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Autoimmune Paleo Diet

DR. IZABELLA WENTZ / JUNE 10, 2017


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Note: Originally published in July 2013, this article has been revised and updated for
accuracy and thoroughness.

What is the Autoimmune Paleo (AIP) Diet and How


Can It Help Improve Symptoms of Hashimoto’s and
Hypothyroidism?
There are numerous dietary protocols that can help a person with Hashimoto’s feel better. In
some cases, a dietary approach can produce a complete remission of the condition!

For me, as a clinician, the goal of the approach is to help your body reset, nourish itself, and
reduce inflammation caused by reactive foods, as well as to help you reconnect to an intuitive
way of eating, where (eventually) you will naturally select foods that make you feel better and
avoid those that make you feel worse.

Dietary protocols are meant to be used as starting points, or templates, where you implement
the basic plan and eventually change it up based on your needs. To keep it simple, I
recommend sticking with the basic template for 30 days or so, and of course, make sure you
reintroduce foods methodically, one by one so that you can isolate your body’s reactions to
individual foods.

The Origins of the Autoimmune Paleo (AIP) Diet


First, let’s talk about the Paleo diet which is the diet from where AIP originates. Many people,
even those not diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, are aware of the benefits of the Paleo diet. It has
helped countless people feel better from a wide range of symptoms: fatigue, brain fog, joint
pain, gas, and bloating, to name a few. In a survey of my readers and clients, a resounding
81% reported that they felt better on a Paleo or grain free diet. In the case of Hashimoto’s, the
traditional Paleo diet has even helped many people lower—or completely eradicate—their
thyroid antibodies.

For those of you who have tried Paleo but have not seen significant improvement, I want you
to know there are additional steps you can take that will give you the power to take back your
health!
The traditional Paleo diet is a classic elimination diet that focuses on omitting things people
are commonly sensitive to in an effort to lower inflammation.

As you may know, the Paleo diet eliminates all grains and allprocessed foods. The focus is on
replacing the things you take out of your diet with nutrient-dense foods such as organic or
grass-fed meats, wild-caught fish, organic vegetables and fruits, nuts, seeds, eggs from
pasture-raised hens and, depending on who you ask, dairy.

The Paleo diet is certainly a great start, but it is not always enough to address every case of
Hashimoto’s. Often, we need to peel back more layers of that onion! The good news is, with
each new diet, supplement, or treatment that you try, you are finding out how your body
responds to different external factors. Each case of Hashimoto’s is unique and many of us
have additional sensitivities that are deregulating our immune system. People with
Hashimoto’s often have sensitivities to a wide range of foods—particularly gluten, dairy,
eggs, and soy—which are all omitted on the traditional Paleo diet.

Anecdotally, the Paleo diet is said to have been introduced in the 1970’s with the book, The
Stone Age Diet by Walter Voegtlin, but it has significantly gained in popularity over the past
ten years. Since then, countless resources such as cookbooks, websites, and articles have been
created that include recipes ready for you to use! I’m sure many of you have seen these
resources at your local bookstore, your go-to health food store, and even at Costco! It’s a very
exciting time to be on a Paleo diet!

As for the Autoimmune Paleo diet, I don’t know who invented it, but I have seen it work
wonders for many people with Hashimoto’s.

If the Traditional Paleo Diet Does Not Improve All My


Symptoms, What’s Next?
Now that you understand Paleo, I would like to put the spotlight on the AIP diet which helped
many of my symptoms of Hashimoto’s. The Autoimmune Paleo diet takes Paleo a step
further…

Although the Paleo diet has helped some people with Hashimoto’s recover completely, I have
found that the AIP diet can be even morehelpful, based on 75% of my readers and clients
reporting significant symptom reduction—and almost 40% seeing a reduction in thyroid
antibodies—with this dietary protocol!

On a personal level, this was one of the key protocols on my own healing journey and helped
me get my condition into remission.

The Autoimmune Paleo diet has helped many people with Hashimoto’s and autoimmune
conditions get better but can be quite difficult to implement. As a pharmacist, I see this daily,
people who know what they need to do to get better but just don’t know how to get started.
When I work with someone who is overwhelmed by jumping straight to AIP, I recommend
slowly transitioning. The 4 most helpful dietary templates I recommend are (in order of
difficulty to implement):

1. the gluten free diet


2. the gluten free/dairy free/soy free approach (The Root Cause Intro Diet)
3. the Paleo diet
4. the Autoimmune Paleo diet
5. the Root Cause Rotation diet (more in the Hashimoto’s Protocol)

If you’ve been eating the standard Western diet for most of your life, starting a dietary
protocol like the AIP can be extremely intimidating! Though you may eventually end up
“going AIP,” it’s okay to take baby steps and begin with gluten free, then move on to dairy
free and soy free. I encourage you to remove one food group at a time if that makes you feel
more at ease with the transition. Committing to a 100% gluten free diet is an important first
step, and 88% of my readers with Hashimoto’s have indicated that they felt better after going
gluten free.

I know that some of you will dive right in! However, many of you will find the AIP diet
difficult to adhere to early on in your personal journey. We all have different needs,
motivations, and challenges, and I encourage you to honor your individuality and listen to
your body!
The Autoimmune Paleo Diet consists of the following guidelines:

Foods to Be Avoided on the AIP Diet


 Gluten
 Grains (including buckwheat and rice)
 Dairy
 Eggs
 Soy
 Fungi (mushrooms)*
 Alcohol
 Caffeine
 Beans and legumes
 Nightshades [tomatoes, potatoes (except for sweet potatoes), eggplant, peppers, goji
berries, ashwagandha (herb that helps balance adrenals) paprika and other nightshade
spices]
 Seaweed and other sea vegetables*
 Sugars (including honey, maple syrup, and agave)
 Canned foods, processed foods, coffee
 High glycemic index foods
 All nuts and seeds (except coconut)

*I recommend avoiding mushrooms because of their ability to exacerbate Candida, and sea
vegetables because of high iodine content which may exacerbate autoimmune thyroid disease.

Foods to Be Included on the AIP Diet


 Organic vegetables (except nightshades and legumes)
 Fermented foods (sauerkraut, nightshade free kimchi, coconut kefir, kombucha,
fermented vegetables, and jams)
 Organic and grass-fed meats
 Organic and grass-fed organ meats
 Wild-caught fish
 Fats & oils
 Low-glycemic organic fruits
 Coconut (including coconut milk and coconut oil)
 Herbs and spices
 Hydrolyzed beef protein
 Sweet potatoes

Recommended Best Practices


 Limit fruits to 1-2 servings per day and make sure they are low on the glycemic index
 Include 6-8 servings of vegetables per day
 Make each meal Mediterranean inspired: 80% vegetables, 20% meat or fish
 Focus on sauces, dips, and broths
 Incorporate plenty of fats & oils, cooked at the appropriate temperature (coconut oil,
duck fat, beef tallow, avocado oil, olive oil)
 Don’t eat on the run, and make sure to chew your food thoroughly
 Learn to ferment your own vegetables
 Drink plenty of filtered water
 Don’t forget to check supplement labels to make sure there are not any non-compliant
ingredients. For your thyroid medication, read Is Your Medication Gluten Free?

What Are the Results and Benefits?


There is often a short transition/withdrawal period before you start feeling better on the AIP
diet, especially if you are new to coming off gluten, dairy, and processed foods.

Research suggests that casomorphins (from the dairy protein casein) and gliadorphins (from
gluten, the protein found in wheat) can bind our “feel good” endorphin receptors, much like
the morphine found in addictive drugs.

This has led some people to say that these foods are as addictive as heroin and other drugs
(which also bind our endorphin receptors)… While I think this is an exaggeration, I have seen
people experience withdrawal-like symptoms including brain fog, irritability, cravings,
fatigue, and headaches, after quitting gluten, dairy, and sugar while adhering to the
Autoimmune Paleo diet.

The good thing is, once off these inflammatory foods, a person will start to feel better.

You can expect to see results within 30-90 days of implementing the AIP diet, although it
may take longer. If you do not see results in 30 days, eliminate mammalian meat and use fish
as your main protein source. Then, you can start to systematically reintroduce certain foods
one by one. This allows you to create a diet for the long term that is tailor-made for you! This
process will allow you will be more in touch with what does—and doesn’t—work for you. I
felt incredibly empowered when my grocery shopping and prep work resulted in a lasting
improvement in health—and I know you will too!

