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Michigan

Wheat on trial
See how your varieties matched up
in MSU’s Wheat Trial results

Farm News
PAGES 24-31

AUGUST 15, 2017


MICHIGAN’S ONLY STATEWIDE FARM NEWSPAPER

Deer season Shining on Vision


Summer is prime time for stored
feed invasions.
Young people have a flair
for livestock.
accomplished
Pork plant cuts ribbon,
»»PAGE 12 »»PAGE 22 opens in September.

»»PAGE 23

Stress of the flies IN BRIEF


■■GOVERNMENT

President approves
disaster declaration
for floods
FARM NEWS MEDIA
President Donald Trump approved a ma-
jor disaster declaration for Michigan Aug. 2.
The decision releases federal funds for
state and local governments to use in
disaster recovery efforts and to help reduce
the risk of such an event in the future.
In addition, the disaster declaration
makes individual assistance available to
the countless families still recovering from
recent flooding.
Members of the Michigan congressional
delegation on July 27 wrote to President
Donald Trump urging him to grant the state
of Michigan’s request for federal assistance
in response to last month’s flooding. Gover-
nor Rick Snyder made the formal request
for funding on July 21.
The area covered by the declaration in-
cludes Bay, Gladwin, Isabella, and Midland
Counties and the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe
within Isabella County.
Individuals seeking assistance in Bay,
Gladwin, Isabella, and Midland Counties
and the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe within
Isabella County can register with FEMA the
A luminescent sight of tart cherries is welcome, but an invader has broken the peace. Spotted wing drosophila can destroy a crop in a following ways:
hurry, but researchers say it will be conquered. | Paul W. Jackson, Farm News Media. • Apply online at www.DisasterAssistance.
gov.
PAUL W. JACKSON up tremendously,” she said in early August. “There’s always some fruit left on the • Constituents may call the registration
FARM NEWS MEDIA “It’s a real challenge for growers to get the trees after shaking, but if we spray the phone number at 1-800-621-3362;
Stress is wearing on Nikki Rothwell. fruit off before the SWD numbers get too (already harvested) trees, all that will hap- those who have a speech disability or
As she takes a phone call amid the activ- high. The faster they get it off, the less likely pen is SWD will develop resistance,” said hearing loss and use TTY, should call
ity buzzing around her, foremost in her mind they are to get an infestation. But there Francis Otto, orchard manager with Cherry 1-800-462-7585 directly; for those who
are cherry growers who surround MSU’s are so many things they have no control Bay Orchards near Suttons Bay. “We used use 711 or Video Relay Service (VRS),
Northwest Michigan Horticulture Research over. Maybe the processor can’t take it all to have problems with cherry fruit flies, so call 1-800-621-3362.
Center near Traverse City. She admits more that fast. Maybe the shaker breaks down.” we’d spray them and control them. But
Congressman John Moolenaar wel-
than once that she’s scared for them. There are more things to list, but she sighs, SWD has so many more generations that
comed the president’s decision:
“I’m a little more optimistic today than emotion exhausting through the phone. the pressure builds up fast. I hope they can
“State and local governments in mid-
I was last week,” she said about the trap When stuff beyond a farmer’s control hap- find natural predators and get them back
Michigan have done an outstanding job in
count numbers she checks daily for spot- pens and even if it doesn’t these nasty little here, because until we get natural preda-
the aftermath of June’s flooding, but the
ted wing drosophila (SWD) in her role as invasive flies seem to thrive when stressed. tion, it will be a major scourge.”
cost of cleanup and recovery was more
MSU fruit educator and coordinator at the Eventually—hopefully—the stress they
Center. “I suspect those numbers will go cause will lead to their ultimate demise. But
for now, the battle rages on many fronts. See FLIES, page 4 See DISASTER, page 20

INSIDE Court keeps wolves groups, effectively took DNR wolf manage-
ment away with the decision, even though

Opinion............................. 2
on endangered list it’s nearly universally accepted that wolves
in the Great Lakes have recovered suffi-
PAUL W. JACKSON
ciently to be managed scientifically.
Markets............................. 6 FARM NEWS MEDIA
The Western Great Lakes District Popula-
Michigan’s ability to manage its own wild-
Weather............................ 8 tion Segment (DPS) of the gray wolf was
life populations became more difficult Aug.
delisted from the Endangered Species List in
1 when an appeals court in Washington.
Field Focus......................21 2011 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service,
D.C. ruled to uphold the gray wolf’s listing
but has faced court challenges ever since.
on the Endangered Species Act list.
Farm Shop............ Section B The court decision also derails, at least
The decision, which upholds a district
temporarily, Farm-Bureau-supported
court ruling in 2014, short-circuits Michi-
www.MichiganFarmNews.com legislation.
gan’s control over a growing wolf popula-
P.O. Box 30960 • West Saginaw Highway

“We support House Resolution 424, the


A Publication of Michigan Farm Bureau

tion that preys on livestock in certain areas


Gray Wolf State Management Act,” said
of the Upper Peninsula and stops any
Michigan Farm Bureau’s national lobbyist
Lansing, MIchigan 48909-8460

further efforts to conduct a controlled hunt.


John Kran, who penned a letter to the U.S.
“This is definitely a disappointment for
House Committee on Natural Resources,
us, because we would like to have the
which had a hearing on the legislation in July.
privilege of and the ability to return to wolf
“Farm Bureau supports legislation that
management,” said Kevin Swanson, wildlife
would direct the Secretary of the Interior
management specialist with the Michigan
Department of Natural Resources’ (DNR)
VOLUME 94 • ISSUE NO. 13 Bear and Wolf Program.
COPYRIGHT© 2017, MICHIGAN FARM BUREAU
The court, siding with animal rights See WOLVES, page 3
2 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 REPORTS & OPINIONS www.michiganfarmnews.com

IN BRIEF LETTER
adapted to the ever-changing society we live
in, but their core mission has not changed.
esting speakers or family-friendly activities,
holding the meeting at new and interesting lo-
You don’t have to farm to experience what cations, and creating opportunities to social-
■■FUR
from the they stand for and the message they carry. ize and learn. Some are even finding ways to

State mink production PRESIDENT


We see today more than ever how impor-
tant ag education is becoming in our society
incorporate local agricultural highlights such
as beer and wine tasting or cider and donuts
increases and how often we wish it reached further, (my personal favorite) while also conducting
enabling an understanding of farming, trust in important business.
Voices, old and new
USDA, FARM NEWS MEDIA
farmers, and fact-based conversation. Each county Policy Development Commit-
Mink pelt production in Michigan was Michigan Farm Bureau has been a long- tee has been busy surfacing issues that are
64,500 pelts in 2016, up from 60,250 pelts CARL BEDNARSKI time friend and advocate of the Michigan currently affecting agriculture in your areas.
in 2015, according to Marlo Johnson, Re- MICHIGAN FARM BUREAU FFA as we see clearly the value in helping to Not only state but national issues too will be
gional Director of USDA’s National Agricul- I had the pleasure to host the State FFA further the development of its students and discussed at the annuals and it’s a chance
ture Statistics Service (NASS), Great Lakes officers at our farm a few weeks ago while its overall mission. You have an FFA chapter to have your voice heard. I strongly encour-
Regional Office. they were making a tour of the Thumb visiting in your area, and I hope you have a chance age you to come out, enjoy dinner with
Michigan female mink bred to produce different segments of agriculture. to get involved and support this great leader- your neighbors, see what your county Farm
kits in 2017 totaled 19,900 compared to These students always impress me by their ship organization. Bureau is doing and take part in the process
17,640 in 2015. leadership skills and dedication they have for Speaking of involvement, it’s getting to be that sets our direction for the year to come
Mink pelt production in the United States agriculture. We should all be proud of the way county annual meeting time. I look forward and makes our organization what we are.
in 2016 totaled 3.32 million pelts. In 2015, these individuals carry themselves and have to visiting each district, talking with mem-
they totaled 3.75 million pelts. immersed themselves in agriculture. They are bers, and witnessing the grassroots policy
Wisconsin, which remained the largest poised to be future leaders in our industry. development in action. If you haven’t been to
mink producing state, produced 1,196,310 The FFA Association has been around for one lately, consider attending. You might be
pelts. Utah, the second largest producing many years. I’m sure many of you have been surprised at the changes a lot of counties are
state, produced 768,010 pelts. involved in it. The program has successfully making to their events such as adding inter-
The number of pelts by color class as a
percent of the total U.S. production in 2016
is as follows: Black at 51 percent, Mahoga- with conventional foods.”
ny at 21 percent, Blue Iris at 7 percent, and The deal has ramifications for the entire
White at 6 percent. The remaining color food industry, including farmers. If Ama-
classes accounted for 15 percent. zon’s past is any guide, it may be a bumpy
Value of mink pelts produced during the ride. Amazon started as an online book-
2016 crop year was $116 million. The aver- seller, and it turned the industry on its head
age price per pelt for the 2016 crop year for writers, publishers and booksellers.
was $35.00, compared to $31.10 in 2015. The Author’s Guild summed up its latest
Nationally, female mink bred to produce complaint this way: “Amazon has already
kits in 2017 totaled 740,810. Percent of done enough damage to the book industry.
total females bred to produce kits in 2017 It has devalued books by setting the price
by color class is as follows: Black at 50 and consumer expectations for ebooks and
percent, Mahogany at 21 percent, White hardcopy books artificially low, even taking
at 7 percent, and Blue Iris at 6 percent. a loss to do so.”
The remaining color classes accounted for Amazon’s aggressive approach led to
16 percent. the closing of many independent booksell-
ers, along with Borders, a major bookstore
■■CROPS chain. Barnes and Noble has barely sur-
vived. It is no wonder that Amazon’s Whole
New research might Foods announcement set off sharp declines
improve lodging in grocery store stocks on Wall Street.
Amazon won’t take over grocery sales as
resistance easily as it did book sales, however. Ama-
zon’s food sales are miniscule compared to
SEED WORLD
the overall market, which is quite fractured.
Plant lodging resistance is an important Walmart leads the way with 14.5 percent
agronomic trait for grain yield and quality of food and grocery sales, Kroger is next
in crops. with 7.2 percent. Whole Foods has a 1.2
Extensin proteins are associated with
plant cell growth and cell wall construction.
Until now, little has been reported on their
AMAZON WANTS TO BE percent market share and Amazon only 0.2
percent of the grocery market.
To better understand the Whole Foods
effect on plant lodging resistance. A team
from Huazhong Agricultural University in
China, led by Chunfen Fan, isolated a novel
YOUR ONLINE SUPERMARKET purchase, it helps to know a little about its
founder, Jeff Bezos. Bezos wants Amazon
to be “the everything store,” which hap-
extensin-like (OsEXTL) gene in rice and STEWART TRUELSEN point for pick-up. According to the Food pens to be the title of his biography by Brad
expressed it in transgenic rice plants under FREELANCE WRITER Marketing Institute, the voice of the retail Stone. It was only a matter of time before
two distinct promoters. “No, Sally, your food doesn’t come from food industry, online sales of food are ex- he focused attention on selling groceries,
The two-promoter-driven OsEXTL-trans- Amazon, it’s produced by farmers and pected to reach 20 percent of grocery sales which was a $669 billion market last year.
genic plants exhibited significantly reduced ranchers.” by 2025, amounting to $100 billion. Amazon Bezos likes bold action, so he’s not afraid to
cell elongation in stem internodes, leading Someday this may be a mother’s answer already has an online grocery presence attempt a transformation of the market.
to relatively shorter plants compared to to a child’s question about where her food through AmazonFresh, but its purchase of Amazon’s success is predicated on low
wild types. comes from. Amazon, the giant e-retailer, Whole Foods greatly raises its profile. prices, quality and wide selection. It’s also
The transgenic plants also showed recently announced a deal to purchase As one analyst put it, “By joining known for excellent customer relations. But
remarkably thickened secondary cell walls Whole Foods Market, the leading organic forces with Whole Foods, Amazon is the same good feeling doesn’t exist with
with higher cellulose levels in the mature supermarket chain, for almost $14 billion. poised to bring natural and organic food all suppliers and industry trade groups.
plants, resulting in significantly increased Increasingly, groceries will be sold online directly to more Americans than ever, at Whole Foods sources fresh produce from
mechanical strength. and delivered to the door or a distribution prices that could be more competitive many small and mid-sized farms across
Due to reduced plant height and the country. Producers could feel squeezed
increased plant mechanical strength, the if Amazon, which is keeping the Whole
OsEXTL-transgenic plants had enhanced Foods name, pays them less. Amazon also
lodging resistances compared to those of Michigan Farm News is in a position to try to dictate other terms
the rice cultivar ZH11. The OsEXTL-trans- Michigan Farm News (ISSN:1063-5980) is published twice per month except in December, to suppliers, including production practices.
genic plants also maintained normal grain June and July, when only one issue is printed, as a service to regular members by Michigan
In time, Amazon could force out some
Farm Bureau, 7373 West Saginaw Hwy., Lansing, MI 48909. A member subscription of
yields and biomass production. $1.50 is included in the annual dues of Michigan Farm Bureau regular members. Additional of the smaller supermarket chains that
This study demonstrates an improved subscription fees required for mailing Michigan Farm News to nonmembers and outside the
serve small cities and rural areas, as
continental U.S.A. Periodical postage paid in Lansing and at additional mailing offices.
lodging resistance in the OsEXTL-trans- WINNER
Best of NAMA – 2003 sometimes happened with Walmart. It
Letters to the editor and statewide news tips should be sent to: editor, Michigan Farm
genic rice plants, and provides insights News, P.O. Box 30960, Lansing, MI 48909-8460. Call (800) 292-2680, ext. 6540, or send could even hurt sales at farmers’ markets.
into extensin function in plant growth and e-mail to mfneditor@michfb.com. POSTMASTER – Send address changes to: Michigan
Amazon is keeping Whole Foods super-
Farm Bureau, P.O. Box 30960, Lansing, MI 48909-8460.
development. markets and may use them as distribution
Dennis Rudat, Publisher; Paul W. Jackson, Editor; Tim Rogers, Advertising Sales;
For more information, check out the Nika Degg and Sarah Paquet, Design and Production; Jill Corrin and Jeremy Nagel, centers for its recently introduced ready-
research published in Plant Biotechnology AFBF’s Best
Newspaper or
Contributors.
to-cook meal packages.
Journal. Tabloid, 2006, 2013 Advertising information: Call (800) 292-2680, ext. 6543; For national advertising, call J.L.
A century ago A&P pioneered the super-
Farmakis, Inc. (203) 834-8832.
Officers: President Carl Bednarski, Caro; Vice President Andrew Hagenow, Rockford; Chief market in America, and now it’s Amazon
Operating Officer Scott Piggott; General Counsel & Secretary Andrew Kok; Treasurer David that is trying to make a big change in the
Baker; Executive Committee: Carl Bednarski, Caro; Andrew Hagenow, Rockford; Mike
Fusilier, Manchester; Dave Bahrman, Rumely; Jennifer Lewis, Jonesville. Directors: District way we shop for food.
1, Brigette Leach, Climax; District 2, Jennifer Lewis, Jonesville; District 3, Mike Fusilier,
Manchester; District 4, Jeff Sandborn, Portland; District 5, Stephanie Schafer, Westphalia;
District 6, Travis Fahley, Yale; District 7, Michael DeRuiter, Hart; District 8, Michael Mulders, Truelsen is a food and agriculture
Essexville; District 9, Ben LaCross, Cedar; District 10, Patrick McGuire, Ellsworth; District freelance writer and a regular
Printed with soy ink 11, David Bahrman, Rumely. At large: Carl Bednarski, Caro; Larry Walton, Sturgis; Douglas
contributor to AFBF’s Focus on
Darling, Maybee; Andrew Hagenow, Rockford. Promotion and Education: Cathy McCune,
St Louis. Young Farmer: Calby Garrison, Adrian. Agriculture series.
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 3
‘historical range.’ If the wolf has to recover states and remove the “endangered spe-
its population in all of its huge historical cies” title from the gray wolf was in the best
range back to antiquity, that would include interest of the First District.
places like “Chicago, and I don’t see “It is unfortunate that the Court ruled
wolves recovering much there.” against local control and it is essential
Ernst said the ruling “restricts the ability for the well-being of all Upper Peninsula
of states to manage wildlife in a way it sees residents that we continue to work toward
fit,” but there may be a solution: change the a resolution,” he said.
Endangered Species Act. The ruling also shows just how far
If that were to happen, Swanson said, removed animal activists and city-based
the DNR can begin public hearings and attorneys and judges are to the realities in
other actions it needs to take to reinstate a rural parts of the United States, said Ernie
wolf hunt, which, in 2013, when 22 wolves Birchmeier, livestock and dairy specialist
were taken, was called a “conflict hunt.” with Michigan Farm Bureau.
“The conflict hunt was more to address “This clearly show how out of touch this
livestock depredation,” he said. “Last court is,” he said. “It refuses to take into
year we had 40 animals killed by wolves, account a balanced approach to wildlife
including dogs, so it’s difficult to say if the populations with concerns of citizens who
hunt was effective. The next hunt, if we live where wolves are thriving, landowners
can have one, might be done differently. and farmers. Our farmers and DNR have
We have between 600 documented cases of
and 700 wolves in wolves killing livestock,
Michigan, but we have and for a court in D.C.
no population goal. If There’s no question to make decisions
we were to start a har- about Michigan’s Up-
Michigan’s DNR hopes to someday revive wolf management. | Courtesy photo vest in the future, we’d the wolf packs have per Peninsula based
look at all the indica- recovered. We only wish on legal challenges

Wolves Duvall said the court ignored science.


“The D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled
tors, poll the public
about its social toler-
we could say the same instead of reality is of
real concern,” he said.
CONTINUED from page 1
a thriving population of 4,000 gray wolves ance, talk to all the of farms and ranches “I know that people
that threaten farmers and ranchers in stakeholders and then like to see wolves, and
make a recommen-
within their reach. it’s a tourist attraction,
to reissue the final rule that was published Minnesota, Michigan, and Wisconsin was
on Dec. 28, 2011, (76 Fed. Reg. 81666 somehow endangered. This ruling defies dation to the Natural – Zippy Duvall although a small one,
et seq) delisting the Western Great Lakes common sense,” he said. Resources Commis- but my guess is they
District Population Segment (DPS) of gray “The court handed down this opinion sion, which makes the would feel differently
wolf, without regard to any other provision despite an abundance of scientific and com- final decision.” if they had to live with
or statute or regulation that applies to the mercial data showing no material threat to Of course, such actions aren’t necessary them in their backyards.”
issuance of such rule and not subject to ju- the wolf population,” he said. “Neither the unless the recent ruling is overturned by a Upper Peninsula farmer Richard Per-
dicial review. This legislation would achieve goals outlined in various recovery plans nor higher court or changed by the legislature. shinske said the ruling is a setback to
this objective,” Kran wrote. the aggressive and successful leadership to And that’s where the most likely solution common sense.
The bill would “require the Department save the wolves in affected states moved will arise. “The bottom line is that activists pursu-
of the Interior to reissue the final rules from the court to do the right thing,” he said. “The ruling by the U.S. Circuit Court of ing this protection really don’t get it,” he
2011 and 2012 that removed the gray wolf “Congress needs to take action to re- Appeals was a disappointing setback for said. “I think you would get farmer support
from the Endangered Species List in the form the broken and outdated Endangered Michigan’s First District,” said U.S. Con- here if we had a reasonable approach to a
Western Great Lakes and Wyoming distinct Species Act. There’s no question the wolf gressman Jack Bergman. “While conser- management tool that makes sense. Most
population segment area and exempt the packs have recovered,” he said. “We only vation and species preservation are both farmers have support for a wolf population
rules from judicial review. U.S. Fish and wish we could say the same of farms and important responsibilities, we must also where there’s not a lot of cattle. They don’t
Wildlife Service will retain authority to list ranches within their reach.” be mindful of the consequences posed like deer, because they eat their crops. At
gray wolves for federal protection if popula- With the court ruling comes concern by one-size-fits-all regulations from the least with management, they could focus
tion numbers warrant relisting.” over states’ ability to manage other wildlife federal level. on a wolf hunt. But where we are now
Michigan Representatives Jack Berg- species that have recovered from threats “In our district, the resurgent gray wolf makes no sense.”
man, Bill Huizenga, John Moolenaar, Fred to their existence, said Tyler Ernst, one of population has become a safety issue for
Upton and Tim Walberg have cosponsored Michigan Farm Bureau’s attorneys. local communities and a growing problem
H.R. 424. “My concern is the reasoning the district for farmers raising livestock,” he said. “The
Animal rights groups, as expected, ap- court used,” he said. “The way I interpreted U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was created
plauded the court decision, saying “the it, it would be nearly impossible to delist to monitor threatened and endangered FOR MORE ON THIS TOPIC, VISIT
basis for the delisting decision was flawed,” the gray wolf in the Great Lakes, despite species; this common sense guidance HTTPS://TINYURL.COM/Y8S7SYNX
but American Farm Bureau President Zippy its recovery, because of the use of the term to turn management control back to the

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4 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

Flies said. “The department of agriculture has


shown its willingness to work with us, too,
that spraying tasks – and grower costs
have increased dramatically.
efforts of everyone involved. This has been
an amazing team effort, and while farmers
and I don’t think we could organize a better “I hate to tell them this,” Rothwell said the are feeling the stress right now of having to
CONTINUED from page 1
set of researchers than we have at MSU.” day after a 1.5 to 3-inch rain went through spray so much and spend so much more
Part of the scourge of SWD is its ability With that funding, the result of the team the Traverse City area (Aug. 3), “but they’re money, we’ll swat this fly.”
to reproduce. The fruit fly begat one gen- effort, research has been able to expand, going to have to spray again. It’s a race to Rothwell believes that too, but as harvest
eration per year. SWD can produce 12. Rothwell said. the end (of harvest) right now, and after that winds down under extreme SWD stress,
“They can hatch a new generation every “Without the ROAR grant, we would not rain, there are no residues left from any of she’s too deeply involved with cherry grow-
seven days when it’s warm,” said Phil have been able to put all those boots on the 3-day interval materials. It’s not what ers to take a 10,000-foot view right now.
Korson II, Executive Director of the Cherry the ground,” she said. farmers want to hear, but we’ve made it this “I’ve seen growers, particularly ones who
Marketing Institute. “Each adult female can Hand-in-hand with that whole-team effort far, and we need to finish the harvest.” were a one-man show, pull trees out,” she
lay up to 300 eggs.” for grants has come a Section 18 waiver said. “Maybe they didn’t own a harvester,
What’s next?
Add to that stress a limited number of from the EPA, Korson said. and they can’t wait for it because of the
EPA-approved effective crop protection “It was a classic partnership,” he said. All parties involved will meet again in pressure of SWD. And they can’t just walk
materials, a lack of natural predators, plus “It was a great example of how we used all November, Korson said, to evaluate what away or the pest will put even more pressure
the fact that one maggot can cause an en- the talents of the people worked this year and what did not. At that on their neighbors,” she said. “I’m scared for
tire load to be rejected for market, and it’s involved for the greater point, and even before, them. In the long run, I think we will conquer
easy to understand why the soft-skinned good of farmers.” more Section 18 waivers it, but not with straight chemical control. It
fruit industry has called for an “all hands on Thanks to efforts by will be sought to shorten will require cultural things, biologicals and
deck” approach to the stress. the Michigan Department other effective pesticide maybe even some tents over the trees. We
of Agriculture and Rural PHIs so SWD can finally will see some changes in the industry. Some
Optimism be controlled without so
Development (MDARD), folks may need to downsize, because it just
There is promise for some stress relief, much stress on growers,
the Cherry Marketing In- doesn’t make economic sense to spray four
however. workers and finances.
stitute and the entire MSU or five more times than they used to.”
“I think we are making progress,” said Ultimately, though,
entomology team to get Eventually, Robson said, there will be
Rufus Isaacs, an entomologist with MSU long-term solutions mean
the waiver for a pyrethroid some stress relief, and not the relief that
who’s one of the hands on deck. “Eradica- all available crop protec-
(Mustang Maxx) in tart comes with going out of business.
tion is not a likely goal, but I’m optimistic tion products will be on
cherries and blueberries, “I know it’s easy to say and hard to do,
that we can control it,” he said. “When I deck, including new bio-
there is some control but growers need to hang in there,” he said.
first started at MSU, Japanese beetles were logicals that are currently
ongoing. A magnified view of the SWD fly. “They’re fortunate to have such a good team
a problem, but now I don’t get calls about it | Courtesy photo under quarantine until
The Section 18 waiver and such a coordinated effort. And they’re
from blueberry growers. It takes time. Even- they can be deemed safe.
bumped the pyrethroid fortunate to have people like Nikki and this
tually, natural enemies and other parasites “We hope to have two
from a 14-day pre-harvest interval (PHI) to amazing team, all of whom empathize with
catch up, but funding is essential.” of the three natural predators available for
a three-day PHI. However, it can’t be used them. There’s enough stress to go around,
Fortunately, all the hands on deck have next year, or even yet this year,” Korson
in sweets, and it’s a temporary solution, and the ultimate end game is to stress these
worked diligently to secure grants dedicat- said. “But we have to be careful, because
Isaacs said. www.aisequip.com little flies out of existence.”
ed to researching control measures. you’re releasing another insect, and we
“With invasive pests like this, we need the That goal—eradication—may not be
The Foundation for Food and Agricul- don’t need that to become a problem.”
chemicals for rapid, immediate response to possible, Rothwell said. Control is possible.
ture Research (FFAR, a farm bill project), There are enough problems to deal with.

gineered for
control them in the short term,” he said. The greater, and more immediate problem,
through a program called Rapid Outcomes “This little pest can find any hole in the
The chemical of choice, Imidan, a broad- though, is the swarming stress of bringing
from Agricultural Research (ROAR), has spray program,” said Kevin Robson, horti-
spectrum pesticide, can only be used on in a crop.
provided funds that were matched by sev- culture specialist with Michigan Farm Bu-
tarts cherries, he said. It carries a seven- “It doesn’t take much to get you down,”
eral stakeholder partners, Korson said. reau. “If the sprayer lifts up a little too soon
day PHI, and growers are seeking another she said, her heart for growers showing
“MSU, the Michigan Cherry Committee, at the end of the row, they’ll take advantage.
waiver to make its PHI shorter. on her sleeve. “People need someone to
Cherry Marketing Institute and the Michigan Any little branch that the sprays missed will

day’s Farms
Also, Rothwell said, some chemicals talk to who understand what they’re going
State Horticulture Society matched those give them an opening. But we’re using our
that have proven effective have such a long through. They can’t talk to people who
funds, so now we have a total of $300,000 all-hands-on-deck approach pretty well
PHI (the amount of time required between don’t understand agriculture. Our team can
for research and mitigation this year,” he right now, and I can’t say enough about the
spraying and harvest for maximum safety) empathize. I just hope that helps.”

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Proven White Wheat Variety


JUPITER (Protected Variety)
JUPITER was the “Number 1” highest yielding white wheat variety in the 2017
MSU Wheat Trials. It had the highest two-, three- and four-year yield averages
of all white wheat varieties tested. JUPITER is a bronze chaff, non-bearded,
high-yielding, medium height, soft white winter wheat. It has excellent resistance
to powdery mildew and stripe rust, and acceptable milling and baking properties.

AC MOUNTAIN
AC MOUNTAIN was the 7th highest yielding white wheat variety in the 2017 MSU
Wheat Trials and had the 4th highest four-year yield averages. AC MOUNTAIN is
a soft white winter wheat developed in Canada and obtained through SECAN. AC
Mountain is high yielding with excellent lodging resistance. It also has moderate
resistance to barley yellow dwarf virus.

