You are on page 1of 241

DRAFT

ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT


REPORT
For

PROPOSED
PESTICIDE TECHNICAL PRODUCTS
MANUFACTURING UNIT
Of

M/s. TAGROS CHEMICALS INDIA LIMITED

TO BE SET-UP AT:
Plot No. 43/1, GIDC Industrial Estate, Dahej,
Taluka: Vagra, District: Bharuch, Gujarat

PREPARED BY:

ANAND CONSULTANTS
ISO 9001: 2008 Certified & NABET/QCI Accredited (S.N.-3 of List “A”)
16, Everest Tower, Naranpura, Ahmedabad – 380013
TEL.: 079-27484871, FAX: 079-27480116,
E-MAIL: environment@dataone.in

JANUARY 2013
INDEX
LIST OF CHAPTERS

SR. TITLE PAGE


NO. NO.

TOR and Its Compliance

CHAPTER:- 1
INTRODUCTION
1.1 Introduction 1
1.2 Need for the Project & its Importance to the Country 2
1.3 Site Selection Criteria 2
1.4 Objective of EIA Study 3
1.5 Purpose of the Report 3
1.6 Scope and Methodology 4
1.7 Location of Project 4
CHAPTER:- 2
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
2.1 Details of Proposed Products 13
2.2 Detail of Raw Materials 15
2.3 Details of Manufacturing Process 21
2.4 Details of Product & Raw Material Storage 81
2.5 Details of Water Consumption 83
2.5.1 During Construction Phase 83
2.5.2 During Operation Phase 83
2.6 Facility for Treatment & Disposal of Liquid Effluent 86
2.7 Source Emission Details 90
2.7.1 Details of Fuels & its Consumption 90
2.7.2 Details of Flue Gas Stack 90
2.7.3 Details of Process Stack 91
2.8 Solid / Hazardous Waste Generation, its Storage & Disposal 91
2.8.1 During Construction Phase 91
2.8.2 During Operation Phase 92
2.9 Noise Pollution 93
2.9.1 During Construction Phase 93
2.9.2 During Operation Phase 93
SR. TITLE PAGE
NO. NO.

2.10 Details of Man Power 94


2.11 Infrastructure Facilities within Project site 94
2.12 Green Belt Development 95
2.13 Socio Economic Development Activities 96
CHAPTER-3
BASELINE ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS
3.1 Pollution Control - Statutory Requirements 97
3.1.1 Air Quality Standards 97
3.1.2 Water Quality Standards 97
3.1.3 Noise Quality Standards 97
3.2 Air Environment 97
3.2.1 Baseline Ambient Air Quality (AAQ) 97
3.2.2 Locations of AAQ Stations 98
3.2.3 Analysis of Samples 100
3.2.4 Baseline Data of AAQ 100
3.3 Meteorology 103
3.3.1 Primary Meteorological Data 104
3.3.2 Secondary Meteorological Data 130
3.4 Water Environment 132
3.4.1 Baseline Data 132
3.4.2 Analysis of Samples 132
3.5 Noise Environment 135
3.5.1 Baseline Data 135
3.6 Land Environment 136
3.6.1 Baseline data 136
3.6.2 Land use pattern as per District Census Record 137
3.6.3 Land use pattern as per Remote Sensing Study 139
3.7 Biodiversity & Ecology 142
3.7.1 Biodiversity of Terrestrial Environment 142
3.7.2 Period of the Study & Study Area 143
3.7.3 Methodology 143
3.7.4 Terrestrial Floral and Faunal Components of the Study Area 143
3.7.5 Habitats 144
3.7.6 Floral Biodiversity of the Study Area 145
SR. TITLE PAGE
NO. NO.

3.7.7 Rare and Endangered Flora in the Study Area 153


3.7.8 Endemic Plants of the Study Area 153
3.7.9 Status of the Forest, their Category in the Study Area 153
3.7.10 Faunal Biodiversity of the Study Area 154
3.7.11 Aquatic Environment 159
3.8 Socio-Economic Environment 162
3.8.1 Demographic Status 162
3.8.2 Economic Status & Occupational Pattern 169
3.8.3 Socio Economic Amenities 171
CHAPTER-4
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT
4.1 Impact Identification 174
4.1.1 Identification Matrix 174
4.2 Assessment of Impacts 178
4.2.1 Air Environment 181
4.2.2 Water Environment 184
4.2.3 Noise Environment 185
4.2.4 Land Environment 185
4.2.5 Ecology & Biodiversity 186
4.2.6 Forest/National Park/Sanctuary/Historical Place 186
4.2.7 Socio-Economic Environment 187
4.2.8 Health & Safety 187
CHAPTER-5
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN
5.1 Introduction 189
5.2 Objective of the EMP 189
5.3 Environmental Management Cell 190
5.4 Fire and Safety 191
5.5 Noise & Communication 191
5.6 Occupational Health and Safety 192
5.7 Green Belt Development 192
5.8 Pollution Control Arrangement/ Mitigative Measures 193
5.9 Monitoring of Environment 198
5.10 Cleaner Production 200
SR. TITLE PAGE
NO. NO.

5.11 Rain Water Harvesting 202


5.12 Risk Assessment 202
5.13 Budgetary Allocation toward Pollution Control Measures 202
CHAPTER-6
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT
6.1 Air Environment 204
6.2 Water Environment 204
6.3 Noise Environment 205
6.4 Land Environment 205
6.5 Ecology & Biodiversity 206
6.6 Socio - Economic Environment 206
6.7 Summary of the EIA Study 206
CHAPTER-7
PUBLIC CONSULTATION
7.1 Introduction 208

CHAPTER-8
CONSULTANT ENGAGED
 Introduction 209
 Contact Information 209
 Technical Team Members 210
LIST OF TABLES

TABLE DESCRIPTION PAGE


NO. NO.
CHAPTER-1
1.1 Nearest Infrastructure Facility with Distance 5
1.2 Detail of Land Area 11

CHAPTER-2

2.1 List of Proposed Products & Production Capacity 13


2.2 List of By-Products 13
2.3 List of Raw Materials & its Consumption 15
2.4 Details of Product & Raw Material Storage 81
2.5 Water Consumption during Construction Phase 83
2.6 Category wise Water Consumption 83
2.7 Category wise Wastewater Generation 84
2.8 Details of Fuel Consumption 90
2.9 Details of Flue Gas Stacks 90
2.10 Details of Process Stacks 91
2.11 Details of Hazardous Wastes and Mode of Disposal 92
2.12 Manpower Requirement 94
2.13 Infrastructure Facilities within the Project Site 94
2.14 Greenbelt Development Plan 96
CHAPTER-3
3.1 Ambient Air Quality (AAQ) Monitoring Stations 98
3.2 Testing Procedures for Ambient Air Quality Parameters 100
3.3 Baseline Data of Ambient Air Quality 100
3.4 Typical Meteorological Record 104
3.5 Detail of Relative Humidity and Vapour Pressure 130
3.6 Detail of Average Monthly Rainfall 131
3.7 (a) Physico-Chemical Characteristics of Surface & Ground Water 133
Samples -1
3.7 (b) Physico-Chemical Characteristics of Surface & Ground Water 134
Samples - 2
3.8 Noise Levels in the Study Area 135
TABLE DESCRIPTION PAGE
NO. NO.
3.9 Physico-Chemical Analysis of Soil Samples 136
3.10 Land Distribution in the Study Area as per District Census Records 137
3.11 Area Statistics of Land Use/ Land Cover as per Remote Sensing 140
Study
3.12 List of Villages covered under the present Baseline Study 143
3.13 List of Trees in the Study Area 146
3.14 List of Shrubs in the Study Area 148
3.15 List of Herbaceous Species in the Study Area 149
3.16 List Climbers observed in the Study Area 151
3.17 List of Birds in the Study Area with its Distribution & Migratory 154
Status
3.18 List of Butterflies in the Study Area 157
3.19 List of Reptiles in the Study Area 157
3.20 List of Mammals from the Study Area 158
3.21 Plankton Community of the Study Area 159
3.22 Comparative Demographic Information 162
3.23 Comparative Demographic Information at Macro Level 163
3.24 Demographic Profile of Villages in 10 km Radial Area from Project 167
Site
3.25 Population Distribution by Caste of Villages in 10 km Radial Area 167
from Project Site
3.26 Literate Population of Village in 10 km Radial Area from Project Site 168
3.27 Percentage of Main Workers, Marginal Workers and Non- Workers 169
for Rural Population
3.28 Occupational Pattern (Industrial Categories of Main Workers) for 170
Rural Population
3.29 Occupational Status of Villages in 10 km Radial Area from Project 171
Site

3.30 Distribution of Village according to the Availability of Different 172


Amenities
3.31 Status of Amenities of Villages in 10 km Radial Area from Project 173
Site
TABLE DESCRIPTION PAGE
NO. NO.
CHAPTER - 4
4.1 Prediction of Impacts (“Cause-Effect” Relationship) during 176
Construction Phase
4.2 Prediction of Impacts (“Cause-Effect” Relationship) during 177
Operation Phase
4.3 Assessment of Predicted Impacts during Construction Phase 179
4.4 Assessment of Predicted Impacts during Operation Phase 180
4.5 Data used for the evolution of the Ground Level Concentration 183
CHAPTER-5
5.1 Pollution Control Arrangement/Mitigative Measure 193
5.2 Environment Monitoring Program 199
5.3 Cleaner Production Aspects 200
5.4 Capital & Recurring Cost for Environmental Management Plan 203
LIST OF FIGURES

FIGURE DESCRIPTION PAGE


NO. NO.
CHAPTER-1
1.1 A Location of Project in Gujarat State 6
1.1 B Location of Project Site in Bharuch District 7
1.1 C Location of Project Site in Dahej GIDC 8
1.2 Google Image Showing Location of Project Site 9
1.3 Distance of the Project Site from Severely Polluted Area 10
1.4 Plant Lay-Out 12
CHAPTER-3
3.1 Map showing the Study Area and Sampling Locations 99
3.2 Wind Rose Diagram 129
3.3 Percentage Distribution of Land Use of Study Area as per 139
District Census Records
3.4 Map showing Landuse / Landcover for 10 km Radius Area 141
3.5 A Comparative Demographic Status of Vagra Taluka 164
3.5 B Comparative Status of Sex Ratio & Population Density in 165
Vagra Taluka
3.6 A Comparative Analysis of Sex Ratio at Micro Level 166
3.6 B Comparative Analysis of Demographic Variables at Micro 166
Level
LIST OF ANNEXURES

ANNEXURE DESCRIPTION PAGE


NO. NO.
CHAPTER-1

1.1 TOR Letter issued by MoEF, New Delhi A

1.2 Copy of Gazette Notification issued by the Government of B


Gujarat indicating location of project in Dahej GIDC

CHAPTER-2

2.1 Water Balance Diagram C


2.2. Design of Venturi Scrubber System D
2.3 Design of Solvent Recovery System E
2.4 Details of Solvent and its Recovery Potential F
2.5 Permission for water supply from GIDC G
2.6 Calorific Value of Hazardous Wastes H

CHAPTER-3

3.1 National Ambient Air Quality Standards I

3.2 Standards prescribed by IS: 10500 for Drinking Water J

3.3 National Ambient Noise Quality Standards K

3.4 Photographs showing AAQ Monitoring L

3.5 Photographs showing Water Sample Collection M

3.6 Photographs showing Soil Sample Collection N

3.7 Geological & Geo-hydrological Status of the Study Area O

CHAPTER-4

4.1 Brief Description of Dispersion Model Used P

4.2 Expected Ground Level Concentration of Various Pollutants Q


due to the Proposed Project
4.3 Ground Level Concentration Contours for the Various R
Pollutants
ANNEXURE DESCRIPTION PAGE
NO. NO.
CHAPTER-5
5.1 Structure of Regulatory Framework S

5.2 Rain Water Harvesting Scheme T

5.3 Risk Assessment Study Report U

CHAPTER-8
8.1 NABET/QCI Accreditation Certificate V

GENERAL
9.1 Compliance to the Recommendations Mentioned in the W
CREP Guidelines
9.2 Environment Policy X
TOR & ITS
COMPLIANCE
TOR & ITS COMPLIANCE
Clarifications, Information and Data as required in Terms of Reference (TOR) letter
no. J-11011/20/2012- IA II (I) dated 10th October 2012. The TOR letter is attached as
Annexure: - 1.1.

A tabular chart with index for point wise compliance is as given below:

Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.
1 Executive Summary of the Project Executive summary of the project is
attached with the EIA report.
2 Justification of the Project Justification of the project is given in
Section No. -1.2 & 1.3 of the Chapter:- 1.
3 Promoters & their background Please refer Section No.-1.1 of Chapter:- 1.

4 Regulatory Framework Please refer Annexure:- 5.1.

5 A map indicating location of the Please refer Figure No. 1.3 of Chapter:-1
project and distance from severely for map showing our unit location and
polluted area distance from critically polluted area of
Bharuch District.
6 Project Location and Plant Layout Please refer Section No. - 1.7 and Figure
No. 1.4 of the Chapter:-1.
7 A copy of Gazette Notification Please see Annexure:- 1.2 for the relevant
issued by the Govt. of Gujarat details.
indicating location of the project in
notified GIDC should be included
necessarily.
8 Infrastructure facilities including Please refer Section 2.11 of Chapter:- 2.
power sources.
9 Total cost of the project alongwith The total estimated cost of the project is
total capital cost and recurring cost/ Rs. 150 Crore out of which fund to be
annum for environmental pollution allocated for pollution control will be
control measures. approximately Rs. 25 Crore.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -a- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.
Please see Section No.- 5.13 of the
Chapter:- 5 for the details.
10 Project site location alongwith site Please refer Figure No.- 3.4 of the
map of 10 km area and site details Chapter:- 3.
providing various industries,
surface water bodies, forests etc.
11 Present land use based on satellite Please refer Figure No.- 3.4 of the
imagery for the study area of 10 km Chapter:- 3.
radius.
12 Location of National Park/ Wild life There is no National Park/ Wild life
sanctuary/ Reserve Forest within 10 Sanctuary/ Reserve Forest within 10 km
km radius of the project. radius of the project.
13 Details of the total land and break- Please refer Table No. - 1.2 of the
up of the land use for green belt Chapter:- 1.
and other uses.
14 List of products alongwith the Please refer Section No. - 2.1 of the
production capacities. Details of Chapter:- 2.
product and quantity to be
manufactured at a time.
15 Detailed list of raw material Please refer Section No. - 2.2 & 2.4 of the
required and source, mode of Chapter:- 2.
storage & transportation
16 Manufacturing process details Please refer Section No. - 2.3 of the
alongwith the chemical reactions Chapter:- 2.
and process flow chart.
17 Site-specific micro-meteorological Please refer Table No. - 3.4 of the
data using temperature, relative Chapter:- 3.
humidity, hourly wind speed and
direction and rainfall is necessary
18 Ambient air quality at 6 locations Please refer Figure No. - 3.1 & Table No. -
within the study area of 5 km., 3.1 & 3.3 of the Chapter: 3 for the details.
aerial coverage from project site as
per NAAQES notified on 16th
September 2009. Location of one

ANAND CONSULTANTS -b- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.
AAQMS in downwind direction
19 One season site-specific micro- Please refer Table No. - 3.4 of the
meteorological data using Chapter:-3 for the site-specific micro-
temperature, relative humidity, meteorological data.
hourly wind speed and direction
and rainfall and AAQ data (except Please refer Table No.:- 3.3 of the
monsoon) for PM10, SO2, NOx, HCl, Chapter:-3 for the ambient air quality
Cl2, HBr including HC and VOCs monitoring data.
should be collected. The
monitoring stations should take Please refer Table No.:- 3.7(a) & 3.7(b) for
into account the pre-dominant the water characteristic data.
wind direction, population zone
and sensitive reactors including Please refer Table No.:- 3.8 for the noise
reserved forests. Data for water monitoring data.
and noise monitoring should be
included.
20 Air pollution control measures Please refer Section No. 2.7 of the
proposed for the effective control of Chapter:- 2.
gaseous emissions within
permissible limits.
21 Name of all the solvents to be used Please see attached Annexure: 2.3 & 2.4
in the process and details of solvent for the details of solvents & its recovery
recovery system. system.
22 Design details of ETP, incinerator, Please refer Section No. 2.6 for the details
if any along with control of Dioxin of ETP.
& Furan, boiler scrubbers/bag
filters etc. Please see attached Annexure: 2.2 for the
details of scrubber system.
23 Details of water and air pollution Please refer Section No. 5.8 of the
and its mitigation plan Chapter:- 5.
24 Action plan to control ambient air Please refer Section No. 2.7 of the
quality as per NAAQES standards Chapter:- 2 & Section No. 5.8 of the
notified by the Ministry on 16th Chapter:- 5.
September 2009.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -c- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.
25 An action plan to control and Fugitive emissions will be managed by:
monitor secondary fugitive (a) All reactors outlets/ connection being
emissions from all the sources. completely sealed;
(b) Providing a thick greenbelt area along
with periphery of complete premises as
well as around manufacturing plant
themselves as far as possible.
26 Determination of atmospheric Please refer Annexure: 4.2 and Annexure:
inversion level at the project site 4.3 for results of ground level
and assessment of ground level concentration and its contour.
concentration of pollutants from
the stack emissions based on site-
specific meteorological features. Air
quality modeling for the plant.
27 Permission for the drawl of 1,383 Please see Annexure: 2.5 for the GIDC
m3/day ground water from the water supply permission letter.
GIDC water supply. Water balance
chart including quantity of effluent Please see Annexure: 2.1 for Water
generated recycled and reused and Balance Diagram.
discharged.
28 Action plan for ‘Zero’ discharge of We plan to proceed towards a “Zero”
effluent should be included. discharge set up by:
(I) Process improvement to reduce water
consumption and/or increase yield,
(II) Recycle of lean wash water for the
initial washing purpose in the process,
(III) Re-use of treated effluent in the
gardening area/ non process area.
29 Ground water quality monitoring Please refer Section No. 3.4, 3.6 & 3.7 of
minimum at 6 locations should be the Chapter No.: – 3 for the details.
carried out. Geological features and
Geo-hydrological status of the Please also see Annexure: 3.7 for
study area and ecological status Geological & Geo-hydrological status of
(Terrestrial and Aquatic). the study area

