodu-
lator is 5 kHz. There are nine pre-defined frequency ranges for the built-in
demodulator:

20 Hz 500 Hz
50 Hz 1 kHz
100 Hz 2 kHz
200 Hz 5 kHz
400 Hz

Any entered frequency value will automatically be adjusted by the analyzer


to the next highest pre-defined frequency value.

Define Off Route Point 5-13


PeakVue™
Select “Yes” to use the built-in peak value (PeakVue) analyzer. The input
signal is passed through a selectable bandpass or high-pass filter (PreFilter),
and then sampled with the peak detector. The resulting signal is then used
to generate the spectrum. PeakVue uses the same nine pre-defined fre-
quency ranges as used for the demodulator, plus a 10 kHz range.

Note
The Demodulate and PeakVue functions cannot be used
simultaneously.

PreFilter
This field is used to specify the filters for use with either the Demodulator
or the PeakVue function. Available filters are shown below.

Bandpass Filters Highpass Filters

20 to 150 Hz 500 Hz
50 to 300 Hz 1,000 Hz
100 to 600 Hz 2,000 Hz
500 to 1,000 Hz 5,000 Hz
5000 to 6000 (PeakVue only) 10,000 Hz
20,000 Hz (PeakVue only)

Note
The filter frequency must be equal to or greater than the spec-
ified maximum frequency (see “Frequency and Low Cutoff”
on page 5-9) or it will not appear on the selection list.

Note
More detailed discussions on using PeakVue are presented in
the application papers “Vibration Analysis of Large Gearboxes
Used In the Mining Industry” and “Vibration Analysis of High
Speed Multi-Drill Head Stations,” and in CSI’s “PeakVue
Technology Showcase” CD-ROM. Contact CSI’s Customer
Support for more information.

5-14 Off Route Program


Define Off Route Point screen four.

Reference RPM
Enter the normal running speed of the machine to be monitored.

Reference Load
Enter the load (in percent) under which the machine to be monitored is
operating.

Save Spectra
Select Yes to automatically save all spectra data for this off route measure-
ment point.

Save Waveform
Select Yes to automatically save all waveform data for this point.

Displ in Order
Select Yes to automatically plot the frequency axis of the off route spectral
display in orders. Select No to display the frequency axis in Hz or CPM.

FS Displ Range
This field can be used to specify a fixed amplitude axis for spectral displays.
Enter the upper amplitude value in engineering units.
Enter “0.0” to instruct the analyzer to automatically scale the amplitude
axis.

Define Off Route Point 5-15


Define Off Route Point screen five.

Sensor Type
Press any key on the keypad to step through and select one of the following
sensor types:
ACCEL accelerometer

VELOCITY velocity probe

DISPLACMNT displacement probe

TEMPERATURE* temperature probe*

MICROPHONE microphone

CURRENT current probe

FLUX LF flux, low frequency

FLUX SP Flux, slot pass

SHAFT V shaft probe, voltage*

SHAFT I1 shaft probe, current*

SHAFT I2 shaft probe, 10 ohm*

SV PEAK shaft probe, peak*

DC static, single value*

NON-STNDRD non-standard

* Channel A only.

5-16 Off Route Program


Convert To
This option is used to convert the sensor units to another type for display.
For example, the sensor could be an accelerometer and the results of a mea-
surement displayed in velocity. Select from the following units:

ACCEL acceleration

VELOCITY velocity

DISPLACMNT displacement

SENSR UNITS same as sensor (no conversion)

Sensitivity
Sensitivity is the number of volts per unit produced by the sensor probe.
For example, the Model 350 accelerometer produces 0.1 volts per G. Enter
the appropriate value for the sensor being used.

Note
When Sensor Type is specified as an accelerometer, sensi-
tivity units are always specified in volts per g. If Sensr Type is
a velocity or displacement probe, sensitivity units may be spec-
ified in English units (inch/sec or mils) or Metric unit (mm/sec
or microns).

Units
This field is used to define the units if the Sensor Type selected above is
not a standard sensor. For example, enter “PSI” when using a pressure
sensor (a non-standard probe). For accelerometer, displacement, velocity,
temperature, or microphone probes, use “Standard.”

Define Off Route Point 5-17


Sensitivity and Units For Two-Channel Analyzer
When using dual points with the analyzer in the dual-channel mode (Model
2120A-2 only), the Channel B sensor can be set independently of the
Channel A values.

98

Sensor Power
Select “On” when using sensors that require an external power source, such
as an accelerometer. See “Sensor Power” on page 4-21 for information on
the Model 2120A’s sensor power option.

5-18 Off Route Program


Chapter 6

Analysis Expert

The Analysis Expert Mode


The Model 2120A’s Analysis Expert key is used to access the Analysis
Expert menu and/or the original Model 2120 Analyze menu. The Analysis
Expert is the default mode. To disable the Analysis Expert and return to the
original Analyze menu, press the Utility key, select Change Setup, select
Expert Options, and then select “Off” for the Expert Menu option.
See “Expert Options” on page 4-39 for information on these setup options.

99

6-1
Analysis Expert Tests
The Analysis Expert menu has three pages:
In general, the tests on the first page do not require any special intervention
by you, although order tracking and synchronous time averaging do
require a tachometer signal.

100

The tests on the second page may require additional user input such as an
impact hammer and/or shutting machinery down.

101

6-2 Analysis Expert


The tests on the third page are only available in the dual-channel model.

102

Running the Tests


Each of these tests can be run before any route data is collected; however,
many of these tests will perform better if data has already been collected
and a frequency of interest has been marked in the spectrum before the test
is performed.
When an Analysis Expert is selected:
• If no measurement point is defined, each Expert will use predefined
settings for acquiring data.
• If a route or off-route measurement point is active (even if data has
not yet been collected on the point), the Expert will use the setup
information from the existing point to perform a more customized
acquisition.
• If data has already been collected and a cursor has been used to mark
a certain frequency, the Expert will perform an even more custom-
ized acquisition based on the marked frequency and other informa-
tion obtained from the point setup. The Expert must be selected
immediately after marking the frequency—before pressing the Reset
key or moving to another measurement point.

6-3
Each test begins with a pre-test help message explaining what the test is
used for. Review the message, then press the Enter key to continue with the
test. When the test is complete, another help message will be displayed
explaining how to interpret the results.
These help messages can be disabled as previously explained (see “Expert
Options” on page 4-39). The Coastdown (Peak/Phase) single-channel test
and the Orbit Plot dual-channel tests do not have pop-up help messages fol-
lowing the test.

SAVE
After the test has been performed and the plot is displayed, the Save Data
DATA function key (if displayed), can be used to store the data to the measurement
point. If the Save Data key is not available, then it is not possible to save
the data to the measurement point

USER
If the resulting plot does not show the desired information, press the Enter
SETUP key to return to the Analysis Expert menu. Then press the User Setup func-
tion key to display the analysis menus that show how the test was config-
ured. At this point, you can alter any of the settings that Expert has chosen
for you and repeat the test (see “Acquire Spectrum” on page 7-23 for infor-
mation on setting up these parameters). Also, you can toggle the Init Setup
field to “Yes” to return the analysis parameters to the original route settings.

Note
The procedure for manually changing setup parameters
described above differs slightly when using the Coastdown
(Peak/Phase), Cross Channel Ampl/Phase, and Orbit Plot
expert tests. These differences are described in the corre-
sponding sections of this chapter.

6-4 Analysis Expert


The Function Keys
The View Spectrum and View Waveform function keys allow you to view
VIEW the spectral or waveform plot of the current measurement point or data that
SPECT
has been saved for this point. See “Display Spectrum/Display Waveform”
VIEW on page 7-2 for information on working within the plot screens.
WAVEF

USER
The User Setup function key displays the Acquire Spectrum menu where
SETUP you can manually set up the parameters that will be used for making a mea-
surement (frequency, lines of resolution, triggering mode, etc.). See
“Acquire Spectrum” on page 7-23 for more information.

LIVE
The Live Mode function key displays the Monitor Mode menu that permits
MODE the Model 2120A to function as a real-time measuring instrument. See
“Monitor (Live) Mode” on page 7-38.

TRUE
The True Zoom key displays the Zoom Analysis key that allows you to
ZOOM obtain a high resolution 800-line spectral plot over a narrow frequency
band. See “Zoom Analysis” on page 7-69 for detailed information.

CROSS
The Cross Spectrum key displays the Cross Phase menu. This function uses
SPECT cross-channel spectra to calculate phase and coherence relationships
between the two channels (for the Model 2120A-2 only). See “Cross
Channel Phase (Model 2120-2)” on page 7-75.

6-5
When To Use the Expert Analyses
If the following conditions are observed or suspected in the machinery, try
at least one of the following suggested tests.
If you see unknown frequencies below the running speed at very low fre-
quencies, try:
• High Resolution Analysis
• Low Frequency Analysis - SST
If you see a peak(s) that looks very close to a harmonic of the turning speed,
but you are not completely sure, and you are trying to confirm unbalance,
misalignment, or looseness, try:
• Synchronous Analysis
• High Resolution Analysis with 2xTS peak marked
If you need to distinguish between imbalance vs. resonance, try:
• Bump Test (Equip Running)
• Bump Test (Equip Off)
• High Resolution Analysis with 1xTS peak marked
If you need to confirm if vibration is bearing related (non-synchronous),
try:
• High Frequency Analysis
• Synchronous Analysis
If you suspect a resonance problem, try:
• Bump Test (Equip Running)
• Bump Test (Equip Off)
• Coastdown (Peak Hold) – if no tach signal available
• Coastdown (Peak/phase) – if tach signal available

6-6 Analysis Expert


If you suspect an electrical problem, try:
• High Resolution Analysis with 2xTS peak marked
• High Resolution Analysis with 1xTS peak marked
• Rotor Bar Test (Motor Current)
If a rolling element bearing failure is suspected, try:
• Bearing/gear - Peakvue
• High Frequency Analysis
If the equipment speed is varying during data collection and “smearing” the
spectrum, try:
• Order Tracking
If you are unsure of turning speed, try:
• Turning Speed Detection
If gear problems are suspected, try:
• Bearing/gear - Peakvue
• High Resolution Analysis

When To Use the Expert Analyses 6-7


The Expert Analysis Menu Options

High Frequency Analysis


This test is used to investigate high frequencies above the Fmax of the
normal route spectrum. It is useful when data is present in the high frequen-
cies of the route spectrum and looks as if it is on a rising slope that continues
beyond the Fmax. Also, if the HFD parameter or the analog overall vibra-
tion reading indicates an alarm, high frequency analysis can be used to see
what frequencies are causing the alarm.
The presence of high-amplitude vibration above the route Fmax should be
analyzed so that machine problems do not go undetected. The presence of
this data may indicate very early stages of rolling element bearing wear,
gear defects, looseness, and/or lubrication problems.
• If data has already been collected on the measurement point, the
Expert will increase the Fmax based on the original Fmax. Gener-
ally, you should see a doubling of the Fmax value.
• If you place a mark anywhere on each spectrum before beginning
the test, the Expert will continue to increase the Fmax each time you
run the expert.

6-8 Analysis Expert


High Resolution Analysis
The High Resolution Analysis test is used to increase the resolution in the
spectral data, which is useful for separating closely spaced peaks.
For example: In a 3600 RPM motor, it can be difficult to distinguish the
vibration from two times the turning speed (misalignment) from two times
the line frequency (120 Hz, electrical problem). If a high-amplitude vibra-
tion peak is seen near 7200 CPM in the route spectrum, the high resolution
Expert can be used to zoom in and separate the two frequencies. This fea-
ture can also be used to distinguish closely spaced sideband frequencies for
rotor bar or gear mesh problems.
• If data has already been collected on the measurement point, the
Expert will increase the resolution based on the original resolution
setting.
• If you mark a frequency of interest in the spectrum before beginning
the test, the Expert will apply increased resolution or apply zoom
analysis to the specific frequency area.
• If you mark a frequency again and repeat the measurement, the res-
olution will increase each time until the analyzer is no longer able to
provide any additional lines of resolution. Be aware that as resolution
increases, it is possible for the test to take many minutes to collect the
data. For example, the test would take 640 seconds for the extreme
case of the Fmax set at 10 Hz (600 CPM) with 6400 lines of resolu-
tion.

The Expert Analysis Menu Options 6-9


Bearing/Gear Analysis - PeakVue
This patented processing technique is used to detect anti-friction bearing or
gear defects at an earlier stage than normal vibration measurements. Also
used for detecting bearing defects on extremely slow turning shafts that do
not generate enough vibration to be detected with normal measurements.
Due to the short duration of bearing impacts, a higher frequency sensor
with an Fmax good to 10,000~15,000 Hz will work best, even when mea-
suring slow speed machines. The sensor should be placed in the radial (hor-
izontal) or axial position as near to the load zone of the bearing as possible
on a very flat surface (without paint preferred).
Bearing defect frequencies will appear in the PeakVue spectrum, just as
they would in a normal spectrum, at their fundamental frequencies and har-
monics. These peaks will be non-synchronous. Gear defects will appear as
peaks at the gear’s shaft turning speed frequency and harmonics. PeakVue
waveform data will be rectified such that all spikes in the data are displayed
on the positive side of the waveform. The amplitude of spikes in the wave-
form is an absolute measurement and can be used to determine the severity
of impacting.
• If data has already been collected on the measurement point, the
Expert will start with the original acquisition settings and add the
PeakVue processing.
• For a special variation on this test, if the original spectrum shows no
vibration peaks past a certain frequency, you may want to set a new
lower Fmax for the PeakVue measurement by first marking the
cursor just to the right of the last vibration peak., then selecting the
PeakVue Expert. The Fmax of the new spectrum will then be low-
ered to the next available Fmax setting in the analyzer above the
marked frequency.

6-10 Analysis Expert


Low Frequency Analysis - SST
This test applies SST processing and is used when looking at very low
speed data (usually below 10 Hz) that has been integrated from acceleration
to velocity or displacement. The SST process enhances the low frequency
data by removing the “ski-slope” effect, and correcting the amplitude
values of vibration peaks. For low frequency measurements, a special low
frequency accelerometer is recommended for best results, but SST works
with a standard sensor as well.
The data is interpreted the same as regular spectra. A high amount of reso-
lution is used so that the harmonics of the very low fundamental frequen-
cies can be separated at the very low frequencies.
• If data has already been collected on the measurement point, the
Expert will consider the original acquisition settings when deter-
mining the low frequency analysis settings.
• If you mark a low frequency peak of interest in the spectrum, before
beginning the test, the Expert will use that frequency and set the new
Fmax equal to or just above the marked frequency.

The Expert Analysis Menu Options 6-11


Order Tracking
A reference pulse must be supplied to the tachometer input of the Model
2120 for this test. This tach pulse is typically from the shaft turning speed,
but could be from a belt. This test is used when the machine speed is
changing/drifting during data collection and causing vibration frequencies
to be “smeared” between adjacent frequency lines. This test allows
increased resolution in the spectral data, which is useful for separating
closely spaced peaks.
The resulting data is related to the reference pulse and is displayed in
orders of turning speed. Frequencies that vary with turning speed will no
longer appear smeared in the data. However, frequencies that do not vary
with turning speed, like electrical line frequency, can now appear to be
smeared.
• If data has already been collected on the measurement point, the
Expert will start with the original acquisition settings and add Order
Tracking.
• A marked frequency is not used for any special data acquisition in
this test.

6-12 Analysis Expert


Synchronous Analysis
A reference pulse must be supplied to the tachometer input of the Model
2120 for this test. It is useful when the amount of non-synchronous energy
(background vibration) is obscuring the synchronous frequency analysis or
when transmitted vibration from other machines is excessive. This is also a
good test to use for belt drive analysis. If the tachometer pulse is taken from
the belt, only the vibration related to the belt frequencies will be left in the
spectrum.
The resulting data is phase locked to the tachometer pulse. Only the turning
speed vibration and it’s integer multiples will be left in the spectrum. The
vibration not related to the reference tachometer pulse will have been
removed from the data plot.
Note that sometimes Synchronous Averaging is not desirable since the data
that disappears can be just as important as the data that stays. Non-synchro-
nous energy could point to a rolling element bearing defect.
• If data has already been collected on the measurement point, the
Expert will start with the original acquisition settings and add Syn-
chronous Time Averaging.
• A marked frequency is not used for any special data acquisition in
this test.

The Expert Analysis Menu Options 6-13


Bump Test (Equip Running)
Use this test when resonance is suspected, but the machine cannot be shut
down for a normal bump test, as outlined in the Bump Test (Equip Off)
Expert. A secondary application is the ability to remove background vibra-
tion when the background machinery cannot be shut down.
A heavy rubber mallet works well to impact most equipment. Strike the
equipment near the sensor and in the same direction as the sensor.
Start the test and immediately begin impacting the machine to get the
“impact data” into the measurement buffer during the first set of averages.
Then the message: “Press Enter to Collect Data” will reappear after the first
set of averages has been completed. At this point stop impacting the
machine and then press Enter to continue the test. The analyzer continues
to negatively average away operational vibration and thus leaves only the
result of the impacts. Generally, four times as many negative averages are
required as positive averages.
Once the operational data has been removed, any remaining data is the
result of the impacts. Peaks in the spectrum indicate resonant frequencies.
It is possible that if the running speed is at a resonant frequency, then as the
operational frequency is subtracted out, it will create a valley in the middle
of the resonant peak. Be aware that if the running speed changes during the
test, the operational vibration may not get subtracted out.
To perform the test in a more focused frequency range, first collect an initial
spectrum, then place the cursor over the possible resonant frequency and
mark the frequency. Then begin the test. This should place the frequency
of interest near the middle of the new spectrum.

6-14 Analysis Expert


Bump Test (Equip Off)
Use this test to check for resonance when high vibration is otherwise unex-
plained. The spectrum might show a broad hump of energy or a single dis-
crete peak. Generally when the amplitude of a frequency is very high, you
want to determine if the amplitude is high because of a high input force or
because a low input force is being amplified by a resonance.
For best results with this type of test, the machine in question should be shut
off. This is because the operational vibration amplitudes are usually higher
in amplitude than the vibration response that can be generated by
impacting the machine with a rubber mallet. Use the hammer to impact the
machine or structure near the transducer, in the same direction. Use only
one impact per average.
Single-channel resonance testing usually requires additional tests to really
confirm, but the results of the bump test should show a peak at the resonant
frequency. The impacts from the hammer place a small amount of force
into the system at all frequencies. A resonance naturally amplifies the
resulting vibration at the resonant frequency. The peaks seen in the spectral
data represent the resonant frequency (or frequencies). Avoid running a
machine at a resonant frequency, because the operational forces will be
amplified causing excessively high vibration.
• To perform the test in a more focused frequency range, first collect
an initial spectrum, then place the cursor over the possible resonant
frequency and mark the frequency. Then begin the test. This should
place the frequency of interest near the middle of the new spectrum.
• If data collection begins before the machine is struck by the hammer,
you will need to increase the trigger level by pressing the F3 function
key. This should be done with the Bump Test (Equip Off) test
selected from the menu. Press the Page Down key on the analyzer’s
keypad and increase the Trig Level value to something greater then
the 0.5 value selected by default. This helps prevent background
vibration from causing a false trigger and beginning the test too soon.