E6012
E6012 yielded 92.8 Bu./acre and was the 6th highest yielding white wheat
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www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 5

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6 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 COMMODITIES www.michiganfarmnews.com

COMMODITY SUPPLY/DEMAND BALANCE SHEETS


MARKET
OUTLOOK TABLE 1 – CORN TABLE 2 – WHEAT TABLE 3 – SOYBEANS
EST. HILKER EST. HILKER EST. HILKER
2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018

Wheat crop down,


(Million Acres) (Million Acres) (Million Acres)
Acres Planted 88.0 94.0 90.9 Acres Planted 55.0 50.2 45.7 Acres Planted 82.7 83.4 89.5

still second-best
Acres Harvested 80.7 86.7 83.5 Acres Harvested 47.3 43.9 38.1 Acres Harvested 81.7 82.7 88.7
Yield/Bushels 168.4 174.6 167.5 Bu./Harvested Acre 43.6 52.6 46.2 Yield/Bushels 48.0 52.1 46.8

in five years (Million Bushels)


Beginning Stocks 1,731 1,737 2,370
(Million Bushels)
Beginning Stocks 752 976 1,184
(Million Bushels)
Beginning Stocks 191 197 410
DR. JIM HILKER Production 13,602 15,148 13,986 Production 2,062 2,310 1,760 Production 3,926 4,307 4,154
MSU EXTENSION Imports 68 55 50 Imports 113 118 140 Imports 24 25 25
Total Supply 15,401 16,940 16,406 Total Supply 2,927 3,403 3,084 Total Supply 4,140 4,528 4,589
USE USE USE

WHEAT Feed & Residual


Food, Seed & Ind.
5,113
6,650
5,425
6,920
5,475
7,000
Food
Seed
957 955 955
67 61 66
Crushings
Exports
1,886 1,900 1,925
1,942 2,100 2,100
Ethanol for fuel 5,224 5,450 5,500 Feed & Residual 149 148 150 Seed 97 104 101
In keeping with the theme of this issue, Total Domestic 11,763 12,345 12,475 Total Domestic 1,174 1,164 1,171 Residual 18 14 34
we will start off with wheat for a change. Exports 1,901 2,225 1,875 Exports 778 1,055 975 Total Use 3,944 4,118 4,160
As we will discuss, the size of winter wheat Total Use 13,664 14,570 14,350 Total Use 1,951 2,219 2,146
Ending Stocks 197 410 429
Ending Stocks 1,737 2,370 2,056 Ending Stocks 976 1,184 938
crop is pretty well known, but due to the Ending Stocks,
Ending Stocks, Ending Stocks,
nasty drought in the Northern Plains, the % of Use 12.7 16.3 14.3 % of Use 50.1 53.4 43.7
% of Use 5.0 10.0 10.3
spring and durum wheat crops are not. U.S. Loan Rate $1.95 $1.95 $1.95 U.S. Loan Rate $2.75 $2.75 $2.75
U.S. Loan Rate $5.00 $5.00 $5.00
However, between now and when you U.S. SEASON AVERAGE
U.S. SEASON AVERAGE U.S. SEASON AVERAGE
receive this issue, the USDA will release Farm Price, $/Bu. $3.61 $3.35 $3.60 U.S. $/Bu. $4.89 $3.89 $4.80
Farm Price, $/Bu. $8.95 $9.50 $9.30
updated estimates on Aug. 12. What did
the updated production report show?
On July 12 the USDA/NASS released
the July Crop Production Report, which
showed winter wheat production was 2 57.5 million bushels, down 45 percent from down 22 percent from last year. 2012-13. Total use for 2017-18 is pro-
percent, 1,280 million bushels higher than 2016. The United States yield is forecast at Michigan winter wheat production, made jected to be down, all due to lower pro-
the June estimate. This was the beginning 30.9 bushels per acre, down 13.1 bushels up of soft red and soft white wheat, was jected exports. And this leaves projected
of the end of the early July wheat rally. from last year. projected to be 36.12 million bushels, ending stocks at 938 million bushels, 43.7
The projected winter wheat yield of 49.7 Expected area to be harvested for grain down from last year’s 50.73 million. They percent of use. And while this is down
bu/ac was down 5.6 bushels from last totals 1.86 million acres, unchanged from do not break out the two wheat types until substantially from the past two years, it is
year’s record of record winter wheat yield, the acreage report released on June 30, the Sept. 30 Small Grains Summary. still a lot of stock.
but is actually right about the long-run trend 2017, but 21 percent below 2016. Harvested acreage was 430,000 acres, The real kicker is the rest of the world’s
winter wheat yield. Other spring wheat production is down from 570,000 acres in 2016. And the wheat production and projected ending
Hard Red Winter production, at 758 forecast at 423 million bushels, down 21 yield was estimated to be 84 bu/ac, down stocks. While the rest of the world’s pro-
million bushels, is up 2 percent from last percent from last year. Area harvested from last year’s record yield of 89 bu/ac, jected wheat production is down margin-
month. Soft Red Winter, at 306 million for grain is expected to total 10.5 million but still the second-highest Michigan wheat ally, the decrease was completely offset
bushels, is up 3 percent from the June acres, unchanged from the acreage report yield on record. by higher beginning stocks. And projected
forecast. White Winter, at 216 million bush- released on June 30, 2017, but down 7 Check out Table 2, the Supply/Demand world 2017-18 ending stocks are pro-
els, is up 3 percent from last month. Of the percent from last year. Balance Sheet for Wheat. While 2017 jected to increase.
White Winter production, 18.5 million bush- The United States yield is forecast at production is down, the drop was partially Did the Aug. 10 report start a rally? If it
els are Hard White and 198 million bushels 40.3 bushels per acre, down 6.9 bushels offset by the increase in beginning stocks. did, it may be a pricing decision time.
are Soft White. from last year. Of the total production, 385 And while total U.S. supply is down mean-
Durum wheat production is forecast at million bushels are Hard Red Spring wheat, ingfully, it is still the second-highest since

CORN Balance Sheet for Corn, I have put in a


2017-18 projection of what I, the trade,
the last three years.
And while it is lower than the USDA’s
on record.
After putting in reasonable use projec-
and corn prices think the combination of 170.7 bu/ac weather adjusted trend yield tions, higher feed and ethanol use, and
So what did the Aug. 10 USDA/NASS the crop report and the update Aug. 10 for 2017, it is pretty much the same as the lower exports, total use is just smaller
Crop Report, the first survey estimate of USDA/WASDE report will suggest. How long term, 1978-2016 straight trend yield than last year. And as can be seen on
the size of the 2017 corn crop, project close is it? If the USDA came in with a would indicate. Table 1, this would drop ending stocks
for 2017 U.S. corn production? How higher number, I suspect prices are down, While the lower projected 2017 har- 13 percent, and lower projected ending
close was it to trade expectations? Was and vice versa. vested acres, combined with the lower stocks to use from 16.3 percent to 14.3
the new information bullish or bearish The weekly crop progress reports yields, makes this year’s expected corn percent this marketing year.
for corn prices? If it was bullish, watch indicate a corn yield of around 167.5 bu/ production down substantially from last This would indicate an annual average
closely for realistic pricing opportunities, acre, and that is the number I have used year’s production, the increase in begin- price in the $3.60 range, about what the
especially if you have not priced much in Table 1. While this number is lower than ning stocks offsets more than half the market was offering as I wrote this issue.
new crop to date. any of the last three years’ yields, we have reduction. That leaves total supplies lower
In Table 1 below, the Supply/Demand had the highest three corn yields ever in than last year, but still the second-highest

SOYBEANS bean production would be if the rest of the


season was “normal” growing conditions?
have had the highest three soybean yields
ever in the last three years. And while 46.8
projections for 2017-18 into Table 3, end-
ing stocks are projected to grow. And the
How did the market react? Did it provide is lower than the USDA’s 48 bu/ac weather stocks-to-use ratio goes from 10 percent
And now for a stab at soybeans, pre- pricing opportunities? Or not? adjusted trend yield for 2017, 46.8 is just in 2016-17, to 10.3 percent in 2017-18.
report, to be read post report. You will get In Table 3 below, the Supply/Demand higher the long term, 1978-2016, straight My projected price of $9.30 is down a bit
a firsthand view of how “good/bad” I am Balance Sheet for Soybeans, I have put trend yield, 46.5 bu/ac. from last year, as the increase in stocks to
at this forecasting gig. Or can I throw darts in a 2017-18 projection of what I think, While 2017 production is projected to use would indicate, but higher than what
randomly better than you can? the trade thinks, and (not so much) prices be down due to the lower projected yield, we are seeing today.
As with corn, the USDA/NASS Aug. 10 think the combination of the crop report it is not down much due to the increase in How does Table 3 match up with the
Crop Production Report will be the first and the updated Aug. 10 USDA/WASDE projected acres harvested. Aug. 10 report?
survey-based projection of the size of the report will suggest. And when you add the massive begin-
2017 soybean crop. And while the saying The weekly crop progress reports sug- ning stocks left over from the 2016-17
August makes soybeans is often true, it is gest, based on historical relationships, that marketing year, total 2017-18 total supply Hilker is an MSU Extension economist
always useful to have a survey-based esti- this year’s soybean yields will be 46.8 bu/ac. is projected to be higher, which means a and professor with Michigan State
mate to base the changes August brings. Like corn, while this 46.8 bu/ac is lower new record. University’s Dept. of Agricultural Food
So what did the report suggest soy- than any of the last three years’ yields, we After putting in reasonable total use & Resource Economics.

YOUR TRUSTED FARM NEWS


IN JUST FIVE MINUTES
Hosted by Janelle Brose
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 7

FOREST, WETLANDS, AND HABITAT


BEN SCHRAM A written management plan is the hallmark of the in verification. The program is 100% voluntary and
MDARD FWH verification. Much of the assessment, includ- confidential. Landowners can take a lot away from
In June 2013, Governor Snyder signed into law a ing questions related to timber management, wild- working with a Conservation District technician and
package of bills focused on better private forest- life habitat, invasive species, and wetland restora- going through an assessment.
land management. The bills mobilized the creation tion, emphasize having a clear picture of resource A MAEAP Forest, Wetlands, and Habitat verifica-
of a new MAEAP Forest, Wetlands, and Habitat conditions and prescriptions in a written document. tion does not only apply to farms. Nearly all land
verification system to help farmers and other types In a cross-country trip, a roadmap is only valuable is eligible, including investment and recreation
of landowners, alike. if you know where you’re going. Similarly, a land properties. The MAEAP Forest, Wetlands, and
The MAEAP Forest, Wetlands, and Habitat management plan is valuable only if the landowner Habitat*A*Syst provides landowners of all types
(FWH) verification evaluates management opportu- has clear objectives for the property. Objectives, with a thoughtful roadmap to accomplishing the
nities on parts of the farm or property not covered sometimes called values, might encompass any- goals for their property.
by the other three MAEAP systems (Cropping, thing from high-quality timber productions, to habitat Conservation District technicians work through-
Farmstead, and Livestock). It focuses on three for deer or migratory birds, privacy, high-functioning out the state. They are available to help landowners
main areas: wetlands, or a sense of place. These values, com- understand their natural resources and begin the
1. Forest management for timber and habitat bined with the natural resources at hand, guide the MAEAP process.
development; recommendations of a professional.
2. Wetland restoration potential; and While the verification addresses a variety of Photo: Ingham Conservation District celebrates
resource conditions and concerns, it really boils its MAEAP FWH Verification and Tree Farm
3. Habitat restoration.
down to three questions: What resources do you Certification. The Ingham Conservation District
Whether forest, wetland, other upland habitat, or is the first FWH Verification in Ingham County.
have? What do you want to see? How can MAEAP
any combination of the three, it is critical that the | Courtesy photo
help get you there? Not all assessments will end
landowner has a plan to guide decision making.

THIS MONTH’S PAGE PROVIDED BY


THE MICHIGAN DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT
FORESTRY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Michigan Soybean
Promotion Committee
The Soybean Checkoff
michigansoybean.org

For a complete list of partners, visit www.maeap.org.


8 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

spring-planted annual crops, many of TEMPERATURE (F) PRECIPITATION


which were entering stages of peak water MICHIGAN WEATHER GROWING DEGREE DAYS

WEATHER
Obs. Dev. from Actual Normal Obs. Normal
7/1/2017 - 7/31/2017
needs. However, impacts varied greatly by mean normal Base 50 Base 50 (inches) (inches)

crop and location, ranging from saturated


OUTLOOK
BAD AXE 69.5 0.2 615 627 3.48 3.2
soils, localized flooding, delayed wheat LAKE CITY 67.4 0.3 556 556 2.00 2.81
harvest in areas hit by heavy rains (mostly COLDWATER 71.5 0.4 661 648 3.11 4.24
northern sections of the state) to unfavor- ALPENA 68.2 0.9 545 556 2.01 3.03

Wide range ably dry soils and increasing levels of mois-


ture stress in other locations repeatedly
DETROIT 74.4 0.8 664 675 2.44 3.37

of extremes
FLINT 70.8 0.3 664 675 2.72 3.32
missed by the rainfall (sections of southern
GRAND RAPIDS 72.5 0.1 651 655 1.12 3.78
and central Lower Michigan).
HOUGHTON LAKE 67.6 0.5 545 556 2.15 2.76
JEFF ANDRESEN Seasonal base 50 degree F grow-
MSU EXTENSION ing degree day accumulations from May LANSING 73.2 1.7 661 648 2.70 2.84
A persistent broad upper-air ridge across 1 through the end of July were close to MARQUETTE 64.0 -1.5 426 498 1.98 2.84
central sections of the U.S. during much slightly below climatological normals, and MUSKEGON 71.6 0.4 608 609 1.63 2.37
of July led to a wide range of weather these totals closely reflect observations PELLSTON 65.3 -0.2 556 556 2.11 2.49
extremes ranging from heat and severe from recent crop progress reports (mostly SAULT STE MARIE 66.0 0.7 451 486 4.47 2.86
drought conditions across the Northern near to a few days behind normal). SAGINAW 72.0 0.9 615 627 1.48 2.58
Great Plains to heavy rains and flooding The latest Palmer Drought Severity Index
through portions of the Upper Midwest. categorized nearly all of Michigan as near below-normal mean temperatures and a the 3-month August-October period.
In Michigan, monthly rainfall totals ranged normal to extremely moist, although as range of rainfall totals from below-normal Mean temperatures are forecast to
from less than 2 inches in some central and noted earlier, pockets of dryness persist levels in western sections to above-normal remain in the equal odds category for the
southern sections of Lower and western across the southern half of the Lower levels in the east. month of August, increasing to above nor-
Upper Michigan to more than 6 inches Peninsula. This pattern is expected to give way to a mal levels for the August-October.
across portions of the northern Lower and Recent medium-range forecast guid- more a typical broad ridging pattern across
eastern Upper Peninsulas. ance has been consistent in suggesting the the Midwest by mid-August, which should Andresen is a professor of
Mean temperatures for the month were formation of an upper-air troughing feature lead to a gradual increase in temperatures. Meteorology/Climatology with
very close to normal across central and (more typical of early fall than of mid-late The NOAA Climate Prediction Center Michigan State University’s Dept. of
southern sections of the state to slightly summer) across the Upper Midwest and Long Lead Outlook ensemble is slightly Geography, Environment, and Spatial
below normal across the north. Great Lakes region during the first two different from previous issuances, and calls Sciences; MSUE specialist and the
In general, this weather combination weeks of August. for equal odds of below-, near-, and above- state climatologist for Michigan.
favored growth and development of most This pattern would lead to near to normal precipitation totals for August and

Court boosts renewable


fuels
NCGA
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the
District of Columbia Circuit ruled
recently in favor of the National Corn
Growers Association (NCGA) and
other renewable fuels advocates,
agreeing with the petitioners that the
Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) erred in how it interpreted and
used the “inadequate domestic sup-
ply” waiver in the Renewable Fuel
Standard law in setting renewable
fuel volumes for 2014-2016.
In Americans for Clean Energy
et al v. Environmental Protection
Agency, the Court vacated EPA’s de-
cision to reduce the total renewable
fuel volume requirement in 2016 and
remanded the rule to EPA for further
consideration.
“This ruling affirms our view that
the EPA did not follow the law when
it reduced the 2014-2016 renewable
fuel volumes below levels intended
by Congress,” the NCGA said in a
statement. “The Court held that EPA
was wrong to interpret the phrase
‘inadequate domestic supply’ to
NEED NEW EQUIPMENT?
mean ‘inadequate domestic supply
and demand.’ We agree with the
court that effectively adding words
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IN JUST FIVE MINUTES subject to change without prior notification.

Hosted by Janelle Brose


www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 9
$8.4 million in new agriculture R&D funds approved
NICOLE SEVREY servation efforts, food safety requirements, Resources Dean Dr. Ron Hendrick, spoke more than $8.1 billion by 2025,” he said.
MFB and more,” Bednarski said. “And there’s about how the lab can prepare students for $1.5 million for the state’s tree fruit
The state’s agriculture department will also a strong drive to be innovative, efficient nearly half of agricultural jobs that involve commission.
receive an almost 20 percent increase and more cost effective.” food processing. Representing apple, cherry, peach and
within the 2017-18 budget passed by the “To accomplish industry growth, we “By creating three mobile food process- plum growers, the commission is making
Michigan Legislature and approved by Gov. must continue collaborating with our ing labs and staffing them with highly infrastructure investments at the state’s four
Rick Snyder. Most notably, it includes a education and research institutions, com- qualified teaching faculty, we can offer fruit research stations.
new $8.4 million line item dedicated to agri- modity organizations and state agencies,” hands-on experience to students through- Historically funded with state dollars, the
culture industry research and development. he said. “This year’s budget is a prime out the state. This will…prepare our projects are now financed by the commis-
Michigan Farm Bureau (MFB) President example of what good we can accomplish students, both on campus and at partner sion’s annual grower assessment imple-
Carl Bednarski said adequate funding for together for Michigan’s food and fiber community colleges, for jobs with any of mented in 2016.
the Michigan Department of Agriculture and production and processing.” the more than 2,200 food processors that However, with a funding gap created over
Rural Development (MDARD) is essential Michigan Farm Bureau and county Farm call Michigan home.” the past decade, the one-time funds will
for farmers to continue Bureau members advocated for the new $2.5 million for the Michigan Alliance help bring the stations’ equipment replace-
providing safe, $8.4 million agriculture industry research for Animal Agriculture (M-AAA). ment and facility maintenance projects up to
afford- and development line item that includes: Resulting from eight industry groups join- speed in order to keep conducting valuable
able and $3.2 million for the state’s fruit and ing forces with MSU Extension and AgBio pest prevention and other priority research.
high-quality vegetable lab, and three new mobile Research in 2014, the M-AAA aims to ad- $1.2 million for agriculture industry
products laboratories. dress ever-changing production practices workforce development initiatives.
consumers The one-of-a-kind Michigan lab plays and consumer demands through research The one-time funds will be used for
expect and a key role in teaching and research to and outreach. The one-time funds will be workforce development initiatives sup-
deserve. address food safety, security and quality used to continue growing the program’s porting food processing, education and
“Farmers issues. Funds will be used to modernize size and scope. agriculture technology.
perform a MSU’s campus-based facility and build Also earlier this year, MSU AgBio
challenging three mobile learning labs focused on Research Director Doug Buhler lauded
balancing act value-added food processing. the alliance’s accomplishments since its
as we juggle At an agriculture appropriations com- formation. “Previous projections suggest TO LEARN MORE, VISIT
weather, input mittee hearing earlier this year, College that Michigan could grow its overall animal HTTPS://TINYURL.COM/Y9W8PRDD
costs, con- of Agriculture of Agriculture and Natural agriculture economy from $5.7 billion to

House approves
measure aligning
ozone standards
AFBF
The House of Representatives
on July 18 passed a Farm Bureau-
Can We Lease Your Land for Our Solar Farms? supported bill that provides for the
reasonable implementation of the
Environmental Protection Agency’s
(EPA) National Ambient Air Quality
Standards for ozone.
The Ozone Standards Implementa-
tion Act (H.R. 806) aligns the 2008
and 2015 ozone standards through a
phased schedule that provides time to
put already-planned controls in place.
The measure gives states time to
implement the 2008 ozone standard
first, while still improving air quality.
“Otherwise, states may have
to unnecessarily expend time and
resources trying to implement two
ozone standards simultaneously,”
American Farm Bureau Federation
Transmission Type Power Lines on Your Land? Lease to Us Today! President Zippy Duvall said in a letter
urging House lawmakers to approve
the bill. “State and local areas may be
faced with adverse impacts in terms
of stymied economic development
and lost job creation.”
For several years, states have part-
nered with business and industry to
improve the nation’s air quality, result-
ing in a 33 percent reduction in ozone
levels since 1980. Those levels will
continue to decline as states imple-
ment the 2008 ozone standards.
Stringent ozone standards could
Large Power Lines on Your Property? Lease Us Your Land! place serious restrictions on farmers,
increasing the cost of critical inputs
We Will Pay Up to $1,250 per Acre per Year like electricity, fuel and fertilizer, as well
as equipment. Further, as ozone stan-
dards come closer to levels that exist
20 to 40 Yr. Lease naturally, more farmers will be forced
to abide by restrictions on equipment
use and land management that would
We Require Large Tracts of Land currently clear clean land (Over 150 Acres) w/ 3Phase Transmission Type Power Lines on the land for Our Solar Farms
make it more expensive to operate.
Land Cannot be in Flood Zone or Have Wetlands Issues – Owner Must Retain Mineral Rights both above and below surface or have Executive Rights In the letter, Farm Bureau also not-
ed its support for provisions that tie
No underground utilities including oil and gas lines within the proposed solar site related air permitting requirements to
the phased schedule. Also important
Long Term Land Leases Needed-(20 – 40 Years Up to $1,250 per Acre per Year) is a requirement for 10-year review
cycles, which the organization said

CALL (828)-817-5400 or (828)-817-9101 were more feasible than the current


schedule to review air standards.
“This reform will allow for environ-
Email Us at InnovativeSolarFarms@gmail.com mental improvements to occur while
bringing more certainty to regula-
tors and the regulated community,”
Visit our website at www.InnovativeSolarFarms.com Duvall wrote.
10 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

ers, regardless of whether they are an active business can realistically continue in the face the opposite, they planned off-farm careers
part of the operation, are aware of the plan of the succession plan. Ideally, you should but then realize they want to return.
DOLLARS and buy into it. These conversations can be
challenging, as siblings may have different
examine five years of financial reports to rec-
ognize important trends, such as increasing
Children may marry and start families, you
will need to continually evaluate whether the
& SENSE ideas than each other and their parents
about who should have what responsibili-
or decreasing equity. At this point, some hard
calls may need to be made about whether
operation that once supported one fam-
ily will be able to support multiple families.
ties, and how assets should be divided fairly. the operation is viable for the next generation. Any of the 5 Ds occurring – death, disability,
In some cases, for example, it may be The fourth important consideration, and disaster, divorce and disagreements – also
Take the time to plan for deemed fair that a child working his whole one that is sometimes challenging, is to necessitates updates to the plan.
succession planning life on the operation would inherit the farm
assets, and a non-farming sibling would
seek and pay for the necessary professional
advice. These advisors may include the
With the plan in place and kept cur-
rent, the time eventually comes to start
KELLY TOBIN inherit some of the land, or a life insurance aforementioned mediator, or a consultant to implementing it. Outside of an unexpected
GREENSTONE FARM CREDIT SERVICES payout. Having a mediator involved in these measure the aptitudes of the children com- event, we recommend beginning to transfer
In America, only 30 percent of all fam- family discussions can help immensely in ing in to run the farm. The consultant can management responsibilities at least 10
ily businesses survive into the second arriving at acceptance of the plan while provide an independent assessment of the years before a planned transition, allow-
generation. Twelve percent will survive retaining family relationships. appropriate role for each to ensure they are ing the next generation to experience the
into the third, and only 3 percent into the The second step is to develop, in writing, able and positioned well to fill the new roles. full cycle of the sector—good times, bad
fourth. While many American farm families the business objectives and the specifics of At the very least, you should retain an times, economic cycles, possibly even
have far beaten these odds to date, taking the plan: who will be the production manager attorney and a tax advisor: the attorney to natural disasters—and learn from the ex-
the important steps of creating a compre- or the financial manager, do you want to advise on the best business structure and perts in the family how to respond.
hensive succession plan will increase the continue the same crops, are you working to- other estate decisions, and the tax advisor That way, both the senior and the
likelihood of success. ward growth or stability? The plan also needs to ensure neither the senior nor the younger younger generation can have confidence in
It is important to recognize that not all to ensure the senior generation is taken care generation pays more income taxes than the operation’s continuation. During this pe-
succession comes at retirement: death, of and has enough money for retirement and necessary. Farming enterprises are complex. riod, the transfer of assets and creation of
disability, disaster, divorce and disagree- elder care when that time comes. Having an advisory team to help you navi- business entities, following the plan devised
ments can also lead to the need to transi- Next, the operator should compile compre- gate the process will benefit all involved. with support from your legal and tax advi-
tion an operation, and all five of these “Ds” hensive and accurate financial information, The fifth and final step is ongoing: once the sors, should also be initiated.
should be addressed in the plan. especially a balance sheet that identifies as- succession plan is established, it needs to be
There are five key considerations to sets, liabilities and owner’s equity. You should revisited periodically as things change. Chil- Tobin is Senior Tax Accountant &
creating an effective plan. The first and most determine your level of profitability, and make dren may go to college and decide they do Tax Services Product Manager at
important is to make sure all the stakehold- an informed decision as to whether the not want to return to the farm as expected, or GreenStone Farm Credit Services.