ANAND CONSULTANTS -d- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.
30 The details of solid and hazardous Please refer Section No. 2.8 of Chapter:-2
wastes generation, storage, for the details of hazardous waste.
utilization and disposal particularly
related to the hazardous waste Please see Annexure: 2.6 for calorific
calorific value of hazardous waste value of hazardous waste.
and detailed characteristic of the
hazardous waste. Action plan for The ash generated from boilers will be
the disposal of fly ash generated sent to Cement Plants and/or sold off to
from boiler should be included. paver block/ building block
manufacturers.
31 Precautions to be taken during Please see attached Annexure: - 5.3 - Risk
storage and transportation of Assessment Report for the details.
hazardous chemicals should be
clearly mentioned and
incorporated.
32 A copy of the Memorandum of We plan to send our organic residues to
Understanding signed with cement nearest incineration facility which is at
manufacturers indicating clearly present Bharuch Enviro Infrastructure
that they will utilized all the Ltd. (BEIL), Ankleshwar.
organic solid waste generated.
33 A copy of the ‘Memorandum of We will be buying an imported coal from
Understanding’ (MoU) signed with dealer who imports such coal from
coal supplier for imported coal. Indonesia/ Australia/ South Africa.
34 Authorization / membership for the We shall be obtaining membership of the
disposal of liquid effluent in CETP nearest TSDF site before obtaining
and solid/hazardous waste in ‘Consent to Operate’ from GPCB.
TSDF.
35 Risk assessment for storage for The detailed Risk Assessment Report is
chemicals/solvents. attached as Annexure: - 5.3.
36 Material safety data sheet for The total number of raw material &
chemicals. products are such that all the Material
Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are total 101.
The numbers of associated MSDS pages
are 525. As a matter of being environment

ANAND CONSULTANTS -e- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.
friendly, copies of the stated MSDSs have
not been attached with this EIA report.
Nevertheless, a copy of the same can be
submitted to any authority/ person/
experts by us on demand.
37 An action plan to develop green Please refer Section No. 2.12 of the
belt in 33% area. Chapter:- 2.
38 Action plan for rainwater Please refer Annexure:- 5.2 for the
harvesting measures at plant site detailed rainwater harvesting scheme.
should be included to harvest rain
water from the roof tops and storm
water drains to recharge the
ground water.
39 Occupational health of the workers Details of precaution related to
needs elaboration including occupational health are given in Section
evaluation of noise, heat, No. 5.6 of Chapter:-5.
illumination, dust, any other
chemicals, metals being suspected
in environment and going into
body of workers either through
inhalation. Ingestion or through
skin absorption and steps taken to
avoid musculo-skeletal disorder
(MSD), backache, pain in minor
and major joints, fatigue etc.
Occupational hazards specific pre-
placement and periodical
monitoring shall be carried out.
40 Occupation health practices for Not Applicable
phosphorus handling to be
submitted.
41 Socio-economic development Details of Socio-economic activities which
activities should be in place. we plan to carry out, is given in Section
No. 2.13 of Chapter – 2.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -f- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.
42 Note on compliance to the Please refer Annexure:- 9.1 for the details.
recommendations mentioned in the
CREP guidelines.
43 Detailed Environment The detailed Environmental Management
Management Plan (EMP) with Plan is given in Chapter:-5 of the EIA
specific reference to details of air report.
pollution control system, water &
wastewater management,
monitoring frequency,
responsibility and time bound
implementation plan for mitigation
measure should be provided
44 EMP should include the concept of The above stated Environmental
waste-minimization, recycle /reuse Management Plan takes care of the
/recover techniques, Energy concepts of waste minimization,
conservation, and natural resource recycling, reuse and recovery techniques.
conservation
45 A copy of Corporate Environment Please see attached Annexure:- 9.2 for the
Policy as per the Ministry’s O. M. details.
No. J-11013/41/2006-IA.II (I) dated
26 th April, 2011 available on the
Ministry’s website.

Corporate Environment Responsibility


46 (a) Does the company have a well Please see attached Annexure:- 9.2 for the
laid down Environment Policy details.
approved by its Board of Directors?
If so. It may be detailed in the EIA
report.
(b) Does the Environmental Policy Our unit not yet started production.
prescribe for standard operating Nevertheless, we shall see to it that
process/ procedures to bring into Environmental Policy that we have frozen
focus any infringement/ deviation/ will bring things into focus and any
violation of the environmental or future issues related to the environment.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -g- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.
forest norms/ conditions? If so, it
may be detailed in the EIA report.
47 What is the hierarchical system or Please see attached Annexure:- 5.1 for the
Administrative order of the details.
company to deal with the
environmental issues and for
ensuring compliance with the EC
conditions? Details of this system
may be given.

48 Does the company have a system of We have not yet started production.
reporting of non compliance/ However, we shall definitely set up a
violations of environmental norms system to report such issues to board of
to the Board of Directors of the directors, shareholders as well as
company and/or shareholders or stakeholders.
stakeholders at large? This
reporting mechanism should be
detailed in the EIA report.
49 Public hearing issues raised and The stated tabular chart will be submitted
commitments made by the project on completion of the public hearing /
proponent on the same should be public consultation process and will be
included separately in EIA/EMP sent to the Ministry of Environment and
report in the form of tabular chart Forest, New Delhi along with the minutes
with financial budget for of meeting of the public hearing / public
complying with the commitments consultation.
made.
50 Any litigation pending against the Not applicable since our unit is a
project and/or any direction /order proposed unit.
passed by any Court of Law against
the project, if so, details thereof.
51 A tabular chart with index for point Included.
wise compliance of above TORs.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -h- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr.
Terms of Reference (ToRs) Compliance Status
No.

General Points

i All documents to be properly All the chapters and annexure of the


referenced with index, page EIA/EMP report has properly numbered
numbered and indexed.
ii Period/ date of data collection Complied.
should be clearly indicated
iii Authenticated English translation We have taken note for the same.
of all material provided in regional
language
iv The letter/ application for EC Complied.
should quote the MOEF file No.
and also attach a copy of letter.
v The copy of the letter received from Please see attached Annexure: 1.1 for the
the Ministry should be also same.
attached as an annexure to the final
EIA- EMP Report.
vi The final EIA-EMP report Complied.
submitted to the Ministry must
incorporate the issues in this letter.
The index of the final EIA-EMP
report must indicate the specific
chapter and page no. of the EIA-
EMP Report.
vii Certificate of accreditation issued Please see attached Annexure:- 8.1 for the
by QCI to the environmental same.
consultant shall be included.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -i- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
CHAPTER – 1
INTRODUCTION
CHAPTER - 1
INTRODUCTION

1.1 Introduction

M/s. Tagros Chemicals India Limited is a part of the Jhaver Group of Companies.
Jhaver Group is a family owned, professionally managed business group, with
interests in diverse businesses including Pharmaceuticals, Chemicals, Zippers, and
Information Technology etc.

Tagros Chemicals India Limited is India’s leading manufacturer exporter of a range


of Agrochemicals. A strong commitment to adhere to higher standards of quality
and care for its people and environment are the guiding factors which has
transformed this Company in rising from a humble beginning a decade back to a
leading supplier in Synthetic Pyrethroids today.

Tagros currently offers a range of high value Synthetic Pyrethroids, Pesticide


Intermediates and Fungicides. Apart from this, a wide range of formulated products
based on these active ingredients are offered. Tagros today caters to the requirement
of not only domestic buyers but also international buyers in more than 50 countries.

Tagros owns registrations in various countries where its products are exported.
Tagros is an approved supplier to WHO projects and has successfully executed
various orders received on Public Health across the globe. Tagros is also the only
company in the World which is a Notifier for EU Biocide Directive, ECC 98/8 for its
Pyrethroids.

M/s. Tagros Chemicals India Limited is now proposed to set up a New Pesticide
Technical Products and Intermediates Plant at Plot No. 43/1, Dahej-GIDC Industrial
Estate, Village: Dahej, Taluka: Vagra, District: Bharuch, Gujarat.

The proposed project is to be set up on an open land area of 71,359 m2 out of which
approximately 21,359 m2 land area will be used for greenbelt development. The total
estimated cost of the project is Rs. 150 Crores. The fund allocated for pollution
control will be approximately Rs. 25 Crores.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -1- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
1.2 Need for the Project & its Importance to the Country

The rising gap between demand and supply has propelled Tagros to put up a new
plant for its products with extended capacities to cater to the requirements of its
customers which hitherto have not been serviced due to lack of production
capacities. Tagros desires to set up a Green Field Project at Dahej for the production
of Synthetic Pyrethroids, Pesticide Intermediates, and Herbicides etc.

Tagros has been in the business of manufacturing and exporting of Synthetic


Pyrethroids for more than a decade and hence has the requisite infrastructure for the
successful management of operations starting from procurement of raw materials till
the sale and realization of its finished products. Tagros also intends to manufacture
newer products like Carfentrazone, Sulfentrazone, Metamitron etc. in the Herbicides
category. Tagros already has experience in dealing with a Herbicide product
through its subsidiary company and has the required infrastructure to successfully
manufacture and market the newer products all over the globe including the
regulated markets.

Tagros, on completion of this project, would become one of the top five companies in
India in terms of manufacturing capacities and would also become the largest
manufacturer of some of the finished products in the World.

1.3 Site Selection Criteria

The proposed project is to be set-up in the GIDC Industrial Estate, which has all
required infrastructure, therefore no alternative site is considered. The suitability of
a site, for setting up the proposed project is determined by the following major
considerations.

 Plot No.: 43/1 is situated in developed industrial estate of GIDC and this estate is
declared as chemical zone.

 Most of the raw materials are available in and around.

 Easy availability of raw water.

 Effluent Disposal facility developed by GIDC.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -2- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 Natural gas pipelines of GSPL and GAIL at close proximity.

 Facility of raw material import is available due to chemical port of Gujarat


Chemical Port Terminal Company Limited (GCPTCL).

1.4 Objectives of EIA Study

 As per provision of the EIA notification, 2006 under the Environmental


(Protection) Act, 1986, new projects can be undertaken only after obtaining an
Environmental Clearance (EC). Any project seeking an environmental clearance
requires an EIA report, prepared in accordance with guidelines of Ministry of
Environment & Forests (MoEF), Government of India.

 To have an in-depth know-how of the project and to indentify the probable


sources of pollution that may arise due to proposed manufacturing activity of
M/s. Tagros Chemicals India Ltd.

 To assess existing environmental status of the study area of the proposed project
by collecting the baseline data of the environmental attributes including air,
water, noise, land/soil, ecological and socioeconomic components.

 To estimate the impacts of the proposed project on the surrounding


environment.

 To prepare a comprehensive Environmental Management Plan (EMP) and


suggest preventive and mitigative measures to minimize adverse impacts and to
maximize beneficial impacts.

1.5 Purpose of the Report

It may be noted that the manufacturing of Pesticides Technical Products and


Agrochemicals fall under Clause No. 5 (b) of Category “A” as stated in the
Environmental Impact Assessment notification dated 14-09-2006 and therefore
Environmental Clearance for these products is required to be obtained. It was due to
this fact that an application was made to Ministry of Environment and Forests, New
Delhi for obtaining the related Environmental Clearance.

ANAND CONSULTANTS -3- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
An application in Form-1 was submitted to Ministry of Environment and Forests in
December, 2011. The proposal was considered by Expert Appraisal Committee
(EAC) (Industry-2) in its 35 th meeting held on 12 th May, 2012 and has issued the TOR
vide their Letter F. No. J-11011/20/2012-IA II (I) dated 10th October, 2012. The same
has been attached as Annexure: 1.1. All the aspects of the Terms of Reference (TOR)
are incorporated in the EIA/EMP report.

1.6 Scope and Methodology

SCOPE

The purpose of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is to determine


environmental impacts of proposed project & development activity associated with a
project. The EIA report is prepared by considering the Terms of References (TORs)
issued by EAC, MoEF.

METHODOLOGY

EIA study includes identification, assessment, quantitative evaluation and prediction


of possible impacts. To minimize impact due to the proposed project on various
environments, an impact identification matrix has been prepared, while the
assessment of impacts has been based on mathematical models and/or scientific
knowledge and judgment.

1.7 Location of Project

The proposed project is to be located at Plot No. 43/1, Dahej-GIDC Industrial Estate,
Village: Dahej, Taluka: Vagra, District: Bharuch, Gujarat.

The geographical information of the proposed project is as given below:

Latitude : 21◦ 43’ 46. 68” N

Longitude: 72 º 35’ 58. 98” E

ANAND CONSULTANTS -4- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 Location of the project site is shown as Figure No. 1.1 A, 1.1 B & 1.1 C

 Satellite (Google) image of project site is shown as Figure No. 1.2

 A map showing distance of the project site from severely polluted area is shown
as Figure No. 1.3

 Lay out of the proposed site is shown as Figure No. 1.4

Table No. - 1.1 - Nearest Infrastructure Facility with Distance

Sr. Distance from the project


Destination
No. site (Approx.)
1 Residential Area –Dahej Village 2.4 km South West

2 Residential Area – Vadadla Village 3.5 km East

3 District Headquarter - Bharuch 41.5 km East

4 Narmada River 5.3 km South

5 Dhadhar River 31.3 km North East

6 Dahej Port 8.6 km South West

7 Bharuch – Dahej Road 1.6 km South

8 Railway Station – Dahej 3 km South West

9 Railway Station- Vagra 28.6 km North East

10 Domestic Airport – Surat 70 km South East

11 International Airport- Ahmedabad 148 Km North

ANAND CONSULTANTS -5- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. 1.1 A - Location of Project in Gujarat State

ANAND CONSULTANTS -6- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. 1.1 B - Location of Project in Bharuch District

ANAND CONSULTANTS -7- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. 1.1 C - Location of Project Site in Dahej GIDC

ANAND CONSULTANTS -8- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. 1.2 - Google Image showing Location of the Project Site

ANAND CONSULTANTS -9- Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. 1.3 - Distance of the Project Site from Severely Polluted Area

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 10 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. - 1.2 - Detail of Land Area

Sr. Description Area (m2) % of Total Land


No. [Approx.]

1. Manufacturing Process Area 12,500 17.50


2. Storage (Raw Materials) 2,500 3.50
3. Storage (Product)
4. Storage (Fuel) 500 0.70
5. Storage (Water) 1,000 1.40
6. Storage (Hazardous/Solid Waste) 1,500 2.10
7. Storage (Hazardous Chemicals) 5,000 7.00
8. Effluent Treatment Plant 2,500 3.50
9. Common Utilities 2,500 3.50
10. Coal Storage Area 1,000 1.40
11. Greenbelt 21,359 30.00
12. Area available for future expansion 12,000 16.80
13. Area for Recovery Plant 2,000 2.80
14. Others (Admin, Workshop, Canteen, 7,000 9.80
Warehouse, Store, Medical Centre. Fire
Station, Research Centre, Security
Office, Weigh Bridge etc.)

TOTAL 71,359 m2 100.00 %

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 11 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
CHAPTER – 2
PROJECT
DESCRIPTION
CHAPTER – 2
PROJECT DESCRIPTION

2.1 Details of Proposed Products

M/s. Tagros Chemicals India Limited proposes to set-up Pesticide Technical Products
manufacturing unit.

Table No. 2.1 and Table No. 2.2 indicate list of the proposed products and by-products
with proposed install capacity, respectively.

Table No. 2.1 - List of Proposed Product & Production Capacity

Sr. Name of Product Proposed Production Capacity


No. (MT/Month)
1 D V Acid Chloride 200
2 Metamitron Technical 100
3 Cypermethrin Technical 150
4 Permethrin Technical 75
5 Alphacypermethrin Technical 50
6 Meta phenoxy Benzaldehyde 200
7 MPBA 100
8 Deltamethrin Technical 10

9 RRCMA 30
10 DICAMBA 50
11 Carfentrazone 100
12 Sulfentrazone 100
13 Thiamethoxam 50
14 Ethofumesate 50

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 13 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. 2.2 - List of By-Products

By - Product Generation (MT/Month)


Sr.
Sodium NH4Cl 30% AlCl3 KCl Cu(OH)2 Spent
No Product
Sulphite Powder HCl Solution Powder Powder Acid
Powder Solution

1 CMAC 363.8 110.00 319.60 -- -- 2.10 --

2 Metamitron -- 52.73 -- -- -- -- 351.90

3 Cypermethrin -- -- -- -- -- -- --

4 Permethrin -- -- 29.48 -- -- -- --

Alpha
5 Cypermethrin -- -- -- -- -- -- --

6 MPB -- -- 210.00 525.40 110.00 -- --

7 MPBA -- -- -- -- -- -- --

8 Deltamethrin 5.3 -- 47.43 47.10 -- --

9 RRCMA -- -- -- -- -- --

10 DICAMBA 56.4 -- -- -- 14.40 -- 412.00

11 Carfentrazone 135.2 -- -- -- -- -- 1226.6

12 Sulfentrazone -- -- -- -- -- 1029.2

13 Thiamethoxam -- -- -- -- -- -- 314.00

14 Ethofumesate -- -- -- -- -- -- --

TOTAL 560.7 162.7 606.51 572.50 124.40 2.10 3333.7

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 14 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.2 Detail of Raw Materials & its Consumption

Details of raw materials consumption is given in the Table No. 2.3.