I have seen many of my clients find 100% relief from their symptoms by implementing the
AIP diet into their lifestyle changes. The symptoms that many find relief of are joint pain,
muscle aches, fatigue, bloating, diarrhea, brain fog, tinnitus, skin rashes as well as
decreased food sensitivities. Even for those who do not recover completely, they will
experience significant improvement. You have nothing to lose (except for symptoms!) and
everything to gain by considering the AIP diet!

What If AIP Is Not Enough?


You may have to take it a step further and incorporate a rotation diet, a low-histamine diet,
or low-oxalate diet, and you can find more information on these helpful protocols in my
latest book Hashimoto’s Protocol. These changes are not permanent, so do not be
discouraged! The Autoimmune Paleo diet is meant to be short term; it solves the problem of
leaky gut and is not just a band-aid. These variations in diet give you the power to improve
how you feel and isolate your root cause(s).

Important Labs That Compliment AIP


After you are finished with the 90-day elimination period on the AIP diet, you may want
to re-test your thyroid antibodies to monitor improvement. You should see a trend in your
antibody levels reducing (or going away).

If, after 90 days, you are still having gut issues, it may be a good time to test for parasites and
other gut infections as well as SIBO.

An Example Day’s Worth of Meals


On a personal note, eliminating eggs was a tough step for me, and although I knew I was
sensitive to them, I put off excluding them from my diet. This delayed my progress for many
months, and I don’t want that to happen to you! I’m sure many of you are thinking…what am
I going to eat for breakfast? I know I asked this question! I used to eat eggs for breakfast
almost daily, in omelets or scrambled eggs on weekdays, and every weekend my husband
would cook a nice breakfast for us that included runny yolk eggs.

However, the transition to life without eggs did not feel limiting after all. I found it made me
more creative in the kitchen! Here are some meal ideas—my husband’s included!

Breakfast, Courtesy of My hubby!

 Bacon
 Steamed spinach with olive oil
 Avocado
 Fermented cabbage (from farmer)
 Fermented cucumbers (my recipe)

Lunch

 Butternut squash chili—last night’s leftovers! (Remember, batch cooking is your


friend!)
 Fresh Swiss chard with lemon, sea salt, and olive oil

Dinner

 Coconut crusted trout

Thirsty?
 Mineral water with lemon and lime or, for the occasional treat, add a few berries!
 Herbal teas are a great choice on an AIP diet

Need a Snack?

 Sip on some homemade bone broth, enjoy a root cause green smoothie, a slice of
avocado with a squeeze of lime and sea salt (yum!), or make some savory sweet potato
chips!

If you are interested in these recipes, you can find those and more in my FREE eBook: Root
Cause Autoimmune Paleo Diet 2-week Recipe Plan!

Remember, 75% of my clients saw a reduction in symptoms on the AIP diet, so it is definitely

worth a try! I know that you can do it…and enjoy it too Once you get going and see the
progress you make, you will not want to turn back!

I’d love to hear from you…what type of benefits have you seen from the AIP diet?

Here are links to additional resources…

Books & Recipes


 FREE Root Cause Autoimmune Paleo Diet 2-Week Recipe Plan
 My book Hashimoto’s Root Cause
 My book Hashimoto’s Protocol
 Autoimmune Paleo Cookbook
 The Healing Kitchen Cookbook
 He Won’t Know It’s Paleo Cookbook
 Simple French Paleo: Flavorful Allergen-Free Recipes for the Autoimmune Protocol
 The Paleo Approach

Food & Pantry Items


 US Wellness Meats
 Desert Farms Camel Milk
 Paleo On The Go
 The Flavor Chef (The Brothery) – Be sure to look for the products marked as AIP
and use “thyroid10” for your special discount!
 Thrive Market

You May Also Be Interested in These Posts


 Food Pharmacology for Hashimoto’s
 Dairy and Hashimoto’s
Here Are Some Helpful Cooking Tools to Make AIP
Life Easier
 Vitamix
 Nik Schmitt Fermenting Crock Pots
 Granite Ware Covered Oval Roaster
 Spiralizer

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FILED UNDER: DIET, RECOVERY TAGGED WITH: AUTOIMMUNE


PALEO, DAIRY, ELIMINATION DIET, FOOD PHARMACOLOGY, FOOD
SENSITIVITIES, GLUTEN, RECOMMENDED RESOURCES, ROOT CAUSE
RECIPE PORTAL, SOY, SUGAR
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eader Interactions

Comments
1. Laina McCall says
July 20, 2013 at 2:09 PM

Where do I start if I may have Lupus.


Reply

2. Thyroid Root Cause says


July 31, 2013 at 8:20 AM

Hi Laina, be sure to see a functional physician. He/she may


help you out with balancing your immune system. Trying a
diet like autoimmune paleo may also be helpful
Reply

3. Kirstin says
August 2, 2013 at 8:47 AM

Do you recommend *starting* with the Autoimmune Paleo


Diet if we have Hashimoto’s? Or do it only if we don’t see any
improvement on the regular Paleo Diet?
Reply

4. Izabella Wentz says


August 11, 2013 at 6:50 PM

Hi Kirstin,
From my personal experience the AIP may be a good place to
start. It would be the most efficient place to start, for let’s say
1-2 months, allowing your gut to heal. Eggs, seeds and nuts on
the regular Paleo diet can still cause problems in someone
with intestinal permeability and delay healing… You will
likely see improvements with Paleo, but than may hit a wall if
you continue eating eggs/nuts/seeds
Reply

5. Jennifer says
August 8, 2013 at 8:53 PM

Izabella, I was so surprised to read your list. Prior to getting


antibiotics for my Hashimoto’s rosacea (which have been
MOST effective!), I went to an ayurvedic practitioner. And the
elimination of nightshades, peppers, alcohol, sugar, coffee,
dairy, etc. is almost EXACTLY what they prescribed. The
only problem for me is, the cure was worse than the problem!
Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
November 29, 2016 at 6:02 AM

Jennifer – In general, most people with autoimmunity


need to find their food sensitivities, heal from infections,
and eat organic; however, bioindividuality is important,
not everyone will respond to the same interventions. The
foods that heal one person, may not be the same for
another. It might seem like a lot to give up, but feeling
your symptoms fade away can make it feel like it’s all
worthwhile. And don’t forget it’s not forever! You will be
reintroducing these foods once your gut heals.

WHAT’S CAUSING YOUR LEAKY GUT


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/whats-causing-
your-leaky-gut

Reply

6. Kirstin says
August 12, 2013 at 4:00 AM

(sorry this didn’t post under the reply above…I kept getting an
error message!)
Thanks so much! That’s kind of what I was thinking.
Interestingly, I already know I’m sensitive to eggs, so I’ve
nearly eliminated them (I can tolerate them baked in things). I
wonder if, after I do the AIP diet, I might be able to add them
back in???? One can dream, right?
So do I understand correctly that I would do the AIP diet for
roughly 2 months and then add in different categories of foods
one at a time, to see if I see a reaction? How will I tell if the
AIP helps my Hashimoto’s?
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 29, 2016 at 6:05 AM

Kirstin – In contrast to other diets that simply exclude


common problematic foods, an elimination diet is done to
determine what particular food intolerances the individual
may have. An elimination period of at least 2-3 months is
a good starting place, but you may want to continue if you
feel that you still have more healing to do. Then you can
trial a new food every 4 days and monitor yourself for
reactions. Going though an elimination diet will help you
figure out your own individual food triggers and your
specific response to each trigger food. Here is an article I
hope you find interesting!

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos
Reply

7. Beth says
August 19, 2013 at 9:00 PM

How do you get enough carbohydrates on this diet?


Reply

8. Izabella Wentz, PharmD says


August 23, 2013 at 11:46 PM

Hi Beth, there are some schools of though that believe we


don’t need as many carbohydrates as we currently consume. In
particular, that grains and grasses are a detriment for human
health, and that fruit should be limited due to their ability to
feed pathogenic bacteria and cause too much insulin issues . I
tend to feel best on a grain free, low fruit diet…That said, we
are all different, and autoimmune paleo is just one dietary
approach that may be helpful
Reply

9. Evan says
November 28, 2016 at 3:35 PM

Hi Izabella,

I am vegan. I do not and will not eat meat. Am I out of luck


here? How can I get the protein that I need if legumes, grains,
nuts and seeds are taken away? Are truly whole grains,
possibly even sprouted, and well soaked beans or lentils still a
problem? I am not aware of having any food allergies. Is soy
nevertheless bad for me? (Thank you for your very kind
providing of highly useful information!)