MSU names new


animal science chair
FARM NEWS MEDIA, MSU
Dr. Pamela Ruegg has been named
chair of the Department of Animal Sci-
ence at Michigan State University.
The announce-
ment came
recently from
Ron Hendrick.
Professor & Dean
of MSU’s College
of Agriculture and
Natural Resourc-
es, and Janice
Swanson, Chair Ruegg
of ANR’s Animal Science department.
“Our sincere thanks and appre-
ciation to members of the search
committee, those in the department
who organized and hosted interview
sessions during this search,” the two
said in a letter announcing the hire.
Ruegg is a professor and Extension
milk quality specialist in the Depart-

Moving you
ment of Dairy Science at the University
of Wisconsin, Madison. She received
her undergraduate degree and DVM
from MSU. She completed a residency
in Food Animal Herd Health and Re-

forward.
productive Management and Masters
of Preventive Veterinary Medicine at
the University of California – Davis.
Prior to joining the University of
Wisconsin, Madison, Dr. Ruegg spent
time in private practice and in aca-
demic faculty positions at the Atlantic When you are ready to expand the footprint of your
Veterinary College in Prince Edward operation, turn to your local lending experts at GreenStone.
Island, Canada, and the College of
We understand the business of agriculture and can provide
Veterinary Medicine at MSU as well as
corporate technical service. the customized financial tools you need to keep growing.
Dr. Ruegg is active in a number
of industry organizations and is a Contact your local branch to learn more about our
past-president of the National Mastitis real estate loan options.
Council. Her Extension program is
focused on developing programs that 800-444-FARM
help farmers maintain healthy cows,
and improving milk quality and safety
on dairy farms.
She has received a number of
awards for research and extension
programs and maintains a popular
milk quality website http://milkqual-
ity.wisc.edu with a goal of providing
practical tools and resources to help
farmers, consultants and veterinarians. www.greenstonefcs.com
Dr. Ruegg was born and raised in
St.Ignace, Mich., and is proud of her
‘Yooper’ heritage.
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 11

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12 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

Trait and Stewardship Responsibilities


Notice to Farmers
In summertime, deer come after your feed
PHIL DURST As expected, there were more visits tent in quality. Even though feed is available
Monsanto Company is a member of Excellence
Through Stewardship® (ETS). Monsanto products MSU EXTENSION by deer to farm-stored feed in the winter in fields and forest, they may have become
are commercialized in accordance with ETS Product Summertime, when the forage is lush (December and January) than in the fall or habituated to farm-stored feed and continued
Launch Stewardship Guidance, and in compliance and there is no shortage of growth, is the spring seasons. But what stood out in the to seek it to meet the high nutrient demand.
with Monsanto’s Policy for Commercialization of data was that deer incursion to stored feed There may also be other reasons that
time of year when deer may be coming
Biotechnology-Derived Plant Products in Commodity
Crops. This product has been approved for import to farm-stored feed the most. It seems on these farms was over twice as great in deer seek out farm-stored feeds during
into key export markets with functioning regulatory counterintuitive, but maybe it is a reason- June and July than in the winter. those early summer months. They may be
systems. Any crop or material produced from this able expectation. That seemed to defy logic. It even seeking refuge from predation after fawn-
product can only be exported to, or used, processed caused some to ask if there was something ing, seeking different water sources when
Deer movements were studied by scien-
or sold in countries where all necessary regulatory
approvals have been granted. It is a violation of national tists with USDA’s National Wildlife Research amiss in the project design. But that may others decline, and simply taking the easi-
and international law to move material containing Center and Michigan State University using be because we were not thinking about the est feed when feed storage gates are left
biotech traits across boundaries into nations where deer collared with radio transmitters. needs of the deer. open by farmers during harvest time.
import is not permitted. Growers should talk to their As an educator with Michigan State Uni- Taken together with what is happening
Deer for this study were captured near
grain handler or product purchaser to confirm their
buying position for this product. Excellence Through six farms in the core tuberculosis (TB) area versity Extension, we recently discussed this with deer nutrient needs, it may not be sur-
Stewardship® is a registered trademark of Excellence of Michigan, and their movements, relative with a farmer while visiting to talk about wild- prising that visits increase in June and July.
Through Stewardship. to the farms, were tracked. Data points life risk. He speculated that whitetail does Factors leading to increased deer pres-
for deer incursion to stored feed on these may seek out stored feed in response to sure are a good reminder to be vigilant in
B.t. products may not yet be registered in all states.
Check with your Monsanto representative for the farms were plotted by month of the year increased nutrient needs for nursing fawns. monitoring and protecting stored feed from
registration status in your state. (Figure 1). Let’s run this through a calendar to see if it deer this summer. A discussion of that
makes sense in light of the research. appears in a companion article “Protecting
IMPORTANT IRM INFORMATION: RIB Complete ® The rutting (breeding) season in North- farm feed from deer.”
corn blend products do not require the planting of a
structured refuge except in the Cotton-Growing Area GPS DEER POINTS WITHIN ern Michigan is typically October through Why does that matter so much? It mat-
where corn earworm is a significant pest. SmartStax® STORED FEED AREA December, and while there is variation, the ters because TB infection of cattle herds is
RIB Complete® corn blend is not allowed to be sold for peak of breeding activity may be late Octo- at stake. TB can be transmitted indirectly
planting in the Cotton-Growing Area. See the IRM/ ber through mid-November. between infected members of the wild deer
Grower Guide for additional information. Always 40
Gestation length for whitetail deer is herd to cattle, or vice versa. Transmission
Total number of points

read and follow IRM requirements. 35


200-205 days, meaning that most fawning of the disease occurs mostly likely when
Fence Installation

30
Individual results may vary, and performance may occurs late May through June. Then, does saliva is deposited on feed and then that
vary from location to location and from year to year. 25
are nursing their fawns for 10-16 weeks of feed is consumed by another while the
This result may not be an indicator of results you may 20
obtain as local growing, soil and weather conditions 15
age, or May through August. bacteria is still alive.
may vary. Growers should evaluate data from multiple 10
The nursing fawns receive their primary The time that the bacteria will live varies
locations and years whenever possible.
5
nutrition from milk for about the first month. by season, moisture conditions, shade or
0
Rumination in fawns begins at around two sun and other factors. In the summer, it
ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW PESTICIDE LABEL
DIRECTIONS. Roundup Ready technology contains weeks of age, and they begin to supple- might be from several hours to weeks. That
ment their milk diet with forage. This is a is a critical period when cattle could become
Ma eb
Ap h
Ma l
Ju y
ne
ly
Se g
pt
t
v
c
n
Ma b
Ap h
Ma l
y
ri

ri
Oc
No
De
rc

Au

Ja
Fe
rc
Ju

genes that confer tolerance to glyphosate, an active


F

ingredient in Roundup® brand agricultural herbicides. Month of study time of high nutrient demand by the nurs- infected from eating contaminated feed.
Agricultural herbicides containing glyphosate ing does. All this occurs during a time of Breaking the cycle of TB means breaking
will kill crops that are not tolerant to glyphosate.
DroughtGard ®, RIB Complete ®, Roundup Ready ®, increased forage availability in the wild. the cycle of deer getting into cow feed.
Figure 1. Number of deer visits to cattle
Roundup ®, SmartStax ® and VT Double PRO ® are However, some deer will have found Please look for the companion article
feed storage by month before and after
trademarks of Monsanto Technology LLC. LibertyLink® stored feed on farms and, we can speculate, “Protecting farm feed from deer” and take
and the Water Droplet Design ® is a registered feed storage fencing.
learned that it’s nutrient-dense and consis- steps now.
trademark of Bayer. Herculex ® is a registered
trademark of Dow AgroSciences LLC. Respect the
Refuge and Corn Design® and Respect the Refuge®
are registered trademarks of National Corn Growers
Association. All other trademarks are the property of
their respective owners. ©2017 Monsanto Company. Young Farmer standout reaps rewards for involvement
FARM NEWS MEDIA exemplified by the corporate and local-level counties.
Michigan’s most recent Young Farmer sponsors that put their products behind their Handing Sollman the keys was Bill An-
Discussion Meet superstar Amanda Soll- support for farming’s next generation. In nin, who oversees 12 Case IH dealerships
man took delivery this week of the Case IH this case, Case IH and Weiss Equipment in across the state from his regional head-
Farmall tractor she earned as a finalist in Frankenmuth embraced the honor of award- quarters in South Lyon.
the national-level competition in January. ing Sollman with her national-finalist award. “We’re proud to sponsor programs like
The Saginaw County standout won the “It’s common knowledge Case IH has this to support the future of agriculture and
state-level Young Farmer Discussion meet been very active in supporting Michigan’s agribusiness,” Annin said. “We’re proud of
at Michigan Farm Bureau’s 2016 Annual farming community—and certainly here in our dealers, too—they’re all very experi-
Meeting, Nov. 30 in Grand Rapids. The the Saginaw Valley and Thumb,” said Weiss enced and well-established. Weiss’ here in
following January she represented Michi- Equipment’s Alan Weiss. Frankenmuth is the oldest of them—one of
gan at the national-level Young Farmer and And he would certainly know, being the oldest in the nation.”
Rancher Discussion Meet, part of the the third-generation owner of his family’s Note: Your Michigan Farm Bureau mem-
American Farm Bureau Federation’s 2017 equipment business, this year celebrating bership can save you hundreds of dollars
Annual Convention in Phoenix, Ariz. its 100th year serving customers across on select Case IH equipment; visit the MFB
“It’s been more than a year now since I Saginaw, Genesee, Lapeer and Tuscola website for details.
first got involved in the Young Farmer pro-
gram, and the discussion meets in particu-
lar,” Sollman said. “Ever since then, I keep
finding myself saying how glad I am to have
found a niche for myself in Farm Bureau—
there’s really something for everyone here,
no matter what your role is in the agricul-
ture industry.”
Sollman’s poise and thorough knowledge
of current agricultural issues made her a
formidable opponent. She weathered two
preliminary rounds before facing off in the
“final four” against competitors from Geor-
gia, Tennessee and Virginia. In the end the
Volunteer State’s Matt Niswander came out
on top, but Sollman’s outstanding perfor-
mance did Michigan “Farm Bureau Proud.”
“I also find myself recommending Farm
Bureau’s Young Farmer program to my
peers in the farming community,” she said.
“It’s a great way to grow your professional
network, enrich your personal farming com-
munity and develop leadership skills that
will serve any farmer well into the future.
“Farm Bureau members here in my
county and MFB staff all really teamed up to
help me prepare for this competition at every
level. From the districts to the state level to Saginaw County’s Amanda Sollman won a tractor from Case IH and Weiss Equipment
the national stage in Phoenix, I was sur- of Frankenmuth for placing in the final four of the American Farm Bureau Federation’s
rounded by support and encouragement.” 2017 Young Farmer and Rancher Discussion Meet. Pictured (from left) are Saginaw
That support extends beyond Farm County Farm Bureau President Jeramie Ziola, Sollman, Case IH Territory Sales
Bureau and into the agribusiness sector, Manager Bill Annin and Weiss Equipment owner Alan Weiss. | Jeremy C. Nagel, MFB
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 13

This is where corn rootworm


inflicts the worst damage.
Learn how to do the ideal root dig at Genuity.com/DigDeeper

S M A R T S T A X® T E C H N O L O G Y :
PROVEN ON OVER 100 MILLION ACRES.

Individual results may vary. Always read and follow IRM, grain marketing and all other stewardship practices
and pesticide label directions for Corn-Growing Areas.
Details of these practices can be found in the Trait Stewardship Responsibilities Notice to Farmers
printed in this publication. ©2017 Monsanto Company. 7656.
smtstx7656c1-P135AR1
14 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

Benzie-Manistee, Gratiot Farm Bureaus earn ag-lit grants


AMELIA MILLER “This is the first attempt to put an agricul- educator at Breckenridge High School. “By
MFB tural literacy program in our county schools sharing their experiences in 4-H and FFA,
Benzie-Manistee and Gratiot County and library,” said Katherine Schoedel, they can begin to formulate how to share
Farm Bureaus have each won $500 White- president of Benzie-Manistee County Farm with others the importance of agriculture.”
Reinhardt mini-grants from the American Bureau. “We read to grades K-3 last year at Small groups of Eisenberger’s agri-
Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture to one school. That took all day with only two science students will be partnered with
expand agricultural literacy education in their volunteers. These funds will give us the sup- second-grade classrooms in the Breck-
communities. They were among 10 grants port we need to more effectively promote ag enridge district. With the help of the FFA
awarded nationwide to county and state education with a small work force.” advisor and local Farm Bureau members,
Farm Bureaus to create new agricultural Manistee County has seven schools with the high-schoolers will deliver a 20-30
literacy projects or expand existing efforts. about eight classes in each grade. Benzie minute lessons on various agricultural Apply today!
“This grant program provides financing County has three schools with five classes topics using pizza. To celebrate the American Farm Bureau
for projects counties might not otherwise in each grade. The county Farm Bureau’s Each lesson will include a focused Foundation for Agriculture’s 50th Anniver-
be able to accomplish,” said Tonia Ritter, goal is to reach at least one grade level in concept, the reading of a related book, an sary, grant awards will be doubled to $1,000
manager of Michigan Farm Bureau’s Pro- each school, with hopes of expanding to activity or guest speaker to connect the for 2018 programming. Applications are
motion and Education Department. “Coun- reach all grades at two of these schools. concept back to the students’ daily lives, evaluated on their connection between
ties interested in furthering their agricultural In the future, Benzie-Manistee hopes to and a take-home resource to continue the agriculture and education; how successfully
literacy outreach should consider applying also partner with local libraries to offer after- conversations at home. After each lesson, the project enhances learner engagement
for these grants in the future.” school or weekend programming with the the books will be donated to the second- in today’s food, fiber and fuel systems; and
mobile ag library. grade classrooms’ in-room library to be the processes and timelines for accomplish-
Benzie-Manistee
referenced throughout the year. ing project goals. Applications for the next
The Benzie-Manistee County Farm Gratiot County
“We will evaluate our progress annu- grant cycle are due Oct. 15, 2017. Visit the
Bureau will use its grant to start a mobile Gratiot County Farm Bureau plans to bring ally for the next five years and invite other American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agri-
library of agricultural books, supplemented together high school students and second- local schools to join the program,” said culture’s website for more information.
by educational supplies to help teachers graders over pizza during a series of monthly Gratiot County Farm Bureau President Erin The White-Reinhardt Fund for Education
and volunteers provide accurate lessons classroom activities focused on agriculture. Humm. “By 2020, we hope ‘Project Pizza’ honors Berta White and Linda Reinhardt,
with activities encouraging students’ further “This project allows our high school will be implemented in all second-grade trailblazers in early efforts to expand ag-ed
exploration. All materials will meet appropri- students to begin forming their agriculture classrooms in the county.” outreach and improve ag literacy.
ate state educational standards. story,” said Katie Eisenberger, agriscence

IN BRIEF
■■POLITICS

Tax relief needed now,


farmer tells Congress INFORMATION
AFBF
Farm and ranch families need a perma-
about your Medicare Supplemental insurance policy.
nent tax code that boosts the agricultural
economy and frees them to reinvest in their
businesses, Scott VanderWal, a South
Dakota farmer, told the House Ways and Paying too much for your Legacy Medigap plan?
Means Subcommittee on Tax Policy July 13.
“Farmers and ranchers operate under tight Limited time offer - Switch and save!
profit margins, often for rates of return that
are modest compared to other businesses,”
VanderWal said. “Our businesses are also
Save money
cyclical where a period of prosperity can be If you’re enrolled in Farm Bureau’s Legacy
followed by one or more unprofitable years.” Medigap policy, it may be time to look at other
Nationwide, net farm income has been lower-cost options.
cut nearly in half since 2011.
“Reducing effective tax rates is the most
important thing that tax reform can do to
Limited time offer
boost farm and ranch businesses,” said Until November 30, 2017, Blue Cross® Blue
VanderWal. “Every dollar that we pay in tax- Shield® of Michigan is giving you the opportunity
es is a dollar that could be reinvested back
into our farm, help lift my community and
to switch to one of their new, lower cost Medicare
contribute to a robust agricultural economy.” Supplemental plans at their guaranteed issue
In 2015, agriculture and related indus- (best) price, with no medical questions asked.
tries contributed $992 billion to U.S. gross
domestic product and provided about 11
You will not get this chance again.
percent of U.S. employment.
“Because our profit margins are tight, we Call today
are more likely to fall into lower tax brack- Call your local Farm Bureau Medicare Plan
ets,” he said. “Tax reform plans that fail
Specialist for more information. If you’re not sure
to factor in the impact of lost deductions,
credits and exemptions for all rate brackets who to call, please call Farm Bureau Health
could result in a tax increase for agriculture.” Services at (888) 294-4335.
■■HEALTH Thank you for trusting Farm Bureau with your
health care needs. We look forward to answering
Soybean oil heart health your questions and helping you make sure you
claim approved have the health care coverage that suits you best.
ASA
The American Soybean Association
(ASA) welcomed news recently that the
U.S. Food and Drug Administration has
approved a qualified health claim linking
consumption of soybean oil to reduced risk
of coronary heart disease. The petition, filed
by Bunge North America, pointed to the
potential heart health benefits of soybean
oil, and manufacturers may now communi-
cate that soybean oil may reduce coronary
heart disease risk and lower LDL-choles-
terol when replacing saturated fat and not
increasing calories. MFBHealth.com
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 15
Country music event launches fund for barns
JAN COREY ARNETT song, “Worth Saving,” in tribute to tra- Grace Health, who with his wife Kay, had
FREELANCE WRITER ditional barns, recorded on its new CD, a timber-frame barn dismantled, moved,
An evening of country music celebrates “Mending Fences” and announces the Barn and reconstructed on their property just
American barns as it launches a fund to Believers Community Project Fund held at off M-37 near Battle Creek, where today it
help save them, when the award-winning the Battle Creek Community Foundation. hosts events. Additional board members
Richard Lynch Band from Waynesville, The Fund will provide financial support will be selected in coming months.
Ohio, performs at the Barn Theatre in Au- for activities that make people aware of “It is important to include people who
gusta, September 16. the value of traditional barns and inspire have traditional barns as part of working
The pure-country concert features the actions to save them. Grants to qualify- farm operations to appreciate their experi-
band’s performance of its specially-written ing nonprofit groups might, for example, ences and viewpoints, as well as young
support informational tool kits for decision people from organizations such as 4-H and
making about barn repair and reuse, work- FFA,” emphasized Arnett. “They will be the
shops, visits to working and adapted-use future advocates for traditional barns. We
barns to understand barns in context, the need them and barns need them.” After: This barn was dismantled, cleaned
proper archiving of farm and barn collec- Opening the show is the debut perfor- and rebuilt at a new location near Battle
tions by historical societies and museums, mance of “The Great Big Beautiful Barn,” Creek. It has a gorgeous “swing beam’
and structural assessments to determine written by Robert Learner, a Battle Creek in it. | Jan Corey Arnett
whether a barn might be given new life in historian and songwriter. Calhoun County
the Rehearsal Shed after the performance.
service to a community. 4-H’ers and theatre arts students, led by
Special assistance will be provided for
While the Battle Creek Community Foun- Sheila Miklusicak, 4-H leader and theatre
those needing help to get from the parking
dation will manage the fund, grantmaking producer; along with Drea Smith, a 16-year
area to the Theatre.
decisions will be made by an advisory old choreographer will add their creative
“Many myths, misinformation, and
board made up of “true barn believers,” energy to the music.
misconceptions abound about traditional
said Jan Corey Arnett, organizer. That Doors open at 6 p.m. at the Barn
barns, among them that it costs too much
Before: At this point, the barn had just board includes Arnett, Lee Peck, owner Theatre’s Rehearsal Shed adjacent to
to maintain them, that they have no value
been purchased for $1 and steps were of Peck Tree Farm, who with his late wife, the Barn Theatre, where concert-goers
when no longer used for livestock, and
taken, by tarping the roof, to dry it out Naomi, transformed an early 1900s timber- can relax and enjoy a beverage before
even that they look charming encased in
and get it cleaned out. | Jan Corey frame barn into their Ceresco home; and the show. The concert begins at 7 p.m.
vines,” said Arnett, author of the book,
Arnett A.J. Jones, retired chief executive officer of followed by an Afterglow with the band at
American Barns.
“These assumptions kill barns that in
fact, are examples of extraordinary archi-
tecture made from virgin timber, have the

OUR FOCUS
capacity to stand and serve for another
hundred years, and when destroyed can
never be replaced with anything remotely
comparable,” she said. “The Barn Believers
IS ON SEED THAT Fund intends to match facts with recep-
tive minds to create healthy attitudes and
PERFORMS BEST heightened awareness of what is and what
can be. It gives people who care about

ON YOUR FARM. heritage barns, a chance to take positive


action by giving support.”
Charitable donations can be sent to the
Barn Believers Community Project Fund at
the Battle Creek Community Foundation,
32 W. Michigan Avenue, Suite 1, Battle
Creek, Michigan, 49017. Gifts may also be
made at www.bccfoundation.org/giving/
Barn-Believers.
“Our goal is to grow the Barn Believers
Fund well enough and quickly enough that
grantmaking can begin in 2018. Barns need
us to be their advocates and time is of the
essence,” emphasized Jones. “They are not
artifacts or icons of a bygone era. They are
valuable structures with both an important
past and an economically important future.”
Richard Lynch, lead vocalist for the
Richard Lynch Band, is himself, a farmer,
barn owner, barn builder, and barn believer.
He is a 2015 inductee to the Independent
Country Music Hall of Fame and has some
two dozen awards and award nominations
to his credit. In addition, he holds the Hu-
manitarian Award from his peers in country
music for his work to assist veterans
through his own Love Tattoo Foundation.
At Rupp, our top priority continues to be “I had a man come up to me after a per-
formance of ‘Worth Saving’ and tell me that
providing seed that’s ideal for your fields. after hearing the song, he had decided not
And your bottom line. to tear his barn down, but to save it. That
matters,” Lynch said.
Tickets can be purchased using credit
We test, grow and select the highest yielding card or paypal at www.richardlynchband.
hybrids for the tristate area. By partnering with com using the “Upcoming Special Events”
link. Cash-only ticket sales are available at
multiple sources, we’re focused solely on providing locations being posted at www.barnlady1.
you with the exact traits you need – helping you com. Unless sold out in advance, tickets
will also be available at the door. They are
pull your yields to new levels. $20 each or two for $30.
Early sponsors include the Battle Creek
Because we know you value a partner who shares Community Foundation; Sherriff-Goslin
Roofing Company; Heritage Chevrolet;
your goals of achieving the healthiest plants and The Petersen/Hutson/Smith Financial
highest yields your farm can possibly produce. Team of Hilliard Lyons; Bill Simonds of The
Simonds Team of Hilliard Lyons; Bachman
Hebble Funeral Service, Inc.; WBCKfm and
Putting your needs first. TownSquare Media; and Peaceful Valley
Farm, all of Battle Creek and the Kansas
That’s what good yields.
Barn Alliance. McCamly Plaza Hotel, 50
Capital Ave. SW, Battle Creek, across from
877-591-SEED (7333) • ruppseeds.com Kellogg’s World Headquarters, is provid-
ing accommodations for the Band and
©2016 Rupp Seeds Inc. discounted rooms for concert-goers.
16 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

MSU Agriculture Innovation Day


Focus on Forages and the Future
August 24, 2017 • Lake City Research Center, Lake City, Michigan
www.msue.msu.edu/msuaginnovationday

Sponsored by:
College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Sponsors Contributors
MSU Extension Michigan Farm Bureau AIS Equipment
MSU AgBioResearch Michigan Forage Council Baders and Son’s Co.
Michigan Milk Producers Associations Dawn’s Fresh Catering
United Dairy Industry of Michigan Ellen’s Equipment
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 17

MSU Agriculture Innovation Day


Focus on Forages and the Future
August 24, 2017 • Lake City Research Center • Lake City, MI
www.msue.msu.edu/msuaginnovationday

Schedule
Michigan State University (MSU) will host MSU Agriculture
Innovation Day: Focus on Forages and the Future on Aug. 24 at the
Lake City Research Center, Lake City, Michigan.
12:30 p.m. Check-in/Registration
In 2017, dairy and beef producers will join us at the Lake City
Research Center in Lake City, Michigan, where experts from 1:00 p.m. Welcome and View Educational Displays
throughout the country will give a cutting-edge, in-depth look 1:00-4:30 p.m. Educational Sessions: 1:15 p.m., 1:55 p.m.,
at forages and the future to help dairy and beef producers meet 2:35 p.m., 3:15 p.m., 3:55 p.m.
growing environmental, production and sustainability demands.
4:30-6:30 p.m. Dinner with Formal Program and View
The free event, which runs from 12:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., comprises nine Educational Displays
field-based sessions focused on specific issues. Dinner, featuring
guest speaker MSU President Lou Anna K. Simon, will be served at 6:45-9:00 p.m. Educational Sessions: 6:45 p.m., 7:25 p.m.
4:30 p.m. Serving Session Times: 8:05 p.m., 8:40 p.m.

RUP and CCA credits available. See website for details.

Presentations
Afternoon Sessions 1 2 3 4 5
Evening Sessions

1 2 3 4 5
Making the Most of Reduced-lignin Alfalfa in Your
Operation. 7 a look8underneath
6 Take
Baleage Made Tight, Made Right.
9 the10plastic 11
wrap and see what is happening to
Learn about the latest in reduced-lignin alfalfa genetics and results the forage from a feed analysis and fermentation perspective. Explore

6 7 8 9 10 11
from a multiyear MSU study. Explore the differences in yield, quality and
1
harvest timing, and what fits best for your operation and forage quality needs.
2 3 4 5
proper moisture ranges, wrapping methods and techniques for ensuring a
quality product so producers can improve their dairy and beef production.

3 from4Brian Luck,
Precision is the Division in Silage.
1 2 Hear 5 University of Wisconsin Extension specialist 6 7 Creating
8 9
Profitable Beef Operations by Managing Land,
10 11
Livestock and People.
in biosystems engineering, as he shares the latest on a mobile app Burke Teichert, past manager of the Deseret Land and Cattle

6 7 8 9 10 11
designed to help producers and custom harvesters view images of processed Company, a current beef ranch consultant and featured columnist for Beef
1
kernels, particle size and kernel distribution. He will explain how combining
this with moisture and starch value data allows producers to use the right
2 3 4 5
Today magazine, will speak on the critical factors of blending land, cattle and
people to be successful in today’s beef farming environment.
equipment adjustments to make the best silage possible.

6 7 8 The9MSU 10
Grass-finished Beef – Research and Experience.
11
4 5your crop rotation to include cover crops can increase feed
2 3 Extending
Expand Your Land Use with Double-cropping. Lake City Research Center has conducted leading research
on grass-finished beef production. See the results from the five-year
harvested per acre and extend the land base for manure application. grass-finished beef study completed at Lake City and hear from John Nelson

7 8 9 10 11
Learn how double-cropping can provide an extra forage crop for heifers, open
1 2 3 4 5
windows of opportunity for manure application, trap manure nutrients and
of Midland about his experiences in switching from cash crop to grass-
finished beef and how this research has helped his bottom line and increased
remove more phosphorus from the system to virtually expand your land base. markets for his products.

7 how8 9 IsProvides
2 3 4 Do5you have a Fitbit fitness tracker? Do your cows?6Come learn
Precision Dairy Cattle Monitoring. Your Land Regenerating? The Land-to-Market Program
10 11
the Answer.
researchers and producers are using wearable technologies similar to The Savory Institute’s Land-to-Market program, with partners such

7 8 9 10 11
Fitbit to monitor behavior, health and reproduction for each cow in their herd as Michigan State University, is working to provide beef, sheep and dairy
24/7. Experts will discuss each technology and how or if it fits with various producers a process to verify that the land they are raising their livestock
management styles, and when or if it makes economic sense. on is improving in well-defined quality indicators. This regeneration effort
creates an opportunity for certified farms to reach new consumers who
4 5 Finding the Right Mix for Soil Health.
Healthy soils are an essential for food and feed production. What we
are concerned about how their food is produced. Learn the basics of the
program, timelines for implementation and opportunities for participation.
grow can improve our soils and ultimately our bottom line. Experts

8 9 10 11 will look at how forage crop selection, crop rotations, cover crops and manure
can affect the productivity of the soil and improve soil health. MSU is an affirmative-action, equal-opportunity employer.
18 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

2017 COUNTY ANNUAL MEETINGS


Genesee

T
9/21/2017

E A
Editor’s note: County Farm Bureau annual Lapeer

R
6 p.m. – Reception

T
meetings are listed here through Sept. 30. 9/15/2017 6:30 p.m. – Dinner
Allegan 5:30 p.m. – Social Hour Montrose Orchards
8/29/2017 6:30 p.m. – Dinner 12473 Seymour Rd, Montrose, MI
6:30 p.m. – Social Castle Creek Golf Club FREE with RSVP

’E M
7 p.m. – Dinner 5191 Lum Rd, Attica, MI Bylaw changes
The Trestle Stop Lenawee Monroe
3366 M-40, Hamilton, MI 9/16/2017

T
9/21/2017 – 5:30 p.m.