Table No. 2.3 – List of Raw Materials & its Consumption

Sr. Raw Material Consumption


No. Product Name (MT/MT of product)

1 D V Acid Chloride
Acrylonitrile 0.460
Carbon Tetra Chloride 1.300
Acetonitrile 0.050
Cupric Chloride 0.011
Liquid Ammonia 0.043
Diethylamine 0.015
Hydrochloric Acid 1.734
Thinoyl Chloride 1.720
Dimethylformamide 0.023
Triethylamine 0.091
Isobutylene 0.595
Sodium bi Carbonate 0.153
n-Hexane 0.351
BF3 Catalyst mixture 0.017
CS flakes 0.929
CS lye 2.439
Sulphuric Acid 0.480
2 Metamitron
Sodiumcynanide 0.580
Toulene 1.263
Benzaldehyde 1.022
Hydrochloric Acid 4.244
Metanol / Ethanol 2.975
Sulphuric Acid 1.852

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 15 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Raw Material Consumption
No. Product Name (MT/MT of product)

Toulene 1.482
TEBA 0.042
Sod.Hypo 4.389
HH 0.655
PTSA 0.050
AH 0.794
DMA 3.935
AA 0.015
K2Co3 0.021
3 Cypermethrin
m-Phenoxy Benzaldehyde 0.46
D V Acid Chloride 0.56
Sodium Cyanide 0.14
Soda Ash 0.015
Catalyst 0.015
Acetic Acid 0.003
Hexane 0.061
Hypochlorite 0.42
4 Permethrin
m-Phenoxy Benzyl Alcohol 0.512
D V Acid Chloride 0.583
Hexane 0.043
Soda Ash 0.015
Acetic acid 0.003
Catalyst 0.015
5 Alphacypermethrin
m- Phenoxy Benzaldehyde 0.883
D V Acid Chloride 1.022
Sodium Cyanide 0.255
Soda Ash 0.027
Catalyst 0.300

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 16 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Raw Material Consumption
No. Product Name (MT/MT of product)

Acetic acid 0.006


Hexane 0.136
Hypochlorite 0.072
Sulphuric Acid 0.002
6 Meta Phenoxy Benzaldehyde
Benzaldehyde 1.000
Bromine 0.771
Chlorine 0.646
DCE 7.009
AlCl3 0.796
Sodium Thiosulfate 0.022
MEG 0.533
Phenol 0.751
KOH 0.465
Toluene 0.525
H2SO4 (98 %) 1.665
7 Meta Phenoxybenzyl Alcohol (MPBA)
Hydrogen 0.12
MPB 0.990
Raney Nickel 0.049
Iso Propyl Alcohol 1.013
8 RRCMA
CIS-CMA 1.667
DMA opt. HCl 0.061
Etylene Di chloride 0.550
Caustic Soda 0.319
Hydrochloric Acid 1.021
9 Deltamethrin
CIS-CMA 1.818
DMA opt. HCl 0.067
Etylene Di Chloride 0.600

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 17 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Raw Material Consumption
No. Product Name (MT/MT of product)

Caustic Soda 0.348


Hydrochloric Acid 30% 1.114
Hydrochloric Acid 33% 1.500
MDC /EDC 0.555
Aluminium Chloride 1.410
HBr dry 2.535
Caustic lye 47% 0.773
Hexane 0.361
DMF 0.004
Thinoyl Chloride 0.540
Lye 2.071
Sodium Cyanide 0.218
TEBAC 0.022
10% Sodium Hypochloride 1.538
Chloride MPB 0.735
Triethylamine 0.675
IPA 0.300
10 DICAMBA
2,5- dichloro aniline 3.390
Sodium Nitrite 1.460
98% Sulphuric Acid 7.840
Sulfamic acid 0.100
Pottasium Chloride 1.080
Xylene 0.630
Carbondioxide 1.700
Hydrochloric acid 30% 3.340
Sodium Hydroxide 1.660
Dimethyl Sulphate 3.660
11 Carfentrazone
2-fluoroaniline 0.730
Sodium Nitrite 0.460

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 18 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Raw Material Consumption
No. Product Name (MT/MT of product)

Hydrochloric Acid 4.210


Sodium Sulfite 2.710
Caustic lye Solution 2.644
20% Sodium Hydroxide 4.275
10% Sodium Hydroxide 1.500
Acetaldehyde 0.382
Sodium Cyanate 0.544
Chlorine 1.980
Acetic Acid 0.500
Methanol 0.157
Pottasium Carbonate 0.924
Dimethylformaide 1.359
Dichlorofluoromethane 0.665
Oleum 5.565
Nitric Acid 0.502
Dichloroethane 0.176
Catalyst Pd/C 0.060
Ethyl Acrylate 0.425
Acetonitrile 0.409
IPA 1.076
12 Sulfentrazone
Phenyl Hydrazine 0.765
Acetaldehyde 0.376
Sodium Cyanate 0.530
Chlorine 2.308
Acetic acid 0.500
Methanol 0.212
10% Sodium Hydroxide 1.500
Pottasium Carbonate 0.900
Dimethylformaide 0.972
Dichlorofluoromethane 0.650

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 19 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Raw Material Consumption
No. Product Name (MT/MT of product)

Oleum 4.450
Nitric Acid 0.386
Dichloroethane 0.073
Catalyst Pd/C 0.063
Methane Sulfonylchloride 0.689
Pyridine 0.049
Toulene 0.384
Dichloromethane 0.319
IPA 3.848
13 Thiomethoxam
Allyl Chloride 0.670
Chlorine 1.330
47% Caustic lye 0.900
Ammonium thio Cyanate 0.780
EDC 0.150
SO2 0.120
4N Sodium Hydroxide 3.000
Guanidine Nitrate 1.255
Sulfuric Acid 3.365
40% Methyl Amine 0.890
Para Formaldehyde 0.742
Formic acid 0.345
DMC 0.210
Pottasium Carbonate 0.900
14 Ethofumesate
Isobutyraldehyde 0.500
Morpholine 0.604
Quinone 0.600
Toulene 0.482
Water 6.000
Methylsulfonyl Chloride 0.650

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 20 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Raw Material Consumption
No. Product Name (MT/MT of product)

Triethylamine 0.058
48% Sodium Hydroxide 0.500
Ethanol 1.000
35% HCl 0.250
Sodium bi Carbonate 0.100

2.3 Details of Manufacturing Process

2.3.1 D V Acid Chloride (Cypermethric Acid Chloride)

STEP 1: Preparation of Tertachloro ButyroNitrile (TBN):

A glass lined MS reactor pH is adjusted to 3.0 – 3.5 by adding a mixture of Cat 1


(50/50). Cat 2 and acetonitrile are added. The contents are heated to 120 + 1 oC and
feeding is started simultaneously from two separate lines of acrylonitrile and carbon
tetrachloride. After complete addition, the reaction mixture is digested for 3 hours at
the same temperature. The reactor contents are cooled to 70 – 75o C. Water is added and
the reaction mixture is stirred for 30 minutes. Aqueous phase is drained to ETP and
organic phase to hold tank. The mass from hold tank is transferred to a glass lined MS
reactor (GL-2) and liq. Ammonia is added till pH reaches 8.0 - 9.0 and distillation is
started first at normal pressure when some fore-cut distills out at ~ 110 oC and later
vacuum of 600 – 650 mm of Hg is applied to distill out Cut I at 115 oC. Residual mass in
the reactor is sampled for TBN content, which should be greater than 98%. This is
transferred to TBN hold tank.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 21 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Qty Sr. Qty
Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Acrylonitrile 460 1 Forecut ( Recycled ) 170.8
Carbon Tetra Chloride 1300 Tetra Chloro 1909
2 2
Butyronitrile
3 Acetonitrile 50 3 Solvent Loss 20
4 Cupric Chloride 10.5 4 CUCl2 (Recovery) and 10.5
5 Hydrochloric Acid 12.8 5 Water Vapor 271
6 Liquid Ammonia 43
7 Diethyiamine 15
8 Water 490
Total 2381.3 Total 2381.3

STEP 2: Preparation of Tetrachloro Butyric Acid (TBA):

In a glass lined MS reactor, 30% HCl is taken. The contents are heated to 67 + 2oC and
then addition of TBN from the hold tank is started at the same temperature. The
addition is completed within 8 hours and the temperature is maintained for further 4
hours. The temperature is raised to 98 oC and then the mass is cooled to 60 – 70oC and
filtered to separate ammonium chloride and dil. HCl is separated. Second wash of
water is given and the aqueous layer is drained. Chloride content in organic layer
checked. It should be less than 500 ppm. The TBA is transferred to hold tank.

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Tetra chloro butyro nitrile 1909 1 Tetra chloro butyric acid 2211

2 Hydrochloric Acid 1721 2 Ammonium chloride 550


(Recovery) and
3 2274 3 Water vapor 3143
Water
Total 5904 Total 5904

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 22 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP 3: Preparation of Tetrachloro Butyric Acid Chloride (TBAC):

In a glass lined MS reactor TBA from the hold tank is taken. The temperature is raised
to 90 – 115oC and vacuum of 640 – 680 mm of Hg is applied for 12 hours. The sample is
taken for checking moisture, which should be less than 0.2%. The contents are cooled
to 60 – 65 oC temperature. Cat 3 is added and the addition of TC is carried out over a
span of 11 hours. The temperature is maintained at 60 – 65 oC. The mass is transferred
to TBAC distillation reactor and TBAC is distilled under vacuum. The distillation
residue obtained as bottom product is sent for incineration.

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
1 Tetra chloro butyric 2211 1 Tetra chloro butyric acid 119
Acid chloride cut I (Recycle)
2 Thinoyl chloride 1197 2 Tetra chloro butyric acid 2237
chloride
3 Dimethyl formamide 18 3 SO2 ( Recovery) 643
4 HCl (Recovery) 367
5 Residue 60
Total 3426 Total 3426

STEP 4: Preparation of 2-Chlorocyclo Butanone (2-CB):

In a SS reactor n-hexane is added to isobutylene. The temperature is raised to 64oC.


TEA and TBAC are added simultaneously, maintaining the pH 2 to 3 over a span of 8
hours. The temperature is maintained and the reaction mass is stirred for one hour.
10% NaHCO3 is added. The mass is stirred for 30 min. and lower aqueous layer is
drained. Hexane layer is given a wash of plain water. Lower aqueous layer is
transferred to TEA recovery tank from which TEA is recovered by neutralization with

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 23 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
caustic lye or flakes. The hexane layer containing 2-CB is transferred to crystallization
reactor. The reactor is heated to 65 oC for normal distillation of hexane and then
vacuum of 600 mm Hg is applied raising the temperature to 65 – 70 oC to remove traces
of hexane. The product is cooled to 14 – 16 oC and the powder formed is dumped to
Closed Nutsch Filter.

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Tetrachloro butyric acid 2237 1 TEA ( Recovery ) 959
chloride
2 Triethylamine 1010 2 Aqueous layer 2040
3 Isobutylene 595 3 Hexane loss 95
4 Sodium bi carbonate 152.7 4 Hexane (Recycled) 4700
5 n-hexane 5158 5 2CB/Hexane 2994.7
6 Water 1687 6 TEA Loss 51
Total 10840 Total 10840

STEP 5: Preparation of 4-Chlorocyclo Butanone (4-CB) and Further To Cyper Methric


Acid (CMA) Through NaCMA:

In a glass lined reactor n-hexane is taken and 2 - CB powder is added manually. The
temperature is raised to 80 - 90 oC. Addition of TEA is started. pH of the reaction
mixture should be 6.0 – 6.5. Catalyst is charged at 100 oC. The temperature starts to
shoot up to 115 oC. The reaction mass is cooled to 40 – 60 oC and n-hexane is added.
The Slurry is cooled to a temperature of 25 – 35 oC. The thin Slurry formed is

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 24 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
transferred to MS reactor containing 4.3 N caustic solution. After the transfer is
complete, the temperature is raised to 55 oC. Cooling is applied till temperature reaches
to 40 oC. The mass is ready for transfer to MS tiled reactor for acidic hydrolysis. n-
hexane is charged to MSTL reactor. In another tank a solution of 80 % sulphuric acid is
prepared. This solution is charged to MSTL. Now NaCMA is transferred to MSTL and
CMA-Hexane layer is transferred to SS reactor for hexane recovery. Heating is applied
to SS reactor and n-hexane is distilled out for reuse. The concentrated hexane solution
is transferred to glass-lined reactor for CMAC preparation.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 25 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Qty Sr. Qty
Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
1 2CB/Hexane 2994.7 1 4 CB 3631.7
2 n-hexane 970 2 Hexane loss 5
3 Catalyst 17 3 Hexane (Recycled) 380
4 Triethylamine 40 4 Aqueous layer 5
Total 4021.7 Total 4021.7

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
1 4 CB 3631.7 1 Organic Layer 737
2 Hexane 146 2 Aqueous NaCMA 8296.7
3 CS Flakes 901
4 Water 4355
Total 9033.7 Total 9033.7

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
1 Organic Layer 737 1 Aqueous layer 7701.5
2 Sulphuric acid 480 2 Hexane (Recycled) 1000
3 CS Lye 27.5 3 Hexane loss 94
4 Water 279 4 TEA (Recycled) 25
5 Aqueous NaCMA 8296.7 5 CMA Hexane 3972.7
6 Hexane 2973
Total 12793.2 Total 12793.2

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 CMA Hexane 3972.7 1 Aqueous layer 389
2 Water 300 2 Hexane (Recycled) 2300
3 CS Flakes 28 3 Hexane loss 135
4 CMA Hexane 1476.7

Total 4300.7 Total 4300.7

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 26 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP 6: Preparation of Cyper Methric Acid Chloride (CMAC) or DVACL:

In a glass lined reactor n-hexane and CMA are charged. The temperature is raised to 68
- 70 oC. Vacuum is applied up to 600-640 mm of Hg and the distilled hexane is collected
in a separate receiver. After complete removal of hexane the temperature is maintained
at 50 – 60 oC and catalyst is added. Addition of TC is started. Vent is attached to
scrubber containing 4N caustic solution (16%). After the addition is completed the
same temperature is maintained further till unreacted CMA estimates to be below 0.5
%. Unreacted TC should be below 1%. The degassed mass is transferred into SS reactor
for distillation under vacuum. The distilled CMAC is collected in the receiver from
which it is to be packed in drums.

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 CMA Hexane 1476.7 1 SO2( Recovery) 281
2 Thionyl chloride 523 2 HCl(Recovery) 160.6
3 Dimethylformamide 4.5 3 Hexane loss 20
4 Hexane (Recycled) 515.7
5 Aqueous layer 10
6 Residue 15
7 Loss 1.9
8 Cypermethric acid chloride 1000
Total 2004.2 Total 2004.2

HCl and Sodium Sulphite Recover Unit

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
1 Water 6831 1 HCl 1598.6
2 SO2( Recovery) 924 2 Na 2SO3 1819
3 HCl (Recovery) 527.6 3 Water vapour 7276
4 Caustic lye 2411
Total 10693.6 Total 10693.6

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 27 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 28 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.2 Metamitron (Tech)

STEP - 1: Preparation of Mandelonitrile (MN):

In a vessel HCl is taken and water is added. The net concentration of HCl solution
becomes 18%. The stirrer is started for 20 minutes. In another SS vessel, water is
charged and sodium cyanide is added under stirring. In a clean glass lined reactor,
Benzaldehyde is charged and brine is applied. Addition of 18% HCl solution and
NaCN solution from SS vessel is started simultaneously. After the addition is
completed, the stirring is continued for 1 hour. Then the two layers are allowed to
separate. The sample from top organic layer is checked for Mandelonitrile (MN)
content.

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Sodiumcynanide 580 1 Aqueous layer 4604.5
2 Toulene 1263 2 Mandelonitrile 2565.5
3 Benzaldehyde 1022
4 Hydrochloric acid 1473
5 Water 2832
Total 7170 Total 7170

STEP - 2: Preparation of Methyl Mandelate (MDT):

In a reactor ethanol is taken. In another glass lined reactor Conc. Sulphuric acid is
pumped. Slowly Conc. HCl is added to the sulphuric acid reactor. The dry
hydrochloric acid gas coming out of the reactor is then passed through Methanol
reactor for 10 – 12 hours. The normality of ethanolic HCl is checked and the addition of
mandelonitrile into the reactor is started Slowly. After completing the addition, the

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 29 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
temperature is raised in 4 hours and maintained further for 3 hours. Purity of Methyl
mandelate and unreacted mandelonitrile is checked. Unreacted mandelonitrile should
be 3 – 5% max. Later brine is applied for further cooling. Purging of ammonia gas is
started.

The material is drained into a clean Nutch Filter to separate ammonium chloride
formed during the reaction. The filtrate contains ethanolic solution of Methyl
mandelate. Washing of ethanol is given to the cake in the filter. The filtrate is
transferred for ethanol recovery. Heating of the reactor is started and recovered
Methanol is collected in a separate vessel. Distillation is continued till no more ethanol
distills out. The reactor is cooled and toluene and water are charged. The mass is
stirred for 30 minutes and the layers are allowed to separate for further one hour. The
aqueous layer is drained and two more washings are given and then organic layer is
transferred to a holding tank.

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Hydrochloric acid 2771 1 Spent acid 3519
Methanol (or) Ethanol 1292.5 Ammonium chloride 527.3
2 2
( Recovery )
Mandelonitrile 2565.5 Methanol (or) Ethanol 32
3 3
loss
Sulphuric acid 1852 Methanol (or) Ethanol
4 4
(Recycled) 830
5 Water 979 5 Aqueous layer 1776
6 Methyl mandelate 2775.7
Total 9460 Total 9460

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 30 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP - 3: Preparation of PGME:

Toluene and TEBA is taken in a reactor. In another SS reactor Hypochlorite solution is


taken. The addition of hypo solution from SS reactor and ethyl mandelate solution in
toluene from holding tank is started to the reactor containing TEBA and toluene.
Simultaneously unreacted ethyl mandelate is checked. It should be nil. Stirring is
stopped and the two layers are allowed to separate. The lower aqueous layer is
separated. Water jet vacuum is applied to the reactor and heating is started for toluene
recovery. Toluene is recovered and the batch is transferred to another glass-lined
reactor. PGME is distilled by vacuum distillation.

Sr. Sr.
Input Material Name Qty(kg) Output Material Name Qty(kg)
No. No.
1 Toulene 323 1 Aqueous layer 4826.8
2 Methyl mandelate 2775.7 2 Toulene(Recycled) 1470
3 Sod.Hypo 4389 3 D-PGME 1117
4 TEBA 42.1 4 Loss 35
5 Residue 30
6 Cut I 51
Total 7529.8 Total 7529.8

STEP - 4: Preparation of Metamitron (Tech)

In a glass-lined reactor, N, N-Dimethyl Acetamide (DMAC), PTSA and acetyl


hydrazine are charged and the stirrer is started. PGME addition is started at the same
temperature. The temperature is maintained for one hour and intermittently the
sample is checked for PGME content till it becomes less than 0.5%. Addition of
hydrazine hydrate is carried out over 4 -5 hours. The temperature is maintained for
further one hour and acetic acid is added till the pH becomes 7.0 and then toluene is
added and the toluene Slurry solution of intermediate formed is kept aside.

In another glass lined reactor, N, N-dimethyl acetamide and toluene are taken.
Potassium carbonate is added, and addition of toluene Slurry solution of intermediate
formed earlier is started, simultaneously the azeotrope of toluene and water is
collected as distillate. Distillation is continued till no more water distills out. The
distillation takes about 4 hours. Distillation is continued and the fraction containing a
mixture of toluene and DMAC is collected. Then ethanol is added. Chilling is applied
and then the mass is filtered through closed Nutch filter to separate the solid. The solid

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 31 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
is further subjected to centrifuge and the dried mass is the fed to Fluid bed drier (FBD)
for further drying till the moisture content of the product is reduced to less than 0.1%.
The sample from FBD is checked for purity and moisture content. Purity should be at
least 98.0%.