The Expert Analysis Menu Options 6-15


Coastdown (PeakHold)
This Coastdown (PeakHold) test is used to check for resonance. The
machines own operational frequency is used to excite suspected resonance
during the machine coastdown. Begin data collection and then immediately
turn the machine off. If the vibration peak at the shaft turning speed passes
through a resonant frequency during the coastdown, the amplitude will
increase at that frequency.
• To perform the test in a more focused frequency range, first collect
an initial spectrum, then place the cursor over the possible resonant
frequency and mark the frequency. Then begin the test.
• Wait for the machine to coast to a stop, then press the Enter key to
stop data collection and store it. Data collection will otherwise con-
tinue for the analyzer’s maximum number of averages.

6-16 Analysis Expert


Coastdown (Peak/Phase)
This test can also be used to confirm resonance and requires a tachometer
input from the shaft turning speed. The goal is to have the operational
vibration excite the resonance frequencies in the system as the equipment
coasts to a stop. Begin data collection, confirm that tachometer pulses are
being detected by the analyzer, then turn the machine off.
The test will record the amplitude and phase of the 1xRPM frequency as it
coasts to a stop. The resulting data will show a peak at any resonant fre-
quency. At a resonance, the phase will also go through a 180-degree phase
shift. This data is very useful in confirming resonance. This data cannot be
stored to a measurement point, but may be stored in scratchpad memory
for your viewing or printing.
• By default, the peak/phase coastdown monitors the first harmonic of
the turning speed. To perform the test on a different harmonic, first
collect an initial spectrum, then place the cursor just to the left of the
desired harmonic. Then begin the test.
• Wait for the machine to coast to a stop, then press the Enter key to
stop data collection and store it to the analyzer’s scratchpad memory.
Data collection will otherwise continue indefinitely with the oldest
data being overwritten when the memory buffer becomes full.

LIVE
If the resulting plots do not show the desired information, press the Anal-
MODE ysis Expert key to return to the Analysis Expert menu. Then press the Live
Mode function key and select Monitor Peak/Phase to display the setup
menu.

The Expert Analysis Menu Options 6-17


Turning Speed Detection
The Turning Speed Detection test is useful for confirming the shaft turning
speed frequency. After you press the Enter key, type in the suspected shaft
turning speed and press Enter. The test will collect a spectrum and detect
the largest peak closest to that speed. The dominate peak nearest the sus-
pected turning speed frequency is most likely the turning speed.
The turning speed detection expert is also available automatically when
F6 collecting data on a variable-speed machine. When the analyzer prompts
you to enter the machine RPM, press the F6 or F1 function keys.
A spectrum will be collected and displayed with a cursor marking the
F1 turning speed peak. Press the Set RPM function key before pressing the
Enter key and the analyzer will accept the new RPM value. If you do not
press the Set RPM key, the analyzer will use the original RPM value.

Note
If the model 430 Laser Speed Sensor is being used, select the
range form the menu and press the Enter key. The model 430
must be enabled under the measurement mode menu to see
the menu below. For details, see “Measurement Mode” on
page 4-32.

103

6-18 Analysis Expert


Rotor Bar Test (Current)
When rotor bar defects are suspected, connect a current clamp to the volts
input of the analyzer adapter. The current clamp should be placed around
one wire of the three-phase power source. The correct sensitivity must be
entered for the clamp, accounting for a CT ratio if measuring on a sec-
ondary wire.
The presence of sidebands around electrical line frequency, spaced at the
number of poles times the motor’s slip frequency, can be an indication of a
rotor bar defect. If the difference between the sideband amplitudes and the
line frequency amplitude is less than 60 dB, then rotor bar problems should
be suspected.

The Expert Analysis Menu Options 6-19


Cross-Channel Amplitude/Phase
This test is useful when the phase shift needs to be determined between two
sensor locations at a particular frequency. This test can be used to distin-
guish between imbalance and misalignment or between imbalance and res-
onance by measuring the cross channel-phase at running speed.
To distinguish between imbalance and resonance, place one sensor in the
vertical direction and the other in the horizontal direction at the bearing
location. If the phase shift is approximately 90 degrees between the vertical
and the horizontal directions, then imbalance is more likely the problem. If
the phase shift is closer to 0 or 180 degrees between the vertical and the hor-
izontal directions, then resonance is more likely the problem. Also, if the
amplitude in one direction is greater than 10 times the amplitude in the
other direction, then the problem is likely resonance.
To distinguish between imbalance and misalignment, place the sensors in
the same orientation (direction) on either side of the coupling. If the phase
shift is approximately 0 (or 360) degrees across the coupling then imbal-
ance is more likely the problem. If the phase shift is closer to 180 degrees
across the coupling then misalignment is more likely the problem.
If a peak has been marked in a spectrum prior to selecting this test, then the
phase will be determined for the marked frequency. If no peak has been
marked, you will be asked to input the frequency where you wish to mea-
sure the phase.
If you need more information than the single-frequency phase data pro-
CROSS
SPECT vides, press the Analysis Expert key to return to the Analysis Expert menu.
Then press the Cross Spect function key to display the setup menu for a full
spectrum cross-channel phase plot.

6-20 Analysis Expert


Orbit Plot
Orbit analysis is performed with two sensors mounted 90 degrees apart at
a bearing location in the radial direction. This is particularly useful with
sleeve bearings using displacement probes, but it can also be used with
accelerometers.
Orbit analysis can be tricky, but a large diameter circle may indicate imbal-
ance, a sharp oval may indicate resonance, and a stationary circle within a
circle may indicate misalignment.
A dual-channel point and the turning speed are required. If a tachometer is
used, the tachometer signal will be automatically recorded. If no tachom-
eter signal is detected, then you will be asked to input a turning speed.

LIVE
If the resulting plot does not show the desired information, press the Anal-
MODE ysis Expert key to return to the Analysis Expert menu. Then press the Live
Mode function key. Select Monitor Orbit from the menu to display the
analysis menus showing how the test was configured. At this point, you can
alter any of the settings the Expert has chosen for you and repeat the test.

The Expert Analysis Menu Options 6-21


6-22 Analysis Expert
Chapter 7

Analyze Mode

If the Expert Analysis mode has been disabled (see “Expert Options” on
page 4-39), the Analyzer Functions menu will be displayed when the Anal-
ysis Expert key is pressed.

Analyze Mode
The Analyze mode enables the Model 2120A to function as a multi-purpose
signal analyzer that can perform the following functions:
• display spectral and waveform plots of collected normal and off-
route measurement point data,
• collect additional, user-defined measurement point data for display
and/or storage,
• display real-time spectral plots, waveforms, overall, temperature,
peak/phase, and DC measurements, and
• collect and display cross-channel and zoom analysis measurements.

104

7-1
Display Spectrum/Display Waveform
The View Spect and View Wavef keys are used to display a frequency spec-
trum or time waveform of the selected (currently displayed) measurement
point.

Display Spectrum plot, single-channel mode.

Display Spectrum plot, dual-channel mode.

7-2 Analyze Mode


Display Waveform plot, single-channel mode.

Display Waveform plot, dual-channel mode.

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-3


Highlight Display Spectrum or Display Waveform with the cursor and
press the Enter key. If more than one set of spectral or waveform data has
been stored for this measurement point, this selection will access a Select
Spectrum or Select Waveform menu. Highlight the desired spectrum
(waveform) using the up/down arrow keys and press the Enter key.

105

7-4 Analyze Mode


Plot Display Control Keys

Cursor
The cursor can be moved across the plot using the left/right arrow keys.
The cursor position, indicated at the top of the plot box, indicates frequency
and amplitude for spectral plots, or time and amplitude for waveform plots.
The cursor frequency (or time) increment is equal to the frequency resolu-
tion which is explained in detail in “Acquire Spectrum” on page 7-23.

Expand and Decrease


These keys are used to expand or compress the frequency axis of a spectral
,;\%
Exp plot (or the time axis of a waveform) by a factor of two.
If the cursor is located at the left or right side of the plot, expansion/com-
*#&@ pression will begin from the minimum or maximum displayed frequency,
Dec
respectively.

0 to 500 Hz spectral plot expanded to 0 to 250 Hz.

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-5


If the cursor is located within the approximate shaded area shown in the
following illustration, the cursor location will become the center of an
expanded or compressed plot.

106

The left/right arrow keys can be used to move an expanded spectrum


through the display window. In the following example, a spectrum from 0
to 500 Hz has been expanded to 0 to 250 Hz. With the cursor located at the
right side of the plot box, the right arrow key will cause the remaining 250
Hz to 500 Hz section of the spectrum to move through the display window.

Pressing the right arrow key moves the remaining section


of the spectrum through the display window.

7-6 Analyze Mode


Home and End
The Home key can be used to move the cursor to the beginning of the plot.
Home Conversely, the End key can be used to move the cursor to the end of the
plot.
End
Home key End key
start of plot end of plot

107

Clear Key
Clear The Clear key is used to remove the cursor, cursor indications, and har-
monic cursors from the screen during display of a spectral or waveform
plot.

Amplitude Scale
The up/down arrow keys can be used to expand or contract the amplitude
axis of the spectral/waveform plot by a factor of two.

Peak Mark
Mark For spectral plots only, the Mark key is used to provide a more accurate
indication of the cursor location. This may be used, for example, to deter-
mine the exact frequency and amplitude of a peak. Place the cursor on top
of the desired peak, press the Mark key and the display will update the
cursor values, giving the exact frequency and amplitude of the peak.

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-7


Harmonic Markers
By pressing the Mark key twice, the selected peak will be referenced as the
fundamental frequency and its harmonics indicated with harmonic cursors/
markers as shown below.

108

Moveable Harmonic Markers


This harmonic marker mode functions similar to the mode described above
except that the fundamental frequency is not stationary. As the cursor is
moved across the plot, the harmonic markers will also move to reflect the
harmonic frequencies of the current cursor location. To access the move-
able harmonic marker mode, press the Mark key three times.

Sideband Cursor Mode

109

This marker displays Delta-F and Delta-A values between a reference and
an active cursor.

7-8 Analyze Mode


Note
Because of the number of times required to hit the Mark key,
a message was added to indicate the current cursor type when
the key is pressed.

Active Plot
On dual-channel or split plots, the Page keys are used to select the active
Page
Up plot (as indicated by the highlighted plot name) that can be controlled with
the cursor functions and control keys.
Page
Down

active
plot

110

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-9


Waveform Delta-T Cursor Mode
This cursor mode on a waveform plot can be used to determine the time
between events in the waveform and/or calculating the frequency of repet-
itive events. With the cursor located at the desired reference point, press the
Mark key; the cursor readout at the top of the plot will now read 0.00 ∆SEC
and 0.00 Hz.

111

As you move the cursor away from the reference point, the cursor readout
will display the delta time and frequency between the reference point (indi-
cated by a square on the plot) and the current cursor location.
To reset the reference point to the current cursor location, press the Mark
key. Pressing the Mark key again (without moving the cursor) will return to
the normal cursor mode.

7-10 Analyze Mode


Plot Display Function Keys
While displaying a spectrum, the function keys can be used to either dis-
play the associated waveform, or to modify display parameters of the spec-
tral plot.

TIME The Waveform key can be used to display the waveform plot of the current
WAVFM measurement.

Single-channel waveform display.

Dual-channel waveform display.

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-11


SPLIT The Split Screen function key (displayed on the waveform plot in single-
SCREN channel mode) can be used to display both the waveform and the spectrum
in a dual-plot format. The Page keys are used to select the active plot (as
indicated by the highlighted plot name) that can be controlled with the
cursor functions and control keys.

112

AVERG The Averaged Spectrum key (displayed on split plots and time waveform
SPCRM dual-channel plots) can be used to return to the spectral display.
SHOW The Show Orbit key (displayed on time waveform dual-channel plots) can
ORBIT be used to display an orbit plot of both channels. See “Monitor “Filtered”
Orbit” on page 7-61 for information on filtered orbit plots.

113

7-12 Analyze Mode


Note
Spectral data, waveforms, and analysis parameter values may
be observed on any point that contains previously measured
and stored data using the above methods. Since analysis
parameter values are always stored, they may be viewed at any
time.

SHOW The Show A Channel key (displayed in the Model 2120A-2’s dual-channel
A CHN mode) displays channel A in a single-plot format.
SHOW The Show B Channel key (displayed in the Model 2120A-2’s dual-channel
B CHN mode after the Show A Channel key has been pressed) displays channel B
in a single-plot format.
SHOW The Show 2 Channels key (displayed in the Model 2120A-2’s dual-channel
2 CHN mode after the Show B Channel key has been pressed) returns to the dual-
plot format.

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-13


SAVE The Save Data key will be displayed whenever unsaved data can be
DATA attached to an appropriate route point. Pressing this key will display the
Data Storage Options screen where spectrum data, waveform data, or both
may be selected for storage in route memory.

Data Storage Options screen.

Note
The Save Data key will not be displayed if the data has already
been stored.

7-14 Analyze Mode


LIST The List Peaks key will display a list of the 20 largest peaks within the cur-
PEAKS rently displayed spectrum and their associated magnitude values. When
you return to the plot (by pressing the Enter key), the cursor will move to
the peak highlighted on the list.

114

Note
The 20 largest peaks are determined by an amplitude criteria
based on the largest peak in the spectrum; therefore, in certain
instances the list may contain less than 20 peaks.

NEXT The Next Peak key will move the cursor on the plot to the next largest peak
PEAK listed in the List Peaks function. The direction of the cursor movement is
determined by which arrow key (left/right) was last pressed when moving
the cursor.

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-15


SET The Set RPM key can be used to specify a frequency peak as the RPM
RPM value for subsequent measurements on a machine. This feature allows you
to specify the turning speed of the machine without the use of a tachometer.
To use this function, collect data on one of the machine’s measurement
points and display the spectral plot. Use the left/right arrow keys to place
the cursor on the frequency peak representing 1xRPM, and press the Set
RPM key.

115

The next time a measurement is made on this machine, the analyzer will
display the machine speed prompt; however, the value specified with the
Set RPM key will be automatically entered into the field. Press the Enter
key to accept this value and continue with the measurement.
When displaying the frequency axis in orders, the Set RPM key can be
used to specify which frequency peak will be referenced as 1xRPM. The
new RPM value will be automatically entered into the machine speed field
as described above.

7-16 Analyze Mode


OTHER The Other FKeys key displays an additional set of function keys.
FKEYS

116

SET The Set Scale key can be used to change the minimum and/or maximum
SCALE (full-scale) values of the amplitude and/or frequency axis.

117

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-17


The X Log Scale key can be used to change the X axis (frequency) of the
X LOG plot to a log format. Press the X Lin key to return to the linear X axis
SCALE
format.

118

The Y Log Scale key can be used to change the Y axis (amplitude) of the
Y LOG plot to a log format. Press the Y Lin key to return to the linear Y axis format.
SCALE

119

7-18 Analyze Mode


CPM The CPM Units key displays the frequency axis in CPM units.
UNITS

120

ORDER The Order Units key displays the frequency axis in orders.
UNITS

121

HZ The Hz Units key can be used to return to the Hz frequency display.


UNITS

Display Spectrum/Display Waveform 7-19


Display Parameters
The Display Parameters option is used to display the RPM reading, the
overall signal level, and up to 12 individual analysis parameters of a normal
or off route measurement point. An alarm flag will display to the right of
the overall signal level or an individual analysis parameter if any of these
values have exceeded preset alarm levels that have been downloaded from
the RBMware/MasterTrend database.

Note
The Display Parameters option is available on the original
Model 2120A Analyzer Functions Menu. It is also available on
the main route point display screen as the F3 Vib Parms func-
tion key. This option does not appear on the Analysis Expert
menu.

Display Parameters screen.

With the Display Parameters displayed, press a Page key to display the
spectrum of the selected measurement point.

Note
When an extended analysis parameter set is defined by RBM-
ware/MasterTrend for the current measurement point,
pressing a Page key will display a second page of analyzer
parameters.

7-20 Analyze Mode


Store Data
After a measurement has been acquired, spectral and waveform data are
stored in a temporary “scratchpad” memory. These data can be displayed
and observed using the Display Spectrum or Display Waveform func-
tions. When another measurement is made, the new measurement’s spec-
tral and waveform data replace the data that were previously stored in the
scratchpad memory.

Note
Only spectral/waveform data that have been stored in route
memory (not scratchpad memory) will be transferred to the
RBMware/MasterTrend database.

Parameter data are automatically stored in route memory, writing over any
previously stored parameter data. However, spectral and waveform data
are stored in route memory only under the following conditions:
• Instructions downloaded along with a route from the database direct
the analyzer to always store spectral and/or waveform data, or to
store data only when certain conditions are met, for example on a
high alarm. The “Data=” indication on the measurement point dis-
play screen lists the types of data that have been stored in route
memory.
• Spectral and/or waveform data that would not normally have been
saved are placed into route memory via the Store Data function
(before moving on to the next measurement point).

Note
The Store Data function is available on the original Model
2120’s Analyzer Functions menu. It is also available on the data
plot display screen as the F3 Save Data function key. This
option appears on the Analysis Expert menu if there is data to
be saved.

Store Data 7-21


Note
Dual-channel data collected in the Analyze mode (Model
2120-2) cannot be saved to a measurement point that is speci-
fied in the RBMware/MasterTrend database as single channel.
Attempts to do so results in saving channel A only. Dual-
channel data can, however, be saved on any measurement
point specified as dual channel—including off route dual-
channel points.

The Expert Analysis function and the user-defined Acquire Spectrum


function store spectral/waveform data in the scratchpad memory only.
Therefore, in order to save spectral/waveform data that have been col-
lected with these functions, you must use the Store Data function before
collecting data on another measurement point. Store Data accesses the
Data Storage Options screen where spectrum, waveform, or both may be
selected for storage in route memory.

Data Storage Options screen.

Using the Analysis Expert or the Acquire Spectrum and Store Data
functions, a large number of spectral/waveform data, over many different
frequency ranges, can be acquired and saved on the same measurement
point. These data can then be dumped into the RBMware/MasterTrend
database, along with normal route data, for analysis.

7-22 Analyze Mode


Acquire Spectrum
This function is used to collect a new spectrum and waveform that are then
temporarily stored in scratchpad memory. These data can then be observed
and, if desired, stored in route memory using the Store Data feature.
Acquire Spectrum permits the storage of more than one data set on a mea-
surement point.