H
$5 9 a.m. – Breakfast

G
Old Mill Banquet Hall

RI
Eaton 10 a.m. – Meeting 242 Toledo St, Dundee, MI
9/6/2017 6518 Sand Creek Hwy, Sand Creek, MI $12/person
5:30 p.m. – Policy discussion (tentative) RSVP by 9/8/2017 Bylaw changes, policy resolutions, election
6:30 p.m. – Meal St Clair of directors, report of program activities,
The Country Mill 9/16/2017 – 4 p.m. financial reports.
4648 Otto Rd, Charlotte, MI 48813 Dorsey House Ottawa
Midland 6008 Beard Rd, North Street, MI 9/21/2017
9/6/2017 Presentation on Farm Safety—one for 6 p.m. – Dinner
6 p.m. – Reception adults and one for youth. 7 p.m. – Annual Meeting
6:30 p.m. – Dinner Otsego Second Christian Reformed Church
Midland County Fairgrounds 9/17/2017 – 2 p.m. 6950 Lake Michigan Dr, Allendale, MI
6905 Eastman Ave, Midland, MI BJ’s Restaurant RSVP is required by 9/15/17 to 616-895-
990 N Center, Gaylord, MI 5846 or jaustin@ctyfb.com
Saginaw
9/8/2017 – 5:30 p.m. Guest Speaker Brian Matchette to speak Charlevoix
Twin Bridges Golf Course on technology, drones and agriculture 9/23/2017 – 6 p.m.
3260 S Fenmore Rd, Merrill, MI Branch Boyne City Schools Hospitality Room
Bylaw changes 9/18/2017 – 6 p.m. 321 S Park St, Boyne City, MI
Macomb Dearth Center Cheboygan
9/11/2017 – 6 p.m. 262 S Sprague St, Coldwater, MI 9/23/2017 – 5:30 p.m.
Manciani’s Banquet Center Regular members – FREE Golden River Orchard
69227 N. Main St, Richmond, MI Non-members – $10 2250 White Cedar Rd, Cheboygan, MI
Policy resolutions, election of directors, Clare Pig roast at the Orchard.
financial reports, committee reports, by- 9/18/2017 – 6:30 p.m. Huron Shores
law changes Jim Ogg’s Farm 9/25/2017
Gladwin 5914 S Eberhart Rd, Clare, MI 6 p.m. – Reception
9/12/2017 – 6 p.m. Washtenaw 6:30 p.m. – Dinner
The Merry Hearted Cidery 9/18/2017 Wilson Township Hall
5740 W M 61, Gladwin, MI 6:30 p.m. – Resolutions 3746 King Settlement Rd, Alpena, MI
7 p.m. – Dinner FREE; please bring a dish to pass
Kent
9/12/2017 – 6:30 p.m. Sharon United Methodist Church Osceola
Perrin Brewing 19980 Pleasant Lake Rd 9/25/2017 – 6:30 p.m.
5910 Comstock Park Dr, Comstock, MI Manchester, MI Evart Free Methodist Church
Arenac 6151 95th Ave, Evart, MI
Shiawassee $10
9/12/2017 9/19/2017 – 6:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m. – Social Modern Craft Winery Copper Country
7 p.m. – Dinner 211 E Huron Rd, Au Gres, MI 9/26/2017
D’Mar Banquet & Conference Center Calhoun 6 p.m. – Registration
1488 N. M-52, Owosso, MI 9/19/2017 6:30 p.m. – Meal
FREE with RSVP received by 9/5/17; 6 p.m. – Reception Waterfront Restaurant
$10/person for RSVPs received after 6:30 p.m. – Dinner 99 Navy St, Hancock, MI
9/5/17 7 p.m. – Meeting Antrim
Ingham Marshall United Methodist Church 9/28/2017
9/13/2017 14711 Old US 27 N, Marshall, MI 5 p.m. – Policy Development
5:30 p.m. – Policy Development $5 cost of dinner and collection will be 6 p.m. – Start
6:30 p.m. – Dinner followed by Program taken up for Food Bank Royal Farms
Ingham County Fairgrounds Community RSVP by 9/12/17 to the county office 10445 N US 31, Ellsworth, MI
Building - 700 E. Ash St, Mason, MI 269-781-2849 or pwest@ctyfb.com First Annual Chili Cook-off & Dessert
$5 entry donation to local food bank Cass competition
Policy resolutions, election of directors, re- 9/19/2017 – 6 p.m. Livingston
port of program activities, financial reports Cass County Fairgrounds 9/30/2017 – 2 p.m.
and annual dessert contest Gregarek Building Esch Farm
Oakland Mac-Luce Schoolcraft 9221 Van Buren Rd, Fowlerville, MI
9/13/2017 9/19/2017 Free with donation
5:30 p.m. – Reception 5:30 p.m. – Registration Family Fun at the Farm, bring the family to
7 p.m. – Dinner 6 p.m. – Dinner enjoy an afternoon at the farm. A picnic
Red Riding Hood Stables Garfield Township Hall and family friendly activities are planned
14031 N. Holly Rd, Holly, MI N6760 M-117, Engadine, MI as well as policy discussion on the current
FREE. MUST RSVP by 9/1/2017 issues facing agriculture.
Wayne
Possible bylaw changes, awards/recogni-
9/20/2017 – 6 p.m.
tions, election of directors, confirmation
Wayne County Fair Grounds
of policy resolutions, program activities,
10871 Quirk Rd, Belleville, MI 48111
financial reports
FREE
Clinton Bylaw changes
9/14/2017
5:30 p.m. – Policy Meeting
District 9 Agricultural Summit EVERYONE’S
Benzie-Manistee, NW Michigan,
6 p.m. – Refreshments
6:30 p.m. – Dinner and Meeting
AgroLiquid
Missaukee and Wexford County
Farm Bureaus
voice IS heard
Components under the Pioneer Premium Seed Treatment offering
1130 S DeWitt Rd, St. Johns, MI
9/21/2017 – 6 p.m.
Cherry Grove Event Center
AT YOUR
Emmet 5676 E M-55, Cadillac, MI
for soybeans are applied at a DuPont Pioneer production facility
or by an independent sales representative of Pioneer. Not all
sales representatives offer treatment services, and costs and
other charges may vary. See your Pioneer sales representative
for details. Seed treatment offering is exclusive to DuPont Pioneer
9/14/2017
6 p.m. Dinner, Meeting to follow
This unique event will feature the
annual meetings for each of the
County Annual
New Hope United Methodist Church County Farm Bureaus, district
and its affiliates.
DuPont™ Lumisena™ fungicide seed treatment will be available
commercially on Pioneer® brand soybeans in the United States for
the 2018 crop year. See your local Pioneer sales representative
4516 US31, Levering, MI
Mason
wide policy development, kids
activities and an opportunity
Meeting!
for details.
PIONEER® brand products are provided subject to the terms 9/14/2017 – 6:30 p.m. for farmers to interact with their
and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and
Farm View Resort peers from our diverse agricul-
purchase documents.
®, TM , SM Trademarks and service marks of DuPont, Pioneer or their
6735 N US 31, Free Soil, MI tural community.
respective owners. © 2017 PHII. DUPPSY17032_VB_MFN
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 19

C H IG A N
INE M I
S TA NT P L A N T
CON DUCTION

Y
PRO

E A R S
40 G
N D G O I N
A ONG
S T R

Congratulations to the Constantine Michigan


Production Plant team, past and present, on
celebrating your 40th anniversary. And, thank you to
our customers and the community for your support.

PIONEER® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents.
, , Trademarks and service marks of DuPont, Pioneer or their respective owners. © 2017 PHII. DUPP0717010 17D-1290
® TM SM
20 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

A three-day tour into agriculture’s diversity


LAURA LUNCEFORD rate all that we’ve learned from the tours as “It was great to have this group of young
MFB we continue to advocate for agriculture and ag leaders take time out of their busy
Michigan FFA state officers were treated teach students about the endless opportuni- schedules to tour the Thumb area,” he said.
to three days of business and industry ties that are available to them through the “These individuals are already demonstrating
tours in Michigan’s Thumb and Saginaw industry. During the tours, I gained an even initiative by furthering their knowledge of the
Valley region thanks to event co-sponsors deeper appreciation for the ag community.” agricultural diversity in our state and taking a
Michigan Farm Bureau, The Michigan “We recognize that to achieve our mission look at the bigger picture of agriculture. They
Foundation for Agriculture, and the Michi- of an economically viable potato industry in are a prime example of the opportunities to
gan Potato Industry Commission. Michigan, we need to expand talent devel- help lead the ag industry in the future.”
Organized in coordination with the opment and collaboration within the potato The group visited about a dozen
Michigan FFA Foundation, the 2017 tours, and agricultural industry,” said Mike Wenkel, enterprises in the Thumb and surround-
held July 24-26, aimed to help the young Executive Director of the Michigan Potato ing area. The itinerary included stops at:
leaders better understand Michigan’s agri- Industry Commission. “We believe that MSU’s Saginaw Valley Research and Ex- Among the many opportunities to dive
cultural diversity and the opportunities and by providing first-hand experiences to the tension Center; Everbest Organics; Ike’s deeply into the diversity of Michigan
challenges that employers face. broadening diversity of agricultural careers Welding and Manufacturing; Michigan agriculture was at the Bay Port Fish
“The Business and Industry Tour allowed for the state officers, we can expose the Sugar; Cooperative Elevator; Bay Port Company. | Laura Lunceford, MFB
my teammates and me to gain an in-depth thousands of high school students they will Fish Company; Valley Enterprises; Roto
look at the diversity Michigan agriculture has interact with to unknown opportunities.” Z Farms; Bavarian Inn; Star of the West
to offer,” said Micah Cuevas, Region V State Michigan Farm Bureau President Carl Milling; Bednarski Farms; Walter Farms;
Vice President. “We are excited to incorpo- Bednarski agreed. and Poet Energy.

Disaster State cancels training refused [to] exclude prayer and religion
as part of their training for low-income
terminating its contract.
The state program trained 35 partici-
contract due to prayers women on how to grow nutritious foods.” pants over a 12-month period on matters
CONTINUED from page 1 The contract was to provide services un- such as soil biology, planting, pruning fruit
TOM GANTERT
than they could bear alone,” he said. MACKINAC CENTER FOR PUBLIC POLICY
der a state social welfare and public health trees, growing mushrooms and how to sell
program called Wisewoman. at a farmer’s market.
“Today’s decision to grant federal A family of Lake City farmers lost its
Robert Gothard, owner of the farm “We talked every aspect of growing,”
assistance from FEMA will go a long $20,000 state contract to teach low-
roughly 50 miles southeast of Traverse City, Gothard said.
way toward helping communities income women how to grow and prepare
said the family had contracted with the Gothard said he contacted the state at-
and families rebuild.” food when officials terminated it because
state for three years and no one com- torney general and was told to get a lawyer.
The effort is also applauded by the curriculum mentioned God and in-
plained to him about the prayers. Gothard The family said it sent a letter to Gov.
Michigan Farm Bureau national lob- structors said prayers.
said state officials showed up for the an- Rick Snyder about the contract being
byist John Kran. The farmers say the state still owes them
nual conference in 2016 and witnessed the terminated and four days later, the farm
“We welcome the support of our more than $6,000 after the contract was
family start the program with a prayer. was visited by a United States Department
Congressional delegation for our terminated in May 2016. The farm is named
That’s when he was told that the con- of Agriculture inspector who threatened to
farmers who were affected by the 3rdDayFarm, which alludes to a statement
tract wouldn’t be renewed if the instructors shut it down for violations.
flooding, and hope the President in the biblical book of Genesis, which says
kept praying as part of the event and did The family said it had to write that USDA
will agree that federal assistance is that on the third day of creation, God popu-
not remove references to God from the cur- inspector a check for $150 “on the spot” to
necessary and grant relief for them,” lated the Earth with fruit and seed.
riculum. Gothard said the curriculum was a get the license to store meat for more than
he said. Jennifer Eisner, spokeswoman for the
training manual the farm shared but never 24 hours. The USDA inspector also asked
Michigan Department of Health and Hu-
printed. When the family refused to abide for all passwords to personal email and
man Services, confirmed the state ended
by the no-religion clause, it received a letter social media accounts.
the contract in 2016 ”because the farm

Michigan Agricultural Mediation Program


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Lab tested for pure seed & healthy plants
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The Ones to Try!


SUNBURST (Protected Variety) SRW Wheat
SUNBURST’S yield average was 93.6 Bu/acre in the 2017 MSU Wheat Trials and
Mediation Helps Michigan 112.1 Bu/acre in the 2016 MSU Wheat Trials and has consistently performed
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Farmers need equipment, seed, storage
and other supplies to run their farms. MCIA WHALE Brand SRW Wheat
Lenders and creditors extend the funds. MCIA WHALE yielded 92.5 Bu/acre in the 2017 MSU Wheat Trials and 111.5 Bu/
These daily transactions are built on acre in the 2016 MSU Wheat Trials. MCIA WHALE has excellent winter hardiness
trust. But when performance on either and very good lodging scores. MCIA WHALE is resistant to leaf rust and stripe
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practice are put at risk. This is especially and responds well to high management practices.
true when farmers and creditors become
adversaries instead of problem solvers.

Fortunately, they can mediate.

The Michigan Agricultural Mediation


Program (MAMP) helps resolve disputes Ask your local seed dealer for
between producers and their lenders,
creditors or the USDA agencies with
these proven genetics.
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trained mediators to help the parties to a multiple varieties all with
dispute communicate effectively about the
superior quality and traits.
issues and possible options for resolution.
Its goal is to help the parties resolve
disputes quickly and save time and
money by avoiding a hearing.
More information available from:
616-774-0121 Michigan Crop Improvement Association
www.agmediation.org
www.michcrop.com | (517) 332-3546
21 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017
BRADY BROWN | SANILAC COUNTY
www.michiganfarmnews.com

Brady Brown is a Stine seed dealer who grows


In the 2017 Field Focus, we’ve once again tapped into Michigan Farm corn, soybeans, sugar beets alfalfa and milks
Bureau’s ProFile class. The Professional Institute for Leadership cows in Sanilac County with his wife Kellie,
daughter Bailie and son Aaron.
Education is a 15-month program that develops personal potential
The dry beans area vining out now, and
into strong leadership and advocacy. This year, only Judy Bishop and
are a lot better than we thought they’d
Jeff Russcher are not ProFile participants, although Russcher’s wife be in June when we had all the rain.
Lisa is in the program. Soybeans look really good, too, setting
pods and seeing few pest pressures.
We had an airplane spray fungicide on
JEFF & LISA RUSSCHER | ALLEGAN & OTTAWA COUNTIES corn recently. It’s all tasseled out and making ears. We’ll be chopping
in a month. We’re spraying sugar beets for leaf spot for the fourth time
Alfalfa’s second-cutting came back a lot better than we thought it would,
Along with their family, Jeff and Lisa Russcher and looks as good as second-cutting. We’ll be on that soon. Cattle are
workson a third-generation farrow-to-finish hog farm doing well. They like the mornings in the low 50s.
in Allegan & Ottawa counties. In addition to the hogs,
Jeff and wife Lisa also raise corn and soybeans for
use in their farm operation.
The recent rains in our area have been a great NATALIE PENNINGTON | MECOSTA COUNTY
blessing. Most fields have received enough
moisture for the time being, but there are a few
Natalie Pennington and husband Thomas
areas could use a bit more. Corn has pollinated
Pennington farm in Mecosta County, growing for
and is looking good and right on track for the
a farm market (fruit and vegetables), along with
growing season. The soybeans are flowering and starting to put pods on. Enjoying
sheep, pigs, cattle, petting farm, a greenhouse,
the more moderate weather this August and what it has done for the crops this year.
bakery and a farm-to-table kitchen. They welcomed
the arrival of their first child, Felicity, this year.
Nature’s cooking timer suddenly went off
MARK ZACHARDA | SHIAWASSEE COUNTY and triggered a cold front that tickled our
ground with chilly rain. This pleasant relief
from the smothering hot dampness is a
Mark Zacharda, his father, Mark A., and mother Kathy Zacharda sobering reminder that the frost’s deadly
grow corn, wheat and soybeans, and produce hay and straw breath could be just a month away. With the fields in full swing, we
from their family farm in Shiawassee County. Mark and wife ought not waste our thoughts on what could be. We’ve collected a small
Stephanie have two daughters: Edie, 6, and Maisie, 4. sample of ripe pumpkins to display at our market. In only a few weeks
In the heart of MI region we have been teetering on we’ll wave our hands and convert our fresh produce market into an
drought conditions. There were areas in early August autumn family wonderland. In reality, all the hands in the air are not
where the crops, especially the corn, were showing magically transforming the yard, but instead are signaling they are open
signs of stress. Seemed like every storm blew around and ready to catch another orange globe in the systematic placement
us! Luckily we have received some rain in the past of size. All is well.
few days, but we could use more considering the
importance of this month as it relates to corn and
soybean yields! The wheat harvest was around
average this year—surprisingly, the market price BRADLEY JERICHOW | EMMET COUNTY
spiked around harvest and has since dropped. Now,
we enter the portion of the summer where we wait for 3rd cutting hay and
occupy the little spare time we have to go fishing or visit the county fair. Bradley Jerichow runs a malting barley and
beekeeping operation in Emmet County.
I bought a fanning mill I found in an old
guy’s barn in Copemish. It’s a machine
JUDY BISHOP | CHIPPEWA COUNTY from 1896. With that, I hope to salvage
some barley for beer markets. Barley
isn’t doing as well as I’d hoped, because
Judy Bishop, along with her brother J.D. Bishop, his
I didn’t get it sprayed for weeds. Barley
family, and their parents Dave and Jane Bishop, raise
harvest should begin about mid-August,
timothy hay, oats and specialty grasses for silage
but in early August, it was just starting
on 1200 acres in Chippewa County. She works on
to dry down. Sweet corn also is behind a little, but doing good. I got it
Mackinac Island as a barn manager for Mackinac
fertilized on time, and we’ve had timely rains. Bees are doing fantastic
Island Carriage Tours.
in the four acres of buckwheat where I moved them. Deer love the
We are finally well into haying and still dodging buckwheat too. They can stay there all day, hopefully, and stay out of the
raindrops. It’s never been this wet this time of sweet corn. I won’t harvest that buckwheat. It’s there for the honey crop.
the year before. We have about 400 acres left
to cut. The crop is good and plenty though, once we can get there. The
calves are mostly all on the ground and are doing well. Lambing season was
wrapped up and everything is out to pasture. Selling freezer lamb, beef and
pork has kept my sister in law, JD’s wife, very busy this summer as she travels
to farmers markets and locals sales. The summer season on Mackinac is
wrapping up. The college kids will be heading back to school. Labor Day will
bring on the fall season here, which is a lot less congested. The horses will
head for their winter home, with the Tuesday after Labor Day being traditionally
a huge shipping day for us. We will ship approximately 50 or more horses that
day, then gradually more through September and October.

NICK OOMEN | OCEANA COUNTY

Nick Oomen, with his father Ken, Uncle Ralph and cousin Tyler, farms 1800
acres in Oceana County, specializing in asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower,
zucchini, carrots, corn, wheat, rye, tart cherries and summer squash.
We’re in the middle of processing zucchini harvest, and that will
go into September. Green and snap beans are about done. Sweet
corn in the area is starting strong, but we don’t have any of that.
We’re also busy spraying fungicides. Carrots and asparagus need
to have a cover about every 15 days, depending on the weather.
Insect pressure is under control for now, and the fungicides are
the important activity. We’re not seeing powdery mildew or downy
mildew in the processed zucchini, but there is some coming on the pumpkins, so we’ll put a cover
on that. Carrots are being sprayed for phytophthora and leaf blight. We also have to fence the
carrots to keep deer damage under control. We had a nice shower in early August, but now we’re
ready to get back on an irrigation schedule.
22 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

SALE OF CHAMPIONS GROSSES


MORE THAN $220,000
PAUL W. JACKSON
FARM NEWS MEDIA
Grocery chain Meijer was again the top
buyer at the Michigan Livestock Expo
(MLE) Auction of Champions, buying four
animals, including the Grand Champion, for
a total of $51,500.
This year’s grand champion Market Beef
was the top seller. Shown by Justin Rug-
gles of Kingston, the animal was bought by
Meijer for $26,000.
The second-highest price paid was
$11,000 for Blissfield’s Spencer Fisher’s
showcase market beef. Two other animals
were auctioned for $10,000.
“We’re very grateful for Meijer and all
the other buyers,” said Kelsey Maye, sales
manager for the MLE. “Every year, Meijer
shows up and continues to support the
event as much as they can. It’s also played
a big part in recruiting buyers, and Dave
Neitzel (the buyer for Meijer) is there every
year, and also is on the MLE board.”
While the $220,400 figure is not a sales
record, “it’s still a pretty great sale,” Maye
said. “We raised $79,200, $8,000 more
than in 2016, for the youth scholarship
fund, so we’re real pleased about that.”
As the MLE continues to grow, it will
reach a milestone in 2018.
“We’re very excited for next year’s 10th
anniversary,” Maye said. “We all think it’s a
pretty big deal, and mark my words, next
year will be big.” 1

BELIEVE, BUILD, GROW...


1. Grand Champion Market Beef, shown by Justin Ruggles of Kingston, was sold
for $26,000 to Meijer. 2. Alissa Boersen of Zeeland showed in the Showcase Market
Beef category, placing third. The animal sold for $7,600. 3. Morgan Kennedy of
Perry appeared in the sale in the Showcase Market Hog category, placing third.
Her animal sold for $8,000. 4. Jena Bradley of Cassopolis sold her seventh-place
Showcase Market Lamb for $4,100. | Paul W. Jackson, Farm News Media

FOR A LIST OF RESULTS AND PURCHASERS, VISIT


4 HTTPS://TINYURL.COM/YCDEMRBS
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 23
TO ACQUIRE PRECISION PLANTING
FROM THE CLIMATE CORPORATION
AGCO 20/20 SeedSense monitor. guson® and Valtra®, supported by Fuse® and reduce risk. For more information,
AGCO, a worldwide manufacturer and The terms of the agreement were not precision technologies and farm optimization please visit www.climate.com or follow the
distributor of agricultural equipment, and disclosed. The transaction is subject to services, and are distributed globally through company on Twitter @climatecorp.
The Climate Corporation, a subsidiary of regulatory approvals. a combination of over 3,000 independent
About Monsanto Company
Monsanto Company (NYSE:MON), an- Cautionary Statements Regarding dealers and distributors in more than 150
Forward-Looking Information countries. Founded in 1990, AGCO is Monsanto is committed to bringing a
nounced recently that a definitive agreement
Statements which are not historical facts, headquartered in Duluth, GA, USA. In 2016, broad range of solutions to help nourish
has been signed for AGCO to acquire the
including expectations regarding the clos- AGCO had net sales of approximately $7.4 our growing world. We produce seeds for
Precision Planting LLC equipment business.
ing of the acquisition are forward-looking billion. For more information, visit http:// fruits, vegetables and key crops—such
“Precision Planting is a strong business
and subject to risks that could cause www.AGCOcorp.com. For company news, as corn, soybeans, and cotton—that help
that plays an essential role in the growth and
actual results to differ materially from those information and events, please follow us on farmers have better harvests while using
adoption of innovative precision ag practices
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that help farmers enhance their productiv-
include, but are not limited to, the failure to Twitter, please follow the hashtag #AGCOIR. efficiently. We work to find sustainable solu-
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obtain regulatory approvals, the failure to tions for soil health, help farmers use data
for The Climate Corporation. “As a leading
About The Climate Corporation to improve farming practices and conserve
global equipment manufacturer, AGCO satisfy closing conditions. Undue reliance
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is uniquely positioned to enable broader
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of the date of this release, and AGCO and world’s farmers sustainably increase their pests and disease. Through programs and
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Monsanto Company disclaim any obligation productivity through the use of digital tools. partnerships, we collaborate with farmers,
tive products that improve the efficiency and
to update any forward-looking statements The integrated Climate FieldView™ digital researchers, nonprofit organizations, univer-
productivity for farmers around the world.”
except as required by law. agriculture platform provides farmers with a sities and others to help tackle some of the
“The acquisition of Precision Planting will
comprehensive, connected suite of digital world’s biggest challenges. To learn more
solidify AGCO as one of the global leaders
About AGCO tools. Bringing together seamless field data about Monsanto, our commitments and our
in planting technology and strengthen our
AGCO (NYSE: AGCO) is a global leader collection, advanced agronomic modeling more than 20,000 dedicated employees,
position as a full line partner for profession-
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Pork industry gears up for processing plant opening


EMILY SCHMITT of ethics, integrity and stewardship.” numbers, this packing plant could not Food Group to bring this plant here.”
MPPA Congressman Tim Walberg and Sena- have come at a better time.” Michigan producers raise more than
Pork industry members, local citizens tor Debbie Stabenow also spoke at the Kelpinski also said the processing plant two million hogs annually with a market
and government officials came to cel- ribbon-cutting ceremony. Following the would likely not be here without the help value exceeding $330 million dollars.
ebrate the opening of the Clemens Food ceremony, tours were given of the facility of the forward-thinking producers. MPPA is an East Lansing-based com-
Group fresh pork processing plant with a to an estimated 800 attendees. “Thank you to the producers who pur- modity organization that administers pro-
ribbon-cutting ceremony and open house The processing facility is expected to sued a plant to come to Michigan,” she ducer-funded pork promotion, consumer
July 29 in Coldwater, MI. open in September 2017 and begin running said. “Thank you for all your hard work information, and research programs, and
During the ceremony, Governor Rick at full capacity early in 2018. The site has during the feasibility study and through- monitors public policy activities affecting
Snyder spoke about the impact the created more than 800 jobs in the area and out the process of working with Clemens Michigan’s 2,000 pork producers.
plant will have on the agricultural indus- is expected to process 11,000 hogs/day.
try in Michigan. Approximately 80 percent of those hogs will
“One of the key things is what this come from Clemens Food Group producer
place represents,” he said, “from the partners in Michigan, Indiana and Ohio.
people growing the hogs themselves to Bob Dykhuis, Michigan Pork Producers
the people transporting them to everyone Association (MPPA) Board President, is
working at this world-class facility.” excited for the potential growth a plant like
Snyder welcomed Clemens Food Group this creates for the industry in Michigan.
to Michigan and looks forward to the “To have a processor that can handle
future of the plant. the increased production will strengthen
“I hope to see Clemens Food Group hav- the pig industry,” he said. “This allows for
ing a celebration in 100 years for their 100th growth in Michigan, which means it’s a
anniversary here in Michigan,” he said. healthy and expanding industry. For those
Doug Clemens, CEO of the Clemens who are contract growers, it gives them
Family Corp., thanked everyone for their space for growth, along with the feed in-
role in opening this processing facility. dustry, including corn and soybeans. You
“Today these families and our family want to be part of an expanding industry,
have joined together and made this vision not a shrinking one.”
a reality,” he said. “We are committed to Mary Kelpinski, MPPA Chief Executive
job growth, economic growth, doing our Officer, is thankful for the opportunity
part to feed the world, educating consum- this facility creates for the producers in
ers where their food comes from, sup- Michigan.
porting this community and surrounding “This is an exciting time in the pork
communities in which we live and work, industry,” she said. “As we continue to Gov. Rick Snyder and Sen. Debbie Stabenow took the tour at the ribbon-cutting
and finally, committed to our core values see expansion and growth in production ceremony for Clemens Food Group’s pork processing plant in Coldwater. | MDARD

Two farmers to be the Calhoun County Fairgrounds in Marshall.