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


November 28, 2016 at 3:56 PM

Evan – Recovering from adrenal fatigue and


hypothyroidism when following a vegetarian diet is very
challenging, as vegetarian diets are often carbohydrate
heavy.
Vegetarian sources of protein such as legumes (beans),
dairy, grains, soy and some seeds may be incompatible
with trying to heal a leaky gut, which is almost always
present with Hashimoto’s. Pea protein is an alternative
that may be easier to digest and is less likely to cause food
sensitivities (I use NOW Foods brand).
Eggs, some seeds, and nuts would be the preferred sources
of protein for vegetarians, however, some people with
Hashimoto’s may be intolerant to those as well, especially
in the early stages of starting a healing diet.

Being a vegan is even more challenging, and nuts and


seeds would be the go-to source of protein, which are
usually too difficult to digest for many in the beginning of
their thyroid healing journeys.

While vegan and vegetarian diets have been reported to be


extremely helpful with autoimmune and chronic
conditions, I have not been able to find reports of people
recovering from Hashimoto’s by following a vegan diet.
Even devout vegans who are nutritionally conscious still
struggle with low body temperatures, hypothyroidism and
Hashimoto’s.

Additionally, many former vegans have reported


improved symptoms of Hashimoto’s following
transitioning to a Paleo diet. Based on this, I believe that
animal proteins must play an important role in building
back the health of people with Hashimoto’s.

That said, while meats and fats are important for healing,
eating them exclusively will produce an acidic
environment in the body; hindering healing, and thus the
diet should be balanced with plenty of nutrient rich
vegetables (suggested ratio may be 20% meat/80%
veggie).

Additionally, vegan and raw vegan diets can be extremely


helpful for cleansing and detoxifying, especially for those
with persistent protein digestion issues. A vegan diet can
be followed for a few days to a few weeks and may help
the body detoxify. B12 and iron or ferritin supplements
should be utilized at this time to prevent deficiency.

Reply

 Emily Wood says


January 20, 2017 at 9:04 AM

If meat takes forever to digest and is void of needed


fiber, how then are nuts and seeds the culprits for
being difficult to digest?

Reply

 Dr. Izabella Wentz says


January 20, 2017 at 2:26 PM

Emily- Unfortunately, most with Hashimoto’s


have sensitivities or develop sensitivities to nuts
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/top-7-
hashimotos-food-myths

Reply
o henriette says
June 12, 2017 at 6:22 AM

Hi Evan, I’ve had the same problem as you. I have been


vegetarian for over 30 years. Since my health was
compromised I started the AIP diet. The first month has
been challenging to say the least. It was very
uncomfortable but I promised myself I would give it a
month to see if the blood works got better. After a month I
could start introducing new foods and when I tested after
3 months my blood was much better. Then a alternative
dietist advised me to eat more protein, in the form of pea
protein and although this was good, she advised me to eat
some fish. I felt awful and prayed for the fish but I tried
since my fear of medicine was bigger than my
determination to exclude animal protein. My health got so
much better that my blood has been in normal range after
6 months. I eat fish sometimes, mostly once a week,
sometimes twice and stick to pea protein daily or an egg.
It felt like me or the animal. It helps if I thank the animal
before I eat it, for its help in my health journey. Meat is
one step too far so I don’t eat that. Good luck on your
path!

Reply
 Dr. Izabella Wentz says
June 27, 2017 at 2:03 PM

Henriette – thank you so much for sharing your


journey! I am so happy you are taking charge of your
health. <3

Reply

10. Alicia Childers says


January 20, 2017 at 7:53 AM

I have had Hashimoto’s for a very long time, and am at the


stage where additional autoimmune problems are manifesting.
I live in a rural area, and none of the drs. around here have a
clue as to how to treat Hashimoto’s. As such, I have been on a
daily regimen of Levothyroid and Cytomel for many many
years. With that said, I am 99% sure that I have an allergy or
sensitivity to gluten and dairy. I am aware that I need to
eliminate these from my diet, along with several others foods
as well. However, because I am a very picky eater and the
majority of the foods listed in the autoimmune paleo diet, and
the cookbook, are not things I would eat. Suggestions for a
picky eater?

Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
January 20, 2017 at 2:30 PM

Alicia- You may be interested in checking out the Root


Cause Recipe Portal. It is full of autoimmune paleo and
paleo recipes. You’re able to organize weekly shopping
lists, meal planning, etc. Hope you check it out.

http://rootcauserecipes.com/

Reply

11. Thaia Katsos Dorow says


January 20, 2017 at 3:41 PM

I just wanted to THANK YOU for being so responsive to


everyone’s questions. I’ve learned so much just from reading
all your responses.
Thaia

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


January 22, 2017 at 2:16 PM

Thaia- Thank you so much for your support!!

Reply

12. jill says


January 29, 2017 at 1:51 PM

I suffer from acid reflux mostly wakes me up at night. I have


hashimotos and take synthroid for 20+ years.what can i do
besides taking rolaids. Would drinking lemon water help?

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


January 30, 2017 at 1:55 PM

Jill – I highly recommend that you work with a functional


medicine clinician. It’s an entire medical specialty
dedicated to finding and treating underlying causes and
prevention of serious chronic disease rather than disease
symptoms.
FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE APPROACH TO THE
THYROID
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/functional-
medicine-approach-to-the-thyroid

WHAT TYPE OF DOCTOR SHOULD YOU SEE IF


YOU HAVE HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/what-type-of-
doctor-should-you-see-if-you-have-hashimotos

10 THINGS I WISH MY ENDOCRINOLOGIST


WOULD HAVE TOLD ME
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/10-things-i-wish-
my-endocrinologist-would-have-told-me

CLINICIAN DATABASE
http://www.thyroidpharmacistconsulting.com/clinician-
database.html

FIND A FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE CLINICIAN


https://www.functionalmedicine.org/practitioner_search.as
px?id=117

Reply

13. Robyn says


February 3, 2017 at 7:59 AM
I was diagnosed with hypothyroidism in my 30’s. In my 40’s,
I was told I had Hashimoto’s and now in my 50’s, I have been
told I have type 2 diabetes. I have been overweight for years
and am having other symptoms such as swollen joints, joint
pain (primarily hips), severe tiredness, no energy, mental fog,
forgetfulness, indigestion and bloat. I do not take medication
for diabetes yet although that seems to be the only thing my
doctor is concerned about. I am wondering what your thoughts
are about this diet and diabetes. I know that I would probably
not be able to eat enough carbs as suggested by my doctor to
maintain blood sugar levels.

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


February 3, 2017 at 10:15 AM

Robyn – please, understand that due to liability issues, I


am unable to answer specific medical questions.

I highly recommend that you work with a functional


medicine clinician. It’s a whole medical specialty
dedicated to finding and treating underlying causes and
prevention of serious chronic disease rather than disease
symptoms.

FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE APPROACH TO THE


THYROID
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/functional-
medicine-approach-to-the-thyroid
WHAT TYPE OF DOCTOR SHOULD YOU SEE IF
YOU HAVE HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/what-type-of-
doctor-should-you-see-if-you-have-hashimotos

10 THINGS I WISH MY ENDOCRINOLOGIST


WOULD HAVE TOLD ME
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/10-things-i-wish-
my-endocrinologist-would-have-told-me

CLINICIAN DATABASE
http://www.thyroidpharmacistconsulting.com/clinician-
database.html

FIND A FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE CLINICIAN


https://www.functionalmedicine.org/practitioner_search.as
px?id=117

Reply

14. Lena says


March 6, 2017 at 10:37 PM

Hi,
I have a history of multi thyroid nodules for years, tested and
was cleared as non-cancerous, with my TSH results always
running on the lower side of norm,somewhere between 0.4-0.5
my endo doctor always sent my home with normal results
BUT I know I am not well.
Thank you so much for all you do, please inform me does my
condition with nodules and low TSH indicates hypothyroidism
or hyperthyroidism?? Please help me understand. I am in the
process of finding functional medicine practitioner in Chicago
area but its not so easy.
Am I hypo or hyper? Thanks so much in advance.

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


March 7, 2017 at 10:42 AM

Lena – Thank you for following this page. Please,


understand that due to liability issues, I am unable to
answer specific medical questions.

TOP 6 THYROID TESTS


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/top-6-thyroid-tests

I’m glad that you are searching for a Functional Medicine


Clinician. You may wish to check out the doctors that
other patients recommend on this list.