Note
This function is available on the original Model 2120 Analyzer
Functions menu. It is also available on the Model 2120A
Expert Analysis menu as the F3 User Setup function key.

After selecting Acquire Spectrum, a four-page screen (use the Page keys
to toggle through the pages) provides for the definition of various parame-
ters that are described in the following paragraphs.

Acquire Spectrum setup screen one.

Note
Data collected and/or stored on a measurement point with the
Acquire Spectrum function do not affect vibration parame-
ters, the overall level value, or the alarm status of the measure-
ment performed in normal route (or off-route) mode.

Acquire Spectrum 7-23


Frequency and Low Cutoff
These two parameters are used to determine the bandwidth of the measure-
ment. For example, to measure a spectrum from 100 to 500 Hz, enter 500
for Frequency and 100 for Low Cutoff. The frequency range does not nec-
essarily have to match the range that has been previously defined for this
measurement point.
Frequency defines the maximum frequency of the measurement and is
specified in Hz or CPM, depending on the Frequency Units selection of the
analyzer’s Setup Parameters.
Low Cutoff defines the minimum displayed frequency of the measure-
ment. Although frequencies below this value are measured, they are not
displayed or used to determine the overall level.

Note
For Low Cutoff values greater than zero, the analyzer may
automatically update the value to the minimum frequency
achievable from the user's analysis setup. For lower frequen-
cies, reduce the Frequency value or increase the number of
lines of resolution.

Note
The Model 2120A uses pre-defined frequency values for data
acquisition. When specifying a value for Frequency and Low
Cutoff, the analyzer will select the next highest pre-defined fre-
quency value.

7-24 Analyze Mode


Lines
This parameter defines the number of lines of resolution used for the FFT
calculation. Select 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, or 3RD Octv. (See
“Third Octave Analysis” on page 8-7.)

3200
lines
100
lines

122

Frequency resolution determines how close two frequency peaks can be to


each other and still be distinguished as separate peaks. For the Model
2120A, resolution (in Hz) is defined as Frequency (Hz) divided by the
number of Lines. (As the maximum frequency is increased, the number of
lines must also be increased in order to maintain the same resolution.)

Acquire Spectrum 7-25


Window
The Window option is used to apply a shaping function to the waveform
signal before computing the FFT spectrum. The Hanning window’s
shaping smooths out end effects and reduces leakage in the spectrum, and
is therefore recommended for normal analyzer operation.
The Uniform window option does not apply any shaping and is subject to
leakage and amplitude errors. This window can be used when analyzing
transient signals that are completely contained within the analysis time
record length (see “Impact Testing” on page 8-13).

1
Amplitude

0
Time
Start of End of
window window
The Hanning window.

Averages
This selection determines the number of data samples or averages that are
to be collected and averaged together to perform the FFT calculation. Four
to ten averages are recommended for normal vibration measurement on
rotating machinery.

Init Setup
Select “Yes” to reset the analysis parameters to those of the currently
selected measurement point (in normal or off-route mode).

7-26 Analyze Mode


Units/Integration
This function allows you to change the display units and the integration
mode on this screen instead of accessing the Change Setup/Sensor Type
function under the Utility Functions key.
Select either Digital or Analog for the integration mode. See “Signal Inte-
grator Mode” on page 4-32 for more information.
For Units, select from the following (two Units fields are displayed for the
Model 2120-2):

ACCEL accelerometer

VELOC velocity probe

DISPL displacement probe

same as the sensor


SENSR
(no conversion)

Note
For information on dual-channel and simultaneous data acqui-
sition, see the section of this manual entitled “Dual-Channel
Considerations (Model 2120-2)” on page 3-54.

Note
The changes for Units and Integration are applicable to the
Analyze and Monitor spectrum modes only.

Note
The waveform units remain the same when using analog inte-
gration; however, the waveform units will be in sensor units if
digital integration is selected.

Acquire Spectrum 7-27


Acquire Spectrum setup screen two.

Average Mode
Select from the following averaging methods:
Normal - This is the normal averaging mode of the analyzer. The
power of each frequency line is summed and then divided by the
number of averages.
Peak Hold - In this mode, the power of each frequency line is mea-
sured and compared to the power of the same frequency line in the
averaged spectrum. The highest value is retained.
Synchronous - In synchronous averaging mode, each data sample is
synchronized via a tachometer pulse. The averages are computed in
the time domain and the spectrum is obtained from the average
waveform.
Order-Track - In this mode, a tachometer pulse is used to control the
data acquisition rate in order to account for changes in a machine’s
RPM.
Negative - In negative averaging mode, normal averaging is first
used to acquire a frequency spectrum. After the spectrum has been
acquired, another power spectrum is collected and subtracted from
the first. This allows two spectra to be subtracted.

Note
The Normal averaging mode should be used for most analyzer
operations. Other mode types may be used in special applica-
tions that are described in Chapter 7.

7-28 Analyze Mode


Trigger Mode
Trigger mode is used to capture particular events that occur within each
average. Press any key to step through the following selections:
• Off - Trigger mode is not activated and data collection begins when
the Enter key (or sensor button) is pressed.
• Normal - Data collection begins when a specified signal amplitude
(Trigger Level) has been exceeded.

Trigger
Level

Normal trigger mode.

• Tachometer - Data collection begins with the once-per-revolution


pulse from a tachometer (the Trigger Level variable is ignored).
• Pre-Tach - Allows you to use a tachometer trigger input signal in a
pre-trigger mode. A value must be specified for Percent Pre-Trigger
(Trigger Level is ignored).
• Pre-Trigger - This trigger mode allows you to specify a percentage
of time (Percent Pre-Trigger) that the data are captured before the
specified signal amplitude (Trigger Level) occurs.

Acquire Spectrum 7-29


Enter a value between 0 and 100% for Percent Pre-Trigger. (0% has the same
effect as Normal triggering mode.) The following example shows the above
waveform with Percent Pre-Trigger set to 50%.

Trigger
Level

0% 50% 100%
Pre-trigger mode (50% pre-trigger).

Dual-Channel Triggering (Model 2120-2)


When the Active Channel option is set to “Dual” (see “Active Channel
(Model 2120-2)” on page 7-34) and Trigger Mode is set to “Normal” or “Pre-
Trigger,” an additional field is displayed next to the Trigger Level field that
indicates which channel is to supply the trigger signal. This field can be
accessed (by pressing the down arrow key to highlight one step past the FS
Range field) to select either the A channel or the B channel.

trigger
channel

123

7-30 Analyze Mode


Trigger Level
This parameter is used to specify the amplitude level of the triggering signal
for Normal and Pre-Trigger modes. Triggering will occur at the specified
amplitude on the rising, positive edge of the waveform. The units of this
value depends on the type of sensor and the Signal Integration mode that
have been selected under the analyzer’s Utility functions.

Signal Integration
Trigger Level Units
Mode

Digital Sensor Units


Analog Display (Convert to) Units

For example, if the analyzer has been set up for analog integration, the units
under “Convert To” have been specified as velocity, and the sensor is an
accelerometer, the value for Trigger Level would be entered in inches per
second. If digital integration is used, the value would be entered in g’s.

Percent Pre-Trigger
This parameter specifies the percentage of time (0 to 100%) used for the Pre-
Trigger mode. A value of 0% places the trigger event at the start of the time
window, a value of 50% places the trigger event at the center of the time
window, etc.

Full-Scale Range
This parameter permits manual control of the analyzer’s signal input range.
Normally, this value should be set to zero (0.0) which instructs the analyzer
to autorange the signal input before each measurement.
When using the Model 2120A-2, separate fields are displayed for both
channels. The units used for Full-Scale Range are the same as displayed on
the waveform plot.

Acquire Spectrum 7-31


Acquire Spectrum setup screen three.

SST
The SST feature enables the analyzer to make accurate very low frequency
measurements. Normally, low frequency peaks are greatly attenuated when
an accelerometer is used and converted to velocity or displacement due to
the non-linear response of the integrators. The SST feature employs a spe-
cial correction technique that corrects the non-linear response and allows
peaks as low as 10 RPM to be accurately measured.

Note
For very low frequency measurements (down to 10 RPM), a
high sensitivity, low frequency sensor should be used. CSI’s
Model A0760GP accelerometer can generally be used down to
40 RPM. For frequencies lower than 40 RPM, please contact
CSI for the proper sensor recommendation.

Note
The SST feature cannot be used in conjunction with the
internal demodulator or PeakVue.

7-32 Analyze Mode


Note
The analyzer must be set to analog integration in order to use
the SST feature (see “Signal Integrator Mode” on page 4-32).
In normal route mode, the analyzer will automatically switch
to analog integration for the point using the SST feature if dig-
ital integration is being used. When using the SST feature in
the off route or Analyze mode, you must manually set the ana-
lyzer to analog integration if digital integration is being used.

A-Weighting
The A-Weighting feature applies a shape curve to the acquired frequency
spectrum that approximates the frequency sensitivity of the human ear.
This feature is typically used only for microphone signals, and is used when
the perceived “loudness” of the spectral lines is desired.

Triax Control
If you are using the triaxial accelerometer with the analyzer, specify which
signal is to be analyzed:
Off - This is the default setting that should be used if you are not
using the triaxial accelerometer.
Channel 1 - the signal on the first channel from the multifunction
input connector.
Channel 2 - the signal on the second channel from the multifunc-
tion input connector.
Channel 3 - the signal on the third channel from the multifunction
input connector.

Note
Triax Control must be set to “Off” in order to use Channel B
or to operate in the dual-channel mode (Model 2120-2).

Acquire Spectrum 7-33


Active Channel (Model 2120-2)
This parameter allows you to select which channel will be used to collect
the spectral data:
A - data collected on channel A.
B - data collected on channel B.
Dual - data collected on both channels A and B (dual-channel
operation; see “Dual-Channel Sensors” on page 3-12 and “Dual
Channel Mode” on page 4-35).

7-34 Analyze Mode


Acquire Spectrum setup screen four.

Demodulate
Select “Yes” to use the analyzer’s built-in demodulator. The internal
demodulator uses a user-specified band-pass or high-pass filter to remove
all low frequency components in the signal (see “PreFilter” on page 7-36).
The signal is then amplified and amplitude demodulated resulting in a low
frequency signal that consists of the envelope of the original signal.
The maximum frequency that can be analyzed with the built-in demodu-
lator is 5 kHz. There are nine pre-defined frequency ranges for the built-in
demodulator:

20 Hz 500 Hz
50 Hz 1 kHz
100 Hz 2 kHz
200 Hz 5 kHz
400 Hz

Any entered frequency value will automatically be adjusted by the analyzer


to the next highest pre-defined frequency value.

Acquire Spectrum 7-35


PeakVue
Select “Yes” to use the built-in peak value (PeakVue) analyzer. The input
signal is passed through a selectable bandpass or high-pass filter (PreFilter),
and then sampled with the peak detector. The resulting signal is then used
to generate the spectrum. PeakVue uses the same nine pre-defined fre-
quency ranges as used for the demodulator, plus a 10 kHz range.

Note
The Demodulate and PeakVue functions cannot be used
simultaneously.

PreFilter
This field is used to specify the filters for use with either the Demodulator
or the PeakVue function. Available filters are shown below.

Bandpass Filters Highpass Filters

20 to 150 Hz 500 Hz
50 to 300 Hz 1,000 Hz
100 to 600 Hz 2,000 Hz
500 to 1,000 Hz 5,000 Hz
5,000 to 6,000 Hz (PeakVue only) 10,000 Hz
20,000 Hz (PeakVue only)

Note
The selected filter frequency must be equal to or greater than
the specified maximum frequency (see “Frequency and Low
Cutoff” on page 7-24) or it will not be displayed on the selec-
tion list.

7-36 Analyze Mode


More detailed discussions on using PeakVue are presented in the applica-
tion papers “Vibration Analysis of Large Gearboxes Used In the Mining
Industry” and “Vibration Analysis of High Speed Multi-Drill Head Sta-
tions.” Contact CSI’s Customer Support for more information.

Acquire Spectrum 7-37


Monitor (Live) Mode
Monitor Mode permits the Model 2120A to function as a real-time mea-
suring instrument. In this mode, data are displayed but are not automati-
cally stored in either the scratchpad or route memory.

Monitor Mode menu.

Note
The Monitor option is available on the original Model 2120
Analyzer Functions menu. It is also available on the Model
2120A Expert Analysis menu as the F4 Live Mode function
key.

Note
Data can be manually saved or recalled using function keys as
described in “Data Storage Functions” on page 7-48.

Note
The most recently collected data samples (up to 1600) can be
saved, displayed, and stored (if required) by the analyzer in
Monitor Overall, Monitor DC, and Monitor Battery modes.

7-38 Analyze Mode


Monitor Spectrum
The parameters for Monitor Spectrum are basically the same as for Acquire
Spectrum discussed previously, with the exception that no parameter is
available for Averages, as the monitor display is continuous. Also, negative
averaging is not available. Refer to the Acquire Spectrum parameter
descriptions beginning in “Acquire Spectrum” on page 7-23 for information
on Monitor Spectrum parameters.

Monitor Spectrum setup screen one.

Monitor Spectrum setup screen two.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-39


Monitor Spectrum setup screen three.

Note
Since the correction factor is applied after all averaging is
done, the SST feature will not work in Live mode. In Live
mode the averaging is continuous.

Monitor Spectrum setup screen four.

7-40 Analyze Mode


After the parameters have been defined, press the Enter key to begin mon-
itoring. The analyzer screen will show a single “snapshot” spectral plot that
will update with each sample. Pressing the Enter key during monitoring will
“freeze” the screen (“Measurement Suspended” will be displayed below the
plot) and the plot can then be examined more closely. Press the Enter key
a second time to resume real-time display.
The cursor, up/down arrows, Exp, Dec, and Mark keys and the X Log, Y
Log, and CPM/Order Units function keys can be used in the same manner
as in Display Spectrum for both real-time and freeze type displays.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-41


Monitor Waveform
Monitor Waveform functions in a like manner to Monitor Spectrum except
that only waveforms are displayed—the analyzer performs similarly to an
oscilloscope.

124

125

7-42 Analyze Mode


126

All parameters, except for Sweep Size, are set up the same way as in
Acquire Spectrum. The freeze feature also applies to Monitor Waveform
display.
The cursor, up/down arrows, Exp and Dec keys can be used in the same
manner as in Display Spectrum for both real-time and freeze type displays.

Sweep Size
Sweep Size determines the number of data samples (50 to 4096) that are
collected by the analyzer for a waveform display. The sample time period
is equal to the Sweep Size divided by 2.56 times Frequency (Hz).
Sweep Size
T (in seconds) =
2.56 x Fmax (in Hz)
127

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-43


Tachometer Lines
When using Monitor Waveform with a tachometer input (Trig Mode set
to “Tach”), dotted lines will be overlaid on the display to show the location
of the tachometer pulses.

128

Waveform Units
This function specifies the units that will be used for the waveform plot.
When using two channel analysis, separate units can be assigned to each
channel. Select from the following:

ACCEL accelerometer

VELOC velocity probe

DISPL displacement probe

same as the sensor


SENSR
(no conversion)

Note
Analog integration is used for waveform unit conversion.

7-44 Analyze Mode


Monitor Overall
Displays a real-time trend plot of the overall signal level over a specified
period of time.

Monitor Overall screen—Analog.

Monitor Overall screen—Digital.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-45


If the Overall Level Mode parameter, from the analyzer’s Utility func-
tions, is set for analog, then the overall signal level will include all frequen-
cies from 1 Hz to 80 kHz. If the Overall Level Mode parameter is set for
digital, then the frequency band from which the overall signal level is
obtained is programmable in the “Monitor Overall” parameter screen.

Monitor Overall plot.

As illustrated above, the right-hand side of the plot contains the most cur-
rent reading (indicated at the top right-hand side of the plot) that is shifted
towards the left on each update.
The Enter key can be used to freeze the display. While in the freeze mode,
the up/down arrows can be used to increase or decrease the amplitude
scale.

Time Span
This parameter determines the displayed time span of the trend plot and is
entered in seconds from 10 to 60,000. The time span can also be changed
while in freeze mode using the Exp and Dec keys.

Alarm Level
This field can be used to establish an alarm level for the measurement. If
the measurement exceeds the specified alarm level, the analyzer will dis-
play an alarm message on the plot and issue a warning beep. This value is
entered in the current “convert to” units of the analyzer. Enter zero (0.0) to
disable the alarm feature.

7-46 Analyze Mode


Lower/Upper Frequency
These parameters specify the lower and upper cutoff frequencies, thereby
creating a frequency band from which the overall signal levels will be mea-
sured.

Sample Time
The Sample Time field can be used to specify a time delay between mea-
surement samples.

Averages
The Averages parameter controls how many measurements are taken and
averaged together before plotting a level on the Overall trend plot display.
One average is suitable for most usage. Under certain circumstances, how-
ever, multiple averages may be required to remove amplitude fluctuations
from a signal.

A-Weighting
If this parameter is set to “On,” A-Weighting will be applied to the input sig-
nals before the overall level is computed. A-Weighting is discussed in detail
in “Acoustic Analysis” on page 8-1 and “Third Octave Analysis” on page
8-7. Set this parameter to Off for normal operation.

Note
The trend plot contains a maximum of 1600 samples. If more
than 1600 samples are collected, only the last 1600 will actually
be retained.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-47


Data Storage Functions
Two data storage options are available while in the Monitor Overall mode:
• The F6 key can be used to manually store collected data. With the
F6 plot containing the desired data displayed, press the Enter key to
freeze the display. Then press the F6 key to save the current data in
the analyzer’s memory. Press the Enter key again to resume col-
lecting data.
• While displaying the Monitor Overall parameter menu, either the
Page
Up Page Up or Page Down key can be used to display a list of previously
stored data. Data from this list can be recalled and displayed by high-
Page lighting the desired data with the up/down arrow keys and then
Down
pressing the Enter key.

129

While displaying the recalled data, the F1 key can be used to display a list
F1 of data point values.

130

7-48 Analyze Mode


Monitor Temperature
The Monitor Temperature mode is used with a temperature probe to mon-
itor the fluctuation of temperature. The temperature readout will be dis-
played in degrees Fahrenheit (if Data Units in Utility functions has been set
to English) or degrees Centigrade (if Data Units has been set to Metric).

131

After selecting Monitor Temperature from the Monitor Mode menu, the
analyzer screen will prompt you to connect a temperature probe. Measure-
ments will begin after the Enter key has been pressed and the analyzer will
then continuously update the display until the Enter key has been pressed
again.

132

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-49


Monitor Peak/Phase
This function is used to collect and display synchronous peak and phase
measurements as a function of a machine’s RPM. This feature is primarily
used for displaying data collected during machine startup or coastdown,
and requires a once-per-revolution tachometer pulse in addition to the
vibration signal.