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
1 HH 654.6 1 Metamitron 1000
2 PTSA 49.7 2 DMA (Recycled) 3755
3 AH 793.5 3 Toulene (Recycled) 1126.3
4 DMA 3934.9 4 Loss 184
5 D-PGME 1117 5 Aqueous layer 1543.4
Toulene 1159.3 Methanol (or) Ethanol 1670
6 6
(Recycled)
7 AA 14.6 7 Residue 68.4
Methanol (or ) Ethanol 1682 Metamitron ML 67
8 8
(Recycled)
9 K2Co3 20.5 9 Solvent loss 12
Total 9426.1 Total 9426.1

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 32 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.3 Cypermethrin (Tech)

a) Manufacturing Process

A solution of sodium cyanide is prepared in SS reactor and further n-hexane is charged


along with Catalyst and soda ash. In another reactor a mixture of cypermethric acid
chloride, m-phenoxy benzaldehyde and n-hexane is prepared and kept at 10-15 oC. This
mixture is added to the first reactor keeping the temperature at room temperature and
maintaining the same temperature for 1 hour. The organic layer is then washed
successively with plain water, hypochlorite solution, and aqueous acetic acid and again
with plain water. It is then passed through sparkler filter and hexane is distilled out
first at normal pressure and then under vacuum to remove the traces to get
cypermethrin tech. of purity 92% min.

b) Chemical Reaction

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 33 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
c). Mass Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 CMAC 562 1 Aqueous layer 1495
2 MPB 485 2 Hexane loss 61
3 Hexane 2053 3 Hexane recovered 1992
4 Water 1235 4 Cypermethrin 1000
5 NaCN 140
6 Catalyst 15
7 Soda ash 15
8 Acetic acid 3
9 Hypo chlorite 40
Total 4548 Total 4548

d) Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 34 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.4 Permethrin (Tech)

a) Manufacturing Process

In a Glass lined reactor, CMAC (DVACl) and catalyst are charged. Addition of MPBAL
is started at temperature of 20oC. The addition is completed within 3 to 4 hours and the
same temperature is maintained for 3 hours. The sample is checked for unreacted
MPBAL. If not found, hexane is added and the hexane layer is washed with soda ash
solution, followed by plain water. The hexane layer is separated and transferred to
another reactor for distillation. Hexane is recovered by distilling under vacuum. The
material remaining in the reactor is permethrin technical, which is packed suitably in
lacquered MS drums.

b) Chemical Reaction

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 35 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
c) Mass Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 CMAC 583 1 HCl ( Recovery ) 393
2 MPBA 512 2 Hexane loss 41
3 Hexane 2053 3 Hexane recovered 2010
4 Water 1000 4 Permethrin 1000
5 Catalyst 15 5 Aqueous layer 737
6 Soda ash 15
7 Acetic acid 3
Total 4181 Total 4181

d) Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 36 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.5 Alpha Cypermethrin

STEP- I: High Cis Cypermethrin Preparation

a) Manufacturing Process

A solution of sodium cyanide is prepared in SS reactor and further n-hexane is charged


along with Catalyst and soda ash. In another reactor a mixture of Cis cypermethric acid
chloride, m-phenoxy benzaldehyde and n-hexane is prepared and kept at 10-15 oC. This
mixture is added to the first reactor keeping the temperature at room temperature and
maintaining the same temperature for 1 hour. The organic layer is then washed
successively with plain water, hypochlorite solution, and aqueous acetic acid and again
with plain water. It is then passed through sparkler filter and hexane is distilled out
first at normal pressure and then under vacuum to remove the traces to get Cis
Cypermethrin tech. of purity 95% min.

b). Chemical Reaction

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 37 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
c). Mass Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Cis CMAC 1022 1 Aqueous layer 2720
2 MPB 883 2 Hexane loss 111
3 Hexane 3736 3 Hexane recovered 3625
4 Water 2248 4 High Cis CMT 1820
5 NaCN 255
6 Catalyst 27
7 Soda ash 27
8 Acetic acid 6
9 Hypo chlorite 72
Total 8276 Total 8276

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 38 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Step-II: Alpha Cypermethrin Preparation

a) Manufacturing Process

Technical high cis cypermethrin is heated to 45oC and triethylamine (TEA) is added.
Later the mixture is gradually cooled from 45 oC to 25 oC and the temperature is
maintained for 2 hours. It is further chilled to 21oC and maintained for 12 hours. The
solid crystallized is filtered through Nutsch Filter and the cake obtained is dissolved in
n-hexane. Hexane phase is washed with dilute sulphuric acid till pH of the product
becomes 3 to 5. It is further washed with water and again chilled to 21 oC. Solid mass
obtained is filtered through Nutsch Filter and vacuum dried to get alpha cypermethrin
of 98% purity.

b) Chemical Reaction

c). Mass Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
High CIS CM 1820 Low purity CM 1071
1 1
(Recycle)
2 Hexane 1000 2 Aqueous layer 524
3 Water 500 3 Hexane 975
4 Catalyst 273 4 Hexane loss 25
5 Sulphuric acid 2 5 Alpha Cypermethrin 1000
Total 3595 Total 3595

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 39 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
d) Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 40 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.6 m - Phenoxy Benzaldehyde

 Manufacturing Process:

STAGE – I Formation of m-Bromobenzaldehyde

The Br-Cl complex is formed by charging chlorine and bromine in that order to
DCE(dichloromethane) @ 5-10 deg.C and which on further reaction with
benzaldehyde @ 10 deg.C in the presence of AlCl3 gives m-bromobenzaldehyde,which
is distilled under vacuum @ 120-125 deg.C., The reactor is vented through a heat
exchanger of proper MOC to avoid solvent losses with the venting of chlorine gas.
Bromine bottle is cooled in a suitable trough and charged to a rector through a funnel
of proper MOC.

The complex formation and bromination reactions are carried out in a glass lined
reactor having efficient stirring, reflux condenser and its vent connected to a proper
scrubbing system for gas absorption. Since it is an exothermic reaction proper care is
ensured. First chlorine is dissolve in DCE @ 2 deg C for 3 hours and then the
temperature of the solution is kept @ < 6 deg C. the bromine (pre-cooled) is charged
and a Slight negative pressure is maintained to avoid vapours of bromine.

Now to the aluminum chloride in DCE benzaldehyde is added. Since AlCl3 reacts
violently with water, proper care is taken to avoid moisture. To the above mass Br-Cl
solution is added and the temperature reaches upto 50 deg.C during end of the
addition. The above mass after cooling is charged to ice water and temperature is seen
not to exceed 28 deg C and layers are separated. The aqueous layer containing AlCl3 is
sold as a by-product and the solvent DCE is recovered and recycled. The washed
organic phase is subjected to distillation under vacuum (640-690 mm) for solvent
removal. The crude product is distilled to get product of purity in the range >97%.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 41 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Material Balance for Stage I

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Benzaldehyde 1000 1 m-BB 1420
2 AlCl3 796 2 forecut 121
3 chlorine 346 3 residue 23
4 bromine 771 4 losses 14
5 DCE 7009 5 HCl,Cl2 as 30% Hcl 1050
6 Water 4532 6 HBr, Br2 (Recycle) 50
7 Sodium thiosulphate 22 7 AlCl3 in water 2627
8 Caustic Lye 365 8 DCE 6909
9 Water and Thio. In Aq. Phase 2627
Total 14841 Total 14841

STAGE II

O
Br CHO
H+ Br
H2C OH
O
+ C OH Catalyst
H2

m-Bromobenzaldehyde, Ethyleneglycol and Toluene are charged in the presence of


regenerated resin.the water of reaction is removed by azeotropic distillation @ around
110 deg. C which reaches 130 deg. C towards end of reaction. The m-
Bromobenzaldehyde, ethylene glycol and toluene are charged in the reactor along with
the regenerated resin catalyst.

The reaction mass is heated to reflux and the water of reaction is removed by
azeotropic distillation @ temp around 110-125 deg. C. it takes 6-8 hours for the
completion of reaction. The crude acetal after distilling out toluene is taken for the next
stage without further purification. Toluene is recovered and recycled and Acetal of m-
Bromobenzaldehyde is ready for next stage.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 42 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Material Balance for STAGE II

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 m-BB 1420 1 Bromo acetal 2066
2 Ethylene glycol 533 2 Effluent 197
3 Toluene 1388 3 Toluene 1033
4 Resin 36 4 Resin 36
5 Losses 45
Total 3377 Total 3377

STAGE III

1. The potassium salt of phenol is formed by phenol and KOH flakes in toluene @120
0
C.

2. To the above reaction mass, m-bromobenzaldehyde is added in the presence of


cuprous chloride catalyst @150-190 0C to form acetal of m-phenoxy benzaldehyde,
the toluene recovered is recycled.

3. The cooking facilities available in the reactor take care of 5 0C in 5 Minutes. Since
phenol is very corrosive to skin, proper care is ensured. The reaction mass is heated
to reflux and the water of reaction is removed by azeotropic distillation and
temperature around 120 0C. and after completion it is cooled to 75 0C To the above
mass CuCl2 and acetal of m-BB are added and heated upto135 0C.

4. Since the reaction is highly exothermic at a temperature of 150 0C, toluene


distillation is carried out gradually.

5. Now the reaction temp Is increased up to 170 0 C and maintained for 4 hours.

The reaction mass is cooled to 80 0C and toluene is added on stirring. The filtrate is
washed with water and the organic phase is taken for next stage. Bromine from KBr
aqueous solution is recovered by Chlorination and Crystalline KCl is recovered from
the solution thus formed.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 43 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Material balance for stage III:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Phenol 751 1 org. phase 3944
2 KOH 465 2 losses 338
3 Toluene 3949 3 Toluene 1643
4 Bromoacetal 2066 4 Bromine(Recycle ) 580
5 Water 1878 5 KCl (Recovery) and 550
6 Chlorine 300 6 Water Vapour 2354
Total 9409 Total 9409

STAGE IV:

Hydrolysis of acetal m-PB and distillation of m-Phenoxy benzaldehyde

O
O O CHO
Hydrolysis H2C OH
O
H+ + C OH
H2
Actetal of m-Phenoxybenzaldehyde m-Phenoxybenzaldehyde

1. The acetal of m-Phenoxy benzaldehyde is hydrolyzed by 20 % dil. Sulphuric acid @


100-105 0C to form m-Phenoxy benzaldehyde and ethylene glycol.

2. The organic phase is washed with water till the aqueous phase is neutral. Normally
2-3 washings are sufficient.

3. The residue is removed from the reactor while it is hot (90 0 C) as it is very tarry @
lower temperatures.

4. In case of difficulty, the reactor is washed with methanol and heated to reflux. The
m-Phenoxy benzaldehyde crude is distilled in vacuum @ 145 0C to a purity level of
>98%.

The ethylene glycol and Toluene are recovered & recycled. The residue mostly of
polymeric impurities is drained off.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 44 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Material balance for Stage IV

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 mPB-Acetal in Toluene 3944 1 m-Phenoxy benzaldehyde 1000
2 Sulphuric acid 1665 2 Forecut ( Recycle ) 146
3 Residue 45
4 Losses 216
5 Toluene 2136
6 Aqueous phase 2066
Total 5609 Total 5609

 Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 45 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.7. Metaphenoxybenzyl Alcohol

a) Manufacturing Process

Raney Nickel is Slurried in Isopropyl alcohol (solvent) and Metaphenoxy


benzaldehyde (MPB) is added to this Slurry. Hydrogen is passed through this mixture
and then the MPB is hydrogenated to form Metaphenoxy benzaldehyde (MPBA). The
Slurry is filtered and Raney Ni is separated & recycled to next batch, and the clear
solution containing MPBA in Isopropyl alcohol is distilled to recover the solvent. The
pure product is collected in Drums.

b) Chemical Reaction

C6H5O-C6H4-CHO + H2 –------------------------------------------ C6H5O-C6H4-CH2OH


MPB IPA SOLVENT/ RANEY NICKEL MPBA

c) Material Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input material Name Output material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Metaphenoxybenzaldehyde 990.0 1 Metaphenoxybenzyl 1000.0
Alcohol
2 Hydrogen 12.3 2 Raney Ni (Recycled) 48.9
3 Raney Nickel 48.9 3 IsoPropylAlcohol ( rec.) 1013
4 IsoPropylAlcxohol 4 IsoPropylAlcohol
1124.1 ( vap. loss.) 111.1
5 water for washing 4500.0 5 H2 excess gas venting 2.33
6 Waste water generated 4500.0
Total 6675.3 Total 6675.3

d) Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 46 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.8. Deltamethrin

 Manufacturing Process

Deltamethrin is manufactured starting from acrylonitrile and carbon tetrachloride. The


manufacturing process is described in the following parts. First acrylonitrile is
condensed with carbon tetrachloride in the presence of cupric chloride as catalyst and
acetonitrile solvent. the reaction produces a product and the product is distilled to get
pure tetrachlorobutyronitrile (CBN) CBN is then hydrolyzed by dilute to get tetra
chloro butyronitric acid (CBA).the spent acid produced in this process ism separated
and sent to storage tank . This being sold to authorized dealers.Tetrachlorobutyric acid
thus obtained in the third stage will be reacted with thinoyl chloride to produce
tetrachlorobutyric acid chloride (CBC)The off gas is scrubbed in water and then with
caustic lye the resulting hydrochloric acid and sodium Sulphite solution are stored
separately in 30KL storage tank and 45KL storage tank respectively and are sold to
authorized dealers Tetrachlorobutyric acid chloride (CBC) is condensed with
isobutylene to get a cyclic compound 2 chloro cyclo butanone (2-CB) the product is
separated and is crystallized

2-CB is isomerised to 4-chlorocyclobutanone (4-CB) and is reacted with caustic solution


and finally neutralized to get cypermethric acid (CMA) in hexane .CIS-CMA is
isolated from CMA solution by selective crystallization the aqueous is separated and is
sent for Cypermethrin production .the process flow diagram is shown in Figure 1. The
chemical reaction is shown in figure II. The flow of the master plan in all the reactors is
shown in figure III.Pure CIS_CMA obtained as above is racemised to IR CIS-CMA
isomer using an optically active amine via its salt. Salt is neutralized and purified to
obtain pure (+) - IR cis permethric acid having high purity and matching the reported
specific rotation.IR CIS CMA is treated with Socl2 in a solvent to get Becisthemic acid
(C3-(dibromovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl cyclopropane carboxylic acid .it is purified by
selective crystallization in MDC solvent Becisthemic acid is treated with socl2 in a
solvent to get Becisthemic acid chloride .Becisthemic acid chloride is condensed with
NaCN and m-phenoxy benzaldehyde in a solvent top isolate racemic Deltamethrin in
good yield Racemic Deltamethrin produced as noted above is epimerized in a solvent
to isolate IR-CIS-α-S epimer ,this is further crystallized to get pure Deltamethrin .

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 47 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE I : Racemisation of Cis-CMA

Reaction conditions / Operation details

CIS-CMA is converted into respective sodium salt by stirring with dilute alkali and
obtained as clear solution. DMA OPT .HCL is dissolved in water to form solution then
the solution of DMA OPT .HCL is reacted with sodium salt of CIS-cma at about 20-25
ºc which is filtered to obtain DMA OPT. salt of RR.CMA as cake and DMA OPT .salt of
SS CMA is retained in the filtrate .

DMA OPT .salt of RR CMA in the cake is treated with EDC and dilute hydrochloric
acid to obtain pure RR CMA in EDC solution and DMA OPT .HCL in aqueous solution
which is recycled .similarly, DMA OPT> salt of SS CMA is treated with EDC and dilute
hydrochloric acid to obtain pure SS CMA in EDC solution and balance DMA OPT
.HCL in aqueous solution. DMA OPT. HCL is recycled for the next batch

The purities of basic raw material used viz., CIS-CMA, DMA OPT.HCL and EDC are
above 99% .the purity of resultant RR CMA is above 99.5% and the associated
impurities moisture and SS CMA

Material Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 CIS-CMA 1818 1 RR CMA 1090.5
2 DMA opt. HCl 876.75 2 SS CMA (to be used for 727.25
cypermethrin)
3 Etylene Di chloride 7286.25 3 Ethylene di chloride (rec) 6686.50
4 Caustic soda 348 4 Ethylene di chloride (loss) 600
5 Hydrochloric acid 1113.75 5 DMA OPT .HCl (rec) 810
6 Water 7807.5 6 Waste water 9336
Total 19250.25 Total 19250.25

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 48 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE II : Bromination of RR CMA

Reaction conditions / Operation details:

Aluminium chloride catalyst is taken in solvent MDC and stirred for 30 minutes. The
mass is cooled to 5 ºC. RR CMA is dissolved in MDC and this solution mixed with the
above in 1 hour period keeping the temperature between 5-7.5 ºC

Dry HBr is passed over 6-8 hours into the above reaction mixture maintaining the
temperature again at 5-7.5 ºC .the reaction mass is stirred for 30 minutes after HBr
addition and nitrogen is passed through the reaction for 30 minutes to drive off
unreacted HBr .unreacted HBr coming out during the reaction and purging is absorbed
in water and can be sold.

The reaction mass is drowned into ice and dilute hydrochloric acid mixture Slowly
keeping the temperature between 0 to 5 ºC the mass is then stirred , temperature raised
to 25 ºC ,settled and the layers separated . the aqueous layer containing 30 %
Aluminium chloride can be sold to zeolite and alum manufactures and hydrochloric
acid is washed with mild hydrochloric acid to remove traces of Aluminium chloride .

The organic layer is then treated with dilute caustic lye solution and water to convert
the bromo acids into sodium salt of bromo acids and tri bromo acid to desired di
bromo acids into sodium salt of bromo acids and tri bromo acid to desired di bromo
acids by dehydrohalogenation .the mass is settled and layers are separated .the mass is
then cooled to 30 ºc and filtered to obtain crude besthermic acid.

The purity of CMA used is above 99 % and that of key raw materials like Aluminium
chloride, HBr and MDC are above 98 % .The purity of becisthemic acid obtained will
be between 88.9 ºc and the associated impurities are chloro bromo acid and unreacted
CMA

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 49 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Material Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 RR CMA 1090.5 1 Becisthemic acid crude 1368
2 MDC/EDC 3450 2 MDC/EDC ( Recovered ) 3412.5
3 Aluminium chloride 1410 3 MDC/EDC (loss) 37.5
4 Hydrochloric acid 33% 1500 4 Hydrochloric acid 3900.75
5 HBr-dry 2535 5 Aluminium chloride 30 % 4710
( By Product )
6 Caustic lye 488.25 6 Waste water 7387.5
7 Scrubbing 1830
8 As ice 1650
9 Water 5212.5
10 HCl dilution 1650
Total 20816.25 Total 20816.25

STAGE III : Purification of Becisthemic Acid

Crude becisthemic acid is dissolved MDC at about 50 ºc ant then cooled to 5 ºc the
mass is fitered and washed with chilled MDC to obtain dibromo-acid . The fitrate is
taken for distillation to recover MDC and the distillation residue containing chloro-
bromo acid is taken back for crystallization. The purity of only raw material used for
the process viz., MDC is above 98 % the purity of product becisthemic acid obtained is
above 99 % and the associated impurities are chloro-bromo acid and solvent MDC

Material balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Becisthemic acid crude 1368 1 Becisthemic acid 1203
2 Crude MDC (or) EDC 3412.5 2 MDC/EDC (recovered) 2895
3 MDC/EDC (loss) 517.5
4 Chlorobromo acid 165
Total 4780.50 Total 4780.50

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 50 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE IV: Formation of Becisthemic Acid Chloride

Becisthemic acid is dissolved in solvent hexane at 40 ºC DMF is added thinoyl chloride


is then added to the above 40 ºC .the temperature is raised and maintained at 45 ºc for
4 hours . Unreacted CMA content is analysed and adjusted to < 1% by adding extra
thinoyl chloride if necessary solvent hexane is distilled out and acid chloride obtained
is taken for next stage reaction.