CLINICIAN DATABASE
http://www.thyroidpharmacistconsulting.com/clinician-
database.html
FIND A FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE CLINICIAN
https://www.functionalmedicine.org/practitioner_search.as
px?id=117

Reply

15. Ana says


March 9, 2017 at 11:26 AM

Hi. I have hypothyroidism and also vitiligo. Should I start for


the food sensitivities test first or just start with the
autoimmune paleo diet? Have you seen in your practice people
with these two conditions getting their pigmentation back after
healing their thyroid? Thank you!

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


March 9, 2017 at 5:49 PM

Ana – thank you so much for following this page.

Did you know that if you live in the United States, the
UK, Australia, Europe and most developed countries that
add iodine to the salt supply and take thyroid medications,
there’s a higher probability that you do have
Hashimoto’s?

Depending on the source, estimates are that between 90-


95% of those with hypothyroidism have Hashimoto’s.

But most doctors will never tell people that they have
Hashimoto’s, or that their own immune system is
attacking their thyroid. People are told that their “thyroid
is sluggish”, and that these things happen with age and
“Just take this pill, you’ll be fine.” I hope you check out
these articles that I wrote.

ARE YOU DOING EVERYTHING FOR YOUR


THYROID BUT NOT YET WELL?
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/are-you-doing-
everything-for-your-thyroid-but-not-yet-well/

DO YOU HAVE HYPOTHYROIDISM OR


HASHIMOTO’S OR BOTH?
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/do-you-have-
hypothyroidism-or-hashimotos-or-both/

Here are the tests you need for diagnosis. Most


endocrinologists don’t run them all so you will have to
request them. Make sure to request a copy of your labs as
well.

TOP 6 THYROID TESTS FOR DIAGNOSIS


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/top-6-thyroid-tests/

Reply
16. Julie says
March 13, 2017 at 1:57 PM

Hi Izabella – Thank you for your informative site. My father


has Hashimotos and I have recently been working with a
provider for my apparent leaky gut. I was vegetarian for about
15 years and while I eat well, with lots of organics, I realize
now I ate too many carbs. Since my we have a family history,
I’m following the autoimmune diet for healing. I adore eggs,
nuts, legumes. It’s very difficult to eat meat, but I’m finding
that easier with bone broth and small amounts of high quality
beef and chicken.

My healing journey started with the discovery that if I drink


fluoridated water, I get horrible migraines. When I cut out tap
water and started drinking spring water known to be F-free,
my health greatly improved. I also cut all foods known to be
high in F, like grapes.

I’m curious if you advise those living with auto-immune


disease or those at high risk to cut out fluoride, esp.
fluoridated water? I see you have it listed as a risk factor for
Hashimotos and I’ve also seen it’s linked to hypothyroidism.
I’ve been drinking fluoridated water since I was 7 and can’t
help but wonder if it’s played a major role in my migraines
and digestive woes. I know you can’t speak to my case, but
I’m curious what you’ve observed on this topic.

Thanks again. All my best, Julie


Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


March 13, 2017 at 3:40 PM

Julie – thank you for following this page. Please,


understand that due to liability issues, I am unable to
answer specific medical questions.

Here is some information you may find interesting.

Three things MUST be present in order for autoimmunity


to occur…

1. Genetic predisposition
2. Environmental triggers
3. Intestinal permeability (leaky gut)

Developing autoimmunity is like a three-legged stool, all


of these factors must be present for autoimmunity to
occur! When you remove one of these, you can prevent or
stop autoimmune disease. While we can’t change genes, if
we know the trigger, we can remove it and we can heal the
gut.

REVERSING AUTOIMMUNITY AND THE PERFECT


STORM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/reversing-
autoimmunity-and-the-perfect-storm/
IS HASHIMOTO’S HYPOTHYROIDISM GENETIC
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/is-hashimotos-
genetic

Reply

17. Elizabeth Nelson says


March 23, 2017 at 2:53 PM

Sorry if this is long. I have hypothyroidism along with


rheumatoid arthritis. Last summer I began the Low Dose
Naltrexone protocol with a knowledgeable functional
medicine doctor. Four weeks ago I began to have erratic (high
to normal) bp issues along with high heartrates. Went to the
ER 2X, saw my pcp 3X, saw a cardiologist, had loads of tests
and my heart was deemed “normal”. I called my func. dr. who
told me to quit the LDN as I may have developed allergies
because of it (or to it). I see him next week. My pcp thinks I
may have a parathyroid issue but I’m waiting several days to
be tested to get the LDN out of my system so it’s more
accurate. I was placed on 2 new bp medications, for 2+ days I
had more normal bp and heartrate—that is until today. I’m
thinking now I do have allergies to whatever I’m eating. I also
want you to be aware that for 5+ yrs I’ve been on the Wheat
Belly protocol so have already eliminated grains, processed
foods, sugars, soda and more recently dairy from my diet.
Have you ever run across anyone similar to what I’ve been
experiencing? I’m looking at the AIP diet and it seems almost
impossible to think about. I know that it could be temporary
and it is a mind-set. Can you help give me words of wisdom??
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


March 24, 2017 at 1:12 PM

Elizabeth – thank you for following this page. I’m sorry to


hear that you are struggling.

Please, understand that due to liability issues, I am unable


to answer specific medical questions.

Here are a few articles related to diet that hopefully help


you get started.

FOOD SENSITIVITIES AND HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/food-sensitivities-
and-hashimotos

AUTOIMMUNE PALEO DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/autoimmune-paleo-
diet

TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

BEST DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S AND


HYPOTHYROIDISM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/best-diet-for-
hashimotos-hypothyroidism

Reply

18. Stephen says


June 5, 2017 at 6:09 PM

Was diagnosed with Hashimotos 8 months ago… went gluten


free…. blood work was still bad 3 1/2 months ago… went full
AIP 3 1/2 months ago… feel great, thinking I’ll try to make it
6 months and then try to reintroduce some foods…(I use to
daily drink for 25 years, so want to give it more time to keep
healing) 49 years old and went from 289 to 215 in the past
year…so happy….I also am only eating between 12-
8pm….feels great!!!!
my question is how long should I give on the AIP to see
change in antibodies in my blood work?? I’ve heard rumors of
6 months after the gut heals??? Is this correct?? Hoping I can
“heal”/ improve my gut health without medication …hoping
!!! Will always stay gluten/dairy free, but miss a few items
like eggs, beans, nuts, & bananas… (whiskey, beer, pizza ,fast
food & Soda…..gone forever!!)
Thanks for all the advice!!

Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
June 6, 2017 at 10:41 AM

Stephen – thank you for following this page. It depends on


the person and their individualized food sensitivities.
Some people go into remission just gluten free; others
may have to go as far as autoimmune Paleo. The most
common triggers in Hashimoto’s are nutrient deficiencies,
food sensitivities, intestinal permeability (leaky gut),
stress, an impaired ability to get rid of toxins and in some
cases, infections. Optimizing your health starts with food.
Figuring out which foods nourish you, and which ones
cause you harm is the single most important thing you can
learn in your health journey.

I’ve found that recognizing and eliminating reactive foods


can be a life-changer for most people with Hashimoto’s.

Reactive foods trigger an inflammatory response in the GI


tract, leading to malabsorption of nutrients (gluten
sensitivity, in particular, has been implicated in causing a
Selenium deficiency, a well-known risk factor for
Hashimoto’s), and can also produce intestinal
permeability whenever they are eaten.

Most people will see a dramatic reduction in gut


symptoms, brain symptoms, skin breakouts, and pain by
eliminating the foods they are sensitive to. Some will also
see a significant reduction in thyroid antibodies! An
additional subset of people will actually be able to get
their Hashimoto’s into complete remission just by getting
off the foods they react to, normalizing their thyroid
antibodies, and some even normalizing their thyroid
function!

BEST DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S AND


HYPOTHYROIDISM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/best-diet-for-
hashimotos-hypothyroidism

TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

DAIRY AND HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/got-hashimotos-
you-may-want-to-reconsider-dairy

Reply

19. Candice says


June 11, 2017 at 11:29 AM

Izabella,

I am an avid reader of your blog and books and a huge fan of


your documentary series. Just wanted to take a moment to
thank you for all you are doing. It is because of you I am
currently healing my body and in tern, living an extremely
fulfilling life. Thankfully my physical symptoms were never
debilitating but mentally they grew to be. It’s because of you,
and all those involved in your documentary series, that
enabled me to take hold of my health, never accept what my
current medical doctors were telling me and to find TRUTH.
Thank you. Thank you for all you do in sharing this blessed
knowledge with the world.

Candice

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 12, 2017 at 7:35 PM

Candice – thank you for following this page and for your
heartwarming words of support. <3

I’m looking forward to hearing your progress on this page.