Monitor Peak/Phase menu.

Note
While the Monitor Peak/Phase menu is displayed, the Page Up
or Page Down key can be used to display and select from a list
of previously stored Monitor Peak/Phase data (see “Displaying
Stored Data” on page 7-58).

Order (xRPM)
Enter a multiple of the machine’s RPM to be tracked. Typically, this will be
a value of 1 which will measure the peak and phase of the 1xRPM fre-
quency component.

7-50 Analyze Mode


Bandwidth (xRPM)
The Bandwidth parameter specifies the bandwidth of the tracking filter that
is used to attenuate all frequency components except the desired peak.
The bandwidth of the filter is defined as the frequency of the peak times the
bandwidth parameter. In the following example, the machine turning
speed is 60 Hz and the bandwidth parameter has been specified as 0.20.
Therefore, the filter bandwidth is 12 Hz.
1.00

12 Hz

IN/SEC

0.00
0.00 Hz 200
60 Hz
133

This parameter will accept values from 0.04 to 0.5 with 0.2 being the rec-
ommended value for most applications. A more narrow filter (lower
numerical value) will attenuate frequency components that are close to the
desired peak; however, more time will be required for the analyzer to take
a measurement.

Averager Enabled
With this function set to “Yes,” each new measurement will be vector aver-
aged with the previous measurements. This feature may be useful if:
• The peak or phase readings fluctuate from measurement to measure-
ment.
• The frequency of interest is being modulated by near-by frequency
components.

Minimum RPM
Enter a minimum RPM value. If the measured RPM is less than this value,
no data collection or analysis will be performed.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-51


Tachometer Timeout
This option determines how the analyzer will respond if no tachometer
pulses are detected. When set to “Yes,” the analyzer will wait approxi-
mately five seconds before displaying a message if no tachometer pulses are
present. When set to “No,” the analyzer will wait indefinitely before starting
the measurement if no tachometer pulses are present.

Full-Scale Range
This parameter permits manual control of the analyzer’s signal input range.
Normally, this value should be set to zero (0.0) which instructs the analyzer
to autorange the signal input before each measurement.
The units used for Full-Scale Range are the same as displayed on the wave-
form plot.

Active Channel (Model 2120-2)


This parameter allows you to select which channel will be used to collect
the data:
A - data collected on channel A.
B - data collected on channel B.
Dual - data collected on both channels A and B (dual-channel
mode).

7-52 Analyze Mode


Peak/Phase Measurement
After the associated parameters have been defined, press the Enter key to
start the measurement. RPM, amplitude, and phase data will be displayed
during the measurement process and will also be retained in an internal,
temporary memory area. New data are stored whenever the RPM value
changes by more than one percent from the previously stored RPM value.

134

At any time, the measurements can be interrupted and the stored data dis-
played in the form of a Bode or Nyquist plot.

Note
When using the Averager function, the Clear key can be used
to clear out all of the previous averages, starting the averaging
process over again.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-53


Note
When a machine is operating in steady state, the displayed
RPM should vary by only a few RPM. If the displayed RPM
is erratic (if it varies from measurement to measurement by
more than a few percent), there is almost certainly something
wrong with the tachometer signal input into the analyzer. This
is particularly true if the displayed RPM reading occasionally
errs by a factor of two (usually caused by double triggering of
the tachometer).

Under these circumstances, the Peak and Phase readings will


be useless even if the erratic readings are only occasional. The
problem with the tachometer signal must be resolved before
valid Peak and Phase measurements can be obtained.

7-54 Analyze Mode


Peak/Phase Display Functions
In order to display the collected Peak/Phase data, press the Enter key to
interrupt the measurement process. From the Display Functions menu,
select one of four ways to display the collected data, select Collect More
Data to repeat the measurement process using the existing parameters, or
select Store Data to save the acquired data.

Display Functions menu.

Note
To collect more data with different parameter definitions,
return to the Monitor Mode menu.

Peak vs. RPM


This display will plot the collected data as amplitude versus RPM.

135

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-55


Phase vs. RPM
This display option will plot the collected data as phase versus RPM.

Phase vs. RPM display.

Dual Bode Plot


The Dual Bode option displays both the Peak versus RPM plot and the
Phase versus RPM plot at the same time.

136

7-56 Analyze Mode


Nyquist Plot
This option displays the collected data in terms of polar coordinates as a
function of RPM.

Nyquist plot.

Dual-Channel Data (Model 2120-2)


When displaying Peak/Phase data that have been collected in the dual-
F6 channel mode, the analyzer will display Channel A data first in a single plot
format. The F6 key can be used to toggle between the two channels.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-57


Displaying Stored Data
The data saved using the Store Data function (see “Peak/Phase Display
Functions” on page 7-55) can be displayed in any of the previously
described plot types. With the Monitor Peak/Phase initial menu displayed,
press either Page key to display a list of stored data.

137

Select the desired data using the up/down arrow keys, and press the Enter
key. From the following menu, select the type of plot (Peak vs. RPM, Phase
vs. RPM, or Nyquist) or select Peak/Phase Setup to return to the Monitor
Peak/Phase menu.

138

7-58 Analyze Mode


Monitor DC
Monitor DC displays a real-time trend plot of a DC signal over a specified
period of time. This function is similar to Monitor Overall except that it is
used to monitor DC-type signals, for example, a pressure sensor.

Monitor DC plot.

Monitor DC menu.

Time Span
This parameter determines the displayed time span of the trend plot and is
entered in seconds from 10 to 60,000. The time span can also be changed
during display by using the Exp and Dec keys.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-59


Alarm Level
This field can be used to establish an alarm level for the measurement. If
the measurement exceeds the specified alarm level, the analyzer will dis-
play an alarm message on the plot and issue a warning beep. This value is
entered in the current “convert to” units of the analyzer. Enter zero (0.0) to
disable the alarm feature.

Units
This parameter specifies the units that will be used for the amplitude axis
of the plot.

Sensitivity
This parameter specifies the volts per unit that are produced by the sensor.

Sample Time
This parameter specifies the time (in seconds) between measurement sam-
ples.

Storing and Recalling Data


To store the displayed DC signal data, press the Enter to freeze the plot.
F6 Then press the F6 key to store the data. Press the Enter key again to resume
data collection.
Stored data can be recalled from the Monitor DC parameter menu. Press
Page either Page key to display a list of stored data. Highlight the desired data
Up
with the up/down arrow keys and press the Enter key.
Page
Down

139

While displaying the recalled data, the F1 key can be used to display a list
F1 of data point values.

7-60 Analyze Mode


Monitor Battery
Monitor Battery is an analyzer diagnostic function that can be used to deter-
mine the health of the battery pack. For this function, Time Span is auto-
matically set up for 60 minutes and Sample Time for 40 seconds. This data
can be stored and recalled in the same manner as for Monitor DC.
A battery in good condition will show a relatively straight line (steady
voltage) on the expanded plot for a period of approximately 11 hours.

140

Monitor “Filtered” Orbit


Monitor Orbit is a feature available in firmware versions 7.43 or later.

Orbit Plots
The term orbit plot is usually taken to mean the trace of the relative move-
ment of the centerline of a rotating shaft with respect to some reference
point. The Model 2120A-2 Machinery Analyzer has the ability to create an
orbit plot using the waveform data from any dual measurement point pair.
Time waveform data is normally plotted as amplitude (vertical) verses time
(horizontal). The same waveform data, two channels worth, can be used to
generate an orbit plot by plotting channel A amplitude (vertical) vs. channel
B amplitude (horizontal). The resulting display pattern represents the
movement of the shaft centerline.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-61


Orbit plots can be generated using normal dual channel time waveform
data, but this requires the user to setup the acquisition to collect the correct
amount of data to generate a good orbit plot and does not provide filtering.
Using the Monitor Orbit feature eliminates the complicated setup. Filtering
the data provides added benefit:
• Only the frequencies of interest are included in the orbit plot.
• The orbit plot will be less complex so the pattern will be easier to rec-
ognize.
Either a Low Pass or a Band Pass filter can be used.

Band Pass Mode


If the Filter Type is set to Band Pass, the analyzer calculates peak and phase
data for both channels using a tachometer input. It then creates two wave-
forms from the peak and phase data and plots these values in the X (hori-
zontal) and Y (vertical) directions. The orbit plot is then a representation of
a perfectly band pass filtered signal. It is useful for analyzing the phase rela-
tionship between the two channels at a specific order of the turning speed.

141

7-62 Analyze Mode


Orbit Orders
The Orbit Orders parameter is used to select between 1X, 2X, or 3X the
RPM.

Bandwidth
The bandwidth parameter specifies the width of the filter around the
selected frequency. This value is expressed as a fraction of RPM and can
range from 0.02 to 1.00.
Example:
If the tachometer measures a turning speed of 1800 RPM, the 1X order is
selected, and the bandwidth parameter is set to 0.10, the actual bandwidth
is 180 RPM (3 Hz), or 1710 to 1890 RPM (28.5 to 31.5 Hz). This is the band
of frequencies that will be included in the orbit plot.

Note
Using the Band Pass mode requires a tachometer.

Note
The time waveform data created in band pass mode cannot be
saved.

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-63


Low Pass Mode
If the Filter Type is set to Low Pass, the analyzer performs low pass filtering
on the data as it is collected. All frequencies above the selected multiple of
RPM value are filtered out. The actual collected waveform data are then
plotted in the orbit. Since this method creates a plot that includes all fre-
quencies from the desired order level and lower, it will show the more com-
plex orbits that can indicate rubs, misalignment, or oil whip.

142

Orbit Orders
The orbit orders parameter is used to select the maximum frequency of the
low pass filter. This setting is specified by selecting 1X, 2X, or 3X the RPM.
The RPM can either be measured using the tachometer or entered manu-
ally using the keypad.

No. Revs
The No. Revs (Number of Revolutions) parameter specifies the number of
shaft revolutions to acquire and display in the orbit plot. This value can be
a whole number from 1 through 9.

7-64 Analyze Mode


Use Tach
The Use Tach parameter can be set to Yes or No. Select Yes to use the
tachometer to measure the RPM. Select No to enter the RPM manually. If
the tachometer is used, the low pass filter value will be constantly updated
for changing machine speeds.

143

Manual RPM
The Manual RPM parameter appears when Use Tach is set to No. It allows
manual entry of the turning speed to use for specifying the filter range. The
RPM may be set to a value from 300 RPM to 18,000 RPM. The low pass
filter will be fixed to this value.

Data Acquisition
After all parameters are set, pressing the ENTER key will start monitoring
the filtered orbit acquisition. The analyzer screen will show a live time orbit
plot.

144

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-65


Channel A is plotted on the Y axis against Channel B on the X axis. The
line from the center of the plot area indicates the first point in the wave-
form. This line will give some indication of the tachometer location.

Note
The phase location of this line is meaningless if the tachometer
is not used in a Low Pass acquisition.

Pressing the Enter key while monitoring will “freeze” the display (“Mea-
surement Suspended” will be displayed below the plot) and the plot can
then be examined more closely. Press the Enter key a second time to
resume real-time display.
The cursor, up/down arrows, Exp and Dec keys are used the same manner
as for other plot types for both real-time and suspended displays. When the
plot is frozen, the function keys are activated (Low Pass mode only).

145

The Save Data function key will save both channels of the time waveform
SAVE data to the current dual channel route point. The time waveform data can
DATA
then be transferred to Master Trend or RBMware as Analyze Mode data
for further analysis.

Note
The FMAX value shown in Master Trend or RBMware is inde-
pendent of the filter setup for a filtered orbit acquisition. This
value can be used to determine the sample rate or Dt of the
time waveform data using the following relationships:

7-66 Analyze Mode


Sample Rate = 2.56 × FMAX = 1/∆t

Note
The Save Data function key is only available if the current
measurement point is a dual route point.

The Time Waveform function key will switch the display from an orbit plot
TIME
WAVFM display to a time waveform plot display. The display will be a dual channel
plot with waveforms from both channels displayed.

146

The Show Orbit function key will switch the display back to an orbit plot.
SHOW
ORBIT The Show A Channel function key will switch the display to a full size A
SHOW
channel time waveform plot.
A CHN

147

Monitor (Live) Mode 7-67


The Show B Channel function key will switch the display to a full size B
SHOW
B CHN channel time waveform plot.

148

The Show 2 Channel function key will switch the display to a dual time
SHOW
2 CHN waveform plot.

7-68 Analyze Mode


Zoom Analysis
The Model 2120A’s Zoom Analysis option enables you to obtain a high res-
olution 800-line spectral plot over a narrow frequency band.

Note
The Zoom Analysis function is available on the original Model
2120 Analyzer Function menu. It is also available on the Model
2120A’s Expert Analysis menu as the F5 True Zoom function
key.

Setting up Zoom Analysis

149

Low Cutoff and Bandwidth


These variables determine the frequency range over which the analysis will
be performed. Enter a Low Cutoff value to specify the desired low-fre-
quency end of the spectrum. Enter a Bandwidth value to specify the
desired frequency range above the Low Cutoff frequency.

Zoom Analysis 7-69


1.00

0.0
190 Hz 210
Zoom Analysis spectrum with Low Cutoff set at 190 Hz, Bandwidth set at 20 Hz.

Window
Select Uniform or Hanning window. The Uniform window is sometimes
used for special applications; however, the Hanning window is recom-
mended for normal analyzer operation (see “Window” on page 7-26).

Averages
The Averages variable determines the number of data samples or averages
that are to be collected and averaged together to perform the FFT calcula-
tion.

Trig Mode
This function allows you to use the tachometer trigger mode when using
zoom analysis. When set to “Tach,” data collection will begin with the once-
per-revolution pulse from a tachometer. Select “Off” to disable the trigger
mode.

Active Channel (Model 2120-2)


This parameter allows you to select which channel will be used to collect
the spectral data:
A - data collected on channel A.
B - data collected on channel B.
Dual - data collected on both channels A and B (dual-channel
mode).

7-70 Analyze Mode


Acquiring and Displaying Data
After the parameters have been specified, press the Enter key to begin the
data acquisition process. After the data have been acquired, the zoom anal-
ysis spectral plot will be displayed.

150

Function Keys
Y LOG The Y Log Scale key can be used to change the Y axis (amplitude) of the
SCALE plot to a log format. Press the Y Lin Scale key to return to the linear Y axis
format.

151

Zoom Analysis 7-71


CPM The CPM Units key displays the frequency axis in CPM units.
UNITS

152

ORDER The Order Units key displays the frequency axis in orders.
UNITS

153

7-72 Analyze Mode


HZ The Hz Units key can be used to return to the Hz frequency display.
UNITS

SAVE This key will be available if there is data to be saved.


DATA

154

Zoom Analysis 7-73


Model 2120A-2 Additional Keys
SHOW The Show A Channel key (displayed in the dual-channel mode) displays
A CHN channel A in a single-plot format.
SHOW The Show B Channel key (displayed in dual-channel mode after the Show
B CHN A Channel key has been pressed) displays channel B in a single-plot format.
SHOW The Show 2 Channels key (displayed in dual-channel mode after the Show
2 CHN B Channel key has been pressed) returns to the dual-plot format.

Note
To store zoom analysis data, return to the Analyzer Functions
menu, and select Store Data (see “Store Data” on page 7-21.)
Zoom data can be stored on a normal or off route point and
dumped into the RBMware/MasterTrend database.

Note
Dual-channel data collected in the zoom analysis mode (Model
2120-2) cannot be saved to a measurement point that is speci-
fied in the RBMware/MasterTrend database as single channel.
Attempts to do so results in saving channel A only. Dual-
channel data can, however, be saved on any measurement
point specified as dual channel—including off route dual-
channel points.

Note
Only spectra can be stored with zoom analysis—trend and
waveform data are not stored.

7-74 Analyze Mode


Cross Channel Phase (Model 2120-2)
The Cross Channel Phase function uses cross-channel spectra to calculate
phase and coherence relationships between the two channels. Two different
options allow the analyzer to monitor a single frequency or to acquire full
spectral plots.

Note
The Cross Channel Phase function is available on the original
Model 2120 Analyzer Functions menu. It is also available on
the Model 2120A Expert Analysis menu as the F6 Cross Spec-
trum function key.

Single Frequency Monitor


On the Model 2120A, the Single Frequency Monitor function has been
replaced by an Expert Analysis option. However, it is available on the orig-
inal Model 2120 as follows.
The Single Frequency Monitor option calculates the cross power phase
relationship between channels A and B at a specified frequency, and also
calculates a coherence value for this relationship.

155

Frequency - The Frequency variable is used to specify the maximum fre-


quency (in Hz) of the measurement. For example, a value of 250 will mea-
sure the spectrum from 0 to 250 Hz.

Cross Channel Phase (Model 2120-2) 7-75


Phase Frequency - The Phase Frequency variable specifies the frequency
at which the cross power phase and coherence are calculated. Enter the
desired frequency in Hz.
Also, the Mark key can be used on a displayed spectrum to automatically
Mark enter the Phase Frequency. Move the cursor on the plot to the desired fre-
quency peak and press the Mark key. Then select Cross Channel Phase
from the Analyze key menu. The Phase Frequency field will be set to the
frequency that was marked on the spectrum.
Lines - The Lines parameter specifies the number of lines of resolution that
will be used for the FFT calculation. Select 100, 200, 400, 800, or 1600. (See
“Lines” on page 7-25 for more information on lines of resolution.)

Acquiring and Displaying Data


After the parameters have been specified, press the Enter key to begin the
measurement. During the measurement the following screen displays the
exact frequency for which the cross power phase and coherence are calcu-
lated, the current number of averages, amplitude of both channels, and the
cross phase and coherence calculations.

156

CLEAR The Clear Averages key can be used to clear out all of the previous aver-
AVERG ages, starting the averaging process over again.
RESET The Reset Frequency key returns to the setup screen.
FREQ

7-76 Analyze Mode


PAUSE The Pause key temporarily stops the measurement process. Press the Start
key to resume the measurement.

Note
Cross Channel Phase data cannot be dumped to or stored in
the RBMware/MasterTrend database.

Full Plot Acquire


This function acquires spectra with a specified number of averages and dis-
plays a full spectral plot of coherence and phase, as well as the spectra of
both channels.

157

Frequency and Low Cutoff - These two parameters are used to determine
the bandwidth of the measurement. For example, to measure a spectrum
from 100 to 500 Hz, enter 500 for Frequency and 100 for Low Cutoff.
Frequency defines the maximum frequency of the measurement and is
specified in Hz or CPM, depending on the Frequency Units selection of the
analyzer’s Setup Parameters.
Low Cutoff defines the minimum displayed frequency of the measure-
ment. Although frequencies below this value are measured, they are not
displayed.