The purity of intermediate becisthemic acid taken is 99% + and that of raw materials
viz., a thionyl chloride, hexane and DMF are above 99%

Hydrogen chloride evolved in the reaction is scrubed in the water to get dilute
hydrochloric acid and sulphur di oxide is sc rubbed in dilute sodium hydroxide
solution to give sodium sulphite solution. Both the above by products are saleable

Material Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
1 Becisthemic acid 1203.75 1 Becisthemic acid chloride 1215
2 Hexane 862.5 2 Hexane (recovered ) 757.00
3 DMF 4.05 3 Hexane (Loss) 105.75
4 Thinoyl chloride 540 4 Organic Waste 67.50
5 C.S lye 47% 772.5 5 Hydrochloric acid 842.25
6 Lye 1582.5 6 Sodium sulphite powder 529.10
7 Preparation HCl scrubbing 667.5 7 Water vapour 2116.40
Total 5632.8 Total 5632.8

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 51 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE V: Formation of Racemic Deltamethrin

Solution of becisthemic acid chloride and meta – phenoxy–benzaldehyde in hexane


reacts with solution of sodium cyanide in water in the presence of phase transfer
catalyst viz., triethyl benyl ammonium chloride at 30 ºc in hexane solvent medium to
form racemic deltamethrin .The solution is given to water wash to remove traces of
sodium cyanide and hexane distilled out to obtain racemic Deltamethrin. The water
washes contain sodium cyanide and it is treated with sodium hypochlorite solution to
destroy sodium cyanide The purities of reactants to be used viz., becisthemic acid
chloride .meta-pheenoxy benzaldehyde and sodium cyanide will be above 99% The
purity of racemic Deltamethrin obtained will be 98% (min) and the likely impurities
are unreacted meta-phenoxy benzaldehyde and becisthemic acid

Material Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 Becisthemic acid 1215 1 Racemic deltamethrin 1875
2 Chloride MPB 735 2 Hexane (recovered ) 1597.5
3 Sodium cyanide 217.5 3 Hexane (Loss) 255
4 TEBAC 21.75 4 Waste water 3742.2
5 n-hexane 1852.5 5 Nitrogen 37.05
6 Water 1927.5
7 10% Sodium hypochloride 1537.5
Total 7506.75 Total 7506.75

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 52 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Stage VI: Formation of Deltamethrin

Racemic Deltamethrin obtained as above is epimerized at 30 ºc in the presence of


triethyl amine and solvent IPA to form Deltamethrin. Then it filtered, dried under
vaccum. IPA and TEA are recovered and recycled .The purity of racemic delta methrin
used will be above 98% and that IPA and triethylamine will be above 99 % and the
purity of Deltamethrin Obtained will be above 99%

Material Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No. (kg) No. (kg)
1 Racemic Deltamethrin 1875 1 Deltamethrin 1500
2 Tri ethyl amine 675 2 Tri ethylamine (recovered) 641.25
3 IPA 300 3 IPA (recovered) 277.5
4 Tri ethylamine (loss) 33.75
5 Residue 397.5
Total 2850 Total 2850

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 53 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 54 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.9. RRCMA

a) Manufacturing Process

CIS-CMA is converted into respective sodium salt by stirring with dilute alkali and
obtained as clear solution. DMA OPT. HCL is dissolved in water to form solution then
the solution of DMA OPT .HCL is reacted with sodium salt of CIS-CMA at about 20-25
ºc which is filtered to obtain DMA OPT. salt of RR.CMA as cake and DMA OPT .salt of
SS CMA is retained in the filtrate .DMA OPT .salt of RR CMA in the cake is treated
with EDC and dilute hydrochloric acid to obtain pure RR CMA in EDC solution and
DMA OPT .HCL in aqueous solution which is recycled .similarly, DMA OPT> salt of
SS CMA is treated with EDC and dilute hydrochloric acid to obtain pure SS CMA in
EDC solution and balance DMA OPT .HCL in aqueous solution. DMA OPT. HCL is
recycled for the next batch the purities of basic raw material used viz.; CIS-CMA, DMA
OPT.HCL and EDC are above 99% .the purity of resultant RR CMA is above 99.5% and
the associated impurities moisture and SS CMA

b) Material Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 CIS-CMA 1667.13 1 RR CMA 1000
2 DMA opt. Hcl 803.99 2 SS CMA (to be used for 666.9
cypermethrin)
3 Etylene Di chloride 6681.57 3 Ethylene di chloride (rec) 6131.59
4 Caustic soda 319.12 4 Ethylene di chloride (loss) 550.20
5 Hydrochloric acid 1021.32 5 DMA OPT .HCL (rec) 742.78
6 Water 7159.56 6 Waste water 8561.22
Total 17652.69 Total 17652.69

c) Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 55 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.10 DICAMBA

 Manufacturing Process

DICAMBA (2-Methoxy-3,6-dichloro benzonic acid) is manufactured starting from 2,5-


dichloroaniline . In the first step, the 2,5- dichloroaniline is diazotized in sulphuric acid
medium with aqueous solution of sodium Nitrate at 5-6˚C. the diazonium sulphate so
formed is not isolated but decomposed by addition to hot water and 2,5-
dichlorophenol so formed is isolated by stream distillation. The 2,5-dichlorophenol is
then carbonated by Carbon-di-oxide to yield 2-hydroxy-3,6-dichlorobonzonic acid.

First 2,5- dichlorophenol is treated with aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide to


form in potassium salt which is dehydrated by addition of xylene and distillation of
water as water-xylene azeotrope. The dry potassium salt is then treated with Carbon-
di-oxide at 130-140˚C in xylene solution under a pressure of 35 kg/cm2. The potassium
salt of acid formed is neutralized with hydrochloric acid to recover the benzonic acid
derivative. The unconverted phenol is recovered from xylene solution. In the last step,
the 2-hydroxy-3, 6-chloro benzoic acid is methylated with dimethyl sulphate and
aqueous sodium hydroxide to give 2-Methoxy-3, 6-dichloro-benzonic acid
(DICAMBA). The product is isolated after neutralization with aqueous Hydrochloric
acid and extraction with solvent toluene extract is washed with water and the product
is recovered by distillation of toluene

STAGE I : 2, 5-Dichlorophenol formation

Dichloroaniline is dissolved in 75-76% solution of sulphuric acid at 80˚C and the salt is
prepared. The cold salt is treated with aq solution of sodium nitrite at 5-6˚C to form the
diazonium sulphate. The Diazonium sulphate is decomposed in hot water to yield the
2,5-dichlorophenol.which is separated by stream distillation.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 56 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Material Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 2,5- dichloro aniline 3390 1 2,5- dichlorophenol 3180
2 Sodium nitrite 1460 2 Sulphuric acid (spent) 8240
3 98% Sulphuric acid 7840 3 Sodium sulphate 5640
(in spent acid)
4 Water 8450 4 Waste water 3660
5 Sulfamic acid 100 5 Nitrogen gas 520
Total 21240.00 Total 21240.00

The spent sulphuric acid containing sodium sulphate is taken for recovery. The
nitrogen gas librated is vented out. Total time cycle 18Hrs.

STAGE II: 3, 6-Dichloro Salicylic Acid formation

Dichlorophenol is treated with aqueous potassium hydroxide solution to form the


potassium salt, which is dehydrated by addition xylene and removal of water
azeotropically.The dried potassium salt is suspended in xylene in an autoclave and
carbon-di-oxide is passed at 140˚C and a pressure of 35 kg/cm2 is maintained till the
reaction is complete. A partial conversion (32%) is achieved and the unreacted dichloro
phenol is recovered and recycled. The potassium salt of the acid obtained is
neutralized with aqueous Hydro chloric acid. The solid obtained is diluted and washed
with water and dried.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 57 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Material Balance:

Sl. Qty Sl. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 2,5- dichlorophenol 3180 1 3,6-Dichloro Salicylic Acid 1680
2 Potassium chloride 1080 2 Recovered 2,5 1830
Dichlorophenol
3 Water 740 3 Xylene recovered 10930
4 Xylene 11560 4 Waste water 4100
5 Carbon di oxide 1700 5 Xylene losses 630
6 Aq.hydrochloric acid(30%) 2350 6 Potassium chloride powder 288
and
7 Water vapour 1152
Total 20610.00 Total 20610.00

STAGE III: 3, 6-Dichloro 2 Methoxy Benzonic Acid

3,6-dichloroSalicyclic acid is methylated at 100˚C using water as solvent with die


methyl Sulphate and sodium Hydroxide. The methylated acid is recovered by
neutralization with aq hydro chloric acid. The product is filtered and washed with
water and the technical product DICAMBA obtained is dried.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 58 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Material Balance :

Sl. Qty Sl. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No (kg)
1 3,6-Dichloro Salicylic 1680 1 3,6-Dichloro 2 methoxy 1000
Acid benzoic acid (Dicamba)
2 Sodium hydroxide 1660 2 Sodium methyl Sulphate 3900
(in Effluent)
3 Water 6470 3 Waste water 9014
4 Dimethyl Sulphate 3660 4 Sodium Chloride (in 470
Effluent)
5 Aq.hydrochloric acid 990 5 Organic Impurities 76
(30%)
Total 14460.00 Total 14460.00

 Overall Flow Chart

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 59 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.11. Carfentrazone

 Manufacturing Process

STAGE I : Intermediate - I

Sodium sulfite solution was charged to a mixture of 2-fluoroaniline, sodium nitrite


solution & hydrochloric acid at 40 – 45°C. The subsequent mass was basified with
caustic lye solution & the resultant product of this step (Intermediate – I) was obtained
by filtration.

NH2
Na SO NH
+ 2 3 NH2
F HCl + NaNO2
NaOH Cl F
2-fluoroaniline Sodium nitrite
Intermediate - I

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 2-fluoroaniline 730.0 1 Intermediate-I 770.0
2 Sodium nitrite 460.0 Effluent:
3 Hydrochloric acid 4210.0 2 Aqueous effluent 17105.0
4 Sodium sulfite 2710.0 3 Sodium sulphite 1352
5 Caustic lye solution 2644.0 4 Water Vapour 5408
6 Water 9606.0
20% Sodium
7 4275.0
hydroxide solution

Total 24635.0 Total 24635.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 60 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE II : Intermediate - II

A mixture of Intermediate - II, acetaldehyde, sodium cyanate and acetic acid in solvent
methanol was chlorinated using chlorine gas at 50 – 55 °C for 6 – 8 hours. Product of
this step (Intermediate II) was filtered after recovery of methanol under reduced
pressure.

F F
Methanol / Cl2 O
+ CH 3CHO + NaOCN + CH3COOH
NHNH 2 N
Acetaldehyde Sodium cyanate Acetic acid NH
Intermediate - I N

Intermediate II

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - I 770.0 1 Intermediate-II 1180.0
2 Acetaldehyde 382.0 2 Methanol recovered 3843
3 Sodium cyanate 544.0 3 Methanol loss 321.0
4 Chlorine 535.0 4 Effluent:
5 Acetic acid 500.0 5 Aqueous effluent 4204.5
6 Methanol 4000.0 6 Scrubbed sodium hydroxide 534.0
solution (containing sodium
hypochlorite)

7 Water 3000.0 7 Drying loss 148.5


10% sodium hydroxide
8 500.0
solution

Total 10231.0 Total 10231.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 61 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE III : Intermediate - III

A mixture of intermediate - II in solvent dimethyl formamide and potassium carbonate


was heated to 175 – 180°C. Freon 22 gas was purged for 3 – 4 hours. The mass was
cooled to 50 – 60°C and resultant solid was filtered. Chlorine gas was purged to the
filtrate for 2 – 3 hours at 65 – 75°C. Dimethyl formamide was distilled off, residue
quenched in water and the product of this step (Intermediate III) was obtained by
filtration.

F Cl F
O O
DMF Cl
2
N + CHF 2 Cl + K 2 CO 3 N CHF 2
NH N
N Freon gas Potassium N
Carbonate
Intermediate II Intermediate-III

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - II 1180.0 1 Intermediate - III 1324.0
Potassium carbonate 924.0 Dimethyl formamide 6141.0
2 2
recovered
3 Dimethyl formamide 7500.0 3 Dimethyl formamide loss 147.5
4 Dichlorodifluoromethane 665.0 Effluent:
5 Chlorine gas 895.0 4 Aqueous effluent 12232.5
6 Water 9650.0 5 Scrubbed sodium hydroxide 1333.0
solution (containing sodium
hypochlorite)
7 10% sodium hydroxide 500.0 6 Drying loss 136.0
solution
Total 21314.0 Total 21314.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 62 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE IV: Intermediate - IV

Nitric acid was charged to a mixture containing Intermediate – III in solvent


dichloroethane and oleum at room temperature. The reaction mass was quenched in
water and the resultant product (Intermediate – IV) was obtained by filtration. Solvent
dichloroethane recovered during the process was recycled.

Cl F Cl F
O O
H 2 SO 4 /HNO 3
F F
N N O 2N N N
N F N F

Intermediate-III Intermediate - IV

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - III 1324.0 1 Intermediate - IV 1415.0
2 Oleum 5565.2 2 Dichloroethane recovered 3074.0
3 Nitric acid 502.2 3 Dichloroethane loss 315.0
4 Dichloroethane 3250.0 Effluent:
5 Water 9500.0 4 Spent acid 12266.6
5 Aqueous effluent 2931.8
6 Drying loss 139.0
Total 20141.4 Total 20141.4

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 63 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE V : Intermediate - V

A solution containing intermediate – IV in solvent isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and Pd/C


catalyst was pressurized using hydrogen at 70 – 80°C for a period of 11 – 12 hours. The
mass was cooled to 50 – 60°C & Pd/C Catalyst was filtered off & recycled. Solvent IPA
was distilled, residue was quenched in water and the product (Intermediate-IV) was
obtained by filtration.

Cl F
5% Pd/C Cl F
O
O
O 2N N CHF 2 IPA, H 2
N H 2N N CHF 2
N N
N
Intermediate - IV Intermediate - V

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - IV 1415.0 1 Intermediate - V 1104.8
2 Isopropyl alcohol 6325.0 2 Isopropyl alcohol recovered 5249.25
3 Catalyst Pd / C 59.5 3 Isopropyl alcohol loss 625.0
4 Water 10050.0 4 Catalyst Pd/C recovered 56.5
Effluent:
5 Aqueous effluent 10624.7
6 Drying loss 189.25
Total 17849.5 Total 17849.5

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 64 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP VI: Carfentrazone

A mixture of Intermediate – V, ethyl acrylate and acetonitrile was charged to the


reactor. Mixture was heated to 50 – 60°C and chlorine gas was purged. Acetonitrile
was distilled off and the residue was quenched in water & the product was isolated by
filtration. Recovered acetonitrile was recycled in subsequent batches.

Cl F Cl F
O O Cl O
F Cl 2
H2N O F
N N + O N
N Acetonitrile N
F O N F

Intermediate - V Ethyl acrylate Carfentrazone

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - V 1104.8 1 Carfentrazone 1000.0
2 Ethyl acrylate 425.0 2 Acetonitrile recovered 4891.25
3 Chlorine 550.0 3 Acetonitrile loss 475.0
4 Acetonitrile 5300.0 Effluent:
5 Water 4650.0 4 Aqueous effluent 5317.3
6 10% Sodium hydroxide 500.00 5 Scrubbed sodium hydroxide 725.0
solution solution (containing sodium
hypochlorite)
6 Drying loss 121.5
Total 12529.8 Total 12529.8

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 65 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 Flow Diagram:

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 66 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.12 Sulfentrazone

 Manufacturing Process

STEP I: Intermediate - I

A mixture of phenyl hydrazine, acetaldehyde, sodium cyanate and acetic acid in


solvent methanol was chlorinated using chlorine gas over a period of 6 – 8 hours at 50
– 55 °C. Product of this step (Intermediate I) was filtered after recovery of methanol
under reduced pressure.

Methanol /Cl2 O
+ CH3CHO + NaOCN + CH3COOH
NHNH2 N
AcetaldehydeSodium cyanate Acetic acid NH
Phenylhydrazine N

Intermediate I

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Phenyl hydrazine 765.0 1 Intermediate-I 1065.0
2 Acetaldehyde 376.0 2 Methanol recovered 3788.0
3 Sodium cyanate 530.0 3 Methanol loss 344.5
4 Chlorine 530.0 Effluent:
5 Acetic acid 500.0 4 Aqueous effluent 4349.0
Scrubbed sodium hydroxide 522.0
6 Methanol 4000.0 5 solution (containing sodium
hypochlorite)
7 Water 3000.0 6 Drying loss 132.5
8 10% sodium hydroxide 500.0
solution
Total 10201.0 Total 10201.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 67 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP II : Intermediate - II

A mixture of intermediate - II in solvent dimethyl formamide and potassium carbonate


was heated to 175 – 180°C. Freon 22 gas was purged for 3 – 4 hours. The mass was
cooled to 50 – 60°C and the resultant solid was filtered. Chlorine gas was purged to the
filtrate over a period of 4 – 5 hours maintaining the temperature of the mass at 65 –
75°C. Solvent dimethyl formamide was distilled off under reduced pressure, residue
quenched in water and filtered to give Intermediate – II.

Cl Cl
O O
DMF Cl 2
N + CHF 2 Cl + K 2 CO 3 N CHF 2
NH N
N Freon gas Potassium N
Carbonate
Intermediate I Intermediate-II

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - I 1065.0 1 Intermediate - II 1360.4
2 Potassium carbonate 900.0 2 Dimethyl formamide 6578.5
recovered
3 Dimethyl formamide 7550.0 3 Dimethyl formamide loss 132.5
4 Dichlorodifluoromethane 650.0 Effluent:
5 Chlorine gas 1778.0 4 Aqueous effluent 12410.6
Scrubbed sodium hydroxide
1950.0
6 Water 9650.0 5 solution (containing sodium
hypochlorite)
10% sodium hydroxide 1000.0
7 6 Drying loss 161.0
solution
Total 22593.0 Total 22593.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 68 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP III : Intermediate - III

Nitric acid was charged to a mixture containing Intermediate – II in solvent


dichloroethane and oleum at ambient temperature. The mass was quenched in water &
the resultant product (Intermediate – III) was obtained by filtration. Solvent
dichloroethane recovered during the process was recycled.

Cl Cl Cl Cl
O O
+ H 2 SO 4 + HNO 3
N CHF 2 CHF 2
N O 2N N N
Sulfuric acid Nitric acid
N N

Intermediate-II Intermediate-III

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - II 1360.4 1 Intermediate - III 1417.2
2 Oleum 4450.0 2 Dichloroethane recovered 2546.55
3 Nitric acid 385.5 3 Dichloroethane loss 262.0
4 Dichloroethane 2620.0 Effluent:
5 Water 9500.0 4 Spent acid 10291.6
5 Aqueous effluent 3610.0
6 Drying loss 188.55
Total 18315.9 Total 18315.9

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 69 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP IV: Intermediate - IV

A solution containing intermediate – III in solvent isopropyl alcohol (IPA) and Pd/C
catalyst was pressurized using hydrogen at 70 – 80°C for a period of 10 – 11 hours. The
mass was cooled to 50 – 60°C & Pd/C Catalyst was filtered off and recycled. Solvent
IPA was distilled, residue was quenched in water and the product (Intermediate-IV)
was obtained by filtration.