Reply

20. Cindy says


June 11, 2017 at 12:46 PM
I would like to try incorporating green smoothies in my diet. I
am currently avoiding foods I have tested sensitive to and am
on a 4 day rotation diet. I am concerned about having the same
ingredients in my smoothie every day, specifically the protein
powder and the coconut milk as I think I can rotate the other
ingredients such as the fruits and vegetables. Any suggestions
for alternatives for the protein powder and coconut milk on
alternate days?

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 12, 2017 at 7:31 PM

Cindy – thank you for following this page. You may be


interested in my 12 week online program called
Hashimoto’s Self-Management Program that covers all of
the strategies that I go through with my one-on-one
clients, in a self-paced format, so that participants have
access to all of the things I’ve learned about Hashimoto’s
without having to schedule costly consults with me or
another practitioner. In addition, any person that goes
through the program will get access to a Quick search
Q&A Database of 1000+ questions asked by past program
participants, Root Cause Assessment based on 100’s of
my clients’ root causes and triggers, 2-week Meal Plans,
recipes, and shopping lists to get you started on the
following diets: Paleo, Autoimmune Paleo, SIBO,
Candida. Also, Discounts on lab tests, high-quality
supplements, and consultations and much more to support
you in your journey! There are a few requirements that
you should pay attention to, such as my book is a required
read.

Hashimoto’s Self-Management Program


http://hackinghashimotos.com/

Reply

21. Melinda Jach says


June 11, 2017 at 1:07 PM

It would be nice if you had a website that you could pay a


nominal fee and I mean nominal to address simple questions
for people struggling. It takes so long and now costs so much
to get into a functional medicine doctor. Be the first Isabella to
truly help those of us who are dying to live.
Thank you

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 12, 2017 at 7:28 PM
Melinda – thank you for following this page. Please,
understand that due to liability issues, I am unable to
answer specific medical questions.

When I was first diagnosed with Hashimoto’s, I felt so


alone. My doctor didn’t think it was a big deal, and none
of my friends or co-workers had it. It wasn’t until I started
to research online that I found others who were going
through the same thing.

A couple of years after my diagnosis, I found Hashimoto’s


411, a closed Facebook group run by Alice Berry
McDonnell. This group is amazing! It is comprised of an
army of highly motivated, smart, supportive women and
men (now 45,000+ strong), and each of them sharing ideas
of what worked for them, things they were planning to try,
and offering support to one another. The comfort I
received from knowing that there were others going
through the same challenges as I, was enormous.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/hashimotos411/

Ask questions. Post your thoughts. Scan the files. It is an


absolutely amazing resource. Best of all it’s kept private
from spammers.

Reply

22. Shasha says


June 11, 2017 at 3:13 PM
I feel like I am starving trying to eat bananas instead of
organic brown rice, but they don’t have the same nutrients and
I have the symptoms of low Vit B1. Se/niacin/protein and
more are in the organic brown rice. I am too
dizzy/inflammation/swollen/leaky gut/nails bend/got new
varicose vein/could not think/no energy etc…trying to eat
organic brown rice again. The first day is fine, but by day 3
my intestines are hurt and many symptoms are kicking in. I
can’t eat meat/dairy/soy/high sugar/food with a
label/gluten/heated oils/saturated and monounsaturated fat etc.
My adrenals are burned out…stage 3+ maybe. Meat/coconut
oil/olive oil clogs my blood vessels. I try to eat organic. I need
more than vegetables…need a carb. Sugar/starch causes
glycation. I still have Lyme. My mitochondria have been hurt
too many times. What has the same nutrients as organic brown
rice, but no gluten. I think quinoa etc in a package has
contamination and is expensive. Thanks!

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 27, 2017 at 2:11 PM

Shasha – Thank you for following this page. Please,


understand that due to liability issues, I am unable to
answer specific medical questions, but I highly
recommend that you work with a functional medicine
clinician. It’s an entire medical specialty dedicated to
finding and treating underlying causes and prevention of
serious chronic disease rather than disease symptoms.
FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE APPROACH TO THE
THYROID
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/functional-
medicine-approach-to-the-thyroid

CLINICIAN DATABASE
http://www.thyroidpharmacistconsulting.com/clinician-
database.html

FIND A FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE CLINICIAN


https://www.functionalmedicine.org/practitioner_search.as
px?id=117

Reply

23. Lola says


June 11, 2017 at 4:41 PM

I was diagnosed with Hashomoto’s a month ago. I’ve been


sick for 4 years. For the last month I’ve been following gluten-
, soy-, dairy-, caffeine-, sugar-, grain-, potato-, alcohol-free
diet. It’s been tough. I never feel full. I’ve gained more
weight. I eat lots of vegetables, salads, meats though I always
have.

I’d like to try the AIP diet but I got Alletess food sensitivity
test done. And It shows reaction to lettuce, mushrooms,
carrots, spinach, green peas, coconut, watermelon, almonds,
salmon, different spices like cinnamon, oregano, nutmeg etc.
among other things.

Would AIP diet be advisable for me or should I go by what the


food sensitivity test say? If I illuminate all of my reactive
foods + nightshades + legumes and limit fruit to 1 serving
(half an apple?) also I’m not a huge fan of meat I’m looking at
a diet that’s really hard to maintain — meats, carrot-free bone
broth, extremely limited selection of vegetables and 1 fruit per
day. It doesn’t sound very healthy, honestly.

Am I understanding the necessary dietary changes correctly?


Would it be ok to include non-reactive foods (according to the
food sensitivity test) like rice, tomatoes, eggs into my AIP
diet?

Thank you

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 27, 2017 at 2:15 PM

Lola – thank you for following this page. In general, most


people with autoimmunity need to find their food
sensitivities, heal from infections, and eat organic;
however, bioindividuality is important, not everyone will
respond to the same interventions. The foods that heal one
person, may not be the same for another. It might seem
like a lot to give up, but feeling your symptoms fade away
can make it feel like it’s all worthwhile. And don’t forget
it’s not forever! You will be reintroducing these foods
once your gut heals.

WHAT’S CAUSING YOUR LEAKY


GUThttps://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/whats-
causing-your-leak

Reply

24. Ursula says


June 12, 2017 at 1:01 AM

Hi Izabella,
first thank you for the amazing work you do in giving us
informations which help. I live in Germany and Functional
Physicians aren’t here. I hold on to your nutritional advice
since a year , strict AIP . And I have followed your plan
outlined in your book how to find my root causes.

However eating AIP didn’t seem to be enough!


I had to dig deeper. Among other root causes physician found
out I have Histamine intolerance. DAO is too low, the causes
are genetical.
I love your recipies, but they all don’ t consider HIT.
No batch cooking, no left overs, all your good and so
supportive nutritional advice…now I can’t use it.
Please write an article on Hashimoto and HIT as one root
cause with some supportive advice . Reading your posts
always give me a feeling:”Oh ! What a good idea, what an
inspiration! I can do that, she did it.”

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 12, 2017 at 7:34 PM

Ursula – thank you for following this page and for your
kind words of support. <3

I will keep your suggestion in mind and look forward to


hearing your progress on this page.

Reply

25. Britlie Silvester says


June 12, 2017 at 8:14 AM

Hi!
I was wondering where flours Fall into this program (like
coconut flour, almond flour, etc) and are they okay to
consume?
Also, what about nut-butters?

Thank you!
Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 12, 2017 at 2:42 PM

Britlie – thank you for following this page. Here are a few
articles related to diet that hopefully help you get started.

FOOD SENSITIVITIES AND HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/food-sensitivities-
and-hashimotos

AUTOIMMUNE PALEO DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/autoimmune-paleo-
diet

GUT, BRAIN, AND AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS:


THE ROLE OF FOOD
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/gut-brain-and-
autoimmune-disorders

TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

Reply
26. Tahnee says
June 13, 2017 at 1:00 AM

After watching the Thyroid Summit I began the AIP Diet on


March 23, 2017. I have been Gluten Free, Soy free and egg
free for 2 years and taking Nature-Throid. I weighed 194lbs.
12 weeks later and I have lost 34lbs! Everytime I step on the
scale I’m afraid to check but am always excited to see a few
more pounds lower. My Dr. was really impressed. I feel so
amazing and I wish I would have tried this sooner! Don’t be
afraid to dive in and try AIP, you won’t regret it!