The three-day event will feature an
hilarious portrayal of Sheriff Andy’s hapless
deputy from the nostalgic town of Mayberry
honored. Eventually, we hope to have our
own building where the information is ac-
inducted into Hall of Fame antique tractor show, agricultural educa- on The Andy Griffith Show promises to be cessible year ‘round to help promote the
tion activities, a farm safety program, a fun for the whole family. importance of Michigan farmers and all
KRISTY SMITH
FREELANCE WRITER
cow milking contest, an auction, a flea Pratley credits Michigan Farmers’ Hall they do for communities and our state’s
market and craft show (space still available of Fame founder, Bill Auckerman of Barry economy,” said Pratley.
After a seven-year hiatus, a new class
for sign-up) and nightly entertainment, all County, and his family for all the hard work Camping during Farm Days, a long-
of honorees will be inducted into the
designed to celebrate Michigan’s farmers they did 35 years ago, beginning with the standing tradition surrounding the event, is
newly-reorganized Michigan Farmers’
and the work they do. first event in 1982. That solid foundation is available and encouraged at the Calhoun
Hall of Fame on Aug. 31 at the Calhoun
On Thursday, Aug. 31 at 2 p.m. at the what the Calhoun County-based group is County Fairgrounds. Pratley said it’s a great
County Fairgrounds in Marshall. Roger
covered arena, this year’s Hall of Fame building upon in re-creating the Farm Days way to get to know other families who have
Lewis of Hillsdale County and Velmar
farmers will be inducted. Their pictures and the Hall of Fame tradition. an interest or stake in Michigan agriculture.
Green from Clinton County are the 2017
will be placed on display in the Belcher Last year during the Calhoun County Fair a Contact the fair office (269)781-8161 or
Hall of Fame inductees.
Building, along with those of past award special ceremony was held on Aug. 15 at the ccaisoffice@gmail.com for details.
“We are very excited to be able to bring
recipients. The event is designed to Community Tent, re-dedicating the Michigan Come help celebrate Michigan’s agri-
new life to this long-standing tradition that
showcase the achievements of Michigan Farmers’ Hall of Fame and declaring a local cultural heritage. Admission to Farm Days
honors farmers who have made extensive
farmers and the strong impact farming commitment to see it through in future years. is $5 per person. Additional information
contributions to agriculture in our state,” said
has on Michigan. “Farm Days will bring in funds to sup- about Farm Days may be obtained on
Hall of Fame Board President Harry Pratley.
Another highlight of Farm Days will be the port the Hall of Fame induction cer- Facebook at Michigan Farmers Hall of
Pratley’s group has designated Aug. 31-
appearance of “Barney Fife” at 3 p.m. and emonies, the honorary plaques and the Fame or through contacting Harry Pratley
Sept. 2, 2017 as “Farm Days,” to be held at
7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 1. Larry Delawder’s pictures of the farmers who are being at (269) 209-2603.
24 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

2017 MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Wheat Performance Trials LEE SILER, MATTHEW GRAHAM, AMBER HOFFSTETTER ANDREW WIERSMA, LINDA BROWN,
KYLE MCCARTHY, JEFF KOVACH, JONATHAN TURKUS, TARA WATKINS, ERIC OLSON

Where wheat followed soybeans, planting powdery mildew, septoria and tan spot. formers in each of the five trial locations in treated, but the chemicals and rates used
was delayed in many parts of the state due Stripe rust was less widespread compared 2014 through 2017. Selection and planting varied according to the preferences of the
to green stems not drying out in soybeans. to 2016, although there were some fields of two or more varieties is recommended. originating organization.
Weather conditions in the fall made it sprayed for control. As an example, planting varieties that differ Seeding rates per linear foot of row were
tough to get wheat planted early. Overall, Fusarium head blight infections were very in flowering date can allow for staggering standardized to the rate that would equate
wheat survived the winter very well with only low to non-existent in commercial fields. of management applications, specifically, with a stand of 2.0 million seeds per acre in
small pockets of winter injury. Wet condi- Ratings for FHB severity, incidence and fungicides to control Fusarium head blight. a solid stand planted in 7.5” rows.
tions in March and April created waterlog- index in a nursery inoculated with FHB and When selecting varieties, look at disease Fall fertilizer application varied with coop-
ging in many counties. Unseasonably warm a misting system is used to create ideal resistance as well as yield potential. erator practice.
temperatures early in the spring helped infection conditions to allow for comparison Disclaimer: MSU makes no endorse- Spring nitrogen was applied as urea (90
wheat to break dormancy and advance in between varieties. Infection levels in this ment of any wheat variety or brand. lbs/acre actual N) at green-up and Affinity
growth rapidly with growth stages being trial will always be higher than what farmers BroadSpec was used for weed control at
Experimental all sites.
reached about 2 weeks early. However, cool see in the field.
weather in the latter half of April and May The 2017 State Wheat Performance Trial All sites were coordinated under high
Choosing Varieties entries were planted at seven sites in seveb management with the exception of an
slowed development back to normal rates.
Periodic rain showers extended the 2017 Variety selection is best made using at counties: Allegan, Clinton, Huron, Ingham, additional conventionally managed trial at
harvest to as long as three weeks. Test least three years of data. Varieties selected Lenawee, Sanilac, and Tuscola. The Clinton Tuscola county. Under high management,
weights were variable, with reports between using data across all locations will likely County site was abandoned due to exces- an additional 30 pounds of nitrogen was
55 and 61. DON levels were very low. perform well under a wide range of condi- sive water damage. Appendix A (below) applied using streamer bars and 28 percent
Falling numbers were a big problem early tions. Although, performance of a given presents information on each of these sites. N. Quilt was applied at Feekes 8.5–9 to
in the harvest season, but, after the early variety will vary based on testing location. Each plot contained 6 rows with 7.5” control lower-canopy and early-season
planted wheat was harvested, became In selecting varieties for a specific loca- row spacing and was planted to a length diseases. Prosaro was applied to control
less of a problem overall. Some farmers tion, it is important to identify varieties that of 18 feet. Plots were trimmed to a length late-season fungal diseases. The timing of
reported falling numbers as low as 165. perform well near the location where the of 12 feet long in the spring for harvesting the Prosaro application coincided with the
There were several diseases present in variety will be grown. Table 4 provides purposes. Sites were designed as Alpha average flowering date of the trial location.
2017, including barley yellow dwarf virus, information on which varieties are top per- Lattice with three replications. All seed was All plots within a location were harvested
on a single day. Yield was calculated using
the entire area of the plot, including the
wheel tracks between plots leading to an
APPENDIX A. TRIAL SITE DESCRIPTIONS FOR 2017 underestimation of yield. For data reported
2017 Michigan State University WheatMSU WHEATTrials
Performance PERFORMANCE TRIALS
Appendix A. Trial Site Descriptions for 2017 MSU Wheat Performance Trials. on a 0–9 scale, 0 is the best possible score.
FUSARIUM HEAD
BLIGHT NURSERY
ALLEGAN
COUNTY
HURON
COUNTY
CLINTON COUNTY
CONV. MANAGED HIGH MANAGED
LENAWEE
COUNTY
SANILAC
COUNTY
TUSCOLA COUNTY
CONV. MANAGED HIGH MANAGED
Six of our experimental sites are on private
Michigan State Harvey Darwin Woods Seed JGDM farmland. We are extremely grateful to those
COOPERATOR
University Jipping Sneller
Tom Galecka
Farm Farms
Stuart Bierlein
growers for accommodating our work and
all of the associated inconveniences.
NEAREST CITY Lansing Hamilton Ownedale Elsie Deerfield Deckerville Reese Funding for the high-management trial
inputs was provided by the Michigan
PLANTING DATE Sept. 22, 2016 Oct. 14, 2016 Oct. 12, 2016 Oct. 20, 2016 Oct. 11, 2016 Sept. 24, 2016 Sept. 25, 2016 Wheat Program. Questions and com-
ments regarding the research reported
HARVEST DATE N/A July 17, 2017 July 18, 2017 N/A July 9, 2017 July 19, 2017 July 15, 2017 here should be directed to Eric Olson at
Capac loam, 0 to
eolson@msu.edu or (517) 353-0142. This
4 percent slopes
Kibbie fine sandy Avoca loamy
Parkhill loam, 0 to Tappan-Londo loams, 0 to 2 percent report and previous reports, may also be
loam, 0 to 3 sand, 0 to 2 Corunna sandy loam Colwood loam
accessed through the Web at http://www.
SOIL TYPE
& Colwood- 1 percent slopes slopes
percent slopes percent slopes
Brookston loams
150 lbs. MAP + 275# 13-5-25 +3.7 S + .45 Mg + 0.8
varietytrials.msu.edu/wheat.
100# DAP + 100# 275 lbs of 9-14-23
None 50 lbs. Potash + None Zn + 0.3 Mn + .24 B + 0.05 Cu + 0.02
Multi-Year Performance Summary
PRE-PLANT FERTILIZER
Potash + 3.6S
50 lbs. AMS Iron
Tables 1 through 8 summarize perfor-
Inoculated / mance of the trial. The full trial included
Additional 30 lbs. Additional 30 lbs. Additional 30 lbs. 90 lbs. Nitrogen Additional 30 lbs.
Misted Fusarium
Nitrogen And Nitrogen And Nitrogen And and No Nitrogen And
125 entries (64 of which were experimen-
Head Blight Abandoned due to water damage.
tal lines) from 13 organizations, includ-
COMMENTS
Fungicides Were Fungicides Were Fungicides Were Fungicides Were Fungicides Were
Screening
Nursery.
Applied. Applied. Applied. Applied. Applied. ing Michigan State University, and data
analyses were conducted using all of these
entries. For ease of viewing, two versions
of the report are available. The “commercial
AVERAGE YIELD
(BUSHELS / ACRE) N/A 87.2 79.6 N/A N/A 86.4 105.0 90.6 99.2

only” version (available online and in the


Michigan Farm News publication) includes
AVERAGE TEST WEIGHT
(LBS. / BUSHEL) N/A 55.1 57.5 N/A N/A 58.9 58.9 55.7 55.6

AVERAGE PERCENT
the data of 57 commercially available vari-
GRAIN MOISTURE AT
HARVEST
N/A 13.4 13.9 N/A N/A 13.5 13.4 13.6 14.0 eties from 12 organizations.
The “including experimentals” version
%INC.(4); %SEV. JDF (3); PLHT JDF (3); PLHT
2014 DATA RECORDED
(NUMBER OF REPS)
(4); INDEX (4)
JDF (3); PLHT (3)
(3); LODGE (3) (3); LODGE (3)
(online only) includes all commercial and
*DATA: FD - Flowering Date (Days Past Jan. 01), PL_HT - Plant Height in Inches, LODGE - Lodging Score (0-9), %INC - Percent Incidence of FHB, %SEV - Percent of Severity of FHB,
experimental lines.
*DATA: FD - Flowering
INDEX - Product
Date (Days
INDEX - Product
of the Incidence
** SCORING
Past Jan.
of the Incidence
INFORMATION:
01), PL_HT
X Severity
X Severity
Score /of100
/ 100 - Plant Height in Inches, LODGE - Lodging Score (0-9), %INC - Percent Incidence of FHB, %SEV - Percent of Severity of FHB,
0 = Best Rating - Score of 9 = Poor Rating
Attached to this narrative is a list of the
** SCORING INFORMATION: Score of 0 = Best Rating - Score of 9 = Poor Rating names and contact information for those
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 25
organizations. Each row in these tables has than the LSD for that column, one should period. 2017 grain samples will be submitted growing season.
data for a single entry. The columns contain conclude that there is no evidence that for DON analysis and will be reported later. The data on Pre-Harvest Sprouting (PHS)
averages for a given trait and time period. those entries are different for that trait in the were generated experimentally. Spikes
FHB Resistance Traits
Data for all of the entries in this trial are not years and sites considered. from two trial replicates were harvested
presented here. However, the averages and Table 1 contains data for yield and test Severity: The average percent of infected at physiological maturity, after-ripened in
statistical parameters in this report are based weight. This data was acquired elec- spikelets in each head. the greenhouse for five days, periodically
on the entire set of evaluated materials. tronically on the plot combine at the time of Incidence: The percent of all spikes in a misted for three days to simulate rainfall,
Comparisons among entries are only harvest. Yield data is standardized to 13.5 plot showing infection. and placed at 100 percent humidity for
valid within a column. Tables 1, 2, 3, 7 and percent moisture. three days. Three spikes were rated for
8 are sorted first by entry grain color, and The 2017 yield data contains the multi- FHB index: The overall infection consider- visual sprouting. PHS is reported as extent
then in descending order by yield for 2017. site yield averages of only the high man- ing severity and incidence. of visual sprouting on a 0 to 9 scale with
In some instances (e.g. yield), data columns agement sites and does not include the DON: Levels of mycotoxin (ppm) present in 0 indicating no sprouting and 9 indicat-
to the right of the 2017 data columns are single site of conventionally managed yield grain. DON data is from the 2015 and prior ing extensive sprouting of all spikelets.
multi-year averages. Only data for entries data in Tuscola County. crop years. Table 3 contains data for powdery mildew,
included in all of the relevant years’ tests The conventionally managed single site Levels of DON Levels of DON mycotoxin leaf blotch, cephalosporium stripe, wheat
are found here. Not all entries have been data can be found on table 5 under the and severity are the most reliable traits to streak mosaic virus, barley yellow dwarf
tested in all years, so the tables have “Tuscola conventionally managed” columns. be used in selecting FHB-resistant varieties.
several blank cells. See the section titled Table 1 also contains grain color, chaff color, Table 2 contains data for visual sprout, Continued on page 26
‘Experimental’ for details on how the trials and degree of awnedness. For degree of lodging, flowering date, plant height and
were conducted and for more detail on awnedness, “Awnless” indicates no awns percent moisture at harvest.
what the data in each column represents. or awns only present at the tip of the spike, The flowering date indicates the aver-
At the bottom of most columns in the “Awnletted” (short awns on the spike), or age number of days past Jan. 1 that a
tables is the trial average (mean), LSD (least “Awned” (long awns on the entire spike). given entry reached the point where half
significant difference), and CV (coefficient of Table 1 also contains data on resistance of its heads were flowering. Plant height
variation) for data in that column. to Fusarium Head Blight (FHB, scab). 2015 is reported as the distance in inches from
LSD values vary among traits and data deoxynivalenol (DON, VOM) numbers are re- the ground to the tip of average heads in
sets (combinations of sites and years). ported in Table 1. Scab data were obtained a plot. Lodging is scored on 0–9 scale,
Differences between the means for two en- from heavy disease pressure in an inocu- where 0 represents all plants fully erect
tries that are greater than the LSD for that lated scab screening nursery. FHB-infected and 9 indicates the entire plot is lodged
column are very likely to reflect a genuine grain is spread to provide inoculum and completely on the ground.
difference between the two varieties. If the artificial misting provides disease-promoting Winter injury scores are from the 2014
difference between two means is smaller conditions throughout the entire flowering WHEAT WISDOM

TABLE 1 : MULTI-YEAR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY Who. A group of visionary


(Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield,
2017 Michigan State University Wheat Performance Trials white wheat’s grouped before red)
(Commercially Available Only)
Table 1 : Multi-Year Performance Summary (Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield, white wheat's grouped before red)
Multi-year data are the most informative.
MSU makes no endorsement of any variety or brand.
wheat farmers set their sights
Yield: Bushels/Acre
(Adjusted to 13.5% Moisture) Test Weight: lbs/Bushel Incidence (% of spikes)
FHB (Scab) : Field Observation
Severity (% within spikes) Index (% overall) DON (ppm) in grain
on a commodity check-off
Grain Chaff 2 YR
Multi-Year Averages
3 YR 4 YR
Multi-Year Averages
2 YR 3 YR 4 YR
Multi-Year Averages
2 YR 3 YR 4 YR
Multi-Year Averages
2 YR 3 YR 4 YR
Multi-Year Averages
2 YR 3 YR 4 YR
Multi-Year Averages
2 YR 3 YR 4 YR
to represent Michigan wheat
Name Color Awns Color 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2015 2014-15 2013-15 2012-15 farmers. In Summer 2011, that
Jupiter White Awnletted Bronze 96.2 108.1 104.4 100.2 56.5 57.3 57.2 57.5 51.4 50.7 66.3 66.0 48.7 48.4 43.4 41.4 25.0 24.6 27.3 26.2 8.7 7.9 9.2 7.1 dream was realized when 54
Ambassador White Awnletted White 95.8 105.2 101.8 98.7 55.6 57.1 56.5 56.6 47.6 42.2 60.2 68.3 58.7 56.7 54.6 55.7 28.0 23.9 32.0 37.7 14.5 14.1 20.1 15.2 percent of wheat farmers who
Dyna-Gro 9362W White Awnless White 95.6 ----- ----- ----- 58.1 ----- ----- ----- 38.5 ----- ----- ----- 44.6 ----- ----- ----- 17.2 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- voted said ‘yes’ to creating
Dyna-Gro 9242W White Awnletted White 95.1 104.1 102.2 98.8 57.2 58.4 58.3 58.5 21.2 27.2 49.0 56.1 17.9 16.4 18.2 21.7 3.8 4.6 10.0 13.5 5.2 7.1 7.8 5.9
the Michigan Wheat Program
92.9 ----- ----- ----- 57.7 ----- ----- ----- 44.6 ----- ----- ----- 39.9 ----- ----- ----- 17.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9611W White Awnletted White
(MWP).
E6012 White Awned White 92.8 102.3 98.8 95.2 56.8 58.1 57.7 57.9 46.4 48.2 60.9 66.3 31.1 33.9 36.0 36.4 14.4 17.2 23.1 25.1 9.8 9.4 8.2 6.2
AC Mountain White Awnletted White 91.0 102.0 98.5 96.6 56.1 57.1 56.8 57.4 64.9 53.3 67.6 72.0 69.1 57.0 54.3 52.7 44.9 31.7 36.9 37.5 8.9 11.0 12.9 9.8 That vote was reaffirmed when
MCIA Venus White Awned White 90.2 100.7 96.9 93.3 56.0 56.3 56.3 56.8 44.2 47.9 61.6 66.8 41.3 37.8 37.0 36.7 18.2 18.0 22.5 24.2 9.1 10.5 14.5 11.0 80 percent of growers voting
W 151 White Awnletted White 90.1 ----- ----- ----- 57.5 ----- ----- ----- 25.5 ----- ----- ----- 34.7 ----- ----- ----- 8.9 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- —representing 81 percent of
Skeet White Awnletted White 90.0 99.3 97.2 ----- 56.9 58.1 57.6 ----- 40.5 41.9 55.9 ----- 53.2 43.2 44.6 ----- 21.5 18.2 25.3 ----- 10.0 ----- ----- ----- production volume voting—
Aubrey White Awnletted White 87.3 99.6 97.4 94.0 58.1 59.0 59.2 59.4 40.5 36.9 50.9 55.0 36.5 38.6 34.5 34.8 14.8 14.7 16.8 18.6 11.1 9.7 11.9 8.9
re-authorized the wheat
82.8 ----- ----- ----- 57.3 ----- ----- ----- 29.2 ----- ----- ----- 40.2 ----- ----- ----- 11.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
check-off for five more years
SY 944 White Awned White

77.4 92.4 91.9 90.4 56.5 57.5 57.4 58.0 35.7 41.2 57.1 59.1 53.8 48.4 40.4 40.2 19.2 19.6 20.4 22.4 5.8 4.3 ----- -----
through August 2021.
Glacier White Awnletted White

DF 112 R Red Awned White 104.3 112.9 108.3 105.2 56.4 56.9 56.9 57.3 38.4 49.2 61.1 62.1 44.7 41.6 34.4 34.8 17.2 20.3 19.3 20.5 3.9 4.8 8.6 -----
SY 100 Red Awnletted White 101.9 113.4 ----- ----- 54.6 55.7 ----- ----- 18.4 27.5 ----- ----- 27.6 32.6 ----- ----- 5.1 10.2 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- The Michigan Wheat Program’s
RS 910 Red Awned White 100.0 107.6 103.2 ----- 57.8 58.8 58.6 ----- 24.5 33.1 51.7 ----- 31.1 34.0 29.9 ----- 7.6 11.4 14.0 ----- 8.3 ----- ----- ----- current board of directors
W 206 Red Awned White 99.5 107.7 105.0 102.7 57.8 58.8 58.8 59.3 32.4 36.2 50.0 54.3 44.7 39.0 33.0 30.3 14.4 13.9 14.6 15.3 8.1 5.9 7.6 ----- includes:
DF 105 R Red Awned White 99.0 111.2 105.0 102.0 55.9 56.9 56.9 57.4 39.7 39.9 59.1 63.7 59.4 46.9 37.9 35.9 23.6 18.7 19.0 20.1 6.7 5.9 8.6 6.5
Dyna-Gro 9552 Red Awned White 98.1 108.0 104.3 ----- 57.9 58.7 58.6 ----- 32.3 37.0 52.2 ----- 24.5 28.4 25.2 ----- 7.9 11.5 12.8 ----- 7.1 ----- ----- -----
L11610 Red Awnletted White 98.0 ----- ----- ----- 57.4 ----- ----- ----- 31.8 ----- ----- ----- 41.8 ----- ----- ----- 13.3 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • David Milligan, Chairman,
W 204 Red Awned White 97.7 108.0 ----- ----- 56.9 58.1 ----- ----- 49.3 50.5 ----- ----- 59.5 48.5 ----- ----- 29.3 24.4 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- Cass City*
97.2 107.9 102.8 100.8 57.0 57.5 56.8 57.1 40.7 39.5 52.2 55.4 33.7 36.5 34.3 31.9 13.7 14.4 17.2 16.8 7.5 5.9 9.6 7.2
• Dean Kantola, Vice Chairman,
DF 109 R Red Awnless White

DF 111 R Red Awned White 97.1 106.6 102.8 100.5 57.5 58.7 58.8 59.2 43.4 48.4 61.0 67.0 23.6 28.3 25.2 25.0 10.2 13.9 14.7 16.3 5.9 6.4 9.9 -----
L11621 Red Awned White 97.1 ----- ----- ----- 58.5 ----- ----- ----- 55.7 ----- ----- ----- 27.3 ----- ----- ----- 15.2 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- Ravenna*
Dyna-Gro 9701 Red Awned White 96.8 ----- ----- ----- 57.4 ----- ----- ----- 20.3 ----- ----- ----- 37.3 ----- ----- ----- 7.6 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• Frank Vyskocil, Treasurer,
AgriMAXX 413 Red White 96.0 107.8 104.2 101.1 55.9 56.8 57.4 57.7 52.8 44.7 58.6 60.8 24.0 27.5 25.3 23.2 12.7 12.1 14.1 13.4 5.4 5.5 9.9 7.4
New Lothrop
Awned

L11418 Red Awnletted White 96.0 108.6 ----- ----- 57.7 58.8 ----- ----- 34.0 40.4 ----- ----- 31.0 38.4 ----- ----- 10.6 15.9 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
AgriMAXX 464 Red Awned White 95.7 107.3 ----- ----- 55.9 57.1 ----- ----- 73.9 47.8 ----- ----- 36.4 33.7 ----- ----- 26.9 16.9 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • Art Loeffler, Secretary, Star
StarBurst Red Awnless White 95.4 ----- ----- ----- 60.1 ----- ----- ----- 28.4 ----- ----- ----- 18.9 ----- ----- ----- 5.4 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- of the West, Frankenmuth*,
95.0 ----- ----- ----- 57.5 ----- ----- ----- 34.3 ----- ----- ----- 36.3 ----- ----- ----- 12.4 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
representing millers
Steyer Berwick Red Awnless White

SY 547 Red Awnletted White 94.8 ----- ----- ----- 57.8 ----- ----- ----- 65.5 ----- ----- ----- 41.3 ----- ----- ----- 27.0 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
L11538 Red Awned White 94.2 ----- ----- ----- 56.6 ----- ----- ----- 56.2 ----- ----- ----- 54.9 ----- ----- ----- 30.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • Marc Hasenick, Springport
RS 972 Red Awnless White 94.2 105.3 101.9 100.4 56.7 57.2 57.2 57.4 58.4 48.3 58.5 62.0 50.2 46.0 39.0 38.7 29.3 22.8 21.9 23.9 3.9 4.5 8.7 6.6
MCIA Harpoon Red Awnless White 94.0 102.3 100.7 ----- 55.5 56.6 56.9 ----- 7.2 19.5 44.2 ----- 17.5 21.4 21.4 ----- 1.3 4.8 9.9 ----- 3.9 ----- ----- ----- • Jerry Heck, Monroe
Dyna-Gro 9772 Red Awned White 93.9 105.5 ----- ----- 55.9 57.3 ----- ----- 23.1 38.2 ----- ----- 29.7 29.2 ----- ----- 6.9 11.9 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • Bill Hunt, Davison
Hilliard Red Awned White 93.8 104.3 100.4 ----- 57.0 58.0 58.2 ----- 29.1 42.0 54.7 ----- 29.7 34.7 32.5 ----- 8.6 15.3 17.7 ----- 5.5 ----- ----- -----
AgriMAXX 438 Red Awnletted White 93.6 107.6 103.8 101.8 57.0 58.0 57.7 57.9 42.3 42.8 59.4 64.5 51.4 44.1 39.0 39.2 21.7 18.9 21.7 24.0 6.1 6.9 7.6 ----- • Sally McConnachie,
Sunburst Red Awnless White 93.6 102.9 101.6 96.8 60.0 60.1 60.2 60.3 32.3 32.8 54.4 61.4 43.0 38.2 34.8 31.9 13.9 12.7 17.5 18.3 4.7 5.8 8.9 6.7 Deckerville; and
W 302 Red Awned White 93.4 ----- ----- ----- 56.1 ----- ----- ----- 29.6 ----- ----- ----- 44.8 ----- ----- ----- 13.2 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9750 Red Awnless White 93.3 ----- ----- ----- 55.6 ----- ----- ----- 13.1 ----- ----- ----- 14.1 ----- ----- ----- 1.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • Brent Wagner, Grawn
93.3 ----- ----- ----- 57.6 ----- ----- ----- 33.0 ----- ----- ----- 35.2 ----- ----- ----- 11.6 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
*Served on temporary wheat
W 305 Red Awnletted White

W 303 Red White 93.0 103.9 ----- ----- 57.2 58.1 ----- ----- 21.7 27.5 ----- ----- 30.2 32.9 ----- ----- 6.5 9.5 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
steering committee before
Awnless

AgriMAXX 444 Red Awned White 92.9 102.8 101.2 ----- 56.8 57.5 57.6 ----- 29.1 23.7 43.3 ----- 35.0 32.7 29.0 ----- 10.2 7.9 11.2 ----- 2.7 ----- ----- -----
Diener XW1701 Red Awnless White 92.9 ----- ----- ----- 57.4 ----- ----- ----- 36.8 ----- ----- ----- 49.9 ----- ----- ----- 18.4 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
2011 vote.
92.5 102.0 101.1 98.5 57.8 58.3 57.9 57.9 44.1 37.1 54.7 57.4 47.6 40.4 40.9 39.1 21.0 15.9 23.5 23.6 6.6 11.4 14.1 -----
For more information on the
MCIA Whale Red Awnless White

Steyer Morrin Red White 92.4 ----- ----- ----- 57.7 ----- ----- ----- 29.0 ----- ----- ----- 36.5 ----- ----- ----- 10.6 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
board visit miwheat.org and
Awnletted

MCIA Red Devil Red White 92.0 102.8 99.3 96.7 57.2 57.9 58.4 58.9 48.1 39.9 54.9 64.3 36.0 34.0 32.7 32.2 17.3 13.8 17.9 20.4 8.9 8.6 11.9 9.0
read their biographies under
Awned

Curly Red Awned White 91.5 ----- ----- ----- 58.1 ----- ----- ----- 55.6 ----- ----- ----- 61.9 ----- ----- ----- 34.4 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 304 Red Awned White 90.1 104.3 ----- ----- 56.5 57.5 ----- ----- 29.5 34.8 ----- ----- 27.2 24.0 ----- ----- 8.0 8.1 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
the about tab.
AgriMAXX 454 Red Awned White 89.2 100.2 ----- ----- 56.5 57.5 ----- ----- 37.2 37.7 ----- ----- 50.9 41.5 ----- ----- 18.9 15.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9692 Red Awned White 89.1 102.7 100.4 ----- 56.4 57.4 57.8 ----- 34.7 31.5 48.9 ----- 58.2 43.7 33.5 ----- 20.2 14.1 13.1 ----- 3.8 ----- ----- -----
RS 902 Red Awned White 87.9 ----- ----- ----- 56.6 ----- ----- ----- 34.3 ----- ----- ----- 44.2 ----- ----- ----- 15.2 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----

Learn more at:


Diener XW1601 Red Awned White 87.1 ----- ----- ----- 57.8 ----- ----- ----- 24.0 ----- ----- ----- 47.0 ----- ----- ----- 11.3 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
HS 30.06 Red Awned White 86.9 100.3 ----- ----- 56.4 57.4 ----- ----- 37.2 37.7 ----- ----- 44.0 35.1 ----- ----- 16.4 13.1 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Hopewell Red Awnletted Bronze 86.3 96.7 94.4 92.4 57.9 58.4 58.0 58.4 55.1 51.7 64.5 66.5 61.2 52.8 48.3 46.7 33.7 27.8 30.1 30.5 8.3 7.4 11.1 8.5 www.miwheat.org
MCIA Red Dragon Red Awnless White 85.8 98.8 98.3 97.1 56.3 57.5 57.9 58.2 14.0 20.3 42.7 50.8 14.4 16.4 20.0 25.2 2.0 3.7 10.4 15.6 4.1 4.1 7.4 5.6 or call 1-888-943-2801 (WHEAT01)
MCIA 110201 Red Awnletted White 85.3 ----- ----- ----- 57.9 ----- ----- ----- 17.0 ----- ----- ----- 7.1 ----- ----- ----- 1.2 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MEAN (2017 125 Entries) 91.6 104.3 101.2 98.5 57.1 57.8 57.8 58.1 37.9 39.5 55.6 61.9 40.0 38.0 35.0 35.9 16.0 15.8 19.1 22.1 6.6 7.5 10.6 8.3
LSD (0.05) 2.9 6.8 5.2 4.7 0.3 1.1 1.1 1.0 ----- 23.1 15.0 12.1 ----- 16.5 13.3 10.5 ----- 13.2 10.1 8.5 3.8 3.0 2.7 2.0
CV (%) 4.7 3.1 3.0 3.2 0.9 0.9 1.1 1.1 0.3 28.9 16.5 13.9 0.3 21.6 23.3 20.6 0.5 41.3 32.3 27.2 47.9 51.4 40.5 40.6
26 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

Continued from page 25


stems. Cephalosporium scores are based vided where available. Each row in the table Percent protein in flour is adjusted at 14
on observations of the entire plant including represents a single entry in the test. percent moisture.
the flag leaf. It is recommended that multiple years Softness equivalent percent is the
virus, leaf rust, winter injury, stripe rust, and
Wheat streak mosaic virus and barley of data in each location be used in variety softness of the flour, with higher values
percent black point (tip) on the grain.
yellow dwarf virus were not observed in the selection decisions. Table 4 is sorted first indicating softer grained wheat. For cookie
Disease scores are recorded as “0 =
2017 growing season and reported scores by organization and then by variety. diameter, a larger diameter is better. Whole
no visual symptoms of disease present”
are from the 2014 and 2013 growing sea- grain protein (%) and whole grain hardness
and “9 = severe visual symptoms of the High Management vs. Conventional
sons, respectively. Management Performance are being reported with 0-100, and higher
disease”.
Stripe rust and leaf rust scores are based values indicating harder wheat.
Powdery mildew scores are based on Table 5 provides a comparison of variety
primarily on infection observations on the The quality lab test weight is not identi-
observations of the entire plant, including performance under intensive management
flag leaf. cal to the test weight at harvest due to
the flag leaf. The causal organism(s) of the and conventional management practices.
Black point is reported on a percentage grain drying and grain cleaning prior to
leaf blotching were not identified, but were Data on yield, test weight, grain moisture at
basis (percent of seeds with visible black quality laboratory test weight evaluation.
likely a combination of Septoria tritici and harvest and lodging are provided from con-
point). Black point is the discoloration of Solvent Retention Capacity (SRC) can be
Stagonospora nodorum. ventional management and high manage-
the embryo (germ) end and surrounding conducted on flour using several different
Cephalosporium stripe is caused by ment trials at Tuscola County.
areas of the wheat kernel. The embryo tip solvents, and reflects different characteris-
Cephalosporium gramineum and causes The Conventional vs. High Management
shows a black to brown discoloration that tics of flour quality.
distinct yellow stripes that may contain thin, Differences portion of the table provides the
may extend into the crease of the kernel. Soft wheat flour for cookies typi-
brown streaks on leaf blades, sheaths and difference between high management and
Visual observations consisted of 500 cally have a target of 95 percent or less
conventional management.
seed lots from one rep at each location when used by the US baking industry for
observed. The data presented is the aver- Milling and Baking Quality biscuits and crackers. Sodium carbonate
age percent of kernels discolored from the Tables 6 & 7 contain data for milling SRC increases as starch damage due to
2016 harvest season and earlier. and baking quality. Quality data are from milling increases.
the 2016 harvest season and prior. Data Normal values for good milling soft
Single Site Yield Performance
Summary were generated by the USDA Eastern Soft varieties are 68 percent or less. Lac-
Wheat Quality Laboratory in Wooster, Ohio tic acid measures gluten strength with
Table 4 contains 2017 yield (adjusted to
on grain harvested from the Michigan State “weak” soft varieties having values below
13.5 percent moisture), as well as multi-
Variety trial each year. 85 percent and strong gluten soft variet-
year means, for entries in each of the five
Flour yield is the ratio of the weight of ex- ies having values, typically, above 105
sites harvested for yield in 2017. Data on
tractable flour to the weight of milled grain, percent or 110 percent.
WHEAT WISDOM performance across multiple years is pro-
expressed as a percentage.