Cl Cl
5% Pd/C Cl Cl
O
O
O 2N N CHF 2 IPA, H 2
N H 2N N CHF 2
N N
N
Intermediate - III Intermediate - IV

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - III 1417.2 1 Intermediate – IV 1064.6
2 Isopropyl alcohol 6415.0 2 Isopropyl alcohol recovered 2566.75
3 Catalyst Pd / C 63.2 3 Isopropyl alcohol loss 609.2
4 Water 10285.0 4 Catalyst Pd/C recovered 60.1
Effluent:
5 Aqueous effluent 13671.0
6 Drying loss 208.75
Total 18180.4 Total 18180.4

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 70 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP V: Sulfentrazone

A mixture of Intermediate – IV, toluene and pyridine was charged to the reactor.
Mixture was heated to 50 - 60°C and methane sulfonyl chloride was charged. Reaction
was subjected to a series of extractions. Pyridine was recovered by extraction with
dichloromethane. Toluene was distilled and the residue was quenched in water and
filtered to yield Sulfentrazone technical. Recovered toluene was recycled in subsequent
batches.

Cl Cl Cl Cl
O O
Pyridine
H2N N CHF2 + CH3SO2Cl N CHF2
N HN N
N methane sulfonyl Toluene N
SO2CH3
chloride
Intermediate - IV Sulfentrazone

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - IV 1064.6 1 Sulfentrazone 1000.0
2 Methane sulfonyl 689.0 2 Toluene recovered 4599.9
chloride
3 Pyridine 490.6 3 Toluene loss 498.4
4 Toluene 4983.8 4 Dichloromethane recovered 1806.3
5 Dichloromethane 2125.0 5 Dichloromethane loss 318.7
6 Water 4250.0 6 Pyridine recovered 441.5
7 Pyridine loss 49.1
Effluent:
8 Aqueous effluent 4774.6
9 Drying loss 114.5
Total 13603.0 Total 13603.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 71 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 Flow Diagram:

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 72 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.13 Thiamethoxam

 Manufacturing Process

STAGE I: Preparation of Intermediate-1

Reaction of Allyl chloride with Chlorine gas at 20-25°C and then treated with dilute
sodium hydroxide solution at 70-75°C to get Intermediate-1. Separated the bottom
organic and washed with water to get pure Intermediate-1

Excess chlorine gas scrubbed in 4N sodium hydroxide solution in ventury scrubber.


Purity of Allyl chloride used for the reaction is always above 99%, RM Chlorine gas is
98% and that of caustic lye is above 47%. The purity of Intermediate-1 obtained will be
min.98%.

Cl 2 (gas)
Cl Cl
Cl
NaOH / H 2O
Allyl Chloride Intermediate -1

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Allyl Chloride 670 1 Intermediate - 1 1010
2 Chlorine gas 630 2 Scrubber Sodium hydroxide 520
solution
3 Water 2100 3 Aqueous Effluent 2770
4 47% Caustic lye 900
Total 4300 Total 4300

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 73 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE II: Preparation of Intermediate - 2

The Intermediate-1 obtained above is heated at 80-85°C with ammonium thiocyanate


solution and the product obtained is separated. Mixed with Ethylene dichloride
solvent and then purged Chlorine and sulphur dioxide at 60-65°C to get Intermediate-
2. The product is washed with water and recovered the EDC solvent and distilled to
get pure Intermediate-2. Excess chlorine and sulphur dioxide gas was scrubbed in
dilute sodium hydroxide solution in ventury scrubber.

Purities of reactants to be used viz. Intermediate-1 is above 98% and Ammonium


thiocyanate, EDC, Chlorine and sulphur dioxide is above 99%. The purity of
Intermediate-2 obtained will be min.97%

NH 4 SCN / H 2 O
Cl S
Cl Cl
Cl
N
Cl 2 (gas) / SO 2
Intermediate -1 Intermediate.2

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate-1 1010 1 Intermediate-2 980
2 Ammonium thiocyanate 780 2 EDC recovered 2350
3 EDC 2500 3 EDC vapour loss 150
Scrubbed sodium hydroxide 3400
4 Chlorine gas 700 4
solution
5 Sulphur dioxide 120 5 Aqueous Effluent 7990
6 4 N Sodium Hydroxide 6 Residue 240
3000
Solution
7 Water 7000
Total 15110 Total 15110

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 74 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE III: Preparation of Intermediate - 3

Guanidine nitrate reacted with sulphuric acid at 15-20°C and the resultant product
filtered and washed with water to get Nitro guanidine with 98% purity. 40%
methylamine solution reacted with 50% sulfuric acid at 10-15°C and the above nitro
guanidine added and cooked at 50-55°C for 3hr.Cooled to 20°C and filtered and
washed with cold water. This product reacted with formic acid and formaldehyde at
45-50°C. Filtered and washed with water and dried to get Intermediate-3 with 98%
min purity.

Purity of reactants Guanidine nitrate will be min 98%.

Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Guanidine Nitrate 1255 1 Intermediate-3 925
2 Sulfuric acid 3365 2 Spent sulfuric acid (50%) 6280
3 40% Methyl amine 890 3 Aqueous Effluent 8297
4 Para formaldehyde 742 4 Water drying loss 95
5 Formic acid 345
6 Water 9000
Total 15597 Total 15597

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 75 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STAGE IV: Preparation of Thiamethoxam

Intermediate-3 reacted with Intermediate-2 in presence potassium carbonate and DMC


solvent at 50-55°C to get Thiamethoxam. Cooled and water added to remove
potassium carbonate. Then cooled to 10°C and filtered to get Thiamethoxam Technical
with 97% purity. DMC was recovered and recycled. The purity of DMC solvent and
potassium carbonate will be above 99%

O O N
Dimethyl carbonate
S N N Cl
Cl N NH S
Cl + K 2 CO 3
- -
N O +N O +N
N N
O O
Thiamethoxam
Mass Balance:

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate-3 925 1 Thiamethoxam Technical 1000
2 Intermediate-2 980 2 Recovered DMC 2790
3 DMC 3000 3 DMC vapour loss 210
4 Potassium carbonate 900 4 Aqueous effluent 3645
5 Water 2500 5 Residue 660
Total 8305 Total 8305

 Flow Diagram:

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 76 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.3.14. Ethofumesate

 Manufacturing Process

STEP I : Manufacture of Intermediate - I

a). Process Description

Morpholine was charged slowly to isobutyraldehyde in toluene over a period of 1 – 2


hours maintaining the temperature of the mass at 40 – 50°C. Quinone in toluene was
charged to the above mixture and the mass was cooked at reflux temperature for a
period of 5 – 6 hours. Solvent toluene was recovered from the reaction mass at 80 –
90°C and 700 – 720mmHg vacuum and was recycled in subsequent batches. The
residue was quenched in ice cold water and the mass was filtered. The product of this
step, Intermediate - I was dried and taken for subsequent step.

b). Chemical Reaction


O
O Toluene HO
HN
+ O +
H 40 - 50°C / reflux N
O
O O
Isobutyraldehyde Morpholine Quinone Intermediate - I

c). Material Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Isobutyraldehyde 500.0 1 Intermediate-I 1365.0
2 Morpholine 604.0 2 Toluene recovered 3930.5
3 Quinone 600.0 3 Toluene loss 400.0
4 Toluene 4300.0 Effluent:
5 Water 1000.0 4 Aqueous effluent 1278.0
5 Drying loss 30.5
Total 7004.0 Total 7004.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 77 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP II : Manufacture of Intermediate - II

a). Process Description

A mixture of intermediate - I in solvent toluene and triethylamine was cooled to 5 -


10°C. Methylsulfonyl chloride was charged to the above mixture over a period of 2 – 3
hours. After completion of reaction, the mass was filtered off to remove triethyl amine
hydrochloride, which was basified with caustic lye solution and recycled in subsequent
batches. The filtrate was washed with water and the product, Intermediate – II in
solvent toluene was taken as such for next step reaction

b). Chemical Reaction


. O
HO O S O
triethylamine
+ S Cl
N toluene O N
O O
O O 5 - 10°C O
Intermediate - I methanesulfonylchloride Intermediate - II

c). Material Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - I 1365.0 1 Intermediate - II in toluene 4775.0
2 Methylsulfonylchloride 650.0 2 Triethylamine recovered 517.5
3 Triethyl amine 575.0 3 Triethylamine loss 57.5
4 Toluene 3500.0 Effluent:
5 Water 1500.0 4 Aqueous effluent 2740.0
48% sodium hydroxide 500.0
6
solution
Total 8090.0 Total 8090.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 78 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
STEP III: Manufacture of Ethofumesate

a). Process Description

A mixture of Intermediate – II in toluene, ethanol and 35% hydrochloric acid was


heated to reflux for a period of 8 – 10 hours. After completion of reaction, the reaction
mass was washed to neutral pH using water and sodium bicarbonate solution. Solvent
toluene was recovered from the reaction mass at 80 – 90°C at 700 – 720mmHg vacuum
and was recycled in subsequent batches. The residue was quenched in ice cold water,
filtered, washed with water, sucked well and dried to yield Ethofumesate technical
with 96%+ purity.

b). Chemical Reaction

O
O
S O
HCl / Toluene S O
O
O N + C2H 5OH
reflux temperature O O
OC2H5
O Ethanol
Ethofumesate
Intermediate - II

c). Material Balance

Sr. Qty Sr. Qty


Input Material Name Output Material Name
No (kg) No. (kg)
1 Intermediate - II 4775.0 1 Ethofumesate 1000.0
2 Ethanol 1000.0 2 Toluene recovered 3387.5
3 35% Hydrochloric acid 250.0 3 Toluene loss 170.0
4 Water 3500.0 Effluent:
5 Sodium bicarbonate 100.0 4 Aqueous effluent 4910.0
5 Drying loss 157.5
Total 9625.0 Total 9625.0

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 79 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 Flow Diagram:

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 80 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.4 Details of Product & Raw Material Storage

Hazardous Chemicals as per Manufacturing, Storage and Import of Hazardous


Chemicals Rules 2000 are listed below. Proper enclosures, in the form of Dykes will be
provided to all Storage Tanks. All necessary fire-fighting arrangements will be
provided near the storage area to combat any fire emergency.

Table No. 2.4 – Details of Product & Raw Material Storage

 PRODUCTS:

Sr. Name of Chemical Solid/ Material of Storage


No. Liquid Construction Capacity
1. D V Acid Chloride Liquid HDPE Drum 15

2. Cypermethrin Technical Liquid MS Epoxy Drums 25

3. Permethrin Technical Liquid MS Epoxy Drums 15


4. Alphacypermethrin Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 20
Technical Fibre Drums
5. Metamitron Technical Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 15
Fibre Drums
6. Meta phenoxy Benzaldehyde Liquid HMHDPE Drums 30

7. MPBA Liquid HMHDPE Drums 15


8. RRCMA Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 10
Fibre Drums
9. Deltamethrin Technical Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 10
Fibre Drums
10. Thiamethoxam Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 15
Fibre Drums
11. Carfentrazone Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 15
Fibre Drums
12. Sulfentrazone Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 15
Fibre Drums
13. DICAMBA Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 10
Fibre Drums
14. Ethofumisate Solid GI / MS / HMHDPE / 10
Fibre Drums

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 81 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 RAW MATERIALS:

Sr. Name of Chemical Solid/Liquid Material of Storage Capacity


No. /Gas Construction
1. Acrylonitrile Liquid MS Tank 2 X 40 KL SS Tank

2. Carbon Tetrachloride Liquid MS Tank 2 X 50 KL MS Tank

3. Acetonitrile Liquid MS Tank 1 X 25 KL MS Tank

4. Hydrochloric acid Liquid PPFRP/ 2 X 25 KL PPFRP Tank

Syntex Tank

5. Thionyl Chloride Liquid G.I Drum / Tank 2 X 20 KL SS Tank

6. Triethyl Amine Liquid MS Tank 1 X 25 KL MS Tank

7. Isobutylene Gas/Liquid MS Tank 3 X 20 KL MS Bullet

8. Hexane Liquid MS Tank 2 X 40 KL MS Tank

9. Sulphuric Acid Liquid MS/PPFRP 1 X 40 KL MS Tank

10. CS Lye Liquid MS Tank 3 X 80 KL MS Tank

11. Sodium Cyanide Solid MS Drum 15 MT

12. Toluene Liquid MS Tank 1 X 40 KL MS Tank

13. Benzaldehyde Liquid MS Tank 1 X 40 KL MS Tank

14. Methanol (OR) Ethanol Liquid MS Tank 2 X 40 KL MS Tank

15. Sodium hydrochloride Liquid Tank 2 X 25 KL PPFRP Tank

16. Bromine Liquid Tank 3 X 8 KL MSGL Tanks

17. Chlorine Gas / Liquid MS Cylinder 3.0 MT

18. EDC Liquid MS Tank 1 X 40 KL MS Tank

19. MEG Liquid Ms Tank 1 X 40 KL MS Tank

20. Phenol Liquid MS Tank 1 X 50 KL MS Tank

21. Hydrogen Gas MS Cylinder 3.0 MT

22. Iso Propyl Alcohol Liquid MS Tank 1 X 50 KL Ms Tank

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 82 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.5 Detail of Water Consumption

2.5.1 During Construction Phase

Water requirement during construction activities is given in Table No. 2.5 this
requirement will be met through GIDC water supply system.

Table No. 2.5 - Water Consumption during Construction Phase

Sr. Water Consumption


Use
No. (kl/day)
1 Domestic
50
2 Construction activities and sprinkling
Total 50#

2.5.2 During Operation Phase

On an average 1,383 kl/day of water will be obtained through GIDC water supply
system. Category wise water consumption is given in Table No. 2.6 and Category wise
wastewater generation is given in Table No. 2.7. Water balance diagram is attached as
Annexure: 2.1.

Table No. 2.6 - Category wise Water Consumption

Sr. Water Consumption


Description
No. (kl/day)
a. Process

Product Water Consumption (kl/MT)

1 D V acid chloride 16.22 108.11


2 Metamitron 3.81 12.70
3 Cypermethrin 1.24 6.18
4 Permethrin 1.00 2.50
5 Alpha cypermethrin 2.75 4.58
6 MPB 6.41 42.73

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 83 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Water Consumption
Description
No. (kl/day)
7 MPBA 4.50 15.00
8 Deltamethrin 19.10 6.37
9 RRCMA 7.16 7.16
10 DICAMBA 15.66 26.10
11 Carfentrazone 46.46 154.85
12 Sulfentrazone 36.69 122.28
13 Thiamethoxam 20.60 34.33
14 Ethofumesate 6.00 10.00
Sub Total - a 552.89
b. Boiler (make-up) 300.00
c. Cooling (make – up) 400.00
d. Washing 25.00
e. Gardening 25.00
f Domestic 40.00
g Softener Regeneration 40.00

TOTAL (a+b+c+d+e+f) 1382.89≈1383

Table No. 2.7 - Category wise Wastewater Generation

Sr. Name of Product Wastewater Production Wastewater


No. Generation (MT/M) Generation
(MT/MT of Product) (MT /day)
A Process
1 D V acid chloride 10.15 200 67.67
2 Metamitron 12.75 100 42.50
3 Cypermethrin 1.50 150 7.50
4 Permethrin 0.74 75 1.85
5 Alpha cypermethrin 3.24 50 5.40
6 MPB 4.89 200 32.60
7 MPBA 4.50 100 15.00
8 Deltamethrin 20.74 10 6.91

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 84 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Name of Product Wastewater Production Wastewater
No. Generation (MT/M) Generation
(MT/MT of Product) (MT /day)
9 RRCMA 8.56 30 8.56
10 DICAMBA 21.14 50 35.23
11 Carfentrazone 55.01 100 183.37
12 Sulfentrazone 41.28 100 137.60
13 Thiamethoxam 26.62 50 44.37
14 Ethofumesate 8.93 50 14.88
Sub Total - A (In MT/Day) 603.44
Sub Total - A (In KL/Day) 553.00
UTILITY
B Boiler (blow-down) 25.00
C Cooling (blow-down) 75.00
D Steam purged into MEE for Evaporation 150.00
E Washing 25.00
F Domestic 36.00
G Softener 40.00
TOTAL(A+B+C+D+E+F) 904.00

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 85 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.6 Facility for Treatment & Disposal of Liquid Effluent

The wastewater generated will be segregated and treated separately. From proposed
product manufacturing plant a total of 904 kl/day of effluent including 36 kl/day of
domestic wastewater will be generated. The process wastewater from the proposed
product manufacturing will be segregated considering its pollution load and finally it
will be treated in Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP).

Segregation of the Waste Streams:

The various streams generated from the industrial activity will be as follows:

Stream A:

The process effluent predominantly containing inorganic salts like sodium chloride
and sodium sulphate with traces of organics, is equalized, Neutralized and processed
through Lamella Settling system to remove any suspended solids.

Thus pretreated process effluent is then fed to Multiple Effect Evaporator (MEE)
followed by Agitated Thin Film Dryer (ATFD) to recover inorganic baggable wet salts
(having moisture less than 10 %) and the condensate is taken for bio-treatment. The
condensate will have traces of organics due to low boiling organics and traces of
inorganic due to entrainment. The wet salt is sent for TSDF site for landfill.

Stream B:

The non process effluents like, cooling tower blow down, Boiler blow down, Softener
regeneration etc. along with domestic waste water and MEE condensate will be treated
in the bio-treatment Effluent Treatment Plant.

In the bio-treatment facility the effluent is equalized, neutralized, and its suspended
solids are removed through lamella settling system. Thus pretreated effluent is further
processed through aerator followed by clarifier.

The treated effluent is finally processed through sand filter and activated carbon filter
and discharged to the GIDC common effluent discharge drain meeting CPCB/GPCB
Norms.

Stream C:

Cyanide waste will be given prior hypo-treatment and will be treated in the MEE along
with stream A.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 86 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
High TDS Effluent Characteristics:

Flow pH COD TDS SS NH4-N

600 m3/day 5.0 – 9.0 40000 mg/l 120000 mg/l 5000 mg/l 600 mg/l

Effluent Scheme:

Schematic of High TDS Effluent Treatment

ID No. Treatment Unit Volumetric Remarks


Capacity
1A & Collection cum 136 m3 x 2 To collect, equalize and neutralize
1B Equalization cum the effluent
Neutralization Tank
2 Flash mixer 3.5 m3 With dosing system
3 Flocculator 7 m3 With dosing system
4 Lamella settler 45 m3 Primary sludge will be pumped to
sludge handling unit, Clear
supernatant will be fed to MEE

Mechanical Equipments

ID No. Treatment Unit Equipment


1A & Collection cum Equalization cum Blower
1B Neutralization Tank
Coarse bubble Diffuser

Feed Pump
2 Flash mixer MS Agitator 100 rpm
3 Flocculator MS Agitator 20 rpm
4 Lamella Settler Primary Sludge Transfer Pump

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 87 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Low TDS Effluent Characteristics:

Flow pH COD TDS SS NH4-N


1000 m3/day 6.0 – 8.0 2000 mg/l 10000 mg/l 300 mg/l 100 mg/l

Effluent Scheme:

Schematic of Low TDS Effluent Treatment

ID No. Treatment Unit Volumetric Remarks


Capacity
1A & Collection cum 140 m3 x 2 To collect, equalize and neutralize
1B Equalization cum the effluent
Neutralization Tank
2 Flash mixer 5 m3 With dosing system
3 Flocculator 10 m3 With dosing system
4 Lamella settler 55 m3 Primary sludge will be pumped to
sludge handling unit
5 Aeration Tank 1000 m3 Underflow sludge to be recycled
6 Secondary clarifier 50 m3 to Aeration tank or to be wasted to
sludge handling unit
7 Holding Tank 125 m3

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 88 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
ID No. Treatment Unit Volumetric Remarks
Capacity
8 Lamella Settler 55 m3 With dosing system

Tertiary sludge will be pumped to


sludge handling unit

Clear Supernatant will be


discharged to Common treated
effluent drainage

Mechanical Equipments

ID No. Treatment Unit Equipment

1A & Collection cum Equalization cum Blower


1B Neutralization Tank
Coarse bubble Diffuse

Feed Pump
2 Flash mixer MS Agitator 100 rpm
3 Flocculator MS Agitator 20 rpm
4 Lamella Settler Primary Sludge Transfer
Pump
5 Aeration Tank Blower

Fine bubble Diffuse


6 Secondary Clarifier Clarifier Mechanism

Secondary Sludge Transfer


Pump
7 Holding pump Effluent Transfer Pump
8 Lamella Settler Tertiary Sludge Transfer
Pump

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 89 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.7 Source Emission Details

2.7.1 Details of Fuels & its Consumption

Name and consumption of each type of fuel, which will be utilized in the proposed
unit is given in the following Table No. 2.8

Table No. 2.8 – Details of Fuel Consumption

Sr. Description Capacity Type of Fuel Fuel Consumption


No.