Cross Channel Phase (Model 2120-2) 7-77


Lines - This parameter defines the number of lines of resolution used for
the FFT calculation. Select 100, 200, 400, 800, or 1600 lines.
Window - Select either Hanning or Uniform (shaping function) as the
window that will be applied to the waveform signal before computing the
FFT spectrum. See “Window” on page 7-26 for more information.
Averages - This selection determines the number of data samples or aver-
ages that are to be collected and averaged together to perform the FFT cal-
culation. Four to ten averages are recommended for normal vibration
measurement on rotating machinery.
FS Range - This field can be used to specify a fixed amplitude axis for spec-
tral displays. Enter the upper amplitude value in the same units as dis-
played on the waveform plot. The same FS Range will be applied to both
A and B channels.
Enter “0.0” to instruct the analyzer to automatically scale the amplitude
axis.
Intg - The integration mode (Intg) allows you to select the mode (digital or
analog) that will be used to convert from sensor units to data units. See
“Signal Integrator Mode” on page 4-32 for more information.
Units - The Units parameter specifies the units for the analyzer’s spectrum
plot only.

Current Data
Press one of the Page keys to display data that is currently in the analyzer’s
Page scratchpad memory. Once collected, the data will stay in the scratchpad
Up
memory until another data acquisition is performed.
Page
Down

7-78 Analyze Mode


Plot Display
After data acquisition, the Full Plot Acquire data is displayed in a dual plot
as shown below.

158

The Change Plot key allows you to independently change the type of data
CHNG
PLOT that is displayed in the upper and lower plots

159

Cross Channel Phase (Model 2120-2) 7-79


Select from the following list:
A Channel Waveform Displays the waveform from the A channel signal
B Channel Waveform Displays the waveform from the B channel signal
A Channel Spectrum Displays the spectrum from the A channel signal
B Channel Spectrum Displays the spectrum from the B channel signal
Coherence Describes the degree of linear relationship
between the two signals
Phase Displays the phase relationship of the A channel
and B channel signals
Off (upper plot only) Turns the upper plot off so that the lower plot is
displayed full screen.

Note
When a spectrum or waveform is displayed on a cross-channel
plot, many of the function and control keys that are used to
control the plot display are available. See “Plot Display Con-
trol Keys” on page 7-5 and “Plot Display Function Keys” on
page 7-11 for descriptions of the functions.

7-80 Analyze Mode


Chapter 8

Advanced Techniques

Acoustic Analysis

Acoustic Noise Monitoring


CSI has incorporated several features in the Model 2120A analyzer that
allow it to be used for acoustic noise monitoring of machinery. These fea-
tures include:
• compatibility with microphone signals,
• the ability to display sound level and narrowband spectra in dB.

Microphone Inputs
The CSI Model 2120A is capable of directly connecting to microphones
that produce an output voltage that is proportional to sound pressure level.
The specifications of the Model 2120A that relate to microphone input sig-
nals are:
• Model 2120A Input Impedance: greater than 200K Ω
• Model 2120A Input Noise Floor: 10 µV or better.
CSI recommends that microphones used with the Model 2120A have an
output impedance of less than 10K ohms. In addition, the noise sensitivity
of the microphone should be such that the lowest sound level that is to be
measured translates to an output voltage level of greater than 10 microvolts.
If this is not so, a microphone preamplifier should be used to amplify the
signal before it is input into the Model 2120. Microphone signals should be
connected to the analyzer’s multifunction input connector using a “volts
input” adapter (CSI Model 622 or 625 Adapter) shown in the following
illustration.

8-1
Model 625 Adapter.

Setup
To set up the Model 2120A for use with a microphone, access the Change
Setup function of the Utility key. Select Sensor Type from the menu and
enter the following parameters:

Sensor Type Micrphn

Convert To ————

Sensitivity (See following comments)

Units Standard

Sensor Pwr Off

8-2 Advanced Techniques


Note
The CSI model A0344MC has a built in pre-amplifier and is
powered by the 2120.

Sensor Type Micrphn

Convert To ————

Sensitivity (See following comments)

Units Standard

Sensor Pwr On

Setup is similar to an accelerometer.

8-3
When the Model 2120A Sensor Type is set to “Microphone,” all data are
automatically displayed in dB. The sensitivity value should be entered in
volts per Pascal (a Pascal equals 1 newton per square meter). For some
microphones, determining this sensitivity can be rather difficult. Some
manufacturers specify this sensitivity in terms of the sensor output voltage
at a reference sound pressure level (for example, 1 volt equals 90 dB). To
compute sensitivity from this information, use the following formula:
V
S=
D
(2 x 10 x 10-5) (10 x 10 )
20
160

Where:
S = microphone sensitivity in volts per Pascal.
D = reference sound pressure level (in dB).
V = Microphone output voltage at reference sound pressure.
If a preamplifier is used with the microphone, the sensitivity of the micro-
phone must be multiplied by the gain of the preamplifier to specify the cor-
rect sensitivity value. For example, a microphone with a sensitivity of
0.0632 volts per Pascal is used with a preamplifier that has a gain of 10 (+20
dB). The sensitivity value entered should be 0.632.

8-4 Advanced Techniques


Calibrating The Microphone
If the exact sensitivity of the microphone is not known, the microphone can
be calibrated using a microphone calibrator. In this case, the exact value
that is entered for the sensor sensitivity is not important (since you are going
to be measuring and correcting the sensitivity value that was entered during
the calibration process). If an approximate value is not known, enter “1.00”
for the sensitivity.
Each microphone calibrator generates a tone at a single frequency that has
a specific sound pressure level (in dB). To calibrate the microphone:
1.···· Turn on the calibrator.
2. ··· Connect the microphone to the Model 2120A input and set up the
Sensor Type parameters discussed in “Setup” on page 8-2.
3. ··· Place the microphone directly over the noise source.
4. ··· Press the Analyze key, select Acquire Spectrum and set up the
parameters for a typical analysis as follows:

Frequency 10,000 Hz
Low Cutoff 0
Lines 400
Windows Hanning
Averages 16
Averaging Mode Normal
Units/Integration Sensor/Analog
Trig Mode Off
%Pre Trig 0
FS Range 0.0
A-Weight Off

8-5
5. ··· Press the Enter key and acquire the frequency spectrum.
6. ··· When the acquisition of the spectrum is complete, move the cursor
(using the right/left arrow keys) to the top of the largest peak. This
peak will correspond to the tone generated by the calibrator. If the
frequency of this peak does not correspond to the calibrator
frequency (or if you cannot locate a peak), there is a problem either
with the microphone, the connections to the analyzer, or the
parameters specified under Sensor Type.

161

7.···· When you are satisfied that this peak is at the correct frequency, press
the Insert key. The analyzer will ask you to enter the reference sound
level (in dB) of the calibrator. Enter this reference sound pressure
level, and the analyzer will recompute the microphone sensitivity and
display the results. It will also correct the value that was previously
entered for sensitivity in order to account for the calibration.

Note
This new sensitivity will be used for all subsequent data collec-
tion.

A-Weighting
The A-Weighting feature applies a shape curve to the acquired frequency
spectrum that approximates the frequency sensitivity of the human ear.
This feature is typically used only for microphone signals, and is used when
the perceived “loudness” of the spectral lines is desired.

8-6 Advanced Techniques


Third Octave Analysis
Third octave analysis can be activated by setting the Lines parameter on
the Acquire Spectrum selection to 3RD OCTV. This results in the measure-
ment of third octave bands starting at 10 Hz and ending at 20 kHz center
frequency.
The analyzer simultaneously makes an 800-line high frequency measure-
ment of 0 to 40 kHz and a 1600-line low frequency measurement of 0 to 2
kHz. The analyzer then computes the third octave display from the
resulting two spectra.
The value specified for Averages applies to the low frequency measure-
ment. Since the high frequency measurement can be made more quickly
than the low frequency measurement, many high frequency averages are
collected and averaged together for each average of the low spectrum.

Third Octave spectrum display.

Third Octave Analysis 8-7


Note
The Low Cutoff parameter on the Acquire Spectrum menu
only determines the minimum frequency for the Overall calcu-
lation. The maximum Frequency parameter is not used.

Note
When printing third octave spectra using the Model 720
Printer Adapter, the associated third octave values will be
printed in addition to the spectrum.

A-Weighting
The A-Weighting feature applies a shape curve to the acquired frequency
spectrum that approximates the frequency sensitivity of the human ear.
This feature is typically used only for microphone signals when the per-
ceived “loudness” of the spectral lines is desired.

8-8 Advanced Techniques


Synchronous Time Averaging
Synchronous averaging is a technique for collecting time waveforms that
are synchronized to a once-per-rev tachometer pulse. These synchronous
time waveforms are then averaged together (in the time domain), and the
resulting frequency spectrum of this averaged waveform is displayed on the
analyzer screen. Synchronous time averaging is used when you want to
measure only vibration that is directly, harmonically related to the turning
speed of a specific shaft.
Synchronous averaging is often used when there are several machines (or
shafts on one machine), each of which turn at a slightly different speed. It is
possible to use synchronous averaging to remove the vibration of the other
machines from the signal, so that only the vibration from the reference
machine remains.
Synchronous averaging can be used only when you have a tachometer pro-
viding a once-per-rev pulse. The machine shaft on which the tachometer is
located identifies the “reference” shaft. Vibration resulting from other shafts
(turning at other speeds) will be averaged away. Also, vibration from the
reference shaft that is not harmonically related to the turning speed will be
averaged away.
Several points to keep in mind when using synchronous averaging are:
• You must have a good, steady once-per-revolution tachometer pulse.
If not, you will get incorrect results when you synchronously
average.
• Synchronous averaging does not eliminate non-synchronous vibra-
tion—it reduces it. The amount of reduction depends on the number
of averages you take, and can be computed from the following for-
mula:
reduction factor = number of averages
162

For example, if you take 100 averages, the nonsynchronous vibration


will be reduced by a factor of 10. If you take 10,000 averages, the
nonsynchronous vibration will be reduced by factor of 100. Obvious-
ly, you will very quickly get to the point of diminishing returns.

Synchronous Time Averaging 8-9


• If Averg Mode (on the Acquire Spectrum menu) is set to “Synchro-
nous,” the Trig Mode will automatically be set to “Tach.” The rec-
ommended values for the remaining parameters are:

Frequency (anything desired, typically 200 Hz)


Low Cutoff 0
Lines (limited to 1600, typically 400)
Window Hanning
Averages (anything desired, typically 100)
Init Setup No
Averaging Mode Synchronous
Trig Mode (will be set to Tach automatically)
Trig Level 0 (this parameter is ignored)
% Pre Trig 0 (this parameter is ignored)
FS Range 0.0
A-Weight No
Demodulate No

• When the synchronous averaging process is complete, the averaged


spectrum is automatically displayed. If Display Waveform is selected
using the Page key or the Analyze key function, the synchronously
averaged waveform will be displayed.

Note
The waveform is limited to a maximum of 4096 points, which
corresponds to a 1600-line spectrum. More lines may be used
in the frequency analysis but cannot be saved in the waveform.

• Synchronous averaging automatically adjusts for speed variations of


the machine, typically from one half to twice the initial speed. The
averaged spectrum will always show the 1x, 2x, 3x, (etc.) RPM peaks
at a frequency that corresponds to the average machine RPM during
the measurement process.

8-10 Advanced Techniques


Order Tracking
Order tracking is an averaging technique that allows the Model 2120A to
automatically adjust its data acquisition to account for the changes in the
turning speed (RPM) of a machine. It is used primarily on variable speed
machines. Because of the varying speed, the peaks associated with certain
machine faults often get “smeared” over many frequencies on the spectral
display.
As a result, it is often very difficult to determine which peak is associated
with 1xRPM, 2xRPM, etc., and usually impossible to identify bearing fault
frequencies, belt frequencies, and other characteristic fault frequencies.
Order tracking allows the Model 2120A to automatically adjust for changes
in RPM so that these peaks do not get smeared. The result will appear to
the analyst as if the machine were operating at a steady speed.
Order tracking can be used only when you have a tachometer providing a
once-per-rev pulse. The vibration signal that is measured by the Model
2120A is automatically adjusted based on the time interval between each of
these pulses. As the machine speeds up (and the tachometer pulse time
interval becomes shorter), the vibration signal is automatically stretched
out (like a rubber band) over each revolution of the machine. If the
machine slows down, the signal is compressed together.
This automatic “stretching” of the signal causes vibration peaks that are
related to the machine turning speed to always be at the same frequency in
the spectrum—even if the machine speeds up or slows down. Each peak will
be displayed at a frequency corresponding to the average machine RPM
during the analysis.

Note
To remove possible confusion concerning the correct “speed,”
the Order Tracking spectrum is normally displayed with the
frequency axis in orders (multiples of the initial turning speed).

Order Tracking 8-11


Several points to keep in mind when using order tracking are:
• You must have a good, steady once-per-rev tachometer pulse. If not,
you will get incorrect results when using order tracking.
• This method can handle up to a six percent speed variation per rev-
olution.
• If Averg Mode (on the “Acquire Spectrum” menu) is set to “Order
Track,” the Trig Mode will automatically be set to “Tach.” The rec-
ommended values for the remaining parameters are:

Frequency (anything desired, typically 200)


Low Cutoff 0
Lines (limited to 1600, typically 400)
Windows Hanning
Averages (anything desired, typically 100)
Init Setup No
Averaging Mode Order Track
Trig Mode (automatically set to Tach)
Trig Level 0 (this parameter is ignored)
%Pre Trig 0 (this parameter is ignored)
FS Range 0.0
A-Weight No
Demodulate No

8-12 Advanced Techniques


Impact Testing
A mechanical impact test is used to determine and measure the resonant
frequency of a mechanical structure. In the case of machinery, impact tests
can be used to identify resonant frequency at or near running speed which
may be causing excessive vibration. In other structures, impact tests can be
used to determine stiffness and damping requirements in order to eliminate
or reduce the amplification effects of the resonant frequency.
Most structures have one (or more) characteristic frequency at which they
prefer to vibrate. At this frequency (called the “resonant” frequency) the
damping of mechanical vibrations in the structure is very weak. Vibration
at this frequency is relatively easy to excite and once excited, tends to take
a relatively long time to decay. This can amplify the severity of other vibra-
tion sources such as imbalance or misalignment.
To measure the resonant frequency, the structure should be excited with a
vibration source that contains a mixture of many frequencies. The frequen-
cies that are near the resonance will take a much longer time to decay than
the other frequencies and the structure will “ring” at this resonant fre-
quency. The Model 2120A can then be used to analyze this ringing fre-
quency that corresponds to the resonant frequency of the structure.
A type of vibration that contains many vibration frequencies is a sharp
impact (sometimes called an impulse). This is the standard excitation force
for measurement of resonant frequencies and is usually generated by
sharply impacting the structure with a rubber mallet.

Note
A single-channel measurement can only be used to record the
impact and identify the resonant frequency (or frequencies) of
a structure. A dual-channel measurement is required to mea-
sure the amplification of a resonant frequency, determine stiff-
ness and damping, and to confirm that the recorded frequency
is indeed a resonance and not some other background vibra-
tion.

Impact Testing 8-13


A dual-channel measurement records the amount of force applied with an
instrumented force hammer on one channel and records the response due
to resonant frequencies on the other channel.

Note
A dual-channel Model 2120A with the Advanced Two Channel
special purpose program and an instrumented force hammer is
required for dual-channel impact testing.

Measurement Procedure (for single-channel method)


1. ··· Set up the analyzer for the proper sensor type. Press the Utility key
and select Change Setup. Select Sensor Type and verify that the
parameters are set to match the sensor being used. The standard
configuration for a CSI accelerometer is as follows:

Sensor Type Accel


Convert To Accel
Sensitivity 0.100
Units Standard
Sensor Pwr On

If the sensor type needs to be modified, set each parameter to its proper
value.

Caution!
Do not press the Reset key when you are finished changing the sensor
setup as this will reset the sensor parameters to the values that were
loaded with the currently selected route.

2. ··· Press the Analyzer key and select the Acquire Spectrum function on
the menu.

8-14 Advanced Techniques


3. ··· Set up the analysis parameters as follows:

Frequency (any value desired, typically 500 Hz)


Low Cutoff 0
Lines (any value desired, typically 400)
Window (see following notes, typically Hanning)
Averages (any value desired, typically 4)
Init Setup No
Averaging Mode Normal
Trig Mode (see following notes, typically Pre Trig)
Trig Level (see following notes, typically 1.00)
% Pre Trig 50.0
FS Range 0.0 (Expected peak input)
A-Weight No
Demodulate No

Note
In some cases, FS Range should be specified for impact tests
to avoid overloading the analyzer input circuits when the
signal suddenly changes from its ambient level to that caused
by the impact.

Note
Trig Mode should normally be set to Pre Trig for best results.
However, Pre Trig can be used only if the Frequency param-
eter is less than 1,000 Hz. If you wish to analyze a frequency
higher than 1,000 Hz, you must set Trig Mode to Normal,
which allows analysis up to 80,000 Hz.

Window should be set to “Hanning” if the Trig Mode is set to


Pre Trig. Window should be set to “Uniform” if the Trig Mode
is set to “Normal.”

Impact Testing 8-15


4. ··· Place the sensor on the structure. The sensor must be held very
steadily to the structure during data acquisition—a stud or magnetic
mount is recommended.
Press the Enter key to start data acquisition. The display will indicate
that the analyzer is “autoranging” and that initial data are being
acquired. The analyzer will then display the “No Trigger” message at
the bottom of the screen.
At this time, impact the structure with a hammer at a location that is
two to four feet away from where the sensor is mounted. If FS Range
was initially set to zero (for autoranging), the analyzer should beep and
display a “Signal Overloaded” message. This is normal and indicates
that the Model 2120A has adjusted its full-scale range upward and will
automatically reset itself to capture another impact.

Note
The Trig Level and FS Range parameters can be adjusted
using the peak impact values observed while monitoring the
time waveform.

After the analyzer has reset itself, the “No Trigger” message will be dis-
played again. At this point, impact the structure again. This procedure
should be repeated until the analyzer no longer displays the overload
message and acquires a single average of data after each impact. This
may require four to eight impacts.
When the analyzer no longer displays the overload indication and has
starting averaging data, each impact thereafter will result in a single
average of data being acquired.

Note
If the analyzer screen never displays the “Signal Overload”
message, but seems to be hung up in the “No Trigger” state, the
problem is likely to be that the Trig Level parameter is set at
too high of a value. In this case, you should press the Analyze
key, select Acquire Spectrum again, and decrease the Trig
Level parameter (by a factor of two). Then repeat the proce-
dure starting at step 4.