What. Michigan’s wheat


crop is the 8th largest in the TABLE 2 : MULTI-YEAR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY
U.S. About 8,000 farmers in (Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield,
2017 Michigan State University Wheat Performance Trials white wheat’s grouped before red)
(Commercially Available Only)
Table 2 : Multi-Year Performance Summary (Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield, white wheat's grouped before red)
Multi-year data are the most informative.
MSU makes no endorsement of any variety or brand.

50 counties plant 500,000 Visual Sprout


Lodging Score
(0-9) (0=none)
Flowering Date
(Days Past Jan. 1)
Plant Height
(Inches) Percent Grain Moisture at Harvest Stripe Rust Evaluation
acres of wheat annually. Score (0-9) Multi-Year Averages Multi-Year Averages Multi-Year Averages Multi-Year Averages Infection Percent

On average, they harvest 40


Grain 2 YR 3 YR 4 YR 2 YR 3 YR 4 YR 2 YR 3 YR 4 YR 2 YR 3 YR 4 YR Type Infection Class
Name Color 2017 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2017 2016-17 2015-17 2014-17 2016 2016 2016

million bushels. Jupiter White 9.0 2.0 2.4 2.5 2.3 151.0 151.5 151.6 152.7 33.3 34.2 32.4 32.4 13.6 13.8 13.8 14.0 4.0 15.8 MR
Ambassador White 5.5 2.0 2.6 3.0 3.0 149.2 149.9 149.7 151.0 35.9 37.1 35.2 34.9 13.1 12.7 12.7 13.0 7.0 39.0 S
Michigan’s wheat farmers Dyna-Gro 9362W White 8.5 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 149.2 ----- ----- ----- 34.2 ----- ----- ----- 13.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
celebrated a record yield of Dyna-Gro 9242W White 4.5 2.0 2.5 2.6 2.5 149.3 150.4 150.3 151.3 36.3 37.9 35.5 35.0 13.8 13.5 13.7 14.0 5.3 36.7 MR
89 bushels per acre in 2016! Dyna-Gro 9611W White 5.5 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 149.2 ----- ----- ----- 34.1 ----- ----- ----- 13.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
The national average yield is E6012 White 9.0 2.7 3.3 3.7 3.2 149.7 150.3 150.4 151.8 34.4 36.1 34.4 33.6 13.0 12.6 12.9 13.2 6.0 6.7 MS
55 bushels per acre. AC Mountain White 8.0 2.7 2.8 4.1 5.0 150.9 151.2 150.9 152.2 40.2 41.0 40.0 39.3 13.3 13.1 13.1 13.5 6.2 19.2 MS
MCIA Venus White 7.5 4.0 5.8 5.6 4.8 148.1 148.7 148.6 150.1 38.6 40.8 37.8 37.0 13.1 12.7 13.2 13.7 2.5 2.5 MR
At the farm gate, Michigan W 151 White 6.5 3.0 ----- ----- ----- 149.4 ----- ----- ----- 36.1 ----- ----- ----- 14.1 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
wheat is valued at $302 Skeet White 4.5 3.0 3.6 4.1 ----- 149.3 149.9 149.7 ----- 39.9 41.9 38.8 ----- 13.9 13.6 13.6 ----- 7.3 29.2 S
million. By the time it’s milled, Aubrey White 9.0 2.3 3.1 3.5 3.1 149.2 149.6 149.5 150.6 36.5 40.1 36.8 35.9 13.9 13.6 13.7 13.9 6.8 21.7 S
processed and utilized, SY 944 White 5.5 6.0 ----- ----- ----- 151.2 ----- ----- ----- 40.7 ----- ----- ----- 14.2 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
annual economic impact is Glacier White 3.0 2.0 2.3 3.6 3.8 151.8 152.2 152.2 153.4 37.4 38.4 37.6 36.8 13.8 13.7 14.1 14.6 5.6 27.0 MS
$535 million. DF 112 R Red 6.0 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.4 148.2 149.2 149.1 150.6 34.0 35.6 33.6 33.4 13.2 12.7 13.1 13.5 3.5 5.0 MR
SY 100 Red 4.0 2.3 3.2 ----- ----- 149.5 150.0 ----- ----- 33.0 34.8 ----- ----- 13.4 13.0 ----- ----- 0.8 3.3 R
Michigan-grown soft white RS 910 Red 6.0 2.0 2.1 2.6 ----- 148.4 149.5 149.4 ----- 36.8 37.3 35.6 ----- 13.5 13.0 13.6 ----- 5.7 21.7 MS
and red winter wheat have W 206 Red 4.5 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.4 148.8 149.7 149.5 150.8 36.0 37.2 35.6 35.4 13.5 13.0 13.6 14.0 6.7 20.0 S
market advantages including: DF 105 R Red 3.0 2.0 2.5 2.7 2.7 148.2 149.1 149.0 150.1 33.0 35.0 33.1 32.9 12.9 12.5 13.0 13.3 1.2 1.7 R
a distinctive “profile” Dyna-Gro 9552 Red 0.5 2.0 2.4 2.3 ----- 149.8 150.4 150.2 ----- 33.4 35.0 33.4 ----- 13.7 13.2 13.6 ----- 3.8 5.0 MR
preferred in many recipes L11610 Red 3.0 4.7 ----- ----- ----- 148.0 ----- ----- ----- 35.7 ----- ----- ----- 13.9 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
for cereal, cakes, cookies, W 204 Red 6.0 2.0 1.9 ----- ----- 147.8 148.9 ----- ----- 34.3 35.8 ----- ----- 13.6 13.3 ----- ----- 6.2 36.7 MS
crackers and pastries. DF 109 R Red 1.5 2.0 2.4 3.7 4.1 149.1 149.8 149.6 151.1 35.2 36.9 35.7 35.4 14.2 13.6 14.2 14.9 4.7 5.0 MR
DF 111 R Red 5.5 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.4 149.7 150.6 150.2 151.4 35.0 36.0 35.0 35.2 13.8 13.3 13.7 14.2 7.7 51.7 S
Michigan also has a L11621 Red 3.5 5.0 ----- ----- ----- 149.0 ----- ----- ----- 35.2 ----- ----- ----- 13.5 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
geographic advantage being Dyna-Gro 9701 Red 5.5 2.7 ----- ----- ----- 149.5 ----- ----- ----- 36.0 ----- ----- ----- 13.7 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
close to major millers and AgriMAXX 413 Red 5.5 2.0 2.8 2.9 2.8 148.5 149.5 149.2 150.4 32.7 34.5 32.9 32.8 12.9 12.6 13.0 13.2 1.0 0.8 R
processors that add value: L11418 Red 1.5 5.0 4.7 ----- ----- 147.9 149.0 ----- ----- 34.6 36.5 ----- ----- 14.0 13.5 ----- ----- 6.3 24.2 MS
AgriMAXX 464 Red 7.0 2.3 2.8 ----- ----- 148.4 149.2 ----- ----- 36.8 38.3 ----- ----- 13.2 12.9 ----- ----- 5.4 23.0 MR
StarBurst Red 0.0 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 150.8 ----- ----- ----- 30.0 ----- ----- ----- 14.4 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• Chelsea Milling (Jiffy®) Steyer Berwick Red 1.0 2.3 ----- ----- ----- 150.3 ----- ----- ----- 32.3 ----- ----- ----- 13.7 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• General Mills SY 547 Red 2.5 3.0 ----- ----- ----- 149.3 ----- ----- ----- 36.1 ----- ----- ----- 13.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
L11538 Red 2.5 2.7 ----- ----- ----- 149.2 ----- ----- ----- 35.8 ----- ----- ----- 13.5 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• Kellogg Company RS 972 Red 1.5 2.0 2.3 3.5 4.1 149.2 149.8 149.7 151.2 35.7 36.9 35.5 35.3 14.2 13.8 14.5 15.1 2.0 4.0 R
• King Milling MCIA Harpoon Red 3.0 2.0 1.8 1.9 ----- 148.7 149.3 149.3 ----- 34.0 35.2 33.4 ----- 13.3 12.6 13.1 ----- 1.8 2.5 R
Dyna-Gro 9772 Red 7.5 2.0 2.6 ----- ----- 148.0 149.0 ----- ----- 35.8 37.4 ----- ----- 13.1 12.9 ----- ----- 5.8 19.2 MS
• Knappen Milling Hilliard Red 3.5 2.0 2.5 2.4 ----- 147.8 148.9 149.0 ----- 36.2 37.9 35.8 ----- 13.6 13.1 13.6 ----- 3.3 5.0 MR
3.0 2.0 2.5 3.5 4.9 149.4 149.8 149.7 151.0 35.4 37.1 35.8 35.6 14.2 13.7 14.4 15.0 3.0 5.0 MR
• Mennel Milling
AgriMAXX 438 Red

Sunburst Red 1.5 2.0 1.9 1.8 1.6 150.7 151.5 151.1 152.3 30.8 32.1 30.9 30.6 14.3 14.6 15.0 15.5 5.2 14.2 MR
• Mondelez International (Kraft) W 302 Red 4.0 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 149.3 ----- ----- ----- 34.0 ----- ----- ----- 13.7 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9750 Red 3.0 1.7 ----- ----- ----- 148.6 ----- ----- ----- 33.0 ----- ----- ----- 13.3 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• Nabisco W 305 Red 3.0 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 149.3 ----- ----- ----- 32.2 ----- ----- ----- 13.6 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• Post W 303 Red 1.5 3.0 3.1 ----- ----- 149.0 150.2 ----- ----- 32.4 34.3 ----- ----- 13.6 13.3 ----- ----- 6.2 14.2 MS
AgriMAXX 444 Red 0.5 2.3 2.9 3.0 ----- 149.4 150.2 150.1 ----- 34.6 35.7 34.4 ----- 13.9 13.5 14.0 ----- 3.3 5.0 MR
• Star of the West Diener XW1701 Red 2.5 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 150.0 ----- ----- ----- 32.2 ----- ----- ----- 13.5 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
4.5 2.0 1.9 2.2 2.2 150.6 151.2 151.2 152.5 34.1 36.2 35.0 35.1 14.1 13.7 14.3 15.1 5.8 6.0 MS
• Local Distilleries
MCIA Whale Red

Steyer Morrin Red 4.5 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 150.4 ----- ----- ----- 34.6 ----- ----- ----- 14.1 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• Local Breweries MCIA Red Devil Red 0.5 2.0 2.4 3.1 2.8 149.8 150.5 150.2 151.2 36.3 37.7 36.1 35.5 13.5 13.0 13.4 13.8 4.2 5.0 MR
Curly Red 6.5 2.7 ----- ----- ----- 148.4 ----- ----- ----- 35.4 ----- ----- ----- 13.7 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• Artisan Bread Makers W 304 Red 3.5 2.0 2.4 ----- ----- 149.1 149.8 ----- ----- 35.0 36.7 ----- ----- 13.9 13.5 ----- ----- 7.2 23.3 S
AgriMAXX 454 Red 4.5 2.0 2.5 ----- ----- 149.1 149.8 ----- ----- 34.6 36.3 ----- ----- 13.8 13.5 ----- ----- 7.2 29.2 S
Dyna-Gro 9692 Red 3.0 2.0 2.4 3.1 ----- 149.1 149.8 149.6 ----- 34.7 36.4 35.0 ----- 13.8 13.5 13.9 ----- 7.3 17.5 S
RS 902 Red 3.0 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 149.1 ----- ----- ----- 34.7 ----- ----- ----- 13.8 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
3.5 2.7 ----- ----- ----- 148.3 ----- ----- ----- 32.5 ----- ----- ----- 14.0 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Learn more at:
Diener XW1601 Red

HS 30.06 Red 4.5 2.0 2.4 ----- ----- 149.2 150.0 ----- ----- 34.9 36.3 ----- ----- 13.7 13.4 ----- ----- 7.7 23.3 S
www.miwheat.org Hopewell Red 3.0 2.0 2.4 3.2 3.0 149.7 150.6 150.3 151.6 37.9 40.1 38.1 37.5 13.7 13.4 13.6 13.8 6.7 19.2 S
or call 1-888-943-2801 (WHEAT01) MCIA Red Dragon Red 2.5 3.0 3.1 3.9 3.8 149.0 149.8 149.6 150.7 40.2 41.4 39.1 38.7 13.4 13.0 13.2 13.5 4.3 31.7 MR
MCIA 110201 Red 0.5 2.0 ----- ----- ----- 151.1 ----- ----- ----- 39.3 ----- ----- ----- 15.4 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MEAN (2017 125 Entries) 4.4 2.5 2.8 3.1 3.2 149.3 150.0 149.9 151.3 35.1 37.2 35.3 35.0 13.7 13.2 13.6 14.0 5.0 20.3 -----
LSD (0.05) 3.3 0.9 1.3 1.5 1.9 0.5 0.7 0.5 0.6 1.3 1.8 2.1 1.8 0.2 0.6 0.7 0.7 ----- ----- -----
CV (%) 53.9 27.5 23.4 28.9 38.4 0.4 0.2 0.2 0.3 3.9 2.3 3.4 3.4 1.7 2.1 3.0 3.4 ----- ----- -----
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 27
Wheat: One step back, many steps forward
PAUL W. JACKSON wheat to better yields and better profits.” a bit discouraged by early yield falling num- have that now. And with the new varieties
FARM NEWS MEDIA Profits, or the potential for little to none bers, however. But that didn’t last long. that are being researched (thanks to Wheat
A step back this year on wheat yields this year, is what caused planted acres last “Reports of quality issues were based on Program help funding Eric Olson, MSU’s
should not halt the forward momentum farm- fall to be down significantly, said Martin the early crop in isolated areas,” said Bruce wheat breeder) there’s a lot to be excited
ers have seen, according to Kate Thiel, field Nagelkirk, Michigan State University’s Sutherland, president of Michigan Agricul- about. I just wish we could fix prices.”
crops specialist with Michigan Farm Bureau. wheat educator. ture Commodities (MAC). “Some of the Wheat prices, however, aren’t neces-
“We saw a little yield reduction, but if you “With the prices we had anticipated, we crop deteriorated in test weight, but even sarily the top concern, because wheat,
think back five years ago, we’d be quite lost a chunk of wheat ground last year,” in white wheat, falling numbers was not a when properly managed, can yield a profit
happy with 84 bushels per acre,” she said. Nagelkirk said. “I don’t anticipate we’ll lose widespread problem. The crop was well despite low prices, as can corn and soy-
“Prices aren’t all that good, but we’re on much more this year, because when prices within quality standards.” beans, Thiel said.
a path now on yields that’s heading in the recovered a little just prior to harvest, many That positive outcome is due to high “We can’t say if they’ll make more on one
right direction.” growers found that encouraging.” management, said Jody Pollock-Newsom, crop or another, but with proper manage-
That may have seemed a little too opti- They needed a little encouragement, he executive director of the Michigan Wheat ment and marketing, there is potential for
mistic when the first wheat came off fields. said, because yields were off around five to Program.
Disease pressure, falling numbers issues 10 percent compared to last year’s record “The board (of the Program, begun in Continued on page 28
(a measure of sprouting) in white wheat, 89 bushels per acre. But that was due to 2011 with a vote to establish a wheat
and weather that made the harvest season conditions, not management, Nagelkirk said. checkoff) decided early on to fund the high-
longer than usual were weighing on the “This year was a reminder that weather management component of wheat,” she
industry. But now that wheat farmers are plays a much bigger role,” he said. “I don’t said. “That’s important when you look at
making a habit of managing their wheat feel that management was the issue. Inputs competition with other crops, because you
more intensely rather than looking at it largely remained the same, but weather need to know how the two crops will per-
merely as the last part of a rotation, there’s conditions caused the heads to not put on form and look at your own operation to see
plenty of room for optimism. as much grain, and yield reflected that. It what makes sense. But with prices the way
“We’ve seen disease pressure in the last was disappointing to be off five to 10 per- they’ve been, we’ve also been trying to
few years that we haven’t before,” Thiel cent, but it was still a good yield. Last year look at the bottom line to be sure growers
said. “It wasn’t as bad this year, and the was phenomenal, so growers shouldn’t be see some profitability. It’s always been said
cumulative research we’re seeing to thwart discouraged by this year.” that you have to look at three years’ worth
WHEAT WISDOM
diseases shows that it is possible to manage White wheat growers in the Thumb were of data before making decisions, and we

When … you think


about the future of wheat
TABLE 3 : MULTI-YEAR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY production, look at Michigan
(Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield,
2017 Michigan State University Wheat Performance Trials white wheat’s grouped before red)
(Commercially Available Only) Multi-year data are the most informative. Wheat Program-funded
research. Research is the
Table 3 : Multi-Year Performance Summary (Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield, white wheat's grouped before red) MSU makes no endorsement of any variety or brand.
Powdery Mildew Leaf Rust Winter Leaf Blotch Cephalo- Wheat Barley Black Point (tip)
Score (0-9)
Multi-Year Avg.
Score (0-9)
Multi-Year Avg.
Injury
Score
Score (0-9)
Multi-Year
sporium
Stripe
Streak
Mosaic Virus
Yellow
Dwarf
Percent
Multi-Year Averages number one priority and
Name
Grain
Color 2016
2 YR
2015-16
3 YR
2014-16 2015
2 YR
2014-15
3 YR
2013-15
(1-5)
2014 2015
2 YR
2014-15
Score (0-9)
2015
Score (0-9)
2014
Score (0-9)
2013 2016
2 YR
2015-16
3 YR
2014-16
4 YR
2013-16 about 65 percent of the
Jupiter White 2.0 1.3 2.5 5.1 5.4 3.6 1.6 5.3 4.0 4.5 3.0 0.8 3.0 7.8 7.1 7.8 budget is spent on it annually.
Ambassador White 3.3 1.7 2.4 5.9 5.0 3.5 1.1 7.2 5.5 5.6 6.7 2.1 2.6 13.6 12.4 11.4 In the last five years, the
Dyna-Gro 9362W White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- Michigan Wheat Program
Dyna-Gro 9242W White 3.0 2.2 3.1 4.8 4.1 3.2 1.3 4.9 4.0 1.9 6.7 2.7 6.2 8.2 11.9 12.0 has invested $1.5 million
Dyna-Gro 9611W White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- grower dollars in more
E6012 White 2.7 1.8 2.5 8.9 6.6 4.9 2.0 6.5 4.1 4.2 3.7 0.2 1.2 5.0 9.4 9.3 than 75 projects to address
AC Mountain White 3.0 2.5 2.6 4.4 3.9 2.7 1.0 5.7 4.2 2.0 5.0 3.1 1.0 14.2 16.5 15.3 quality and yield issues that
MCIA Venus White 2.7 1.6 1.8 2.5 2.6 1.8 3.1 5.8 4.8 3.6 7.3 0.0 0.8 3.4 6.8 7.2 challenge wheat production.
W 151 White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Skeet White 2.0 1.3 ----- 3.6 ----- ----- ----- 5.6 ----- 5.4 ----- ----- 3.6 13.3 ----- ----- Research funded includes:
Aubrey White 2.0 1.0 1.3 2.5 1.9 1.3 1.0 4.8 4.1 3.0 4.0 2.7 0.0 6.9 10.6 10.7
SY 944 White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • high-management trials
Glacier White 0.0 0.2 0.8 5.0 4.2 ----- 1.1 3.0 2.4 4.0 6.3 ----- 0.4 11.1 19.2 ----- • cover crops
DF 112 R Red 3.0 2.2 2.3 8.0 6.9 5.3 1.6 5.4 4.2 5.1 5.7 0.4 2.4 7.9 15.8 15.6 • nitrogen rate and timing
1.3 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 3.0 ----- ----- -----
• rotation
SY 100 Red

RS 910 Red 2.0 1.0 ----- 0.0 ----- ----- ----- 4.8 ----- 2.6 ----- ----- 1.8 20.7 ----- -----
W 206 Red 1.3 0.9 1.8 0.0 0.0 0.0 1.0 4.5 3.4 4.7 3.0 1.2 5.8 23.2 29.7 28.5
• planting date
DF 105 R Red 2.3 1.2 2.0 3.7 3.0 2.5 1.0 4.5 3.9 2.9 5.0 2.9 1.4 7.9 14.9 13.5 • double-cropping with
Dyna-Gro 9552 Red 3.0 2.6 ----- 3.4 ----- ----- ----- 5.4 ----- 5.4 ----- ----- 1.6 15.0 ----- ----- soybeans
L11610 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • sprouting resistance
W 204 Red 4.0 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 8.0 ----- ----- ----- • disease resistance &
5.0 3.9 4.5 5.7 4.9 3.3 1.6 5.1 3.7 4.5 5.7 2.0 1.6 12.6 25.6 25.6
management
DF 109 R Red

DF 111 R Red 1.3 1.4 2.8 5.0 3.9 2.7 1.4 5.0 3.9 4.5 2.0 1.9 3.6 20.9 31.6 35.4
L11621 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• nutrient management
Dyna-Gro 9701 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • utilizing UAVs
AgriMAXX 413 Red 2.3 2.0 3.0 1.3 2.5 2.3 1.0 4.8 3.8 4.1 4.7 2.9 4.0 6.1 16.9 14.5 • free diagnostics
L11418 Red 3.3 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 0.2 ----- ----- ----- • health-related traits
AgriMAXX 464 Red 1.7 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 2.2 ----- ----- ----- • marketing
----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
• processing qualities
StarBurst Red

Steyer Berwick Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
SY 547 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • weed management
L11538 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- • breeding & genetic projects
RS 972 Red 5.0 4.1 4.0 6.2 5.6 4.1 1.0 5.8 4.4 4.0 6.7 1.5 8.8 21.0 29.1 28.1
MCIA Harpoon Red 2.7 1.5 ----- 0.2 ----- ----- ----- 4.8 ----- 4.0 ----- ----- 3.4 4.6 ----- ----- Check miwheat.org for
Dyna-Gro 9772 Red 1.7 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 5.0 ----- ----- ----- updates on research
Hilliard Red 0.7 0.7 ----- 0.0 ----- ----- ----- 5.8 ----- 5.9 ----- ----- 3.4 16.1 ----- ----- projects. Results are
AgriMAXX 438 Red 3.7 3.5 4.0 4.8 3.9 3.0 1.4 5.4 4.1 4.3 6.3 3.1 3.8 10.7 23.7 21.7 available under the research
Sunburst Red 0.7 1.0 1.2 2.1 1.7 1.7 1.4 7.0 4.9 1.9 5.0 2.5 3.0 12.5 18.6 17.2 tab arranged by topic.
W 302 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9750 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
If you want monthly updates,
W 305 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
sign up for our Wheat Wisdom
W 303 Red 5.3 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 0.6 ----- ----- -----
e-newsletter at miwheat.org at
AgriMAXX 444 Red 3.7 2.6 ----- 2.6 ----- ----- ----- 5.3 ----- 4.0 ----- ----- 2.6 9.7 ----- -----
the bottom of the page.
Diener XW1701 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MCIA Whale Red 4.0 4.7 5.8 0.0 0.5 0.3 1.1 4.6 3.5 3.5 5.7 2.0 6.6 22.8 24.7 28.5
Steyer Morrin Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MCIA Red Devil Red 1.3 0.8 1.2 2.9 1.8 1.2 1.0 5.3 4.2 3.8 1.3 1.8 3.0 7.8 15.3 18.7
Curly Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 304 Red 5.3 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 3.8 ----- ----- -----
AgriMAXX 454 Red 6.0 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 2.8 ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9692 Red 5.3 5.6 ----- 5.6 ----- ----- ----- 5.0 ----- 4.3 ----- ----- 1.0 20.6 ----- -----
RS 902 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Learn more at:
Diener XW1601 Red

HS 30.06 Red 5.7 ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 1.8 ----- ----- -----
Hopewell Red 1.7 0.9 1.9 4.9 4.6 3.3 1.1 6.6 4.8 4.1 4.7 3.5 2.2 7.5 6.7 7.7 www.miwheat.org
MCIA Red Dragon Red 2.3 2.0 2.7 5.0 4.4 3.2 1.0 5.1 4.1 4.5 4.3 1.2 1.2 5.9 9.4 12.1 or call 1-888-943-2801 (WHEAT01)
MCIA 110201 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MEAN (2017 125 Entries) 2.8 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.0 2.6 1.4 5.3 4.1 4.2 4.6 1.9 3.4 11.8 16.7 16.8
LSD (0.05) 1.3 1.8 1.5 1.6 1.9 2.0 0.5 1.1 1.5 1.6 1.3 1.1 ----- 16.3 15.1 12.3
CV (%) 35.4 45.7 36.1 39.0 31.4 48.6 44.8 18.6 17.7 32.5 20.4 33.8 ----- 64.9 52.1 48.3
28 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

Continued from page 27 that weather is key, especially for wheat.” figured out quite yet,” she said. “Even flowering period, we thought we’d see a lot
As wheat interacts with other crops in while we wait for that research, growers I more scab than we did,” he said. “For the
profit even when prices are down,” she rotation, a smaller yield this year may be a talked to say things this year were better second-straight year, it was extremely low.
said. “And again, with the research being blessing in disguise, Sutherland said. than they thought they’d be. We’re really On the quality side, that was good news.
done now, along with high management ef- “Because of the (estimated) size of the still in our infancy here, but we have a Only the test weight was a little shaky, and
forts, it’s doable. And farmers already know soybean crop, if we had had a wheat crop really good team at MSU that’s coming even then, not in all cases.”
similar to last year, we would have had a stor- up with new stuff, but it requires patience. What it all means, Thiel said, is that
age crunch,” he said. “With a reduced wheat We tend to plant wheat varieties that have farmers should examine all the benefits and
crop, commercial storage should be ample.” been around a long time, when you com- potential of wheat, as they’ve begun doing.
That little blessing shouldn’t be over- pare them to corn. Growers will like the “Wheat has potential we’ve barely begun
looked, but neither should the future of new varieties when they look at disease to realize,” she said. “If we can stay on this
wheat in Michigan, Pollock-Newsom said. resistance and yield potential.” path, there’s no reason why wheat can’t
“We’re always going to face challenging Knowing that, Nagelkirk said disease be a profitable part of a rotation and farm
years, and there are new varieties being pressure was surprisingly low this year. management plan. We just need to keep
looked at that have potential we haven’t “With all the rain we had during the on looking ahead.”