1 Boiler 1 16 (MT/hr.)
(Stand by)
2 Boiler 2 6 (MT/hr.)
(Working)
Coal 50 MT/day
3 Boiler 3 8 (MT/hr.)
(Working)

4 D. G. Set 1 1000 KVA


5 D. G. Set 2 1500 KVA
HSD 2200 Lit./hr.
6 D. G. Set 3 2500 KVA

2.7.2 Details of Flue Gas Stack

Details of Flue Gas Stacks are given in Table no - 2.9.

Table No. - 2.9 – Details of Flue Gas Stacks

Sr. Stack Pollutant Expected Permissible Height of Dia. Air


No. attached Pollution Limit stack from (m) Pollution
to ground Control
level (m) Measures
1 Boiler 1, 2 & 3 SPM 80 mg/Nm3 150 mg/Nm3 30 0.6 Bag Filter
(Common
Stack)
SO2 30 ppm 100 ppm
NOx 50 ppm 50 ppm
2. D. G. Set SPM
SO2 -- -- 6 0.3 --
NOx

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 90 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.7.3 Details of Process Stack

Details of Process Stacks are given in Table no - 2.10.

Table No. - 2.10 – Details of Process Stacks

Sr. Name of the Expected Concentration Height of Dia. Air Pollution


No. process vessel to of pollutants (mg/Nm3) Vent from (m) Control Measures
which the vent ground
Type Amount PCB
is attached level (m)
Limit
1 DVAC SO2 20 40 15 0.15 Two stage water
Manufacturing scrubber followed
HCl 10 20
by alkali scrubber
2 Permethrin & HCl 10 20 15 0.15 Two stage water
Deltamethrin scrubber
Manufacturing
3 MPB HCl 10 20 15 0.15 Two stage water
Manufacturing Cl2 3 5 scrubber followed
HBr 3 5 by alkali scrubber

4 Thiomethoxam, SO2 20 40 15 0.15 Two stage water


Carfentrazone & scrubber followed
HCl 10 20
Sulfentrazone by alkali scrubber
Manufacturing Cl2 3 5

2.8 Solid / Hazardous Waste Generation, its Storage & Disposal

All hazardous waste will be handled as per the Hazardous Waste (Management &
Handling) Rules, 1989 and Amendment Rules, 2003 and the current Hazardous
Material (Management, Handling and Transboundry Movement) Rules, 2008.

2.8.1 During Construction Phase

The major quantity of solid waste generated during construction phase will be
construction debris (not considered as hazardous waste due to the fact that it would be
inert in nature) which will be utilized for leveling up low lying areas within the project
site itself.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 91 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.8.2 During Operation Phase

Table No. 2.11 – Details of Hazardous Wastes and Mode of Disposal

Sr. Type of Waste Category Quantity Mode of Disposal


No.
1. Used Lube Oil 5.1 500 Lit./month Given to CPCB
Authorized re-
processors
2. Process /Distillation 29.1 1102.68 MT/year Incineration in
Residue Common Incineration
facility
3. ETP Sludge 29.2 150 kg/day Disposal at BEIL

4. Date Expired /off 29.3 25 MT /year Incineration in


Specification Products Common Incineration
facility
5. Spent Solvent 20.2 150 MT/ month Incineration in
Common Incineration
facility
6. Packing Materials 33.3
1) Empty Bags 1) 2000 Bags/month Given to GPCB
2) Barrel 2) 1000 Barrel /month Authorized Vendor
7. Spent Carbon from 34.3 250 kg/ month Disposal at BEIL
ETP
8. Sludge from wet 36.1 1000 kg/ month Incineration / Common
scrubber Incineration facility
9. Resins 34.2 1.0 MT / year Given back to the
supplier (manufacturer)
against new resins.
10. MEE Salt 34.3 10 MT/day Disposal to BEIL

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 92 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.9 Noise Pollution

2.9.1 During Construction Phase

During Construction phase; construction equipment including dozer, scrapers,


concrete mixers, generators, vibrators and power tools and vehicles will be the major
noise source. Construction noise is difficult to predict because the level of activity will
constantly change. Most of the construction activities are expected to produce noise
level within safe exposure limit. The noise generated from various sources is expected
to be of short duration. The effect of such noise would be temporary and negligible.
Nevertheless, protective equipments will be given to the workers working in such
conditions.

2.9.2 During Operation Phase

The major sources of noise in industry have been identified as under:

 Diesel Generator
 Pumps
 Machineries
 Boilers
 Compressors
 Reaction Vessels

Adequate sound enclosures will be provided and proper maintenance as well as


lubrication will be done to all the equipments and machineries generating high noise.
Care will be taken to ensure that the noise level do not exceed 75 dB (A) during the
Day time and 70 dB (A) during the Night time.

However, earplugs/earmuffs will be provided to all the workers working in such areas
where noise level will be high. Further to this a large green belt area will be developed
within the premises which will help to reduce noise levels.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 93 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
2.10 Details of Man Power

In the proposed project the need of manpower (skilled and unskilled) as well as
material requirement will arise. Local people will be employed based on their
education qualification and technical expertise for this purpose. Manpower
requirement of operation of M/s. Tagros Chemicals India Ltd. is foreseen as 830 nos.
with a broad breakdown as follows.

Table No. 2.12 – Manpower Requirement

Sr. No. Category Nos.


1 Senior Management 15
2 Middle management 40
3 Engineer/Chemist/Officers 100
4 Foreman /Supervisor/Assistant 275
5 Operator/ Attendant 200
6 Workmen/ Labor 200
Total 830

2.11 Infrastructure Facilities within Project Site

Infrastructure facilities for proposed project are given below:

Table No. - 2.13 – Infrastructure Facilities within the Project Site

Facility Details
Electricity Source: Gujarat Electricity Board (GEB) / Dakshin Gujarat
Vij Company Limited (DGVCL)
Power Requirement : 4.5 MW
D.G. Set Type of Fuel: High Speed Diesel
Capacity: 1000 KVA/ 1500 KVA/ 2500 KVA
Fuel Supply Type of Fuel: Coal
Source: Coal Mines
Quantity : 50 MT / Day

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 94 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Facility Details

Facility of Water Supply Source: GIDC Water Supply System


and Drinking water Water purification and water cooler will be provided for
safe drinking water.
Roads Pucca internal roads will be provided for proper
transportation.
Effluent Treatment Plant Industrial Effluent will be evaporated in Multiple Effect
Evaporator followed by Agitated Thin Film Drier. The
condensate water from MEE and ATFD along with non
process effluent will be treated in the Bio-treatment ETP.
The treated effluent is finally process through sand filter
and activated carbon filter and discharged to GIDC
common effluent discharge.
Hazardous Solid Waste Separate storage area for each type of waste having RCC
Storage Facility flooring covered with Asbestos roof. Hazardous waste is
ultimately disposed to secured landfill site.

Addition to above, industry will also provide storm water drainage system, provision
for restrooms for workers and drivers.

2.12 Green Belt Development

Implementation of greenbelt program is prime importance for any development. The


plantation and greenbelt development in an area not only functions as foreground and
background landscape features resulting in harmonizing and amalgamating the
physical structures of the plant with surrounding environment but also acts as
pollution sink. In order to mitigate the air pollutants, to control the magnitude of noise
generated by the plant, the unit will be develop greenbelt area in 21,359 m2 within the
industrial premises for the abatement of gaseous and noise pollution.

The green belt is developed to avoid any kind of fugitive emission in to surrounding
environment in any case. Special care will be taken while planting trees, as regards
their type and density. Industry will plant approx. 2,100 nos. of various types of trees
within the premises. The detail of proposed greenbelt development plan is given in
Table No. 2.14.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 95 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. - 2.14 – Greenbelt Development Plan

No. of Trees No. of Trees No. of Trees


Details Total
during 1 Year
st
during 2 Year
nd
during 3rd Year
No. of Trees to
840 840 420 2100
be planted
% each year 40 % 40 % 20 % 100 %

2.13 Socio Economic Development Activities

We plan to carry out the following Socio-economic developmental activities:

 A number of social activities for the down trodden children of the area by
arranging proper schooling, clean water etc.

 To distribute school books and bags to the needy children.

 To provide jobs to people residing near the project site based on their skill.

 To provide possible financial help in cultural events of nearby villages.

 To keep the area green and clean by planting as many trees as possible.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 96 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
CHAPTER – 3
BASELINE
ENVIRONMENTAL
STATUS
CHAPTER  3
BASELINE ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS
An industrial project may cause some environmental impacts on the surrounding
environment. These impacts may be beneficial as well as detrimental. To assess
environmental impacts from proposed project at a specific location, it is essential to
monitor the environmental quality prevailing in the surrounding area prior to
implementation of the project. The environmental status within the impact zone could
be used for identification of significant environmental issues to be addressed in the
impact assessment study.

In order to know the cumulative impacts due to the proposed activity on the
surrounding environment, base line data was collected for various environmental
parameters including Air, Water, Land, Noise, Flora-Fauna & Socio economic status.

3.1 Pollution Control - Statutory Requirements

3.1.1 Air Quality Standards

National Ambient Air Quality (NAAQ) Standards are presented in Annexure - 3.1.

3.1.2 Water Quality Standards

Standards prescribed by IS: 10500 for drinking water are given in Annexure - 3.2.

3.1.3 Noise Quality Standards

National Ambient Noise Quality Standards are presented in Annexure - 3.3.

3.2 Air Environment

3.2.1 Baseline Ambient Air Quality (AAQ)

The collection of base-line information for air environment includes identification of


specific air pollutants being released into the atmosphere having significant impact on
neighborhood of an industrial project.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 97 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
The ambient air quality status with respect to identified air pollutants across the study
area of 10 km radius from the site as well as within the project site premises forms the
base-line information. This has been done through Air quality surveillance program.

The background air quality for Particulate Matter (PM2.5 & PM10), SO2, NOx, HCl, Cl2 ,
HBr, HC and VOCs has been monitored. The monitoring for these parameters has
been carried out at Six (6) sampling stations located in different directions and
situated within the suspected impact zone, in and around the project site.

3.2.2 Locations of AAQ Stations

The locations of AAQ stations were decided based on meteorology and available
infrastructure facilities. These stations are the nearest inhabited localities around the
project site.

The locations of the AAQ monitoring stations are as shown in Figure No. 3.1 and
tabulated in Table No. 3.1. Photograph showing AAQ monitoring is attached as
Annexure-3.4.

Table No. 3.1 – Ambient Air Quality Monitoring Stations

Station Approx. Aerial Direction w. r. t.


Location
No. Distance (km) project site

1 Project Site 0 --

2 Village: Padariya 7.0 NNE

3 Village: Janiadara 8.5 NE

4 Village: Galenda 7.3 ENE

5 Village: Vadadla 3.5 E

6 Village: Jageshwar 6.6 SSW

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 98 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. 3.1

Map showing the Study Area (10 km) and Sampling Locations

Sampling Locations in the Study Area

Station Name of Location Sign Description


No.
1 Project Site Meteorological Station

2 Village: Padariya Ambient Air Sampling Location

3 Village: Janiadara Ambient Noise Sampling Location

4 Village: Galenda Soil Sampling Location

5 Village: Vadadla Water Sampling Location

6 Village: Jageshwar -- --

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 99 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.2.3 Analysis of Samples

Monitoring and testing for ambient air quality was carried out for various parameters
like PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NOx etc. The brief details of testing procedures adopted are
given in the Table No. 3.2.

Table No. 3.2 – Testing Procedure for Ambient Air Quality Parameters

Parameter Testing Procedure

PM10 Gravimetric method using PM10 & PM2.5 Sampler, [IS: 5182 (Part 23) 2006]

PM2.5 Gravimetric method using PM10 & PM2.5 Sampler, [IS: 5182 (Part 23) 2006]

NOx Absorption in dilute NaOH and then estimating colorimetrically with


Sulphanilamide and N (1-Nepthyl) Ethylene Diamine Dihydrochloride
and Hydrogen Peroxide, [IS:5182 (Part 6) 2001].
SO2 Absorption in Sodium Tetra Chloro Mercurate followed by Colorimetric
estimation using P-Rosaniline Hydrochloride and Formaldehyde, [IS:
5182 (Part 2) 2001].
HCl Titraration Method using Silver Nitrate
HBr Phenol Red Colorimetric Method
HC & VOC Gas Chromatography Method
Cl2 Methyl Orange Method [IS:5182, (Part 19)]

3.2.4 Baseline Data of AAQ

At every sampling station important parameters viz. PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NOx, HCl, Cl2 ,
HBr, HC and VOCs were monitored in the Summer & Winter Season of 2012 and the
results are depicted in the Table No. 3.3.

Table No. 3.3 – Baseline Data of Ambient Air Quality

Concentration NAAQ
Parameter Percentile Permissible
Minimum Maximum
(98%) Limit
Sampling Location:- Project Site (Industrial Area)
PM10 83.99 g/m3 97.65 g/m3 97.38 g/m3 100 g/m3

PM2.5 14.39 g/m3 32.73 g/m3 32.36 g/m3 60 g/m3

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 100 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Concentration NAAQ
Parameter Percentile Permissible
Minimum Maximum
(98%) Limit
SO2 21.32 g/m 3
23.72 g/m 3
23.67 g/m 3
80 g/m3

NOx 12.17 g/m3 14.51 g/m3 14.46 g/m3 80 g/m3

HCl 120.8 g/m3 128.3 g/m3 128.15 g/m3 --

Cl2 11.1 g/m3 21.7 g/m3 21.48 g/m3 --

HBr 10.8 g/m3 14.5 g/m3 14.42 g/m3 --

HC 0.52 ppm 0.63 ppm 0.62 ppm

VOC B.D.L. 05 g/m3


(as Benzene)
Sampling Location:- Village: Padariya (Rural Area)
PM10 77.80 g/m3 88.05 g/m3 87.85 g/m3 100 g/m3

PM2.5 16.47 g/m3 19.61 g/m3 19.55 g/m3 60 g/m3

SO2 18.12 g/m3 21.32 g/m3 21.26 g/m3 80 g/m3

NOx 12.28 g/m3 15.37 g/m3 15.31 g/m3 80 g/m3

HCl 100.4 g/m3 121.3 g/m3 120.88 g/m3 --

Cl2 15.2 g/m3 20.6 g/m3 20.49 g/m3 --

HBr 11.3 g/m3 16.2 g/m3 16.10 g/m3 --

HC 0.47 ppm 0.66 ppm 0.65 ppm --

VOC B.D.L. 05 g/m3


(as Benzene)

Sampling Location:- Village: Janiadara (Rural Area)


PM10 72.18 g/m3 89.79 g/m3 89.44 g/m3 100 g/m3

PM2.5 18.31 g/m3 45.75 g/m3 45.20 g/m3 60 g/m3

SO2 25.2 g/m3 26.1 g/m3 26.10 g/m3 80 g/m3

NOx 18.23 g/m3 19.91 g/m3 19.88 g/m3 80 g/m3

HCl 83.3 g/m3 84.3 g/m3 84.29 g/m3 --

Cl2 14.8 g/m3 27.9 g/m3 27.63 g/m3 --

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 101 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Concentration NAAQ
Parameter Percentile Permissible
Minimum Maximum
(98%) Limit
HBr 9.3 g/m3
10.5 g/m 3
10.47 g/m 3
--

HC 0.71 ppm 0.76 ppm 0.75 ppm --

VOC B.D.L. 05 g/m3


(as Benzene)
Sampling Location:- Village: Galenda (Rural Area)
PM10 68.38 g/m3 76.31 g/m3 76.15 g/m3 100 g/m3
PM2.5 13.83 g/m3 19.95 g/m3 19.83 g/m3 60 g/m3
SO2 21.1 g/m3 22.53 g/m3 22.50 g/m3 80 g/m3
NOx 15.60 g/m3 16.41 g/m3 16.39 g/m3 80 g/m3
HCl 113.3 g/m3 114.3 g/m3 114.28 g/m3 --

Cl2 16.7 g/m3 19.4 g/m3 19.34 g/m3 --

HBr 8.2 g/m3 12.6 g/m3 12.51 g/m3 --

HC 0.51 ppm 0.81 ppm 0.80 ppm --

VOC B.D.L. 05 g/m3


(as Benzene)
Sampling Location:- Village: Vadadla (Rural Area)
PM10 51.06 g/m3 70.78 g/m3 70.39 g/m3 100 g/m3
PM2.5 15.80 g/m3 23.10 g/m3 22.95 g/m3 60 g/m3
SO2 22.34 g/m3 25.5 g/m3 25.44 g/m3 80 g/m3
NOx 16.29 g/m3 16.63 g/m3 16.62 g/m3 80 g/m3
HCl 90.8 g/m3 93.1 g/m3 93.05 g/m3 --

Cl2 18.2 g/m3 23.3 g/m3 23.19 g/m3 --

HBr 11.9 g/m3 14.4 g/m3 14.35 g/m3 --

HC 0.38 ppm 0.56 ppm 0.55 ppm -

VOC
(as Benzene) B.D.L. 05 g/m3

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 102 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Concentration NAAQ
Parameter Percentile Permissible
Minimum Maximum
(98%) Limit
Sampling Location:- Village: Jageshwar (Rural Area)
PM10 78.37 g/m3 91.79 g/m3 91.52 g/m3 100 g/m3
PM2.5 7.51 g/m3 46.32 g/m3 45.54 g/m3 60 g/m3
SO2 26.45 g/m3 33.75 g/m3 33.60 g/m3 80 g/m3
NOx 17.55 g/m3 26.6 g/m3 26.42 g/m3 80 g/m3
HCl 90.2 g/m3 95.9 g/m3 95.78 g/m3 --

Cl2 16.7 g/m3 20.8 g/m3 20.71 g/m3 --

HBr 13.7 g/m3 15.0 g/m3 14.94 g/m3 --

HC 0.46 ppm 0.65 ppm 0.64 ppm --

VOC B.D.L. 05 g/m3


(as Benzene)

Baseline AAQ data indicates that concentration of ambient air quality parameter such
as PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NOx, VOC in the surrounding areas are well within the
permissible limits of National Ambient Air Quality (NAAQ) standards. Subsequently,
the concentration of baseline AAQ parameters like HCl, Cl2, HBr, HC at all monitoring
locations are much below the satisfactory level.