8-16 Advanced Techniques


Note
If the analyzer screen always displays the “Signal Overload”
message after each impact and never starts collecting data, the
problem is likely to be that the Trig Level parameter is set at
too low a value. In this case, you should press the Analyze key,
select Acquire Spectrum again, and increase the Trig Level
parameter (by a factor of two). Then repeat the procedure
starting at step 4.

Note
Always wait for the analyzer to display the “No Trigger” mes-
sage before impacting the structure. This indicates that the
trigger circuit is properly armed.

5. ··· After all averages have been acquired, the averaged frequency
spectrum of the impact data will be displayed.
The amplitude axis of the spectral plot can be expanded or contracted
using the up/down arrow keys. The left/right arrow keys can be used
to move the cursor in order to identify the frequencies of the largest
peaks which will represent resonant frequencies. The time waveform
of the last impact can also be examined by pressing the Analyze key
and selecting Display Waveform.

Impact Testing 8-17


Example impact spectral plot.

Example impact waveform plot.

8-18 Advanced Techniques


Chapter 9

Technical Notes

Data Units
For each type of dynamic vibration unit (acceleration, velocity, displace-
ment, or nonstandard) or frequency, data collected with the Model 2120A
machinery analyzer can be displayed in various forms.

163

The top level of units selection is the choice of the English or Metric system
of measurement. The following table lists the English/Metric units.

Type English Metric

Acceleration g g

Velocity inch/sec mm/sec

Displacement mil micron

Temperature Degree-F Degree-C

Microphone Pascal Pascal

Nonstandard (as specified by the units field)

9-1
The frequency units are specified to be in either Hz (Hertz) or CPM (60 x
Hz) units. In addition, the analyzer can be instructed to display spectral
plots in units of Orders. This method of display requires you to specify a
reference frequency—typically the machine running speed. All other fre-
quencies are then indicated as multiples of the reference frequency. For
example, an order value of 2.0 indicates a frequency at two times the refer-
ence frequency.
In addition to the major units types, you can specify that vibration signals
be displayed in RMS (root-mean-square), Peak, Pk-Pk (peak-to-peak),
Average, or dB (decibels). For normal spectral and analysis parameters,
conversion between the above units qualifiers is based on theoretical fac-
tors for sinusoidal signals as specified below.
To convert from:

RMS to... multiply by


RMS 1.000
Peak 1.414
Pk-Pk 2.828
Average 0.900

For conversion to dB, the RMS values are divided by the reference value
(i.e. dB reference), the logarithm (base 10) is taken of the ratio, and then the
resulting log value is multiplied by 20.

Saving As Default
These values can be used for either the off route or Analyze modes. Nor-
F1 mally, once the Reset key has been pressed to return to the normal route
mode, the reference values return to those that are specified in the RBM-
ware/MasterTrend database. However, the new values can be saved as the
analyzer’s defaults by pressing the F1 key while the Define Data Units
screen is being displayed.

9-2 Technical Notes


Overall Calculation
Several methods of calculating the overall vibration level are provided in
the Model 2120A analyzer. Digital Overall is the mode used for normal
analyzer operation—all other methods are used only for special applica-
tions. The Model 2120A overall vibration level methods are:
Digital Overall - The overall vibration level is calculated from the spec-
trum over the frequency band between the specified lower frequency and
maximum frequency. If the lower frequency is less than the lower limit of
two times the frequency resolution of the spectrum, then vibration values
below this lower limit are not included.
Analog Overall - The overall vibration level is directly measured from an
RMS-to-DC converter circuit that has a frequency bandwidth of approxi-
mately 1 Hz to 80,000 Hz.
True Peak Overall - The overall vibration level is calculated by deter-
mining the maximum (peak) value within the time waveform over all
blocks used in the spectrum averages.
Average Peak Overall - The overall vibration level is calculated by deter-
mining the maximum (peak) value within the time waveform of each anal-
ysis block. These peak values are then averaged for the specified number
of analysis averages. (This method simulates the averaging method imple-
mented in older types of analog vibration panel meters.)

Note
True Peak and Average Peak modes may only be selected
when the units qualifier is set to Peak or Pk-Pk, and the global
overall measurement mode is set to digital.

Note
Beginning with MasterTrend 3.30 and firmware version 7.07,
the global overall mode can be set within MasterTrend’s Route
program module. In RBMware, the selections can be over-
ridden on a measurement point basis.

Overall Calculation 9-3


Downloading Firmware
The software that controls the operation of the analyzer (firmware) is stored
in Random Access Memory (RAM). The most recent version of the firm-
ware is downloaded into the analyzer before being shipped. The firmware
number is displayed on the analyzer’s startup screen. A floppy disk con-
taining the firmware is supplied with each new analyzer and firmware
upgrade.
This firmware can be reloaded into the analyzer at any time for firmware
upgrades, or for reinstallation in the unlikely event that RAM information
has been erased. Firmware is installed into the analyzer via communica-
tions with a personal computer and does not require disassembly of the
analyzer.

Caution!
Reloading firmware will erase all data and DLP’s stored to the
internal memory card. Verify that no essential data are in the analyzer
before proceeding with the following procedure.

Note
Reloading firmware does not have any affect on the external
memory card. However, the DLP’s (Downloadable Programs)
and routes may not be compatible with newer version of firm-
ware. Verify all route data and jobs associated with DLP’s have
been transferred to the database before proceeding.

Note
CSI does recommend re-initializing the external card after
loading new firmware.

9-4 Technical Notes


Download Procedure
The following procedure should be followed to download firmware into the
analyzer:
1.···· Connect the Model 2120A analyzer to the COM1 port of the
computer using the supplied communications cable (see
“Communications With the Host Computer” on page 3-1).
2. ··· Run the program downloader. Place the floppy disk containing the
firmware into drive A or B of the computer.
• For Windows - Click Start on the Task Bar, then select Run. Select
LoadFW from the drive where the firmware is located, and then
click on the OK button.
• For DOS - type:
A: (or B:) then type DOWNLOAD,
and press the Enter key.
The computer will display the Program Downloader screen and the
remainder of the procedure is controlled by the analyzer.
3. ··· To initiate the downloading sequence, start with the analyzer turned
off. Press and hold the Enter key and then press the On/Off key until
“2120A System Firmware Is Not Loaded” is displayed on the screen.
Release the keys and the download procedure will begin. The
analyzer screen will indicate that downloading is in progress.

Note
CSI recommends that all memory cards be re-initialized after
downloading a numerical revision/upgrade to the analyzer’s
firmware. (This does not apply to the smaller updates to the
firmware noted with letter-based increases.)

Downloading Firmware 9-5


Calibration
To ensure maximum measurement accuracy, each Model 2120A
machinery analyzer is thoroughly calibrated by CSI before shipping, and
the results of the calibration are recorded on the calibration tag that is
shipped with the analyzer. The values entered into the analyzer’s calibra-
tion routine allow the firmware to compensate for any minor errors in mea-
surement that may be caused by component tolerances within the analyzer.
The calibration values are stored in the analyzer in an EEPROM and pro-
tected from accidental erasure. Normally, you do not need to modify these
values unless they have somehow become corrupted in the analyzer’s
memory. In this rare case, the calibration values would simply be entered
into the analyzer using the values recorded on the calibration tag.

Note
For accurate results, the Model 2120A should be periodically
recalibrated. CSI recommends that the analyzer be returned to
the factory once every year for this recalibration procedure.

The calibration functions are accessed via the Set Calibration selection in
the Utility key’s Special Functions menu. The access code “CSI” must be
entered after selecting Set Calibration in order to gain access to the Calibra-
tion Functions menu.

164

9-6 Technical Notes


The following are brief descriptions of the functions of each calibration sub-
routine.

Set Calibration Factor


Adjusts the overall signal amplitude compensation.

165

Set Integrator Calibration


These four parameters apply to the gain corrections used for the analog
integrators that convert sensor units to display units.

166

Calibration 9-7
Set DC Offsets
These four parameters are associated with the DC measurement offset, the
analog RMS to DC converter offset, and the positive/negative battery test
offset.

167

Note
When entering negative numbers, enter the number first and
then press the +– key to enter the negative sign.

9-8 Technical Notes


Set Integrator Poles
These parameters apply to low frequency roll-off correction of the analog
integration circuits. This correction is normally disabled unless special low-
frequency measurements are being performed.

If pole corrections are enabled (Apply Poles field set to “Yes”), the specified
lower frequency for correction will be used not only for analog integration
but also for digital integration. Do not enable pole corrections for normal
route mode unless there are special requirements for measurements.

Store Calibration Values


After you have entered or modified calibration values, you must select
Store Calibration Values in order to store the new values to the analyzer’s
EEPROM.

Calibration 9-9
9-10 Technical Notes
Chapter 10

Cascade Special Function Program

Program Description
The optional Cascade special function program allows the Model 2120A
machinery analyzer to rapidly capture and display continuous FFT calcu-
lations using a predefined number of sampling blocks. Cascade displays the
acquired data using a waterfall graphic display that provides a pseudo 3-D
effect.
The Cascade program can assist in determining resonant frequencies
during coastdown/start-ups and in catching transient events caused by
changes in loads or processes during normal operation.

168

Note
For information on loading the Cascade program into the ana-
lyzer, see “Load Downloadable Program (DLP)” on page 4-5.

10-1
Entering the Cascade Special-Function Program
After the Cascade program is installed, it must be activated prior to use.
The following instructions will provide you with information on activating
the Cascade program.
To activate the program after installation, or at any other time that it is not
currently active, press the Program Select key—a menu will then be dis-
played listing all programs currently available on the active memory card.
Using the arrow keys, highlight the Spectral Cascade selection and press
the Enter key. The Cascade program is now active.

Program Restart
After the program has been activated, the analyzer will automatically
return to the Cascade program after you turn analyzer power on. While the
analyzer is on, pressing the Reset key at any time will also restart the pro-
gram. The analyzer will remain in this program until it is deactivated by
selecting another program from the Program Select menu.

Note
The analyzer must be set to the active card that contains the
special function program in order to access the program (Select
Card for Program function under the Utility key’s Memory
Card menu selection).

10-2 Cascade Special Function Program


Starting the Cascade Program
Depending on how the analyzer was last used, one of two screens will be
displayed when the analyzer is turned on or the Cascade program is acti-
vated.
If valid spectral cascade data resides in scratchpad memory, the following
screen will be displayed by the analyzer.

169

To collect new data (and erase the old data from scratchpad memory), press
the “5” key—the analyzer will then advance to the Cascade Setup menu.
This two-page menu enables you to set up the analyzer's collection param-
eters for new data acquisition.
To display the currently saved spectral cascade data, press any other key
(except the “5” key) on the analyzer’s alphanumeric keypad. The analyzer
will then display the saved data.

Caution!
If you have important data residing in scratchpad memory that has not
been saved, do not press the analyzer’s “5” key at the screen shown
above. Pressing the “5” key erases the scratchpad memory and the data
cannot be retrieved. See “Saving Data” on page 10-16 for information
on saving Cascade data.

Starting the Cascade Program 10-3


Cascade Setup Menu—Page One

170

Frequency
The Frequency parameter sets the upper frequency limit for the spectral
collection—from 10 to 40,000 Hz (600 to 2,400,000 CPM). The Frequency
parameter, in conjunction with the Low Cutoff parameter, establishes the
bandwidth of the spectral measurement.

Note
The Model 2120A uses pre-defined frequency values for data
acquisition. When specifying a value for Frequency and Low
Cutoff, the analyzer will select the next highest pre-defined fre-
quency value.

Low Cutoff
This parameter sets the low frequency limit for the spectral collection. The
limits for the Low Cutoff parameter vary according to the number of lines
of resolution and the upper Frequency that have been selected. To set Low
Cutoff to the lowest possible frequency, enter a zero (0)—the analyzer will
automatically use the lowest value.

Note
If the user-entered frequency value is too low, the program will
automatically adjust the value to the lowest possible frequency.

10-4 Cascade Special Function Program


Lines
The Lines variable defines the number of lines of resolution (100, 200, or
400) used for the FFT calculation. When selecting the lines of resolution,
keep in mind that the 100-line mode provides the fastest data collection
while the 400-line mode provides the highest resolution.

Window
Select Uniform or Hanning window. The Hanning window is recom-
mended for normal analyzer operation.

# Blocks
This parameter specifies the number of spectra that are to be collected and
displayed.

Cascade display with 15 blocks of spectra.

Sample Type
This function controls the method used to start the collection of each snap-
shot of acquired data.
Continuous - The collection of each snapshot of data is started as
quickly as possible.
Delta Time - Each snapshot of data is started at specified time
intervals.
Delta RPM - Each snapshot of data is started at specified RPM
intervals.

Starting the Cascade Program 10-5


Cascade Setup Menu—Page Two

171

Tach Start (Trigger)


This feature enables you to instruct the analyzer to begin collecting data as
soon as a tachometer pulse is detected. Once data acquisition begins, no
additional tachometer pulses are required—the analyzer will continue to
acquire data until all blocks have been collected.
Select “First” to start acquisition of the first data block at the next tachom-
eter pulse. Select “All” to start acquisition of every data snapshot at the ear-
liest tachometer pulse. Answer “No” to begin data acquisition immediately
after the Enter key has been pressed.

Note
If a tachometer is connected to the analyzer, the RPM will
always be measured—regardless of the Tach Start setting.

10-6 Cascade Special Function Program


Dly/Secs
Delay/Seconds enables you to set a programmed minimum delay (in sec-
onds) to occur between each acquired spectrum. The delay period is from
the start of the current acquisition to the start of the next.
A minimum delay always exists due to the processing time that is required
to complete the current acquisition. The analyzer takes this minimum delay
into consideration and adjusts accordingly so that the total delay equals the
specified time period. If the programmed delay setting is less than the time
required for acquisition, no programmed delay will be used.

RPM Mode
When Sample Type is specified as “Delta RPM,” this function specifies the
type of RPM change required to be detected as a sample trigger.
+ RPM changes are detected in the increasing direction.
– RPM changes are detected in the decreasing direction.
+— RPM changes are detected in either direction.

Delta RPM
This function determines the RPM interval between starts of two consecu-
tive data snapshots, and is entered as a percentage value of the RPM of the
first data snapshot.

Note
The accuracy of RPM calculations is approximately 0.1%;
therefore, values less than 0.1 for Delta RPM are not recom-
mended.

Force RPM
Select “Yes” to force RPM measurement regardless of other settings. When
set to “No,” RPM may be measured if tachometer pulses exist and RPM
data are collected faster than spectral data.

Starting the Cascade Program 10-7


FS Range
Full Scale Range determines the signal input range of the analyzer. When
set to zero (0), the full-scale range is established by the analyzer’s autorange
function. Alternatively, the full-scale range can be set manually by entering
the desired value in the FS Range field.
The units used for Full Scale Range is determined by the integration mode
of the analyzer (see “Signal Integrator Mode” on page 4-32). When using
digital integration, Full Scale Range uses the same units as that specified for
the sensor (see “Sensor Type” on page 4-16). When using analog integra-
tion, Full Scale Range uses the same units as the spectral plot (see “Viewing
a Single Spectrum” on page 10-15).

A-Weight
The A-Weighting feature is used primarily for acoustic applications where
a shape curve is applied to the frequency spectrum to approximate the fre-
quency sensitivity of the human ear. Answer “No” to disable A-Weighting.

10-8 Cascade Special Function Program


Cascade Setup Menu—Page Three

172

Demodulate
Select “Yes” to use the analyzer’s built-in demodulator. The internal
demodulator uses a high-pass filter to remove all components in the signal
below 600 Hz. The signal is then amplified and amplitude demodulated
resulting in a low frequency signal that consists of the envelope of the orig-
inal signal. See “Demodulate” on page 5-13 for more information.

PeakVue
Select “Yes” to use the built-in peak value (PeakVue) analyzer. The input
signal is passed through a selectable bandpass or high-pass filter (PreFilter),
and then sampled with the peak detector. The resulting signal is then used
to generate the spectrum. PeakVue uses the same nine pre-defined fre-
quency ranges as used for the demodulator.

Note
The Demodulate and PeakVue functions cannot be used
simultaneously.

Starting the Cascade Program 10-9


PreFilter
This field is used to specify the filters for use with either the Demodulator
or the PeakVue function. Available filters are shown below.

Bandpass Filters Highpass Filters

20 to 150 Hz 500 Hz
50 to 300 Hz 1,000 Hz
100 to 600 Hz 2,000 Hz
500 to 1,000 Hz 5,000 Hz
5,000 to6,500 Hz (PeakVue only) 10,000 Hz
20,000 Hz (PeakVue only)

The selected filter frequency must be equal to or greater than the specified
maximum frequency (see “Frequency” on page 10-4).

10-10 Cascade Special Function Program


Collecting Data
After the collection parameters have been set up on the Cascade Setup
menu, press the Enter key to begin data collection. The analyzer screen will
display the number of blocks remaining to be acquired.

173

Note
The data acquisition process may be prematurely stopped at
any time during acquisition by pressing the Enter key. The ana-
lyzer will then display all of the data that have been collected
up to that point.

Collecting Data 10-11


Displaying Data
After the data for all of the specified blocks have been acquired, the ana-
lyzer will display the data in cascade plot mode.

Cascade plot display mode.

The F1 function key toggles the display between the cascade plot mode and
F1 the four-plot mode.

Four-plot display mode.

10-12 Cascade Special Function Program


Paging and Scrolling Data
When there are more blocks of spectral data than can be displayed at one
time on the screen (maximum of 90), the analyzer will display “pages” of
spectra in the cascade plot mode. The beginning and ending spectra dis-
played on the current page of data are indicated by the numbers on the left-
hand side of the screen.

174

Page Page
To advance to the next higher page of spectra, press the Page Up key. To
Up Down display the previous page of spectra, press the Page Down key.
The left/right arrow keys enable you to scroll through the spectra in incre-
ments of approximately one-quarter of the number of plotted spectra. To
scroll forward, press the right arrow key; to scroll backward, press the left
arrow key.

Note
The Page keys are also available in the four-plot mode to dis-
play the next/previous set of spectral data.

Displaying Data 10-13


Additional Display Control Keys
The following control keys can also be used while data are being displayed
in the cascade plot mode.
The on-screen cursor is activated using the Insert key. Once activated, the
Insert cursor, in the form of a left arrow located at the right-hand side of the dis-
play, points to an individual spectrum. The spectrum number (collection
block number) and RPM data (if a tachometer was used) from the spectrum
are indicated at the upper left-hand corner of the display.
When the cursor is displayed on the plot, the F3 and F4 keys control the
F3 F4 vertical movement of the cursor. The F3 key moves the cursor towards the
bottom of the plot, and the F4 key moves the cursor towards the top.
The Clr key clears the cursor and cursor readout from the plot display.
Clear

The Up/Down arrow keys increase or decrease the amplitude scale of the
plot, respectively.