WHEAT WISDOM TABLE 4 : SINGLE SITE: MULTI-YEAR YIELD PERFORMANCE SUMMARY


2017 Michigan State University Wheat Performance Trials
(Note: Tables sorted alphabetically by organization/entry
Table 4 : Single Site: Multi-Year Yield Performance Summary (Note: Tables sorted alphabetically by organization/entry name)
(Commercially Available Only)
name) Multi-year data are the most informative.
MSU makes no endorsement of any variety or brand.

Allegan HURON Yield: Bushels/Acre LENAWEE Yield: Bushels/Acre SANILAC Yield: Bushels/Acre TUSCOLA Yield: Bushels/Acre

Where … can we meet


Yld: Bu/Acre (Adjusted to 13.5% Moisture) (Adjusted to 13.5% Moisture) (Adjusted to 13.5% Moisture) (Adjusted to 13.5% Moisture)
(Adjusted to Multi-Year Averages Multi-Year Averages Multi-Year Averages Multi-Year Averages
Grain 13.5% Moist) 2 YR 3 YR 4 YR 2 YR 3 YR 2 YR 3 YR 2 YR 3 YR 4 YR

you? Find out by signing up Name Color 2017 RANK 2017 RANK 2016-17 RANK 2015-17 RANK 2014-17 RANK 2017 RANK 2016-17 RANK 2015-17 RANK 2017 RANK 2016-17 RANK 2015-17 RANK 2017 RANK 2016-17 RANK 2015-17 RANK 2014-17 RANK

for our free monthly Wheat AgriMAXX 413 Red 87.5 57 85.0 23 93.0 10 95.3 12 92.8 11 87.3 59 96.9 21 91.3 20 114.6 16 129.0 6 126.5 3 106.1 18 115.7 5 113.9 5 110.2 5

Wisdom e-newsletter at the AgriMAXX 438 Red 97.4 8 69.2 116 83.8 37 92.0 20 92.7 12 95.9 7 104.4 5 94.7 9 106.9 57 125.6 11 122.3 10 99.6 67 112.3 17 113.5 6 109.8 6

bottom of our home page AgriMAXX 444 Red 88.7 53 85.1 21 88.3 25 96.0 10 ----- 88.6 50 93.4 28 92.4 15 100.5 92 120.6 26 119.6 16 99.3 71 108.5 23 109.0 17 -----

located at miwheat.org. Each AgriMAXX 454 Red 84.1 86 80.0 69 86.9 29 ----- ----- 87.1 62 93.5 27 ----- 102.8 79 117.9 33 ----- 93.1 100 103.5 36 ----- -----

month we send news about AgriMAXX 464 Red 84.1 86 83.1 38 93.4 6 ----- ----- 85.0 74 98.0 16 ----- 113.4 21 127.4 9 ----- 110.1 7 112.8 13 ----- -----

research results, events, Diener XW1601 Red 76.9 116 63.7 123 ----- ----- ----- 84.0 79 ----- ----- 101.4 86 ----- ----- 104.7 30 ----- ----- -----

production information, crop Diener XW1701 Red 85.3 79 81.1 55 ----- ----- ----- 88.6 50 ----- ----- 109.1 45 ----- ----- 99.1 76 ----- ----- -----

updates and what’s happening Ambassador White 85.6 77 81.9 46 92.6 11 102.3 1 99.2 1 89.9 39 101.1 9 94.1 11 116.3 11 124.1 16 123.1 7 108.3 12 112.4 16 109.2 15 104.7 15

out in the wheat fields. Aubrey White 82.9 97 87.7 10 95.0 3 101.0 3 96.7 4 71.8 123 85.0 41 85.1 29 105.3 66 119.8 27 119.1 17 92.4 104 103.0 37 104.1 27 100.7 21

DF 105 R Red 91.9 34 80.8 57 93.2 9 96.8 9 94.7 8 86.4 65 101.8 8 96.4 5 118.6 4 129.9 5 123.8 6 115.9 2 119.7 1 114.7 3 110.4 3

Don’t miss our Winter DF 109 R Red 97.1 9 78.4 78 86.6 30 89.9 25 90.7 18 98.0 3 104.7 3 96.5 4 106.9 57 124.0 17 123.1 8 105.4 25 113.3 8 112.1 9 109.1 7

Annual Meeting each March DF 111 R Red 94.3 18 76.8 89 88.7 23 94.5 14 92.2 14 93.2 19 97.4 19 95.3 7 117.3 6 123.7 20 120.2 12 105.0 28 112.9 11 110.5 13 108.2 9

and Summer Field Day in DF 112 R Red 105.8 1 89.3 6 95.5 2 102.1 2 97.9 3 95.2 11 103.9 6 100.2 1 124.7 1 134.3 2 130.8 1 111.5 3 119.3 2 116.7 1 112.0 1

June. (Handouts, videos Skeet White 88.0 55 84.1 28 90.4 17 97.7 7 ----- 81.1 100 90.5 36 86.4 28 103.4 76 116.1 36 118.6 19 96.6 87 103.6 35 106.1 24 -----
and presentations from Dyna-Gro 9242W White 82.9 97 76.1 94 86.2 35 91.9 21 91.6 16 92.4 24 94.7 25 92.2 17 108.2 49 121.0 25 120.2 13 110.5 5 114.1 6 110.8 11 105.6 12

these meetings are found at Dyna-Gro 9362W White 90.6 43 80.5 62 ----- ----- ----- 90.4 36 ----- ----- 112.2 26 ----- ----- 104.9 29 ----- ----- -----
miwheat.org under education, Dyna-Gro 9552 Red 92.1 32 82.1 45 87.6 27 91.3 22 ----- 92.2 26 101.0 10 95.7 6 118.5 5 130.5 4 125.2 5 107.2 14 112.9 11 112.2 8 -----
previous meetings.) Dyna-Gro 9611W White 93.9 21 76.6 91 ----- ----- ----- 79.4 111 ----- ----- 110.0 41 ----- ----- 105.1 27 ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9692 Red 88.9 83.7 91.7 92.5 ----- 83.1 93.4 88.9 97.7 117.2 113.8 96.2 106.6 110.3 -----
You’ll also find the Michigan
50 31 14 18 83 29 24 101 35 27 91 30 14

Dyna-Gro 9701 Red 92.4 81.5 ----- ----- ----- 92.9 ----- ----- 116.9 ----- ----- 102.0 ----- ----- -----
Wheat Program at winter Ag
29 51 22 8 44

Dyna-Gro 9750 Red 80.8 83.9 ----- ----- ----- 85.0 ----- ----- 114.9 ----- ----- 97.5 ----- ----- -----
Day events, industry meetings,
105 30 74 14 82

Dyna-Gro 9772 Red 92.9 83.0 92.0 ----- ----- 79.4 97.7 ----- 112.8 124.4 ----- 101.7 107.3 ----- -----
summer field days and other
26 39 13 111 17 24 15 49 26

Glacier White 77.2 78.4 88.5 94.2 92.3 82.8 89.6 86.6 79.2 101.5 104.9 78.9 95.6 98.0 96.8
farm meetings.
114 78 24 15 13 85 38 27 124 41 29 125 41 29 22

HS 30.06 Red 83.1 92 74.8 101 82.7 40 ----- ----- 90.2 38 97.0 20 ----- 103.6 74 117.2 34 ----- 86.8 117 102.0 38 ----- -----
We’re also telling consumers how Curly Red 83.8 88 80.6 60 ----- ----- ----- 81.9 95 ----- ----- 107.2 56 ----- ----- 101.7 49 ----- ----- -----
important Michigan wheat is to L11418 Red 87.3 60 85.7 18 92.6 12 ----- ----- 94.1 13 107.5 1 ----- 115.0 13 128.6 7 ----- 101.2 56 111.0 19 ----- -----
our economy and a healthy diet. L11538 Red 89.0 49 87.7 10 ----- ----- ----- 90.5 35 ----- ----- 95.5 108 ----- ----- 104.3 31 ----- ----- -----
L11610 Red 96.1 13 91.3 2 ----- ----- ----- 86.9 63 ----- ----- 105.7 63 ----- ----- 106.6 16 ----- ----- -----
We’ve met more than 22,000 L11621 Red 92.8 27 79.2 73 ----- ----- ----- 91.7 32 ----- ----- 106.6 60 ----- ----- 110.6 4 ----- ----- -----
farm friends at Breakfast on AC Mountain White 88.5 54 80.1 68 91.0 16 97.3 8 95.2 6 83.2 82 95.5 23 89.0 23 103.7 73 118.5 32 117.0 22 99.3 71 107.1 28 109.2 16 105.3 14

the Farm events held across E6012 White 86.0 71 81.7 49 86.5 32 90.6 23 86.6 21 95.8 8 99.7 13 94.8 8 105.6 64 118.6 31 115.3 25 99.4 70 106.8 29 107.4 23 101.8 19

the state! We are a member of Hopewell Red 86.8 67 79.6 70 89.1 21 93.9 17 91.5 17 82.5 89 88.4 40 86.7 26 101.0 88 111.8 40 110.5 28 90.6 106 101.1 40 99.7 28 96.6 23

the MI Ag Council, which did a Jupiter White 90.0 45 83.0 39 93.4 6 101.0 3 96.5 5 95.2 11 105.8 2 98.0 2 108.8 46 123.7 18 121.0 11 105.3 26 111.6 18 111.8 10 107.0 11

wheat planting and harvest ride MCIA 110201 Red 91.8 35 72.3 110 ----- ----- ----- 78.9 113 ----- ----- 96.3 104 ----- ----- 88.6 112 ----- ----- -----
along live via Facebook. MCIA Harpoon Red 87.3 60 77.3 88 83.4 38 88.4 28 ----- 83.3 81 93.8 26 92.1 18 124.1 2 128.2 8 125.4 4 100.8 60 107.4 25 108.1 21 -----

We’re getting the word out MCIA Red Devil Red 82.3 99 77.5 83 86.3 34 89.4 26 88.6 20 87.6 55 97.4 18 92.4 15 105.3 66 122.0 24 117.5 20 103.2 38 105.2 33 106.0 25 103.0 17

that wheat is a healthy food MCIA Red Dragon Red 78.2 112 64.7 121 77.5 41 82.8 29 84.9 23 81.2 98 92.5 31 92.0 19 103.8 72 119.0 30 116.5 23 98.1 79 106.6 31 108.6 20 105.4 13

by sharing information and MCIA Venus White 91.1 41 75.0 100 83.0 39 88.9 27 86.1 22 87.3 59 91.8 33 89.1 22 95.8 106 114.4 38 114.1 26 101.1 57 105.7 32 105.6 26 100.9 20

recipes, and defeating myths. MCIA Whale Red 88.9 50 75.7 96 89.7 19 95.9 11 94.4 9 95.5 10 91.2 34 90.3 21 106.7 59 119.3 28 119.6 15 97.6 81 105.0 34 107.5 22 103.5 16

StarBurst Red 85.7 75 87.3 13 ----- ----- ----- 79.9 107 ----- ----- 114.9 14 ----- ----- 103.3 37 ----- ----- -----
Meet us on Facebook at Sunburst Red 85.9 73 77.8 82 87.6 28 92.5 19 89.4 19 95.6 9 95.6 22 94.0 13 103.4 76 119.0 29 117.2 21 101.3 54 108.7 22 109.0 17 102.1 18

Michigan Wheat. Be part of the RS 902 Red 84.2 84 68.5 118 ----- ----- ----- 89.5 41 ----- ----- 100.9 89 ----- ----- 94.5 96 ----- ----- -----
conversation by sharing what’s RS 910 Red 91.4 39 88.7 8 91.6 15 97.8 6 ----- 91.9 29 102.2 7 94.1 10 115.4 12 122.4 22 115.7 24 109.7 8 113.9 7 112.3 7 -----
happening on your farm or a RS 972 Red 89.5 46 81.5 51 89.0 22 90.0 24 91.6 15 91.8 31 91.1 35 87.1 25 102.7 80 123.2 21 119.7 14 102.0 44 113.0 10 114.4 4 110.4 4

favorite wheat recipe. Steyer Berwick Red 84.7 81 85.1 21 ----- ----- ----- 85.1 71 ----- ----- 112.1 27 ----- ----- 102.1 43 ----- ----- -----
87.5 83.4 ----- ----- ----- 87.6 ----- ----- 105.2 ----- ----- 100.0 ----- ----- -----
Learn more about how the
Steyer Morrin Red 57 33 55 68 63

100.4 88.0 95.9 ----- ----- 98.6 104.6 ----- 113.3 132.9 ----- 109.3 117.1 ----- -----
Michigan Wheat Program
SY 100 Red 3 9 1 1 4 22 3 10 4

84.5 80.3 ----- ----- ----- 89.1 ----- ----- 111.1 ----- ----- 104.0 ----- ----- -----
is driving the bold future of
SY 547 Red 82 65 45 34 32

70.9 83.3 ----- ----- ----- 94.0 ----- ----- 75.4 ----- ----- 81.9 ----- ----- -----
Michigan wheat!
SY 944 White 124 37 14 125 123

Hilliard Red 86.0 71 80.5 62 87.7 26 94.1 16 94.1 10 89.0 46 98.0 15 92.8 14 107.8 51 123.7 18 118.6 18 103.7 35 109.8 20 108.7 19 108.7 8

W 151 White 87.9 56 83.4 33 ----- ----- ----- 88.8 49 ----- ----- 102.2 81 ----- ----- 93.2 99 ----- ----- -----
W 204 Red 90.8 42 83.4 33 90.2 18 ----- ----- 93.1 21 100.5 11 ----- 107.5 53 124.8 13 ----- 107.0 15 112.5 15 ----- -----
W 206 Red 87.3 60 89.7 5 93.8 5 99.9 5 98.1 2 91.0 33 99.1 14 94.1 12 113.6 20 127.0 10 122.7 9 109.7 8 113.3 8 110.8 12 107.7 10

W 302 Red 92.8 27 77.4 87 ----- ----- ----- 89.5 41 ----- ----- 111.5 31 ----- ----- 96.9 86 ----- ----- -----
Learn more at: W 303 Red 81.0 104 73.4 109 85.7 36 ----- ----- 82.1 92 92.9 30 ----- 116.4 10 125.3 12 ----- 105.5 24 112.8 13 ----- -----
www.miwheat.org W 304 Red 89.2 48 79.6 70 86.5 33 ----- ----- 82.8 85 95.1 24 ----- 101.9 83 122.2 23 ----- 99.2 75 109.1 21 ----- -----
or call 1-888-943-2801 (WHEAT01) W 305 Red 81.2 102 84.3 27 ----- ----- ----- 82.2 90 ----- ----- 111.1 34 ----- ----- 101.8 48 ----- ----- -----
MEAN (2017 125 Entries) 87.2 79.6 89.2 94.3 92.7 86.4 96.5 92.4 105.0 122.3 119.6 99.2 109.5 109.5 105.5
LSD (0.05) 6.7 7.3 8.4 7.9 7.6 6.0 12.9 10.3 5.3 11.9 10.2 5.5 9.4 8.1 7.0
CV (%) 4.6 6.8 4.6 5.1 5.8 5.2 6.6 6.8 3.7 4.8 5.2 4.1 4.3 4.5 4.7

Your choice for top quality, top yielding wheat seed in Michigan.

MICHIGAN PROVEN. MICHIGAN GROWN. EXPORTED TO THE WORLD.


White and Red Wheat available today! To learn more call (517) 623-6161 or visit www.dfseeds.com.
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 29
Dow, Arcadia to improved wheat quality trait, which has
completed initial field trials and is advancing
globe, and our scientific expertise can help
improve the nutritional profile and quality of
commercialize wheat to next-stage field trials. Dow AgroSciences this important crop by enhancing its value
will introgress Arcadia’s trait into its propri- for human health and consumption while
quality trait etary elite germplasm lines and manage all also enabling farmers to produce an added
SEED WORLD aspects related to the trait commercializa- value crop,” says Rolando Alegria, Dow
Arcadia Biosciences, Inc. and Dow tion. Certain development costs will be co- AgroSciences global business leader for
AgroSciences LLC announced Aug. 8 they funded under the collaboration agreement, wheat, forages and sorghum.
will collaborate to develop and commercial- and the commercial value will be shared by Specific financial and trait details of the
ize a breakthrough improved wheat quality Arcadia and Dow AgroSciences. collaboration were not disclosed.
trait in North America. The collaboration “Wheat is a staple crop around the
leverages Arcadia’s non-GM TILLING trait
development platform with Dow AgroSci-
ences’ enabling technology platforms,
high-quality germplasm and global com-
mercial channels.
“This collaboration reflects the unique
nature of Arcadia’s business model,
expanding our access into the growing
market of improved nutrition traits with an
established leader in agriculture,” says Raj
Ketkar, president and CEO of Arcadia Bio-
sciences. “Dow AgroSciences’ experience
in value-added crops is a perfect comple-
ment to Arcadia’s portfolio of nutritional
quality traits.
“Together, we can accelerate the de-
velopment and commercial deployment
of improved nutrition crop traits to deliver
significant added value to growers, food
manufacturers and consumers.”
Under the collaboration, the companies Under the collaboration, the companies will further develop and commercialize an
will further develop and commercialize an improved wheat quality trait. | Courtesy photo
WHEAT WISDOM
TABLE 5 : SINGLE SITE: YIELD, TEST WEIGHT AND MOISTURE PERFORMANCE SUMMARY
2017 Michigan State University Wheat Performance Trials organization/entry name)
(Note: Tables sorted alphabetically by (Commercially Available Only)
Table 5 : Single Site: Yield, Test Weight and Moisture Performance Summary (Note: Tables sorted alphabetically by organization)
Multi-year data are the most informative.

MSU makes no endorsement of any variety or brand. Why. The Michigan Wheat
Conventional
TUSCOLA
High Management
Program meets the unique
needs of Michigan wheat
Conventional vs. High Management Differences
Grain Yield Yield Test Grain Lodge Yield Yield Test Grain Lodge Yield Yield Test Grain Lodge

farmers—especially for
Name Color bu/acre Rank Weight Moisture Score (0-9) bu/acre Rank Weight Moisture Score (0-9) bu/acre Rank Weight Moisture Score (0-9) Organization

AgriMAXX 413 Red 92.7 61 53.4 12.4 2.0 106.1 18 54.2 13.3 2.3 + 13.4 11 + 0.8 + 0.6 - 0.3 AgriMAXX Wheat Company

AgriMAXX 438 Red 94.1 42 55.6 13.9 1.7 99.6 67 55.2 14.5 2.0 + 5.5 98 - 0.3 + 0.1 - 0.3 AgriMAXX Wheat Company
research, market development,
AgriMAXX 444 Red 93.8 45 54.8 13.7 1.7 99.3 71 55.0 14.3 2.7 + 5.5 98 + 0.2 + 0.3 -1.0 AgriMAXX Wheat Company communications and education.
AgriMAXX 454 Red 86.6 92 54.6 13.7 2.0 93.1 100 54.3 13.8 2.0 + 6.5 88 - 0.3 + 0.4 0.0 AgriMAXX Wheat Company We’re planting seeds now for
AgriMAXX 464 Red 94.5 37 54.1 13.1 2.0 110.1 7 54.9 13.4 2.0 + 15.6 6 + 0.7 + 0.4 0.0 AgriMAXX Wheat Company a world-class wheat research
Diener XW1601 Red 88.6 82 55.8 13.8 1.7 104.7 30 55.7 14.1 2.3 + 16.1 5 0.0 + 0.6 - 0.6 Bio Town Seeds program in the future.
Diener XW1701 Red 91.4 66 56.0 13.2 2.0 99.1 76 54.6 13.7 2.0 + 7.7 79 - 1.4 + 0.4 0.0 Bio Town Seeds

Ambassador White 89.4 75 55.3 13.1 3.0 108.3 12 55.3 13.7 3.0 + 18.9 1 0.0 + 0.6 0.0 DF Seeds, Inc. We’re also an advocate for
Aubrey White 82.2 111 58.7 14.0 2.0 92.4 104 57.2 14.4 2.0 + 10.2 46 - 1.5 + 0.7 0.0 DF Seeds, Inc. wheat concerns. Take the
DF 105 R Red 98.0 11 53.9 12.5 2.0 115.9 2 54.3 13.1 3.3 + 17.9 2 + 0.3 + 0.7 - 1.3 DF Seeds, Inc. inequity in crop insurance
DF 109 R Red 97.5 13 56.1 13.8 2.0 105.4 25 55.2 14.6 2.0 + 7.9 77 - 0.8 + 0.3 0.0 DF Seeds, Inc. coverage. The USDA Risk
DF 111 R Red 94.8 34 55.5 13.6 2.0 105.0 28 56.2 14.3 2.0 + 10.2 46 + 0.7 + 0.2 0.0 DF Seeds, Inc. Management Agency (RMA)
DF 112 R Red 100.0 8 54.7 13.2 4.0 111.5 3 54.7 13.5 6.0 + 11.5 27 0.0 + 0.6 -2.0 DF Seeds, Inc. falling number reimbursement
Skeet White 86.4 96 56.1 14.0 2.3 96.6 87 56.0 14.2 2.3 + 10.2 51 - 0.1 + 0.6 0.0 DF Seeds, Inc. chart was inadequate to cover
Dyna-Gro 9242W White 96.6 18 56.4 14.0 1.7 110.5 5 57.3 14.5 2.0 + 13.9 10 + 0.8 + 0.5 - 0.3 Dyna-Gro Seed
grower losses.
Dyna-Gro 9362W White 93.4 50 57.2 13.8 2.0 104.9 29 57.4 14.4 2.3 + 11.5 27 + 0.1 + 0.6 - 0.3 Dyna-Gro Seed

Dyna-Gro 9552 Red 94.3 41 55.8 13.5 2.0 107.2 14 56.0 14.0 2.7 + 12.9 14 + 0.2 + 0.3 - 0.7 Dyna-Gro Seed The Michigan Wheat Program
Dyna-Gro 9611W White 93.0 57 56.5 13.7 1.7 105.1 27 56.1 14.3 2.0 + 12.1 20 - 0.3 + 0.6 - 0.3 Dyna-Gro Seed worked with RMA to get
Dyna-Gro 9692 Red 85.1 101 54.3 13.5 2.0 96.2 91 54.2 13.8 2.3 + 11.1 34 0.0 + 0.4 - 0.3 Dyna-Gro Seed changes made, including
Dyna-Gro 9701 Red 93.7 46 55.4 13.6 2.3 102.0 44 56.0 14.2 2.7 + 8.3 69 + 0.6 + 0.4 - 0.4 Dyna-Gro Seed
hiring an expert on crop
Dyna-Gro 9750 Red 93.3 52 53.8 13.0 2.3 97.5 82 54.0 13.4 2.3 + 4.2 111 + 0.2 + 0.5 0.0 Dyna-Gro Seed
insurance to review Michigan
Dyna-Gro 9772 Red 93.1 53 54.3 13.0 1.7 101.7 49 54.3 13.4 2.3 + 8.6 65 0.0 + 0.8 - 0.6 Dyna-Gro Seed
wheat data over several years.
Glacier White 67.7 125 55.1 13.8 2.0 78.9 125 55.4 14.4 2.0 + 11.2 33 + 0.2 + 0.8 0.0 Harrington Seeds, Inc.
After reviewing thousands of
HS 30.06 Red 81.7 116 53.7 13.0 2.0 86.8 117 53.5 13.8 1.7 + 5.1 104 - 0.2 + 0.7 + 0.3 Harrington Seeds, Inc.
settlement sheets it was proved
Curly Red 91.2 67 56.9 13.7 2.3 101.7 49 57.3 14.2 2.0 + 10.5 42 + 0.3 + 0.4 + 0.3 Irrer Seed Farm
that Michigan wheat farmers
L11418 Red 89.6 73 55.6 13.6 3.0 101.2 56 56.9 14.3 3.0 + 11.6 25 + 1.3 + 0.5 0.0 Irrer Seed Farm
with falling numbers below 200
96.5 54.3 13.4 2.0 104.3 54.7 13.8 2.3 + 7.8 + 0.4 + 0.3 - 0.3
were not adequately covered.
L11538 Red 20 31 78 Irrer Seed Farm

L11610 Red 101.0 6 56.2 13.8 1.7 106.6 16 55.8 14.3 1.7 + 5.6 96 - 0.4 + 0.5 0.0 Irrer Seed Farm

L11621 Red 100.3 7 57.1 13.5 2.0 110.6 4 57.5 13.8 2.3 + 10.3 45 + 0.3 + 0.6 - 0.3 Irrer Seed Farm
After months of work with RMA,
AC Mountain White 90.2 72 54.7 13.4 2.0 99.3 71 55.0 13.9 2.0 + 9.1 59 + 0.2 + 0.3 0.0 Michigan Crop Improvement Association
the Michigan Wheat Program
86.1 54.7 12.7 2.3 99.4 54.5 13.3 2.3 + 13.3 - 0.2 + 0.9 0.0
got a change that was effective
E6012 White 97 70 12 Michigan Crop Improvement Association

77.3 56.5 13.8 2.3 90.6 56.3 14.2 1.7 + 13.3 - 0.2 + 0.3 + 0.6
for the first time with the 2016
Hopewell Red 120 106 13 Michigan Crop Improvement Association

92.9 55.5 13.5 2.0 105.3 56.0 14.4 2.0 + 12.4 + 0.5 0.0 0.0
white wheat harvest. Michigan
Jupiter White 60 26 18 Michigan Crop Improvement Association

MCIA 110201 Red 85.8 57.3 15.4 2.0 88.6 56.9 15.9 2.0 + 2.8 - 0.3 + 0.6 0.0
white wheat growers are now
99 112 118 Michigan Crop Improvement Association

MCIA Harpoon Red 88.8 80 53.8 13.5 3.0 100.8 60 54.0 13.6 3.3 + 12.0 22 + 0.2 + 0.2 - 0.3 Michigan Crop Improvement Association

MCIA Red Devil Red 93.0 57 55.6 13.4 2.0 103.2 38 55.2 13.6 2.3 + 10.2 46 - 0.3 + 0.7 - 0.3 Michigan Crop Improvement Association
able to submit settlement sheets
MCIA Red Dragon Red 86.5 94 55.4 13.4 3.3 98.1 79 55.7 14.0 5.0 + 11.6 26 + 0.3 + 0.5 - 1.7 Michigan Crop Improvement Association
to receive reimbursement of
MCIA Venus White 91.2 67 54.2 12.8 4.3 101.1 57 54.7 13.6 3.7 + 9.9 54 + 0.5 + 0.3 + 0.6 Michigan Crop Improvement Association their actual losses. The change
MCIA Whale Red 89.4 75 56.3 14.0 2.7 97.6 81 56.1 14.7 2.0 + 8.2 71 - 0.1 + 0.1 + 0.7 Michigan Crop Improvement Association is not in place for red wheat, as
StarBurst Red 97.8 12 59.9 14.2 3.0 103.3 37 59.1 14.7 4.0 + 5.5 98 - 0.7 + 0.3 -1.0 Michigan Crop Improvement Association there was not enough data for
Sunburst Red 94.8 34 59.6 14.4 3.0 101.3 54 58.9 14.6 2.7 + 6.5 88 - 0.7 + 0.1 + 0.3 Michigan Crop Improvement Association RMA to include it. As more data
RS 902 Red 88.7 81 54.5 13.7 1.7 94.5 96 54.2 14.1 2.0 + 5.8 94 - 0.2 + 0.5 - 0.3 Rupp Seeds, Inc. becomes available the change
RS 910 Red 100.0 8 56.2 13.2 2.3 109.7 8 55.9 13.8 2.3 + 9.7 56 - 0.3 + 0.7 0.0 Rupp Seeds, Inc. can be requested.
RS 972 Red 95.9 24 55.1 13.9 2.0 102.0 44 55.2 14.4 2.3 + 6.1 91 + 0.1 + 0.6 - 0.3 Rupp Seeds, Inc.