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 13, 2017 at 10:30 AM

Tahnee – thank you for following this page. That is


amazing and I’m so happy for you! <3

I'm currently collecting success stories and my goal is to


collect 10,000 in hopes to submit them to a medical
journal. I know it's a lot to ask but would you mind
submitting yours?

http://www.thyroidpharmacist.com/testimonial
Reply

27. Débora says


June 13, 2017 at 5:07 PM

Hi,

I was dignosed with Hashimoto’s this past January, and I


started following your protocol a couple of days ago.
When you mention that Kombucha is ok for an AIP Diet, are
there any restrictions?
I know almost all Kombucha has caffeine. Just want to make
sure it is ok.
Thank you so much for all you do!

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 14, 2017 at 10:01 AM

Débora – thank you for following this page. Kombucha


can be helpful sometimes, but I recommend proceeding
with caution, as some people may have adverse reactions
to the wild yeast. I prefer probiotics and fermented foods.

Reply
28. Lynn J says
June 13, 2017 at 5:23 PM

Aloha! So far, haven’t come across articles about


incorporating sprouts into the AIP diet. I understand no seeds
or nuts, and with sprouts soooo full of nutrients, it’s difficult
to not incorporate. This may be redundant also, but what about
wheat grass, before it’s processed. Spirulina also. Thank you
for all that you do and have done. You came into my life this
February after being diagnosed with Hashi and empowered
me. Such very right timing!! (Initially my DO did the first
screenings, and since my symptoms are so vague, I went to a
ND, who confirmed it again. And we were doing well, then
she wanted me to start Levothyrozine. That prompted me to
seek out a Functional MD who is working with a couple
alternatives.) Mahalo nui loa, once again. Aloha

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 14, 2017 at 10:00 AM

Lynn – thank you for following this page and for your
support. <3
You may be interested in my 12 week online program
called Hashimoto’s Self-Management Program that covers
all of the strategies that I go through with my one-on-one
clients, in a self-paced format, so that participants have
access to all of the things I’ve learned about Hashimoto’s
without having to schedule costly consults with me or
another practitioner. In addition, any person that goes
through the program will get access to a Quick search
Q&A Database of 1000+ questions asked by past program
participants, Root Cause Assessment based on 100’s of
my clients’ root causes and triggers, 2-week Meal Plans,
recipes, and shopping lists to get you started on the
following diets: Paleo, Autoimmune Paleo, SIBO,
Candida. Also, Discounts on lab tests, high-quality
supplements, and consultations and much more to support
you in your journey! There are a few requirements that
you should pay attention to, such as my book is a required
read.

Hashimoto’s Self-Management Program


http://hackinghashimotos.com/

Reply

29. Jill Klausen says


June 14, 2017 at 8:51 AM

I literally blew my doctors away with the degree of success


I’ve had on the AIP diet. At the beginning of this year, I told
both my GP and my endocrinologist that I was tired of treating
the symptoms of my disease with pharmaceuticals and
intended to heal my body with food, with a goal of being off
all prescription medication except thyroid hormones by the
end of the year. They were not optimistic. I said, “Watch me”;
they shrugged.

Both my endo and GP were stunned and thrilled when I saw


them after having followed the AIP protocol for 90 days. They
could not stop crowing about how amazing I looked and how
beautiful my bloodwork was.

Here’s why:

A1C: before – 6.2 (prediabetic); after – 5.9 (healthy)

LDL cholesterol (the bad one): before – 115; after – 86.

Triglycerides: before – 214; after – 133

Total cholesterol: before – 230; after – 166

Chol/HDL ratio: before – 4.4 (avg. risk of heart disease); after


– 3.3 (reduced risk by half)

Free T3: before – 2.7 pg/mL; after – 3.8 pg/mL (Free T3


levels below the reference range [of 2.3 – 4.2 pg/mL] are
considered evidence of hypothyroidism. … [L]evels in the top
half of the reference range are considered evidence of
sufficient thyroid function, and levels in the top 25th
percentile of the reference range are considered optimal.)

https://www.verywell.com/interpret-your-thyroid-test-results-
3231840
Weight loss: 30 pounds!

THIRTY POUNDS! ?

My endo was so overwhelmed she had me write down all the


resources I used to get these incredible results (are you
sitting?) so she could use them to help her other patients! Of
course I started with “Finding the Root Cause,” and included
your website and your newest book, along with links to Paleo
Mom and Hypothyroid Mom.

I wish you could have seen the looks on their faces!

And guess what? They took me off statins and off blood
pressure medication, with Metformin elimination only a
couple of months away.

I cannot thank you enough for the vast amount of great


information and resources you make available to men and
women like me who have been suffering for years using
conventional treatment only. It has saved my life.

With gratitude,
Jill

Reply

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 14, 2017 at 9:46 AM

Jill – thank you for following this page and for sharing
your amazing success story. I’m so thrilled for you! <3

I'm currently collecting success stories, and my goal is to


collect 10,000 in hopes to submit them to a medical
journal. I know it's a lot to ask but would you mind
submitting yours?

http://www.thyroidpharmacist.com/testimonial

Reply

30. Anne Veloo says


June 15, 2017 at 11:25 PM

Hello Isabella, I have a question I was hoping you could help


me with. I have been trying to follow Bright Line Eating (no
sugar, no flour) and found that I was putting on weight despite
being on BLE. I have subclinical thyroid levels and I’m seeing
a Naturopath. The treatment seems to be going well. I have
read that dairy is in the “NO” list. I take about 1 oz of milk in
coffee / black tea and I have about 2 cups of coffee with milk
and 2 cups tea with milk almost every day. Is this a problem if
I have no other form of dairy?

I have been quite good about giving up flour and sugar but am
finding it difficult to give up milk with the hot beverages. I
have a stressful job and I have a cup of tea with milk helps me
get my work done.

I’d appreciate your thoughts.

regards, Anne

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 16, 2017 at 12:24 PM

Anne – thank you for following this page.

Going gluten free is always the first step that I


recommend. Through my research, I’ve found that a good
percentage feel better off gluten. About 20% will actually
go into remission by doing so. Some researchers have
found that three to six months on a gluten-free diet can
eliminate organ-specific antibodies.

10 MOST HELPFUL DIY INTERVENTIONS FOR


HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/10-most-helpful-
diy-interventions-for-hashimotosaccording-to-my-clients

TOP 9 TAKEAWAYS FROM 2232 PEOPLE WITH


HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/top-9-takeaways-
from-2232-people-with-hashimotos/

Reply

31. Becca says


June 19, 2017 at 7:45 PM

To avoid painful swelling in my left hand I’ve had to cut out


wheat, corn and rice — even black rice which is not
inflammatory according to some but it definitely is for me.
Not sure about quinoa. I also have to avoid sugar, wine, beef
and nuts. For me, dairy, eggs, coffee, and potatoes do not
cause a problem so far.

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 20, 2017 at 12:30 PM

Becca – thank you for following this page. Here are a few
articles related to diet that hopefully help you get started.

FOOD SENSITIVITIES AND HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/food-sensitivities-
and-hashimotos
GUT, BRAIN, AND AUTOIMMUNE DISORDERS:
THE ROLE OF FOOD
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/gut-brain-and-
autoimmune-disorders

TAILORING YOUR THYROID DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/tailoring-your-
thyroid-diet-to-your-needs

BEST DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S AND


HYPOTHYROIDISM
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/best-diet-for-
hashimotos-hypothyroidism

Reply

32. Carolyn Chamberlain says


June 25, 2017 at 11:26 AM

I’ve been paleo for 6 months now. I wake up at 6 full of


energy. My dr. Has lowered my synthroid. I still won’t give up
my wine though. I love it and enjoy a bp coffee 4 times a
week. I’ve lost 20 lbs by going grain, dairy and sugar free.
Feel awsome. Thank you Dr. Isabella. I came across through
thyroid secret guide by accident and it changed my life. Thank
you!!!

Reply
o Dr. Izabella Wentz says
June 26, 2017 at 12:22 PM

Carolyn – thank you for following this page, and for your
support! <3

That is amazing, and I'm so happy for you. I'm currently


collecting success stories, and my goal is to collect 10,000
in hopes to submit them to a medical journal. I know it's a
lot to ask but would you mind submitting yours?

http://www.thyroidpharmacist.com/testimonial

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 28, 2017 at 11:01 AM

Carolyn – thank you for following this page and for


sharing what has worked for you! I’m looking forward to
seeing your progress here.

Reply
33. Jolene says
June 25, 2017 at 5:10 PM

Izabella,
A warm thank you for the wisdom, experience and love you
have put into helping others with Hashimoto’s.
I have two questions.