The Exp key expands the display of spectral plots—decreasing the number
,;\%
Exp of plots shown. With the cursor off, the display is expanded from the center
of the plot. With the cursor on, the display is expanded from the current
cursor position.
The Dec key compresses the display of spectral plots—increasing the
*#&@
Dec number of plots shown. With the cursor off, the display is compressed from
the center of the plot. With the cursor on, the display is compressed from
the current cursor position.
When the cursor is active on the cascade display, the F5 function key can
F5 be used to center the plot at the current cursor location without plot expan-
sion or compression. This function does not change the total number of dis-
played spectra; the spectra are shifted up or down in order to center the plot
at the cursor position.

10-14 Cascade Special Function Program


Viewing a Single Spectrum
While viewing the cascade plot, a single spectrum may be selected and
viewed in a mode similar to the Analyze function of the Model 2120A (see
“Display Spectrum/Display Waveform” on page 7-2 for additional infor-
mation).
To view a single spectrum from the cascade display, use the F3 and F4 keys
F2 to position the cursor next to the desired spectrum (cursor must be acti-
vated using the Insert key); then press the F2 function key.

175

Note
For information on spectral display function keys, see “Spec-
tral Plots” on page 3-26.

Displaying Data 10-15


Saving Data
A single spectrum or any number of selected spectra from the cascade dis-
play can be saved and stored with a measurement point of a machine, in
either route or off-route mode, and downloaded into the RBMware/Mas-
terTrend database. The saved data are assigned to the measurement point
that was displayed before entering the Cascade special function program.
To save data, press the analyzer’s F6 function key while the cascade plot is
F6 being displayed. The program will then display the Save Cascade Data
menu where you can specify the spectra to be saved.

176

To save a group of spectra within the cascade plot, enter the first and last
collection block numbers of the group of spectra into the respective First
Spectrum and Last Spectrum fields. These spectra and all blocks in between
will then be stored by pressing the Enter key. To save a single spectrum,
enter the collection block number of the desired spectrum into both fields
and then press the Enter key.

10-16 Cascade Special Function Program


Note
If no routes have been loaded into the analyzer, data cannot be
saved. The analyzer will display an error message if an attempt
is made to save data without an active route or off-route point.
In this case, you may access the analyzer’s off-route mode
(using the Program Select key), define a point, enter the off-
route mode, and then return to the Cascade program (again
using the Program Select key) to save the data as previously
described.

Note
Data that have been saved in route memory can be recalled for
display using the “Display Spectrum” option under the Ana-
lyze key function. See “Display Spectrum/Display Waveform”
on page 7-2 for additional information.

Saving Data 10-17


Error Messages
The following error messages may be encountered when attempting to col-
lect or save data while using the Cascade program.

The analyzer’s memory is too full to allow additional data collection. To


permit data collection, dump the currently stored data into the RBMware/
MasterTrend database (if desired) and then clear the analyzer’s memory
using the Erase All Route Data function of the Utility key’s Memory Card
menu (see “Erase All Route Data” on page 4-51).

10-18 Cascade Special Function Program


Data cannot be saved because there is no active route or off-route point in
the analyzer. To save data that have already been collected:
1···· access the off-route program using the Program Select key,
2···· define a point using the Define Off Route Point function,
3···· enter the off-route mode using the Enter Off Route Mode function,
4···· return to the Cascade program using the Program Select key.
Alternatively, you may download a route into the analyzer and then recol-
lect the data.

The analyzer’s memory is too full to save all of the requested spectra. You
may save data by either reducing the total number of spectra or by
removing stored data from the analyzer.

Error Messages 10-19


10-20 Cascade Special Function Program
Appendix A

Sensor Button/Enter Key Operation

The way that measurements are carried out by the Model 2120A
Machinery Analyzer is determined by the settings of Control Parameters 1
& 2 (Utility key-Operational Parameters), the Group/Channel Enable
option (Utility key-Measurement Mode), and whether the Enter key or
sensor button is used to start a measurement. Data collection is started/con-
tinued according to the following table.

Off On Triax
Group/Chan Enable Sensor Enter Sensor Enter Sensor Enter
Button Key Button Key Button Key
Control Parameter 1 = Off 1 1 1 1 1 1
Control Parameter 2 = Off
Control Parameter 1 = Off 2 2 2 2 2 2
Control Parameter 2 = On
Control Parameter 1 = On 3 1 7 1 7 1
Control Parameter 2 = Off
Control Parameter 1 = On 4 2 8 2 8 2
Control Parameter 2 = On
Control Parameter 1 = Off 5 5 2 2 9 9
Control Parameter 2 = Auto
Control Parameter 1 = On 6 5 8 2 10 9
Control Parameter 2 = Auto

A-1
Group/Chan Enable Off
1. The Enter key/sensor button must be pressed twice to start data
collection. The message “Press Enter to Start Data Acquisition” is
displayed after the key/button is pressed for the first time. Press the
key/button again to start data collection. Use up arrow key to advance
to the next route measurement point.
2. The Enter key/sensor button is pressed only once to start data
collection. Use up arrow key to advance to the next route measurement
point.
3. After the sensor button is pressed:
• if current point has not been previously measured, data are collected
as described in number 1 above.
• if current point has been previously measured, the next route mea-
surement point is automatically selected.
4. After the sensor button is pressed:
• if current point has not been previously measured, data are collected
as described in number 2 above.
• if current point has been previously measured, the next route mea-
surement point is automatically selected.
5. The Enter key/sensor button is pressed only once to start data
collection. After completion of data collection, the results are displayed
for two seconds and then the next route measurement point is
automatically selected.
6. After the sensor button is pressed:
• if current point has not been previously measured, data are collected
as described in number 5 above.
• if current point has been previously measured, the next route mea-
surement point is automatically selected.

A-2 Sensor Button/Enter Key Operation


Group/Chan Enable On
1. After the sensor button is pressed:
• if current point has not been previously measured, data are collected
as described in number 1 above.
• if current point has been previously measured, the next point in mul-
tiple measurement point sequence is found, set up and displayed. If
there are no remaining points in the sequence, the next available
measurement point is selected.
2. After the sensor button is pressed:
• if current point has not been previously measured, data are collected
as described in number 2 above.
• if current point has been previously measured, the next point in mul-
tiple measurement point sequence is found, set up and displayed. If
there are no remaining points in the sequence, the next available
measurement point is selected.

Note
If the current point is the first one in a multiple measurement
point sequence, data collection begins with the press of the
Enter key/sensor button. Otherwise, the first point in the
sequence is located, set up and displayed. The Enter key/
sensor button must then be pressed again to start data collec-
tion.

Note
After completion of data collection, the next point in the mul-
tiple measurement point sequence is located, set up, and dis-
played. When all points in the sequence have been measured,
the analyzer will then select the next available point.

A-3
Group/Chan Enable “TRIAX”
1. An initial press of the Enter key/sensor button starts data collection on
all points in a multiple measurement point sequence; channels are
automatically selected on the internal multiplexer. No further action is
required by the user.
2. An initial press of the Enter key/sensor button starts data collection on
all points in a multiple measurement point sequence that have not been
previously measured; channels are automatically selected on the
internal multiplexer. No further action is required by the user. Points in
the multiple measurement point sequence that have been previously
measured are displayed for one second but not re-measured.

Note
If the current point is the first one in a multiple measurement
point sequence, data collection begins with the press of the
Enter key/sensor button. Otherwise, the first point in the
sequence is located, set up and displayed.

Note
A triaxial accelerometer must be connected to the analyzer’s
input port (see “Multifunction Input Connector” on page 2-2)
before using the Group/Chan Enable “TRIAX” option.

A-4 Sensor Button/Enter Key Operation


Appendix B

Technical Specifications

Hardware Specifications

Physical Dimensions
Height: 273.1 mm (10.75 inches)
Width: 174.6 mm (6.875 inches)
Depth: 38.1 m (1.5 inches)
Weight: 2.15 kg (4.75 pounds)

Environmental Limits
Temperature: -10° to 50° C (15° to 120° F)
Relative Humidity: 0 to 95% non-condensing

Power Supply
Battery: rechargeable, 7.2V battery pack
Capacity: 4.5 amp-hours (2.4 amp-hours for the original 2120)
Recharge time: 2 1/2 hours nominal
Operation time: approximately 11 to 14 hours of normal route usage on a
full charge (10 hours for the original 2120)

LCD Display
Type: Supertwist liquid crystal display
Display size: 76.2 x 101.6 mm (3.0 x 4.0 inches)
Dot resolution: 320 x 240 pixels
Electroluminescent backlighting

Keypad
41 keys including six function keys
Electroluminescent backlighting

B-1
Input Specifications

Input Signals
A 2-milliampere, 20-volt (nominal), constant-current power supply inside
the analyzer powers sensors such as accelerometers. Depending upon the
type of input selected, the constant-current power supply can be made
available or bypassed.

Full Scale Input Level

Channel A Channel B

Sensor Power “On” +/- 9 volts +/- 3.75 volts


Sensor Power “Off” +/- 21 volts +/- 3.75 volts

The full-scale vibration level depends upon the type of sensor used and its
sensitivity. Full-scale vibration level is +/- 90 g’s when using a 100-millivolt-
per-g accelerometer. For small signals, full-scale range is lowered in binary
steps from 1 to 1024 for improved signal-to-noise ratio. Selection of proper
full-scale range occurs automatically at the beginning of every analysis and
is called “autoranging.”
Input Impedance: greater than 125K ohms

Input Signal Types


Dynamic signals: Single channel
DC signals: Single channel
RPM/tach signal: TTL pulse
Keypad entry: Full alphanumeric capability
Temperature input: CSI infrared sensor or thermocouple

Input Sensor Types


Portable sensors: accelerometers, velocity probes, RPM/tachometer
probes, temperature sensors.
Installed sensors: Any vibration or dynamic sensor with a voltage output;
any DC-type signal.

B-2 Technical Specifications


Input Unit Types

Vibration Signals Units

Acceleration g’s
Velocity In/sec or mm/sec
Displacement Mils or microns
Other dynamic signals Any user-specified unit
DC Signals Any user-specified unit

The Model 2120A calculates the integration or differentiation necessary to


convert from sensor units to other units for display purposes. The Model
2120A uses analog integration circuitry for conversions from acceleration
to velocity or displacement.

Tachometer Input
The tachometer input measures a once-per-rev pulse. This capability lets
the analyzer measure RPM and synchronous vibration and phase.
RPM range: 6 to 100,000 RPM
Tach input level: TTL compatible (0 to +5 volt pulse)

Triaxial Sensor Input


Top panel multifunction input connector allows direct connection and
sequencing of triaxial signal.

Autoranging
The Model 2120A automatically scans the input signal for each measure-
ment. The analyzer sets the input range to maximize the dynamic resolu-
tion.

Demodulator and PeakVue


Built-in demodulator and PeakVue function.

B-3
Prefilters
The following filters are available for use with the demodulator or PeakVue
function.

Bandpass Filters Highpass Filters

20 to 150 Hz 500 Hz
50 to 300 Hz 1,000 Hz
100 to 600 Hz 2,000 Hz
500 to 1,000 Hz 5,000 Hz
5,000 to 6,500 10,000 Hz
(PeakVue only)
20,000 Hz
(PeakVue only)

B-4 Technical Specifications


Measurement Specifications

Frequency Analysis
A/D converter: 16 bits of accuracy
Dynamic range: Greater than 96 dB
Number of averages: 1 to 9999
Averaging modes: normal, peak hold, order tracking, negative averaging
Resolution: 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, or 6400 lines of resolution
and 1/3 octave
Frequency range: DC to 10 Hz minimum
DC to 80 kHz maximum
Response: flat to DC for non-integrated and DC-coupled signals;
optional AC coupling -3 dB at 1 Hz
Automatic Integrator Correction feature allows precise measurement of
low frequency vibrations down to 0.2 Hz.
Full-scale range: 3mV to 21V
Noise floor: typically less than 0.5 µV for a 400-line spectrum at 1000 Hz
maximum frequency
Windows: Hanning or uniform

Data Storage Capacity


Internal memory: 512 kilobytes
External memory: 512 kilobytes to 8 MB using SRAM (PCMCIA) external
card

Number of Stored Spectra


Can store 1,000 400-line spectra for each MB of memory. Generally, with
spectra, waveform, and trend parameters, 1 MB is sufficient for 200 to 300
measurement points.

B-5
Output

Communications
The Model 2120A communicates with Intel® microprocessor-based per-
sonal computers that have an RS232 serial link. Baud rates may be selected
from 300 up to 115.2K. Remote links via modem are fully supported.

Printer
RS232 interface communicates with IBM graphics compatible dot matrix
printers using optional adapter (Model 720 Printer Interface).
Virtual printer provides printing through a personal computer to any
graphics printer.

B-6 Technical Specifications


Appendix C

Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams

Auxiliary Connector Pinout


Pin Description
1 Volts Input
2 TTL In (not a tachometer input)
3 Triax Input #1
4 Triax Input #2 and Channel B Input
5 Triax Input #3
6 Analog Ground
7 Digital Ground
8 (internal use only)
9 +5.0 Volts

C-1
Multifunction Input Connector Pinout
Pin Description
01 Digital Ground
02 Transmit (RS-232)
03 Receive (RS-232)
04 Connected to 05
05 Connected to 04
06 Connected to 08 and 20
07 Common Ground
08 Connected to 06 and 20
09 Control #0 Out
10 Control #1 Out
11 Transmit (for CSI Modem only)
12 Receive (for CSI Modem only)
13 +5.0 Volts
14 Sensor Button
15 Triax Input #1
16 Analog Ground
17 +20.0 Volts
18 Triax Input #2 and Channel B Input
19 Triax Input #3
20 Connected to 06 and 08
21 Accelerometer Signal Input
22 Analog Ground
23 Volts In (Signal Input)
24 Analog Ground
25 <Reserved>

C-2 Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams


Model 630 9-to-25 Pin Adapter Cable

9-pin 25-pin
female end male end
1 8
2 3
3 2
4 20
5
6 6
7 4
8 5
9 21 177

Model 631 Sensor Cable

LEMO to Model
connector 2115
1 Shield 16
22
2 Brown 14
3 Red 21
4 Black 24
5 Yellow 23
178

C-3
Model 633 Communications Cable

to Model 2120 to computer


1 Black 1
2 Brown 3
3 Red 2
4 Orange 5
5 Yellow 4
7 Green 7
6 Blue 20
8 6
20 Violet 8 179

Model 635 Modem Cable

to Model 2120 to modem


1 Black 1
2 Brown 2
3 Red 3
4 Orange 4
5 Yellow 5
6 Blue 6
7 Green 7
8 Violet 8
20 White 20 180

C-4 Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams


Model 639 Communications Cable

to Model 2120 to computer


2 Brown 2
3 Red 3
4 Orange 8
5 Yellow 7
7 Green 5
6 Blue 4
8 6
20 Violet 1 181

182

C-5
C-6 Pinouts and Wiring Diagrams
Glossary

Acceleration
the rate of change of velocity of a mechanical system. Usually measured in
units of g (or sometimes G) in English units;
1 g = 386.4 in/s2 = 32.2 ft/s2
The international standard unit is m/s2;
1 g = 9.806 m/s2
The sensor used to measure acceleration is the accelerometer.

Acoustic
the study of the characteristics of sound emitted by machinery. The Model
2120A can measure and analyze overall sound intensity levels as well as
narrowband spectra and third octave bands.

Alarm
an indication that the vibration characteristics of a machine have changed
in a significant manner.

Alarm Limits
represent amplitude levels that indicate an alarm condition on the machine
being monitored. The Model 2120A allows alarm limits to be specified for
the overall level and for each of the individual vibration parameters. Alarm
Limits are downloaded to the analyzer from the MasterTrend database
during the route load process.

Alarm Status
the status message that displays on each measurement point screen that
indicates the alarm status of this particular point.

Aliasing
an effect that results in erroneous frequency spectra when the frequency of
the signal being sampled is more than 0.5 times the sampling rate. The
Model 2120A includes anti-aliasing filters that eliminate these errors.

G-1
Amplitude
the magnitude (RMS, peak, peak-to-peak, average, or dc) of a measured
signal.

Analog Integration
a method of converting from acceleration to the equivalent velocity signal
or converting a velocity signal to the equivalent displacement signal.
Analog integration is superior to the equivalent digital method as it pro-
duces much less low-frequency components in the vibration spectrum.

Analysis Parameters
divides the frequency spectrum into bands that are individually measured
and analyzed.

Analysis Parameter Sets


includes up to 12 individual analysis parameters, and also contains instruc-
tions that tell the machinery analyzer how to acquire data.

Autoranging
the process of automatically adjusting the input gain of an analyzer to
match the amplitude of a signal. Optimizes the use of the dynamic range of
the analyzer and improves signal-to-noise ratio.

Averaging
a method of collecting data where the spectra are averaged together to
eliminate random noise.

A-Weighting
a frequency spectrum shaping that is applied to frequency spectra in acous-
tics. The effect is designed to approximate the way that the human ear per-
ceives the loudness of sound. Sound levels are reduced at low frequencies
and at very high frequencies where the ear is less sensitive. There are
national and international standards for A-weighting.

Bandwidth
the analysis frequency range over which data will be collected. For normal
route measurements, this is listed by the “BW =” parameter located on the
screen display. It can be specified as a frequency range in Hz, as an order-
based analysis (for example 10xRPM), or in CPM.

G-2
Baud Rate
unit of speed for data transmission over a serial communications link. The
Model 2120A supports baud rates from 300 to 57.6K baud.

Bode Plot
a graphic plot that shows how the 1xRPM amplitude and phase have
varied with the RPM of a machine. These are always measured over a
startup or coastdown of a machine and are used to identify shaft resonances
and other signal characteristics.

Coherence
A function of frequency which describes the degree of linear relationship
between two signals. Used to assess cross-channel measurement quality,
locate noise sources, and to check out transmission paths.

CPM
cycles per minute. Favored by many in machine vibration analysis because
the vibration caused by unbalance shows up at a frequency in CPM equal
to the RPM of the shaft. 60 cycles per minute (CPM) is equivalent to one
(1) cycle per second which equals one (1) hertz.

Crest Factor
the ratio of peak to RMS levels of a signal. A single-frequency signal has a
crest factor of 1.414; random noise has a crest factor of approximately 3; sig-
nals with impulsive content have higher crest factor values. The crest factor
can be used to check for impacting, such as caused by rolling bearing
defects.

CSICOM
MasterTrend’s communications program that enables the host computer to
transfer routes and data to and from the analyzer.

Cursor
a manually controlled marker that can be moved across the plot display
indicating frequency and amplitude at the cursor location.