Steyer Berwick Red 97.3 15 55.6 13.4 2.0 102.1 43 55.4 14.0 2.0 + 4.8 109 - 0.2 + 0.6 0.0 Steyer Seeds The Michigan Wheat Program
Steyer Morrin Red 89.0 79 55.8 13.9 2.3 100.0 63 56.7 14.7 2.0 + 11.0 36 + 0.9 + 0.5 + 0.3 Steyer Seeds board is currently working on
SY 100 Red 101.3 5 52.9 12.9 2.3 109.3 10 53.4 13.5 2.7 + 8.0 74 + 0.5 + 0.2 - 0.4 Syngenta AgriPro vomitoxin issues.
SY 547 Red 96.4 22 56.7 13.7 2.7 104.0 32 57.3 14.3 2.3 + 7.6 80 + 0.5 0.0 + 0.4 Syngenta AgriPro

SY 944 White 87.2 88 57.4 14.2 2.0 81.9 123 55.8 14.4 3.3 - 5.3 125 - 1.6 + 0.3 - 1.3 Syngenta AgriPro

Hilliard Red 93.0 57 55.9 14.0 2.0 103.7 35 54.8 13.9 2.3 + 10.7 38 - 1.1 + 0.3 - 0.3 Virginia Tech / VCIA

W 151 White 84.2 105 57.0 14.1 2.7 93.2 99 56.4 14.4 2.0 + 9.0 60 - 0.6 + 0.8 + 0.7 Wellman Seeds, Inc.

W 204 Red 101.9 3 55.0 13.3 1.7 107.0 15 55.3 13.9 2.0 + 5.1 104 + 0.2 + 0.7 - 0.3 Wellman Seeds, Inc.

101.7 56.2 13.2 2.3 109.7 56.2 14.0 2.7 + 8.0 0.0 + 0.4 - 0.4
Learn more at:
W 206 Red 4 8 74 Wellman Seeds, Inc.

W 302 Red 91.9 64 53.0 13.3 3.3 96.9 86 53.1 14.1 3.7 + 5.0 106 + 0.1 + 0.8 - 0.4 Wellman Seeds, Inc.

W 303 Red 95.5 29 55.7 13.6 2.3 105.5 24 56.1 14.0 2.3 + 10.0 53 + 0.3 + 0.6 0.0 Wellman Seeds, Inc.
www.miwheat.org
W 304 Red 87.7 86 54.6 13.5 2.0 99.2 75 54.8 14.3 2.3 + 11.5 27 + 0.1 + 0.6 - 0.3 Wellman Seeds, Inc. or call 1-888-943-2801 (WHEAT01)
W 305 Red 95.1 33 56.2 13.3 2.0 101.8 48 55.5 14.0 2.0 + 6.7 85 - 0.7 + 0.6 0.0 Wellman Seeds, Inc.

MEAN (2017 125 Entries) 90.6 55.7 13.6 2.3 99.2 55.6 14.0 2.5 + 8.6 - 0.1 + 0.4 - 0.2
LSD (0.05) 4.6 0.6 0.3 1.1 5.5 0.6 0.3 0.9 ----- ----- ----- -----
CV (%) 3.7 0.9 1.8 34.6 4.1 0.8 1.6 27.5 ----- ----- ----- -----
30 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

PARTICIPATING Wheat matters to Michigan


ORGANIZATIONS MICHIGAN WHEAT PROGRAM a farmers’ crop rotation also impact the The funds are used for:
The rich farmland and natural rainfall of amount of wheat planted. • Research/production
the Great Lakes region, makes Michigan On average, farmers plant slightly more • Education
AgriMAXX Wheat Company an optimum location for filling America’s than 500,000 acres of wheat annually. In • Communication, and
7167 Highbanks Road breadbasket. The state is home to thou- 2016, a record production year, farmers
Mascoutah, IL 62258 • Market development for Michigan wheat
sands of farms that raise wheat along with harvested 51 million bushels of wheat from
Phone: 855-629-9432 corn, soybeans and other row crops like 610,000 acres. The five-year average pro- Wheat matters to Michigan economy
AgriMAXX 413 dry beans and sugar beets. duction figure is closer to 39 million bushels. Millers call Michigan home—including
AgriMAXX 438 Michigan grows winter soft red and white Wheat farmers in the Great Lakes state Chelsea Milling, King Milling, Knappen Mill-
AgriMAXX 444 D wheat, most of which is milled locally and established a new record yield in 2016, of ing, Mennel Milling and Star of the West.
AgriMAXX 454 baked into consumer foodstuffs in the 89 bushels of wheat per acre! That’s well Significant opportunities lie on the ho-
AgriMAXX Exp. 1785 Great Lakes region by such well-known above the national average yield of 55.3 rizon for Michigan wheat farmers, in part
AgriMAXX 464 companies as Chelsea Milling owner of the bushels per acre. There are six different because these value-added processors
AgriMAXX Exp. 1786 Jiffy brand, General Mills, Kellogg Com- classes of wheat, and several varieties of are located in the state and they prefer to
BioTown Seeds pany, King Milling, Knappen Milling, Kraft each class are grown for different markets source locally. Michigan-grown soft winter
Foods, Mennel Milling, Mondelez Interna- and uses. Michigan produces both red and wheat has a distinctive profile and is pre-
P.O. Box 299
tional owner of Nabisco and other brands, white winter wheat. ferred in recipes used by many manufac-
Reynolds, IN 47980
Phone: 219-984-6038 Post Foods and Star of the West. Michigan’s top-five wheat producing turers of cereal, cakes, cookies, crackers,
counties are Huron, Sanilac, Lenawee, pastries and pretzels.
Diener XW1601 Where wheat is grown Tuscola and Saginaw.
Wheat is grown in most Michigan coun- At the same time, other Eastern wheat-
Diener XW1701
ties in most years. The graph at right shows Michigan Wheat Program producing areas have decreased white
D.F. Seeds, Inc. the eight districts of the Michigan Wheat is farmers’ advocate wheat production leaving more market
P.O. Box 159 Program and the average annual quantity opportunities for Michigan. To fully leverage
The Michigan Wheat Program was creat-
905 S. Jackson St. of wheat grown in each district (given in these opportunities, the crop’s profitability
ed and voted in by the state’s wheat farmers
Dansville, MI 48819 thousands of bushels). and yields must be improved relative to
as a commodity check-off organization to
Phone: 517-623-6161 Weather conditions such as an early other crops grown in the state.
advance the interests of wheat grown here.
winter or a late fall harvest of corn and Michigan wheat sales average $218.5
Ambassador The program has grown since then utiliz-
soybeans, often result in less wheat being million annually, with a total economic im-
Aubrey ing a 0.5 percent assessment on farmers in
planted. Worldwide market pricing and pact estimated to be $388 million.
DF 105 R Michigan who grow and sell their wheat.
DF 109 R
DF 111 R
DF 112 R TABLE 6 : MULTI-YEAR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY
2017 Michigan State University Wheat Performance Trials
(Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield, white wheat’s grouped before red)
(Commercially Available Only)
DF EX 1701
Multi-year data are the most informative.
Table 6 : Multi-Year Performance Summary (Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield, white wheat's grouped before red) MSU makes no endorsement of any variety or brand.

DF EX 1702 Percent Flour Yield


Milling and Baking Properties (2016 Crop and Earlier)
Percent Protein In Flour (at 14%) Softness Equivalent Percent Sodium Carbonate SRC (%)
DF EX 1710 Grain 2 YR
Multi-Year Averages
3 YR 4 YR 2 YR
Multi-Year Averages
3 YR 4 YR 2 YR
Multi-Year Averages
3 YR 4 YR 2 YR
Multi-Year Averages
3 YR 4 YR
DF EX 1711 Name Color 2016 2015-16 2014-16 2013-16 2016 2015-16 2014-16 2013-16 2016 2015-16 2014-16 2013-16 2016 2015-16 2014-16 2013-16

DF EX 1713 Jupiter White 69.2 69.9 70.0 70.3 7.8 8.0 8.2 7.8 57.3 54.9 55.5 57.2 67.3 67.0 69.2 68.8
DF EX 1714 Ambassador White 71.1 71.6 71.6 71.6 7.5 7.9 8.2 7.9 58.6 56.0 55.6 57.0 62.8 63.3 65.7 65.1
DF EX 1715 Dyna-Gro 9362W White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
DF EX 1716 Dyna-Gro 9242W White 67.9 68.5 68.5 68.7 7.8 7.8 8.0 7.9 57.2 56.5 56.6 57.4 65.7 65.6 68.0 67.4
DF EX 1717 Dyna-Gro 9611W White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
DF EX 1718 E6012 White 69.1 70.3 70.4 70.6 8.4 8.3 8.4 8.0 56.7 55.6 56.1 58.1 65.8 66.1 67.4 66.8
Skeet AC Mountain White 69.6 70.3 70.3 70.6 8.0 8.2 8.2 7.8 54.0 53.1 54.5 56.3 63.3 63.2 65.8 65.3
MCIA Venus White 71.1 71.4 70.9 71.2 7.6 8.0 8.3 7.9 57.4 54.5 54.1 55.2 67.6 69.4 70.8 69.8
Dyna-Gro Seed Michigan Crop W 151 White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
4648 S Garfield Rd Skeet White 69.1 70.2 ----- ----- 8.3 8.5 ----- ----- 59.0 56.9 ----- ----- 65.2 65.0 ----- -----
Auburn, MI 48611 Aubrey White 68.3 69.4 69.1 69.3 8.5 8.6 8.8 8.5 56.4 56.4 57.3 58.5 65.4 65.4 68.2 67.6
Phone: 989-662-0000 SY 944 White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9242W Glacier White 67.8 68.8 69.1 ----- 8.6 8.6 8.6 ----- 58.1 56.0 56.9 ----- 65.1 65.4 68.0 -----
Dyna-Gro 9362W DF 112 R Red 69.7 71.1 71.1 71.3 7.7 7.9 8.1 7.8 54.4 54.8 55.7 57.3 65.8 66.8 70.1 69.8
Dyna-Gro 9552 SY 100 Red 70.0 ----- ----- ----- 7.1 ----- ----- ----- 59.3 ----- ----- ----- 63.8 ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9611W RS 910 Red 67.3 68.6 ----- ----- 8.1 8.4 ----- ----- 58.4 56.0 ----- ----- 70.5 70.7 ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9692 W 206 Red 67.8 68.7 68.9 69.2 7.3 8.0 8.3 7.9 58.7 55.7 55.6 56.7 69.8 69.9 70.8 70.1
Dyna-Gro 9701 DF 105 R Red 69.6 70.5 70.3 70.5 8.2 8.5 8.6 8.3 53.2 53.0 54.0 55.1 64.6 64.7 66.3 66.0
Dyna-Gro 9750 Dyna-Gro 9552 Red 69.1 70.0 ----- ----- 7.8 7.8 ----- ----- 61.6 59.3 ----- ----- 67.4 66.6 ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9772 L11610 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro WX17441W W 204 Red 67.2 ----- ----- ----- 6.7 ----- ----- ----- 62.3 ----- ----- ----- 69.4 ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro WX17702W DF 109 R Red 70.6 71.1 70.9 71.0 7.9 7.9 8.0 7.6 62.5 60.8 60.6 61.8 64.5 64.0 65.9 65.5
DF 111 R Red 67.7 69.1 68.8 69.2 7.8 8.1 8.1 7.7 56.2 53.9 54.3 55.1 70.8 71.6 73.0 72.9
Harrington Seeds, Inc. L11621 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
2586 Bradleyville Road Dyna-Gro 9701 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Reese, MI 48757 AgriMAXX 413 Red 70.2 71.2 70.4 70.6 8.2 8.4 8.5 8.2 53.9 53.8 54.5 55.1 64.5 64.0 66.3 66.0
Phone: 989-868-4750 L11418 Red 69.8 ----- ----- ----- 7.6 ----- ----- ----- 60.7 ----- ----- ----- 69.0 ----- ----- -----
Glacier AgriMAXX 464 Red 66.1 ----- ----- ----- 7.7 ----- ----- ----- 57.5 ----- ----- ----- 68.0 ----- ----- -----
HS 30.06 StarBurst Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
HS EX16R Steyer Berwick Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
HS EX17R SY 547 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
L11538 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Irrer Seed Farm RS 972 Red 71.2 71.5 71.0 71.2 7.5 7.7 7.7 7.6 62.7 60.6 60.6 61.5 63.7 64.1 64.9 64.8
9621 Dexter Trail MCIA Harpoon Red 65.7 66.8 ----- ----- 8.4 8.5 ----- ----- 55.4 53.9 ----- ----- 68.5 67.3 ----- -----
Fowler, MI 48835 Dyna-Gro 9772 Red 65.9 ----- ----- ----- 7.4 ----- ----- ----- 58.5 ----- ----- ----- 67.4 ----- ----- -----
Phone: 517-719-5710 Hilliard Red 66.5 67.2 ----- ----- 7.5 8.1 ----- ----- 59.7 57.9 ----- ----- 68.6 69.2 ----- -----
Curly AgriMAXX 438 Red 71.1 71.4 70.9 71.1 7.4 7.5 7.8 7.9 63.6 61.7 61.1 61.8 63.8 63.3 64.8 64.6
L11418 Sunburst Red 64.2 65.0 65.0 65.1 8.2 8.6 8.6 8.3 51.1 48.8 49.6 50.3 76.0 76.6 77.6 76.5
L11538 W 302 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
L11610 Dyna-Gro 9750 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
L11621 W 305 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 303 Red 65.6 ----- ----- ----- 7.5 ----- ----- ----- 52.2 ----- ----- ----- 69.1 ----- ----- -----
Michigan Crop Improvement AgriMAXX 444 Red 70.9 71.6 ----- ----- 7.2 7.3 ----- ----- 63.9 62.1 ----- ----- 64.7 64.7 ----- -----
Association Diener XW1701 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
2905 Jolly Road MCIA Whale Red 68.1 68.6 68.7 68.8 7.8 8.1 8.1 7.8 56.9 54.7 55.1 56.4 69.3 69.5 71.6 70.8
Okemos, MI 48864 Steyer Morrin Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Phone: 517-332-3546 MCIA Red Devil Red 66.9 67.9 67.8 68.1 8.6 8.5 8.5 8.2 57.4 56.0 55.9 56.9 69.5 69.4 71.3 70.2
AC Mountain Curly Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
E6012 W 304 Red 70.6 ----- ----- ----- 7.2 ----- ----- ----- 64.4 ----- ----- ----- 63.8 ----- ----- -----
Hopewell AgriMAXX 454 Red 70.4 ----- ----- ----- 7.7 ----- ----- ----- 64.2 ----- ----- ----- 64.8 ----- ----- -----
Jupiter Dyna-Gro 9692 Red 70.1 70.9 ----- ----- 8.0 8.3 ----- ----- 63.0 61.1 ----- ----- 65.3 65.2 ----- -----
MCIA 110201 RS 902 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MCIA Harpoon Diener XW1601 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MCIA Red Devil HS 30.06 Red 70.5 ----- ----- ----- 7.7 ----- ----- ----- 63.9 ----- ----- ----- 65.5 ----- ----- -----
MCIA Red Dragon Hopewell Red 67.0 67.4 67.4 67.6 8.8 8.7 8.7 8.4 56.3 55.7 56.7 57.9 69.2 68.6 71.3 70.6
MCIA Venus MCIA Red Dragon Red 69.7 70.2 70.2 70.3 7.9 8.2 8.4 8.0 58.7 57.6 58.0 58.9 65.4 65.3 67.1 66.4
MCIA Whale MCIA 110201 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
StarBurst MEAN (2017 125 Entries) 69.1 69.6 69.6 69.8 7.7 8.2 8.3 8.0 58.1 56.3 56.1 57.2 66.7 68.8 68.8 68.3
Sunburst LSD (0.05) ----- 0.9 1.0 0.7 ----- 0.6 0.5 0.5 ----- 2.6 2.3 2.0 ----- 1.7 2.2 1.8
CV (%) ----- 0.7 0.8 0.7 ----- 3.4 3.5 4.1 ----- 2.3 2.5 2.4 ----- 1.3 1.9 1.8
www.michiganfarmnews.com August 15, 2017 | Michigan Farm News 31
Considerations for wheat resistant variety and commit to using
Prosaro or Caramba fungicide at early
• moderately greater risk of Fusarium head
scab; PARTICIPATING
following crops flowering (moldboard plowing to bury all • greater risk of barley yellow dwarf mosaic ORGANIZATIONS
corn residue would alleviate much of the virus (insure that volunteer wheat/barley
Soybean & dry bean
additional risk). is destroyed so that it does not provide a
• excellent roation if harvested early;
Grass hay & CRP acres bridge for virus-transmitting aphids; use Rupp Seeds, Inc.
• lends itself to minimum tillage and no-till
• relatively poor rotation as there is a varieties that have some resistance to 17919 Co Rd. B
systems where residue is evenly distributed;
greater risk of soil insect damage and barley yellow dwarf mosaic virus). Wauseon, OH 43567
• delayed bean harvest can lead to late root diseases, including take-all (avoid Oats Phone: 419-337-1841
wheat seeding (loss of wheat yield = early planting and consider using seed • relatively good rotation; 9xp710
1.1 bu/ac/day for each day planting is placed potash fertilizer);
delayed beyond optimum seeding date); • destroy volunteer oats at seeding to 9xp732
• use an aggressive herbicide program avoid a bridge for virus-transmitting RS 902
Prevented- planting & fallow
• elevated risk of Fusarium head scab (to aphids; RS 910
• excellent rotation
minimize scab risk, use a relatively scab • use wheat varieties that have some RS 972
• fall applied N is likely unnecessary as N resistant variety and use Prosaro or Car- resistance to barley yellow dwarf mosaic Michigan State University
mineralized throughout summer will be amba fungicide at early flowering) virus;.
available; MI14R0009
Alfalfa • volunteer oats that emerge with wheat
• limited MI experience suggests that MI14R0011
• relatively good rotation; growers have will eventually winter kill.
where wheat precedes the fallow period, MI14R0029
had success under both no-till and con- Sugar beets MI14R0160
take-all disease could be a constraint, ventional tillage;
especially for poorly drained fields; avoid • relatively good rotation; MI14R0213
• use an aggressive herbicide program for • provides plenty of time to seed wheat MI14R0267
early planting and consider using seed
burn-down and various perennial weeds during September; MI14R0288
placed potash fertilizer.
Wheat & barley • relatively aggressive tillage may be MI14R0330
Corn silage & corn grain
• poor rotation, budget for a 10 to 50 necessary where harvested under wet
MI14W0003
• relatively good rotation if confident Fu-
percent yield reduction; conditions;
MI14W0013
sarium head scab can be managed; MI14W0054
• greater risk of take-all and other soil- • late seeded wheat may have greater
• elevated risk of Fusarium head which MI14W0064
borne root and crown disease; risk of winter injury when following sugar
can potentially double with this rotation; MI14W0190
• greater risk of leaf diseases; beets. MI14W0245
• to minimize scab risk, use relatively scab
MI14W0250
MI14W0334
TABLE 7 : MULTI-YEAR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY MI14W0652
2017 Michigan State University Wheat Performance Trials
(Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield, white wheat’s grouped before red)
(Commercially Available Only)
Table 7 : Multi-Year Performance Summary (Note: Tables sorted by 2017 High Management Yield, white wheat's grouped before red)
Multi-year data are the most informative.
MSU makes no endorsement of any variety or brand.
VA09W-192WS-121
Lactic Acid SRC (%)
Milling and Baking Properties (2016 Crop and Earlier)
Cookie Diameter (cm) NIR Kernel Protein SKCS Kernel Hard
VA09W-192WS-29
Multi-Year Averages Multi-Year Averages Multi-Yr Averages Multi-Yr Averages

Name
Grain
Color 2016
2 YR
2015-16
3 YR
2014-16
4 YR
2013-16 2016
2 YR
2015-16
3 YR
2014-16
4 YR
2013-16 2016
2 YR
2015-16
3 YR
2014-16 2016
2 YR
2015-16
3 YR
2014-16
Steyer Seeds
Jupiter White 90.6 92.3 96.0 94.2 18.8 18.6 18.4 18.5 9.7 9.9 10.3 18.3 18.0 21.0 P.O. Box 209
Ambassador White 86.8 85.5 89.1 86.6 19.0 19.1 18.9 18.9 9.5 10.0 10.3 6.1 7.2 11.0 Old Fort, OH 44861
Dyna-Gro 9362W White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- Steyer Berwick
Dyna-Gro 9242W White 87.0 93.1 99.0 97.2 19.0 19.1 19.0 19.0 9.7 9.7 9.9 21.5 19.7 21.8 Steyer Morrin
Dyna-Gro 9611W White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- Steyer STex166
E6012 White 92.0 92.8 97.7 96.5 18.9 18.8 18.7 18.7 10.4 10.2 10.5 22.4 19.0 19.0
Syngenta
AC Mountain White 79.6 77.4 81.0 79.7 19.0 18.8 18.9 18.9 9.5 9.7 10.1 18.9 15.3 18.1
MCIA Venus White 87.7 91.7 90.5 87.4 18.3 18.4 18.3 18.4 9.1 9.5 9.9 22.9 24.2 26.8
14031 Trestle Road
Highland, IL 64229
W 151 White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Phone: 765-412-5420
Skeet White 94.5 94.2 ----- ----- 19.0 18.5 ----- ----- 10.3 10.4 ----- 18.1 16.2 -----
Aubrey White 98.3 99.4 104.0 102.0 18.7 18.7 18.4 18.5 10.6 10.6 10.9 24.1 20.2 21.6 SY 100
SY 944 White ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- SY 547
Glacier White 103.8 101.5 101.6 ----- 18.2 18.3 18.2 ----- 10.4 10.6 10.7 21.6 21.4 22.5 SY 944
DF 112 R Red 84.7 99.6 110.1 108.7 18.8 19.0 18.8 18.9 9.3 9.7 9.9 25.9 18.9 18.6 Virginia Crop Improvement Assoc./
SY 100 Red 80.6 ----- ----- ----- 19.5 ----- ----- ----- 9.2 ----- ----- 8.9 ----- -----
VA Tech
RS 910 Red 103.5 98.0 ----- ----- 18.3 18.5 ----- ----- 9.7 10.1 ----- 33.9 30.7 -----
2229 Menokin Road
W 206 Red 91.4 93.7 98.1 95.0 18.6 17.9 18.1 18.1 9.2 9.9 10.2 34.9 32.2 32.8
Warsaw, VA 22572
DF 105 R Red 80.4 78.7 83.9 82.4 19.0 19.2 19.0 19.0 10.0 10.1 10.5 28.4 28.0 29.1
Phone: 804-333-3485
Dyna-Gro 9552 Red 99.5 97.6 ----- ----- 18.6 19.0 ----- ----- 9.8 9.7 ----- 12.6 11.8 -----
L11610 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- Hilliard
W 204 Red 81.2 ----- ----- ----- 19.5 ----- ----- ----- 8.7 ----- ----- 23.5 ----- ----- VA11W-108PA
DF 109 R Red 107.0 105.3 108.4 104.9 19.4 19.4 19.3 19.2 9.5 9.6 9.8 13.4 12.7 17.4 VA11W-313
DF 111 R Red 84.4 83.3 87.3 85.3 18.5 18.6 18.3 18.1 9.4 9.7 9.9 29.2 26.3 29.0
VA12W-31
L11621 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- Wellman Seeds, Inc.
Dyna-Gro 9701 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- 23778 Delphos Jennings Road
AgriMAXX 413 Red 80.7 80.9 85.9 84.0 19.1 18.8 18.8 18.9 9.8 9.8 10.3 30.9 27.4 29.5 Delphos, OH 45833
L11418 Red 108.3 ----- ----- ----- 18.8 ----- ----- ----- 9.3 ----- ----- 14.6 ----- ----- Phone: 800-717-7333
AgriMAXX 464 Red 100.3 ----- ----- ----- 18.9 ----- ----- ----- 9.7 ----- ----- 25.3 ----- -----
W 151
StarBurst Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 204
Steyer Berwick Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 206
SY 547 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 302
L11538 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- W 303
RS 972 Red 98.5 101.3 103.3 101.9 19.1 19.0 19.2 19.3 9.1 9.4 9.6 13.7 13.3 16.7 W 304
MCIA Harpoon Red 99.4 96.8 ----- ----- 18.7 18.8 ----- ----- 9.7 10.1 ----- 22.4 18.7 ----- W 305
Dyna-Gro 9772 Red 102.5 ----- ----- ----- 18.3 ----- ----- ----- 9.3 ----- ----- 24.9 ----- -----
Hilliard Red 97.2 105.6 ----- ----- 18.5 18.3 ----- ----- 9.4 10.1 ----- 21.0 19.3 -----
AgriMAXX 438 Red 103.1 103.1 106.6 103.8 19.3 19.3 18.9 18.8 9.0 9.3 9.8 11.0 10.8 17.4
Sunburst Red 97.1 98.8 101.4 98.6 17.6 17.3 17.4 17.4 9.9 10.2 10.5 46.6 43.8 44.6
W 302 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9750 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 305 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 303 Red 82.3 ----- ----- ----- 18.2 ----- ----- ----- 9.1 ----- ----- 40.2 ----- -----
AgriMAXX 444 Red 99.2 97.9 ----- ----- 19.3 19.4 ----- ----- 9.0 9.2 ----- 4.1 4.2 -----
Diener XW1701 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MCIA Whale Red 96.5 93.5 97.7 96.9 18.8 18.7 18.3 18.2 9.7 10.0 10.3 24.5 23.9 25.0
Steyer Morrin Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MCIA Red Devil Red 93.1 105.5 104.9 100.6 18.7 18.8 18.6 18.7 10.3 10.1 10.3 31.8 29.2 31.6
Curly Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
W 304 Red 84.4 ----- ----- ----- 19.9 ----- ----- ----- 9.2 ----- ----- 6.7 ----- -----
AgriMAXX 454 Red 96.6 ----- ----- ----- 19.0 ----- ----- ----- 9.5 ----- ----- 10.5 ----- -----
Dyna-Gro 9692 Red 100.8 98.3 ----- ----- 20.0 19.9 ----- ----- 9.8 10.3 ----- 12.4 10.9 -----
RS 902 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
Diener XW1601 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
HS 30.06 Red 101.2 ----- ----- ----- 19.3 ----- ----- ----- 9.6 ----- ----- 8.4 ----- -----
Hopewell Red 110.2 108.3 108.8 105.7 18.8 18.4 18.4 18.4 10.9 10.8 11.0 21.5 18.5 19.5
MCIA Red Dragon Red 110.8 104.8 106.1 100.6 19.0 18.4 18.4 18.5 9.6 10.0 10.3 8.4 5.7 7.2
MCIA 110201 Red ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- ----- -----
MEAN (2017 125 Entries) 93.1 95.7 98.2 95.6 18.9 18.8 18.9 18.6 9.5 10.0 10.3 18.5 19.6 22.9
LSD (0.05) ----- 13.9 10.9 8.3 ----- 0.8 0.6 0.5 ----- 0.7 0.5 ----- 5.2 5.7
CV (%) ----- 7.1 6.7 6.2 ----- 2.0 2.0 1.9 ----- 3.4 2.7 ----- 13.1 15.1
32 Michigan Farm News | August 15, 2017 www.michiganfarmnews.com

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