1) I am a vegetarian and the AIP diet is not an option for me. I


went back on fish for awhile but with most seafood being
radioactive from Fukushima, it’s not worth the risk (for me) so
I went off again. Eggs have been my primary source of
protein. I’ve been off gluten for about 10 years. But I’m
feeling pretty discouraged with how limiting this will be & it
scares me I will go off. Are there other options?
2) Would it be more beneficial to have the tests done first
before starting a 90 day diet in case there is an underlying
infection going on?

Thanks so much,
Jolene

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 26, 2017 at 11:47 AM
Jolene – thank you for following this page.

Recovering from adrenal fatigue and hypothyroidism


when following a vegetarian diet is very challenging, as
vegetarian diets are often carbohydrate heavy.

Vegetarian sources of protein such as legumes (beans),


dairy, grains, soy and some seeds may be incompatible
with trying to heal a leaky gut, which is almost always
present with Hashimoto’s. Pea protein is an alternative
that may be easier to digest and is less likely to cause food
sensitivities (I use NOW Foods brand).

Eggs, some seeds, and nuts would be the preferred sources


of protein for vegetarians. However, some people with
Hashimoto’s may be intolerant to those as well, especially
in the early stages of starting a healing diet.

Being a vegan is even more challenging, and nuts and


seeds would be the go-to source of protein, which are
usually too difficult to digest for many in the beginning of
their thyroid healing journeys.

While vegan and vegetarian diets have been reported to be


extremely helpful with autoimmune and chronic
conditions, I have not been able to find reports of people
recovering from Hashimoto’s by following a vegan diet.
Even devout vegans who are nutritionally conscious still
struggle with low body temperatures, hypothyroidism and
Hashimoto’s.

Additionally, many former vegans have reported


improved symptoms of Hashimoto’s following
transitioning to a Paleo diet. Based on this, I believe that
animal proteins must play an important role in building
back the health of people with Hashimoto’s.

That said, while meats and fats are important for healing,
eating them exclusively will produce an acidic
environment in the body; hindering healing, and thus the
diet should be balanced with plenty of nutrient rich
vegetables (suggested ratio may be 20% meat/80%
veggie).

Additionally, vegan and raw vegan diets can be extremely


helpful for cleansing and detoxifying, especially for those
with persistent protein digestion issues. A vegan diet can
be followed for a few days to a few weeks and may help
the body detoxify. B12 and iron or ferritin supplements
should be utilized at this time to prevent deficiency.

AUTOIMMUNE PALEO DIET


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/autoimmune-paleo-
diet

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


June 28, 2017 at 10:56 AM
Jolene – thank you for following this page. In general,
most people with autoimmunity need to find their food
sensitivities, heal from infections, and eat organic;
however, bioindividuality is important, not everyone will
respond to the same interventions. The foods that heal one
person, may not be the same for another. It might seem
like a lot to give up, but feeling your symptoms fade away
can make it feel like it’s all worthwhile. And don’t forget
it’s not forever! You will be reintroducing these foods
once your gut heals.

WHAT’S CAUSING YOUR LEAKY


GUThttps://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/whats-
causing-your-leaky

Reply

34. Jen says


July 6, 2017 at 11:07 AM

Hi Dr. Wentz,

I have been AIP for almost 8 weeks now. I read today that
people with Hashimoto’s can be triggered again by even a
molecule of gluten that may drift onto the GF food at a
restaurant and the have antibodies go back up for 8-9 months
after this exposure. Is this true? I have been absolutely GF, as
far as I know. But I have eaten the occasional grilled chicken
salad at a restaurant where it wasn’t marinated in a GF
dressing. Do we have to be so careful as to request glove
changes at Chipotle and separate pans at restaurants?

Thanks so much for all your work!

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


July 6, 2017 at 4:11 PM

Jen – In contrast to other diets that simply exclude


common problematic foods, an elimination diet is done to
determine what particular food intolerances the individual
may have. An elimination period of at least 2-3 months is
a good starting place, but you may want to continue if you
feel that you still have more healing to do. Then you can
trial a new food every 4 days and monitor yourself for
reactions. Going though an elimination diet will help you
figure out your own individual food triggers and your
specific response to each trigger food. Here is an article I
hope you find interesting!
ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply
 Jen says
July 6, 2017 at 6:39 PM

Thanks for your reply! Do you know if we need to


avoid gluten to such an extreme level? For instance,
replacing all kitchen tools and avoiding eating out
completely? Do you do this for yourself?

Also, when re-introducing foods, for someone like me


who has no symptoms b/c antibodies are barely
elevated, how do I know if a reintroduced food is
okay or not?

Thanks, again!

Reply

 Dr. Izabella Wentz says


July 8, 2017 at 12:26 PM

Jen – thank you for following this page. In


contrast to other diets that simply exclude
common problematic foods, an elimination diet is
done to determine what particular food
intolerances the individual may have. An
elimination period of at least 2-3 months is a good
starting place, but you may want to continue if
you feel that you still have more healing to do.
Then you can trial a new food every 4 days and
monitor yourself for reactions. Going though an
elimination diet will help you figure out your own
individual food triggers and your specific
response to each trigger food. Here is an article I
hope you find interesting!
ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S

https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination
-diet-for-hashimotos

Reply

35. suryabhan singh says


July 9, 2017 at 8:48 AM

need an advice
i have started reintroduction of food and start with egg yolk,
and after 3 time he complain stomach pain and i have
introduced 10/6/17 and blood test done on 5/7/17 and TSH
raise 16.42. whether reintroduction fails can raise TSH level.

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


July 10, 2017 at 1:36 PM

Suryabhan – thank you for following this page. In general,


most people with autoimmunity need to find their food
sensitivities, heal from infections, and eat organic;
however, bioindividuality is important, not everyone will
respond to the same interventions. The foods that heal one
person, may not be the same for another. It might seem
like a lot to give up, but feeling your symptoms fade away
can make it feel like it’s all worthwhile. And don’t forget
it’s not forever! You will be reintroducing these foods
once your gut heals.

ELIMINATION DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

WHAT’S CAUSING YOUR LEAKY GUT


https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/whats-causing-
your-leaky

Reply

36. Susan Bennett Gallimore says


July 11, 2017 at 6:49 PM

I recently purchased the AIP meal portals. I have 2 questions.


Can lunch recipes be used for dinner? Above it states to avoid
all sweeteners including honey. Several of the recipes call for
honey??? So far all of the recipes are delicious!

Many thanks

Reply

o Dr. Izabella Wentz says


July 13, 2017 at 3:20 PM

Susan – thank you so much for your support. I am so


happy you are enjoying the recipes.:) Please contact my
team at info@thyroidpharmacist.com and they will be
happy to help you.

Reply

37. Raffaella says


July 27, 2017 at 12:30 PM

Hi Dr. Izabella Wentz and thanks for all informations you


share here.
I write from Italy to ask you an advice.
Some months ago, i was always felt tired, with headache,
suffering pain on my back and having a lot of problems with
my mood… well, actually i don’t exactly know what is really
related to the disease… all doctors say that i don’t have
anything, but i decided to go ahead for myself.
After tiroid analysis i have found Hashimoto’s, with values
TSH 0.89, FT3 2.83, Anticorps anti-thyroglobuline 579,3 (in a
range of about 20-30 if i remember well), anticorps anti
microsomal 307,8.
Here, endocrinologists usually don’t give anything for this
disease. They let waiting patients for six months or more, to
bring overall hormones out of range values and, only then,
they give a drug called Eutirox…
But, most of all patients have a lot of collateral effects,
including tachycardia, mood swings, etc.

So, i’ve decided to follow your Paleo diet, but here we don’t
have some foods like sweet potatoes… So i made this
integrations:
– 2 times a week legumes, such as peas, chickpeas, always
gluten free
– 1 fruit a day (less sweet as possible)
– Almonds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower oil, oil of various seeds
– Total abolition of gluten-based foods, milk and derivates,
sugars, flours (except quinoa, 2 times a week)
– D3 Vitamin (5000units, once a day), selenium (1
capsule/day 100mg), serotonin (1 capsule/day).

Hope i’m doing well for my health. I’m crossing fingers for
future…
Sorry for my english and thanks again.
Have a nice day!
Raffaella

Reply
o Dr. Izabella says
July 31, 2017 at 9:37 AM

Raffaella – thank you for following this page. I am so


proud of you for taking charge of your health! The gold
standard or the most accurate test for uncovering reactive
foods and individual food sensitivities is actually the
Elimination Diet. It works better than trying a
recommended dietary approach (i.e. gluten-free, Paleo,
etc.) and even better than food sensitivity testing (which
may be helpful in many cases but may not be affordable
for many people). The elimination diet can work as a
stand-alone or in symphony with food sensitivity testing.
You may find this article interesting! ELIMINATION
DIET FOR HASHIMOTO’S
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/elimination-diet-
for-hashimotos

Reply

38. Manija Abawi says


August 8, 2017 at 11:16 AM

Hello Dr. Izabella!