G-3
Decibels (dB)
a logarithmic system of non-dimensional units that measures the size of a
quantity relative to a reference level. Any quantity can be measured in this
way, as can any two quantities with the same dimensions be compared
using decibel measure.
Given a reference power (amplitude squared) level Wref, any other power
quantity W, having the same dimensions, may be expressed in decibels
using the formula:
W
dB = 10log10
Wref
183

If a quantity X is in RMS amplitude units, and Xref is a suitable reference


level, the formula may then be rewritten using W = X2, to give:
X
dB = 20log10
Xref
184

Digital Integration
a method of converting acceleration to velocity or velocity to displacement
by first collecting the spectral data and then digitally converting the spectra
at each frequency. Digital integration is less desirable than analog integra-
tion as it produces low-frequency components within the spectra. Digital
integration is included in the Model 2120A to be compatible with data col-
lected with the older Model 2100 Machinery Analyzer.

Displacement
refers to the distance that an object has moved, usually measured in mils or
microns. Displacement is often measured from eddy current probes and
represents the physical movement of a rotating shaft.
Sometimes accelerometers or velocity probes are used, and the data is inte-
grated into displacement. In this case, movement represents the relative
displacement of the machine casing where the probe is mounted.

G-4
Downloadable
the method used in the Model 2120A to load the control software (firm-
ware) into the analyzer’s memory from a computer. The Model 2120’s firm-
ware can therefore be easily updated without disassembly or electronic
component replacement.

FFT
Fast Fourier Transform; a mathematical technique which allows the time
waveform of a signal to be converted into a frequency spectrum.

Filter
an analog or digital device that removes or attenuates unwanted frequen-
cies in a signal.

Firmware
a term referring to the software that controls or instructs the functions of the
Model 2120.

Frequency
number of times an “event” repeats in a specific period of time. Units are
hertz (Hz equals cycles per second) or CPM (cycles per minute).

Fundamental
primary frequency of rotation for a machine (1xRPM); usually causes the
highest peak of energy in the spectrum.

Fundamental Frequency
a peak selected as the basis from which harmonic peaks are marked.

g’s
a unit of acceleration, commonly used with the English system of units;
One (1) g represents the acceleration due to gravity at sea level and is
approximately equal to 386.4 in/s2, or 32.2 ft/s2 (9.806 m/s2).

G-5
Hanning
a shaping function applied to a time record before the FFT is calculated in
order to smooth out end effects and reduce leakage in the spectrum. Usu-
ally the default window type to use when analyzing continuous signals
because of the compromise between frequency discrimination and leakage
suppression.

Harmonic
an integer multiple of a fundamental frequency.

Harmonic Marker
a marker that appears on a spectral display to indicate the harmonic peaks
of a fundamental peak.

Hertz
a unit of frequency equal to cycles per second (CPS), usually abbreviated
as Hz. One (1) hertz is equivalent to one (1) cycle per second, which equals
60 cycles per minute (CPM).

HFD
high-frequency detection; the amplitude of vibration in G’s over a broad
frequency band from 5 kHz up to 20 kHz or greater.

ICM
Influence Coefficient Method; the method used by the analyzer to calculate
balancing solutions.

Impact Test
a type of test used to investigate the properties of a structure, in which the
structure is caused to vibrate by an impulsive load from an instrumented
hammer, and the vibratory response is picked up by a vibration transducer.

Integrator
see Signal Integration Mode.

Lines
the number of lines of resolution used for the spectrum calculation. Reso-
lution (in Hz) equals maximum frequency divided by the number of Lines.

G-6
Live-time
a feature that allows the Model 2120A to dynamically display the spectrum
(or waveform) during data collection.

Measurement Point
any location or point on a machine where measurements are made.

Mil(s)
a unit of measure for displacement (thousandths of an inch).

Modem
a device that enables remote communications between the host computer
and the analyzer over telephone lines.

Multiplane Balancing
a method of balancing a machine that allows the measurement of the imbal-
ance at several planes along the shaft of the machine. Correction weights
are then added in each of these planes. Multiplane Balancing, as opposed
to single plane balancing, is usually required when a machine has several
rotating elements, such as flywheels, tightly coupled on a shaft and closely
spaced.

Notes
specific observations that can be stored on the measurement point of a
machine along with the collected data. These observations can be pre-
defined notes from the MasterTrend database, user-defined notes that have
been created via the analyzer's keypad, or a combination of the two
methods.

Nyquist Plot
a polar plot of the peak amplitude and phase of the 1xRPM vibration com-
ponent across a change in machine speeds. The Nyquist plot is typically
used during startup or coastdown analysis to identify shaft resonances.

1/3-Octave
method of measuring a signal by measuring the signal levels within a set of
bandpass filters that have a bandwidth of 1/3 octave.

G-7
Off Route
a mode that allows the collection and storage of data on measurement
points that are not defined in the downloaded route.

Order Tracking
a measurement of a signal from a machine whose speed is changing with
time, showing the level of one or more orders as a function of machine
speed or time.

Overlap
a function that speeds up data collection at low frequencies. The definable
range of overlap for the Model 2120A is 0 to 80% with 50% being the rec-
ommended value.

Peak
the largest signal level seen in a waveform over a period of time. For sinu-
soidal signals, the peak signal level is always 1.414 times the RMS value of
the signal level. For non-sinusoidal signals, the peak level is often larger
than the result that this formula would produce.

Peak-to-Peak
the difference between the maximum and the minimum levels (positive or
negative) in a signal over a given period of time. For a sinusoidal (single fre-
quency) signal, the peak-to-peak level is always two times the peak level
and 2.828 ( 2 2 ) times the RMS level. For non-sinusoidal (multiple fre-
quency) signals this is no longer true and there is no simple relationship
between peak-peak, peak, and RMS levels.

Period
the time required for one complete cycle of a periodic signal.

Phase
1xRPM phase represents the location of the shaft of a machine in degrees
(0 to 360) with respect to the tachometer pulse where the largest vibration
occurs.

G-8
Plane
designates one or more of the rotating elements of a machine that is to be
balanced. Each plane lies perpendicular to the line that defines the axis of
rotation.

Point
any location on a machine where measurements are required; used inter-
changeably with measurement point.

Pre-Trigger
triggered data acquisition using a delay such that the time record starts
before the trigger event.

Real-Time
FFT frequency spectrum of an analog signal displayed instantaneously and
continuously.

Resolution
the frequency range represented by one line of an FFT spectrum. Found by
dividing the maximum analysis frequency by the number of lines. The res-
olution in Hz is equal to the inverse of the data record length in seconds.

RMS
root mean square. When applied to a dynamic signal such as vibration or
sound, refers to an averaged level of a function obtained by averaging the
square of the signal level over a period of time (or number of data records),
then taking the square root of the result.

Route
one or more machines and their respective measurement points organized
in an efficient sequence for data collection.

G-9
Sideband
a frequency component that represents the effect of modulation on a signal.
If a modulated signal has more than one component, each component will
show sidebands. A sideband is spaced off from the frequency of the modu-
lated signal by an amount equal to the modulating frequency. If the modu-
lating signal has multiple components or if there is frequency modulation,
the sideband pattern may be very complicated including sum and differ-
ence frequencies between the sideband component frequencies (intermod-
ulation effects).

Signal Integration Mode


provides a choice of analog or digital modes for the integration of signals.
See also Analog Integration and Digital Integration.

Spectrum
the frequency domain representation of a signal. In practical measure-
ments, the spectrum is usually displayed as a plot of magnitude verses fre-
quency over a limited frequency range.

Station
a grouping of machines within a company or a plant for the purpose of pre-
dictive maintenance; may include the entire facility or a logical division
thereof; can then be subdivided into routes of machines for data collection.

Subharmonics
vibration frequencies which are integer fractions of the running speed
(example 1/2 RPM, 1/3 RPM, etc.) or some other fundamental frequency.

Tachometer
a device that generates a pulse signal corresponding to the revolution of a
shaft; used to measure turning speed. A single pulse per revolution may be
used to trigger data acquisition synchronously with shaft rotation.

Transient
a non-steady-state signal of brief duration; often refers to a startup or coast-
down of a machine.

Trend
plotting a number of measurements of a parameter over time.

G-10
Trigger
causes the machinery analyzer to start data collection upon the receipt of a
specified dynamic signal from a sensor or a pulse from a tachometer.

Uniform Window
analyzing a signal without shaping; no window is applied. Sometimes used
for collection of non-steady-state data.

Velocity
the rate of change of displacement of a mechanical system. Units are inches
per second (in/s or ips) in English units and m/s, cm/s, or mm/s in SI units.
Can be measured directly with a velocity sensor or by integrating an accel-
eration signal from an accelerometer.

Vibration Parameters
(also individual analysis parameters) up to twelve frequency band-limited
parameters that are measured from the vibration signal. These parameters
are defined in the analysis parameter set and are loaded into the machinery
analyzer for each point from the MasterTrend database.

Waveform
analog or digital representation of a signal or function displayed as ampli-
tude vs. time.

Window
see Hanning Window and Uniform Window.

G-11
G-12
Index

A capacity 1-5
accelerometer 3-11, 4-22 changing 1-8
triaxial 7-33 charger input 2-2
acoustic noise 8-1 charging 1-6
alarm level 7-46, 7-60 checking 1-5, 3-19, 4-43
alphanumeric keys 2-15 to 2-16 diagnostic function 7-61
amplitude axis 4-27 multiple packs 1-7
analog overall 9-3 baud rate 3-3, 4-3
analysis bandwidth 3-17 beeper 4-13
analysis parameters 3-25, 5-7, 7-20, 7-26
Analyze key 2-6 C
arrow keys 2-8 to 2-9 cable, coiled 3-11
automatic poweroff 4-15 cable, communications 3-1
auxiliary connector 2-3 calibration 4-46, 9-6 to 9-9
average peak overall 9-3 card, see memory card
Averaged Spectrum key 3-33, 7-12 cascade plot mode 10-12
averaging case, leather 1-4
data overlap 4-33 Channel/Group 4-33
mode 7-28 Clear Data key 3-19
Monitor Overall mode 7-47 Clear key 2-10, 3-21, 3-29, 7-7, 7-53, 7-76
Monitor Peak/Phase mode 7-51 coastdown, machine 7-50
number of averages 5-11, 7-26, 7-78 coastdown/start-up 10-1
synchronous 8-9 to 8-10 coherence 7-75
A-Weighting 7-33, 7-47, 8-6, 8-8, 10-8 COM port 3-1
axis communications 3-1 to 3-8
amplitude 3-39, 4-27, 7-18, 7-71 error 3-10
frequency 3-27, 4-28, 7-5, 7-72 menu 4-2 to 4-5
modem 3-48 to 3-51
B configure port 4-3
backlight 4-13 contrast, screen 2-11, 4-29
bandwidth 5-9, 7-24, 7-51, 7-69, 7-77 control parameter 4-14
bar code scanner 2-3, 4-36 CPM Units key 3-40, 7-19, 7-72
battery cross channel phase 7-75 to 7-80

I-1
CSICOM program 3-4, 3-46, 3-49 dump data 4-2
cursor 3-27 to 3-30, 7-5 to 7-8
E
D End key 2-9
data English units 4-26, 9-1
collecting 3-20, 10-11 Enter key 2-8
displaying 3-25, 7-58, 10-12 error messages (cascade) 10-18
dumping 3-46, 4-2, 7-22 Exp key 2-9, 3-27 to 3-28, 7-5 to 7-6
printing 3-52 extended analysis parameters 7-20
storing 3-24, 7-21 to 7-22, 7-48, 7-60,
10-16 F
data overlap 4-33 fields
data units 4-23, 9-1 to 9-2 alphanumeric 2-15
database name support 3-7, 4-35 numeric 2-16
date 3-2, 4-9 response 2-13
DC signal 7-59 filters, demodulate and PeakVue 5-14,
Dec key 2-10, 3-27 to 3-28, 7-5 to 7-6 7-36, 10-10
decibels 4-23 firmware 2-1, 9-4 to 9-5
decimal point key 2-11 four-plot mode 10-12
delay 10-7 frequency
Delete key 2-10 axis 4-28
demodulator 5-13, 7-35, 10-9 cutoff 7-47, 10-4
digital overall 9-3 range 5-9
display control 4-27 to 4-29 resolution 5-10
Display Parameters 7-20 resonant 8-13
dual-channel units 4-26, 9-2
enabling 4-35, 7-34, 7-52, 7-70 front panel 2-4 to 2-11
live display 4-28 full scale range 5-15, 7-31, 7-78, 8-15, 10-8
MasterTrend setup 3-54 function keys 2-7, 3-19
measurement point display 3-18
measurements 3-54
off route 5-6 H
orbit plot 3-33, 7-12 Hanning window 5-11, 7-70, 8-15, 10-5
point ID 5-7 harmonic markers 3-30, 7-8
saving data 7-22 Help key 2-6
sensors 3-12 HFD 4-33
triggering 7-30 Home key 2-9
zoom analysis 7-74 Hz Units key 3-40, 7-19, 7-73

I-2
I communication settings 3-3
impact test 8-13 to 8-17 CSICOM program 3-4, 3-46, 3-49
input connector 2-2, 3-1, 4-29 Database Name Support 3-7
Insert key 2-10 dB reference values 4-24
integration mode 4-32, 7-27 dual-channel setup 3-54
measurement mode 4-32 to 4-37
K measurement point 3-22
description 3-15, 5-6
keypad 2-9 to 2-11
ID 3-15, 5-6
Keypad backlight 4-14
measurement point display 3-15 to 3-18
keys
memory 3-17
command 2-5 to 2-6
scratchpad 7-21, 7-38, 10-3
control 2-8
memory card 2-17 to 2-23, 3-17
function 2-7, 3-19
battery 2-17, 2-22, 4-52
functions 4-48 to 4-52
L installing 2-18 to 2-19
LCD backlight 4-13 removing 2-19
LED 2-4 selecting 3-5
level, triggering 7-31 write protect 2-21
lines of resolution 5-10, 7-25, 7-76, 7-78, Metric units 4-26, 9-1
10-5 microphone 8-1 to 8-6
List Peaks key 3-36, 7-15 calibration 8-5 to 8-6
live display 4-28 preamplifier 8-1 to 8-4
load route 4-2 Model 628 3-12
local route 5-2 modem 2-2, 3-48 to 3-51, 4-2
low cutoff 5-9, 7-24, 7-77, 8-8 command string 4-4
Move Harmonic 3-30, 7-8
M multifunction input connector 2-2, 3-1, 4-29
machine multiplexer 4-34
set RPM 3-37, 7-16
machine description 3-15 N
machine ID 3-15, 5-6 negative averaging 7-28
Machine List key 3-19, 3-22 New RPM key 3-19
maintenance, battery 1-10 Next Peak key 3-36, 7-15
Mark key 2-10, 3-29, 7-7 noise, acoustic 8-1
master reset 4-42 Notes key 2-6, 3-41 to 3-45
MasterTrend 1-2 notes, creating 3-43
Channel/Group 4-33 number of blocks 10-5
COM port 3-1

I-3
Nyquist plot 7-57, 7-58 data 3-52
generate report 4-45
O third octave spectra 8-8
off route 2-5 Program Select key 2-5
accessing 5-3
defining points 5-5 to 5-17 R
dual-channel 5-6 real-time display 4-28
modifying point 5-4 remote connect 4-2
point association 5-1 resolution 3-27, 4-15, 5-10, 7-5, 7-25, 7-78
orbit plot 3-33, 7-12 resonant frequency 8-13
order tracking 8-11 to 8-12 route
Order Units key 3-40, 7-19, 7-72 clear data 4-51
orders 5-15, 7-50, 8-11 copying 4-52
order-track averaging 7-28 deleting 4-50
Other FKeys key 3-38, 7-17 loading 3-6 to 3-10, 4-2
overall level mode 4-32 local 5-2
overall signal level 7-45 to 7-47 maximum 3-9
overall value 4-24 selecting 4-7
overall vibration level 3-15, 9-3
S
P sample time 7-47
Page keys 2-10 scratchpad memory 7-21, 7-38, 10-3
panel, front 2-4 to 2-11 screen
panel, top 2-2 to 2-3 contrast 2-11, 4-29
peak hold averaging 7-28 display control 4-27 to 4-29
peak/phase measurement 7-50 to 7-58 initial 2-1
PeakVue 5-14, 7-36, 10-9 select route 4-7
Plot Data key 3-19, 3-26 sensitivity
plot display microphone 8-4
control keys 3-27 to 3-29, 7-5 to 7-7 sensor 4-19, 5-17, 7-60
function keys 3-32 to 3-33, 7-11 to 7-12 sensor 2-2, 3-20, 3-21
plus/minus key 2-11 button 4-14 to 4-15
poweroff, automatic 4-15 connecting 3-11
preamplifier 8-4 conversion 4-32, 5-17
pre-trigger 7-29 to 7-31 converting units 4-18
Print key 2-9 dual-channel 3-12
printing power 4-21 to 4-22, 5-18
connections 2-2, 3-52 sensitivity 4-19, 5-17, 7-60

I-4
type 4-16, 4-17, 5-16 U
units 4-19, 5-17 Uniform window 5-11, 7-70, 8-15, 10-5
Set RPM key 3-37, 7-16 units
Set Scale key 3-38, 7-17 data 4-23, 9-1 to 9-2
Show Channel key 3-34, 7-13 frequency 9-2
Sideband Cursor Mode 3-30, 7-8 mode 4-26
Space key 2-11 sensor 4-19
special-function program 2-5, 4-5, 4-50 units modifier 3-16
Split Screen key 3-33, 7-12 Utility key 2-5
SST Control 5-11, 7-32
startup, machine 7-50 V
status message 3-16, 3-18
values
stop bit 3-3, 4-3
Delta-A 3-30
storing data 3-24, 7-21 to 7-22, 7-48, 7-60
Delta-F 3-30
strap, shoulder 1-4
variable load 5-7
strobe light 2-2, 4-36
variable RPM 5-7
sweep size 7-43
Vibration Parameters key 3-19, 3-25
synchronous averaging 7-28
vinyl jacket 1-4
volts input adapter 8-1
T
tachometer 7-28, 7-52, 10-6 W
connecting 2-3
Waveform Delta-T 3-31
erratic signal 7-54
Waveform key 3-32, 7-11
order tracking 8-11
waveform size 4-15
plot lines 7-44
window 5-11, 7-70, 8-15
synchronous averaging 8-9
trigger mode 7-29, 7-70
temperature probe 4-37, 7-49 X
thickness gauge 4-36 X axis 4-28
third octave 5-10, 8-7 X Log Scale key 3-39, 7-18
time 3-2, 4-9
time span 7-46, 7-59 Y
timeout 4-3 Y Log Scale key 3-39, 7-18, 7-71
triaxial accelerometer 2-2, 7-33
triggering 7-29 to 7-31, 8-15, 10-6
Z
true peak overall 9-3
zoom analysis 7-69 to 7-70

I-5
I-6