First I want to thank you for showing a us the light at the end
of the tunnel:-)
I’m almost done reading your Hashimoto’s Protocol book and
I’m going to start my 90 day diet in two weeks! I have a
questions about using organic raw honey during the 90 day
diet? This was not mentioned in the book, is this safe to use?
Thank you for your time!!

Reply

o Dr. Izabella says


August 9, 2017 at 11:37 AM

Manija – thank you for following this page. For questions


pertaining to the protocols or side effects please contact
my team at info@thyroidpharmacist.com and they will be
happy to help you.

Reply

39. Kristine Fischer says


August 21, 2017 at 5:31 PM

What kind of olives are acceptable on this plan

Reply
o Dr. Izabella says
August 22, 2017 at 11:29 AM

Kristine – thank you for following this page. Optimizing


your health starts with food. Figuring out which foods
nourish you, and which ones cause you harm is the single
most important thing you can learn in your health journey.
I’ve built a database of 300+ paleo and autoimmune paleo
Root Cause Approved recipes. The software allows you to
customize your weekly menu and grocery store list by
aisle. I hope you check it out: http://rootcauserecipes.com/

Reply

40. Becca says


September 14, 2017 at 2:59 PM

I am curious if you have numbers or an idea of how many


people who follow the AIP actually experience complete
healing from their thyroid issues (as in, being completely off
of thyroid meds) or if you know where I could find any
information about that? Thanks

Reply
o Dr. Izabella says
September 19, 2017 at 8:30 AM

Becca – thank you for following this page. Please contact


my team at info@thyroidpharmacist.com and they will be
happy to help you.

Reply

41. Deb says


October 30, 2017 at 8:15 AM

Hi Dr. Izabella,
I’m wondering if you’ve seen patients that have
hypothyroidism and asthma? My Dr. and I can’t figure out
why my asthma kicks in shortly after taking the medication
and we’ve tried a few different things. I’m in Canada so we
don’t have access to the variety of medications that you do in
the States. I’m working hard on the leaky gut issue, AIP diet,
and a host of other things but I’d love to know if you’ve heard
of any connection between hypothyroidism and asthma.

Reply
o Dr. Izabella says
November 1, 2017 at 11:35 AM

Deb – thank you for following this page. While I only


work with patients with Hashimoto’s, oftentimes patients
will have additional autoimmune conditions. Most
autoimmune conditions have common root causes, and a
lot of times the things that are recommended for one
autoimmune condition will help with others. Conditions
that I have found to respond really well to the
Hashimoto’s protocols have been rheumatoid arthritis,
lupus, Celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome, eczema,
asthma, Graves’, premature ovarian failure, psoriasis,
Alopecia Areata, and Sjogrens. I have also seen the
protocols help with Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue
syndrome, PCOS, as well as Type 2 diabetes, Crohn’s,
and Ulcerative colitis.

Hashimoto’s Protocol
https://www.amazon.com/Hashimotos-Protocol-
Reversing-Thyroid-Symptoms-
ebook/dp/B01HXK6GVQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=150
6463784&sr=8-
1&keywords=hashimotos+protocol+izabella+wentz

Hashimoto’s Root Cause


http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0615825796?ie=UTF
8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0615825796&linkCode=x
m2&tag=thyroipharma-20
Reply

42. Liv says


November 4, 2017 at 6:51 PM

Dra Izabella,
I was diagnosed with Hashimoto several years ago. I made
some small changes and was able to quit my meds very soon. I
check my thyroid levels and visit my endo every quarter or so.
I recently started feeling foresaken and anxious. My T levels
were under control but my TPO was higher than when I was
diagnosed (I haven’t checked them in between, just those two
times). So I started the AIP, since I really didn’t want to feel
anxious not lonely I also started taking magnesium citrate and
thiamine (in lower doses than your articles about the nutrient
deficiencies). Within few days I started feeling better; no more
loneliness and no more anxiety. But I feel kind of stuck. I am
also constipated and very gassy. Is it normal? Every since I
started AIP I was also very hungry, even 30 min after a meal
when I had felt full. At the beginning if I did not eat when I
was hungry I will feel like depressed, took me a few days to
discover the link. So I will eat and I will feel better. It does not
happen anymore (to feel depressed if I don’t eat when I am
hungry) but the constant hunger continues.
Is it normal and part of the healing process? How to know
when to reintroduce the foods? I’ve read that some do after 30
days, some later (even years later!). If I am not feeling neither
anxious nor foresaken can I say it is safe to start the
reintroduction foods? Or is my TPO supposed to lower after
the AIP (should I testing it again to see if it lowers?). Is it
common to have my thyroid levels under control but my TPO
to be higher? Also, if my soap is made with not oils such as
safflower, castor, sunflower, etc. does it mean that I’m not
AIP compliant at all?

Reply

o Liv says
November 4, 2017 at 6:55 PM

Sorry I meant, soap made with ** not compliant** oils


such as safflower, castor, sunflower, etc.

Reply

o Dr. Izabella says


November 6, 2017 at 10:51 AM

Liv – thank you for reaching out. We know that intestinal


permeability (aka leaky gut) is present in every case of
autoimmunity and often precedes the development of
Hashimoto’s. Symptoms of leaky gut may include
bloating, diarrhea, constipation, stomach aches, acid
reflux and irritable bowel syndrome. According to the
Institute of Functional Medicine, many people develop
IBS 5-10 years before an autoimmune diagnosis. I was
one of them and didn’t take my gut health as seriously as I
should have. Gut problems are often caused by infections
like H. pylori, parasites like Blasto, SIBO, an imbalance
of bacteria, and enzyme deficiencies or food sensitivities
(especially to gluten, dairy, and/or soy). Even stress can
be a factor in gut permeability. Here is an article you
might find interesting.
6 DIFFERENT ROOT CAUSES
https://thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/6-different-
hashimotos-root-causes/

Reply

43. Bonnie Rosenbarker says


December 18, 2017 at 1:09 PM

I have celiac and Hashi’s. I started the autoimmune diet six


weeks ago and am feeling good. My problem is weight loss
which I do not need. I’m loosing a pound a week & don’t want
to lose more. Any suggestions?

Reply

o Dr. Izabella says


December 19, 2017 at 11:24 AM
Bonnie – thank you for following this page and my
research. Most people with Hashimoto’s will experience
weight gain, and so of course that’s what gets the most
focus, but some people actually experience weight loss, or
they can’t keep their weight on.This is especially
problematic when a person has multiple food sensitivities
and needs to adhere to an autoimmune diet that restricts
foods. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

1. Get a calorie counting app like My Fitness Pal on your


phone, to help you keep track of your daily calories.
Eating real food can be more filling than eating simple
carbohydrates and you may not be getting enough
calories. Use the app to figure out your target weight and
the number of calories per day you need to get there.
2. Supplement after dinner with The Root Cause Building
Smoothie: 1 avocado (300 calories), 1 cup coconut milk
(150 calories), 1 banana (100 calories), 2 egg yolks (100
calories, if tolerated), 1 scoop of protein of beef/pea
protein (60 calories) – You can also add cooked sweet
potatoes if you need more carbs.
3. Get tested for gut infections. Gut infections can prevent
the digestion and assimilation of foods, leaving you
underweight and malnourished. The 401H test or GI
Effects test are my go to tests.
4. Get your adrenals tested with an adrenal saliva tests. In
some, stressed adrenals may actually lead to poor
absorption of foods.
5. Be sure that you are not over medicated.
6. Work on reducing your antibodies with a selenium
supplement
7. Stress reduction, when we’re stressed we don’t digest.
8. Add coconut oil in your beverages, this can add extra
calories in your day
9. Avoid caffeine, it can make you less hungry and stress
out your adrenals.

In case you would like to read more, here are the links to
my books:
Root
Cause: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0615825796?i
e=UTF8&camp=1789&creativeASIN=0615825796&link
Code=xm2&tag=thyroipharma-20

Hashimoto’s Protocol (this is my latest


book): https://www.amazon.com/Hashimotos-Protocol-
Reversing-Thyroid-Symptoms-
ebook/dp/B01HXK6GVQ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=150
5933035&sr=8-
1&keywords=hashimotos+protocol+izabella+wentz

Reply

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