3.3 Meteorology

Meteorological conditions at the site regulate the transport and diffusion of air-
pollutants released into the atmosphere. Ambient temperature, wind speed, wind
direction and atmospheric stability are called primary or basic meteorological
parameters because the dispersion and diffusion of pollutants depend mainly on these
parameters. Humidity, precipitation, pressure and visibility are secondary
meteorological parameters as this control the dispersion of the pollutants indirectly by
affecting primary parameters.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 103 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.3.1 Primary Meteorological Data

Meteorological survey was undertaken for monitoring meteorological parameters


namely ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction at
M/s. Tagros Chemicals India Ltd. in the Summer Season of 2012.

The meteorological station was set-up near the proposed project site. Readings were
taken by using Automatic Weather Station (AWS) at an hourly interval and the
findings are given in Table No. 3.4. Wind rose diagram for the same is given as
Figure No. 3.2.
Table No. 3.4 - Typical Meteorological Record

Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
1/5/2012 15:43 34.47 35.27 33.38 63.42 66.99 59.69 6.14 222 0 25.48
1/5/2012 16:43 33.87 35.51 32.98 64.65 66.41 56.75 6.7 234 0 24.07
1/5/2012 17:43 32.76 34.27 32.57 68.07 70.08 63.09 6.84 229 0 24.8
1/5/2012 18:43 31.25 32.92 31.24 74.87 74.87 67.81 7.82 208 0 24.58
1/5/2012 19:43 30.58 31.24 30.54 75.9 76.93 74.49 6.84 139 0 25.52
1/5/2012 20:43 30.43 30.61 30.34 73.75 78.47 73.56 6 233 0 25.16
1/5/2012 21:43 30.42 30.5 30.36 75.28 75.59 73.7 6.42 258 0 25.19
1/5/2012 22:43 30.23 30.46 30.1 79.2 79.2 75.21 5.72 230 0 25.35
1/5/2012 23:43 30.12 30.28 30.02 78.76 79.2 78.19 5.3 222 0 25.89
2/5/2012 0:43 30 30.14 29.96 76.51 78.74 75.87 4.88 242 0 25.27
2/5/2012 1:43 29.8 30.03 29.76 79.43 79.79 76.47 4.32 219 0 25.21
2/5/2012 2:43 29.7 29.85 29.65 79.79 80.23 79.3 4.6 230 0 25.73
2/5/2012 3:43 29.61 29.72 29.59 80.18 80.18 79.67 4.05 227 0 25.72
2/5/2012 4:43 29.5 29.7 29.47 80.4 80.51 79.53 4.32 225 0 25.58
2/5/2012 5:43 29.44 29.53 29.37 80.39 80.98 80.23 3.77 231 0 25.67
2/5/2012 6:43 29.85 29.86 29.4 76.23 80.66 76.23 3.77 235 0 25.21
2/5/2012 7:43 30.68 30.68 29.82 72.63 76.53 72.6 3.49 239 0 25.18
2/5/2012 8:43 31.98 32.02 30.59 68.12 72.99 68.09 4.18 227 0 25.35
2/5/2012 9:43 33.09 33.1 31.7 64.46 68.87 64.46 3.91 282 0 25.48
2/5/2012 10:43 34.4 35.04 32.96 53.89 64.79 53.83 3.77 266 0 23.68
2/5/2012 11:43 34.6 36.38 34.17 60.99 61.46 47.11 3.91 313 0 21.67
2/5/2012 12:43 34.88 35.22 34.17 57.18 61.82 55.71 4.18 175 0 24.7
2/5/2012 13:43 36.03 36.27 34.33 53.82 59.99 53.2 4.88 227 0 24.99
2/5/2012 14:43 36.41 37.09 35.84 55.37 56.98 51.77 5.3 215 0 24.88
2/5/2012 15:43 34.73 36.42 34.17 62.1 62.91 55.17 5.86 237 0 24.4
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 104 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
2/5/2012 16:43 32.69 34.92 32.07 66.51 68.74 60.61 6.42 184 0 24.07
2/5/2012 17:43 31.69 32.93 31.58 72.16 72.25 65.02 6.7 238 0 24.3
2/5/2012 18:43 30.67 32.3 30.62 77.03 77.25 69.77 6 207 0 24.51
2/5/2012 19:43 30.1 30.68 30.09 73.32 76.94 70.94 7.82 249 0 24.24
2/5/2012 20:43 29.78 30.23 29.77 78.56 78.59 73.23 5.72 241 0 24.46
2/5/2012 21:43 29.85 29.87 29.65 75.08 79.96 75.03 6.7 239 0 24.94
2/5/2012 22:43 29.72 29.98 29.7 72.11 75.09 70.73 4.46 213 0 23.83
2/5/2012 23:43 29.77 29.78 29.57 67.2 72.24 67.2 3.35 208 0 23.03
3/5/2012 0:43 29.74 29.86 29.61 71.31 71.37 66.61 4.46 237 0 22.85
3/5/2012 1:43 29.43 29.74 29.38 73.65 73.96 71.25 3.63 224 0 23.67
3/5/2012 2:43 29.1 29.45 29.08 77.9 77.9 73.5 3.35 223 0 23.87
3/5/2012 3:43 29 29.12 28.94 82.9 83.11 77.77 4.18 229 0 24.72
3/5/2012 4:43 29 29.13 28.98 83.69 83.69 82.59 4.32 232 0 25.73
3/5/2012 5:43 29 29.08 28.95 83.27 84.03 82.4 4.46 215 0 25.69
3/5/2012 6:43 29.32 29.33 28.94 82.07 83.6 82.02 3.35 212 0 25.93
3/5/2012 7:43 30.45 30.53 29.31 78.17 82.31 77.87 5.16 236 0 26.14
3/5/2012 8:43 32.34 32.34 30.42 69.77 79.24 69.42 5.58 230 0 26.02
3/5/2012 9:43 34.26 34.27 32.24 63.42 70.17 63.36 4.46 223 0 26.29
3/5/2012 10:43 34.07 34.49 33.36 64.04 66.14 62.53 4.18 243 0 25.89
3/5/2012 11:43 34.71 35.35 33.32 63.55 65.97 61.98 5.02 279 0 26.34
3/5/2012 12:43 36.2 36.46 34.43 60.55 64.84 59.63 3.91 106 0 27.08
3/5/2012 13:43 35.32 36.6 35.21 59.37 63.99 56.41 5.3 181 0 25.32
3/5/2012 14:43 35.14 36.52 34.99 60.76 62.57 56 6.14 208 0 25.03
3/5/2012 15:43 35.5 36.19 34.82 52.7 61.88 49.16 6.7 215 0 23.19
3/5/2012 16:43 33.32 35.97 32.86 68.38 68.85 52.09 8.24 179 0 22.15
3/5/2012 17:43 32.36 33.77 32.32 69.54 69.75 65.19 8.37 235 0 24.98
3/5/2012 18:43 31.43 32.45 31.36 74.74 74.74 68.88 7.82 229 0 25.02
3/5/2012 19:43 30.92 31.44 30.88 69.38 75.12 67.22 6.98 261 0 24.12
3/5/2012 20:43 30.38 30.93 30.36 76.81 77.41 69.22 5.72 231 0 24.1
3/5/2012 21:43 30.24 30.49 30.22 79.47 79.52 76.39 5.44 238 0 25.62
3/5/2012 22:43 30.08 30.29 30.04 78.62 79.52 77.88 5.86 223 0 25.79
3/5/2012 23:43 30.01 30.13 29.98 79.83 80.13 78.55 5.72 245 0 25.87
4/5/2012 0:43 29.75 30.07 29.73 78.88 79.83 77.73 5.44 225 0 25.44
4/5/2012 1:43 29.35 29.78 29.32 79.67 79.88 78.8 5.58 222 0 25.28
4/5/2012 2:43 29.09 29.37 29.06 80.98 81.06 79.56 6.14 245 0 25.19
4/5/2012 3:43 28.93 29.12 28.92 81.96 81.99 80.49 5.72 237 0 25.23
4/5/2012 4:43 28.83 28.96 28.78 82.18 82.5 81.57 6.56 238 0 25.36
4/5/2012 5:43 29.02 29.04 28.82 81.4 82.22 81.1 4.74 227 0 25.44
4/5/2012 6:43 29.15 29.17 28.96 83.15 83.2 81.37 4.46 226 0 25.63
4/5/2012 7:43 30.88 30.93 29.14 72.53 83.52 72.53 5.16 228 0 25.36
4/5/2012 8:43 32.01 32.25 30.85 69.95 72.77 69.1 5.44 245 0 25.62
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 105 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
4/5/2012 9:43 33.35 33.56 31.66 64.19 70.66 63.21 5.86 259 0 25.39
4/5/2012 10:43 33.79 33.93 32.71 63.56 67.62 62.76 6 214 0 25.69
4/5/2012 11:43 34.29 34.86 33.58 63.64 66.54 61.91 7.4 206 0 25.93
4/5/2012 12:43 35.12 35.12 34.2 61.51 63.93 60.26 6.42 121 0 26.25
4/5/2012 13:43 34.93 35.33 34.25 60.36 64.17 60.32 8.37 173 0 26.09
4/5/2012 14:43 34.85 35.52 34.36 62.28 63.98 58.83 6.14 156 0 25.59
4/5/2012 15:43 34.16 35.04 33.89 63.31 65.61 61.21 8.1 223 0 25.61
4/5/2012 16:43 33.16 34.43 33.15 67.1 67.1 62.05 8.51 234 0 24.9
4/5/2012 17:43 30.91 33.67 30.91 74.44 74.44 65.79 7.54 228 0 23.76
4/5/2012 18:43 30.85 31.19 30.7 73.98 74.83 72.18 7.82 206 0 25.25
4/5/2012 19:43 30.43 30.84 30.36 74.97 75.53 73.36 6.84 236 0 25.12
4/5/2012 20:43 30.28 30.45 30.16 74.26 76.23 73.02 7.12 212 0 24.9
4/5/2012 21:43 30.17 30.31 30 75.06 76.15 73.62 6.56 239 0 24.93
4/5/2012 22:43 30.01 30.19 29.98 76.43 76.48 75.03 6.28 207 0 25.09
4/5/2012 23:43 29.86 30.06 29.75 78.36 78.6 76.31 5.44 218 0 25.23
5/5/2012 0:43 29.57 29.88 29.54 79.39 79.68 76.62 6 229 0 25.02
5/5/2012 1:43 29.49 29.64 29.4 77.76 79.67 77.62 4.88 214 0 25.16
5/5/2012 2:43 29.46 29.56 29.42 77.45 78.52 77.07 5.02 184 0 25.01
5/5/2012 3:43 29.34 29.53 29.29 77.78 78.41 76.57 4.32 224 0 24.79
5/5/2012 4:43 29.23 29.55 28.94 78.53 82.27 77.76 4.32 191 0 24.94
5/5/2012 5:43 28.19 29.42 28.19 83.54 83.69 78.29 2.93 116 0 24.05
5/5/2012 6:43 28.02 28.24 27.89 82.82 83.97 82.77 3.35 93 0 24.81
5/5/2012 7:43 29.59 29.59 27.98 77.92 83.27 77.92 3.21 104 0 25.32
5/5/2012 8:43 32.28 32.28 29.58 71.22 78.46 70.85 3.21 204 0 26.3
5/5/2012 9:43 32.99 33.74 31.67 68.65 72.83 67.34 3.63 252 0 26.12
5/5/2012 10:43 34.22 34.22 31.92 65.8 73 64.64 5.44 235 0 26.59
5/5/2012 11:43 34.16 34.39 33.71 64.75 66.88 62.11 5.86 223 0 25.86
5/5/2012 12:43 34.89 35.25 33.13 63.21 68.17 61.54 6.42 222 0 26.39
5/5/2012 13:43 34.51 35.6 34.22 62.04 63.83 59.79 6.84 170 0 25.54
5/5/2012 14:43 34.85 35.5 34.29 62.46 64.56 59.78 7.68 236 0 25.86
5/5/2012 15:43 35.23 35.76 34.51 60.71 63.61 58.73 6.14 216 0 25.91
5/5/2012 16:43 34.56 35.54 34.27 64.91 65.49 58.53 6.7 218 0 25.23
5/5/2012 17:43 33.11 34.56 32.8 69.41 69.73 64.7 6 165 0 25.56
5/5/2012 18:43 31.78 33.51 31.62 71.97 72.38 67.4 6.42 184 0 24.99
5/5/2012 19:43 30.42 31.79 30.31 76.79 79.18 71.67 4.74 220 0 24.72
5/5/2012 20:43 30.37 30.6 30.34 80.47 80.74 76.61 5.16 208 0 25.79
5/5/2012 21:43 30.19 30.38 30.09 78.45 80.87 77.98 5.58 219 0 25.92
5/5/2012 22:43 30.1 30.22 30.03 79.98 80.04 78.4 5.02 181 0 25.92
5/5/2012 23:43 29.87 30.1 29.85 80.72 80.85 78.96 4.74 179 0 25.82
6/5/2012 0:43 29.83 29.91 29.75 80.31 81.6 79.77 4.05 203 0 25.95
6/5/2012 1:43 29.71 29.85 29.63 80.6 81.25 80.28 3.49 232 0 25.94
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 106 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
6/5/2012 2:43 29.58 29.76 29.54 81.99 82.07 80.52 3.07 236 0 25.87
6/5/2012 3:43 29.59 29.67 29.54 81.94 82.02 81.73 2.65 138 0 26.13
6/5/2012 4:43 29.44 29.64 29.42 83.31 83.39 81.86 1.95 236 0 26.01
6/5/2012 5:43 29.42 29.57 29.38 83.41 83.44 81.51 1.25 248 0 25.92
6/5/2012 6:43 29.69 29.7 29.34 83.05 83.95 83.05 1.11 241 0 26.5
6/5/2012 7:43 30.46 31.13 29.68 80.28 83.27 78.39 1.81 257 0 26.27
6/5/2012 8:43 32.49 33.05 30.42 69.8 80.86 67.88 2.09 244 0 25.78
6/5/2012 9:43 33.49 33.49 31.73 68.68 73.7 68.14 2.51 235 0 26.8
6/5/2012 10:43 33.22 34.3 32.35 65.06 69.1 63.1 3.07 242 0 25.24
6/5/2012 11:43 35.89 36 32.66 58.38 67.08 57.74 4.05 291 0 26.24
6/5/2012 12:43 36.04 36.64 34.86 54.64 60.93 53.79 5.02 255 0 25.18
6/5/2012 13:43 37.76 37.85 35.67 48.09 55.78 47.89 4.46 313 0 24.81
6/5/2012 14:43 37.34 38.36 36.7 48.89 49.79 46.38 5.3 310 0 23.89
6/5/2012 15:43 38.08 38.83 37.27 46.37 49.48 44.03 4.46 336 0 23.69
6/5/2012 16:43 38.75 39.07 37.92 41.61 46.85 40.06 4.88 261 0 22.73
6/5/2012 17:43 38.6 39.27 38.4 39.38 41.87 38.14 3.63 283 0 21.79
6/5/2012 18:43 37.63 39.12 37.55 41.42 42.25 38.05 3.91 246 0 20.89
6/5/2012 19:43 33.55 37.64 33.54 69.78 69.99 40.85 3.35 231 0 18.42
6/5/2012 20:43 32.21 33.54 32.16 76.19 76.44 69.52 5.44 215 0 25.92
6/5/2012 21:43 30.33 32.37 30.33 70.99 79.68 70.99 5.58 156 0 24.47
6/5/2012 22:43 27 30.32 26.62 91.91 92.01 69.4 8.79 254 0 20.92
6/5/2012 23:43 27.54 27.55 26.74 91.27 92.05 89.56 2.23 232 0 25.67
7/5/2012 0:43 28.06 28.11 27.43 89.98 91.45 89.48 2.79 224 0 26.16
7/5/2012 1:43 28.05 28.12 27.94 90.79 90.86 89.93 1.11 198 0 26.24
7/5/2012 2:43 28.73 28.75 27.98 91.07 91.27 90.66 0.41 113 0 27.05
7/5/2012 3:43 28.6 28.74 28.39 89.61 91.09 89.59 1.95 121 0 26.72
7/5/2012 4:43 28.39 28.63 28.03 90.99 90.99 89.54 1.67 117 0 26.5
7/5/2012 5:43 27.42 28.57 27.4 91.53 91.58 90.66 1.67 80 0 25.75
7/5/2012 6:43 27.97 28 27.28 91.52 92.3 91.52 0.83 133 0 26.46
7/5/2012 7:43 31.99 32.07 27.95 80.73 92.51 80.73 1.53 127 0 28.25
7/5/2012 8:43 32.66 32.74 31.3 78.51 81.6 76.72 2.65 136 0 28.03
7/5/2012 9:43 32.53 33.26 31.52 72.14 78.48 70.19 3.91 224 0 26.38
7/5/2012 10:43 33.79 33.94 32.22 69.26 73.9 69.17 4.6 222 0 27.34
7/5/2012 11:43 33.57 34.27 33.25 69.79 70.99 67.77 5.16 170 0 26.78
7/5/2012 12:43 34.5 34.92 33.13 66.84 70.27 64.84 5.72 221 0 26.91
7/5/2012 13:43 34.38 35.02 33.93 66.19 69.48 64.97 6.28 197 0 26.83
7/5/2012 14:43 35.07 35.28 34.32 65.67 67.57 62.69 6.14 201 0 26.87
7/5/2012 15:43 34.92 35.67 33.84 62.32 68.39 60.7 6.28 238 0 26.18
7/5/2012 16:43 32.38 35.69 32.3 72.86 73.06 58.81 6.56 194 0 23.28
7/5/2012 17:43 31.27 32.44 31.23 73.74 75.69 71.85 6.14 207 0 25.57
7/5/2012 18:43 31.07 31.54 31.04 75.26 75.26 73.39 4.88 226 0 25.74
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 107 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
7/5/2012 19:43 30.62 31.28 30.61 78.07 78.07 74.53 4.32 218 0 25.57
7/5/2012 20:43 30.19 30.67 30.17 79.62 79.89 77.29 4.74 225 0 25.77
7/5/2012 21:43 29.94 30.26 29.9 80.76 81.3 79.49 4.32 209 0 26
7/5/2012 22:43 29.98 30 29.79 80.58 81.81 79.96 3.49 222 0 26.14
7/5/2012 23:43 29.96 30.06 29.92 80.39 81.49 79.68 2.65 139 0 26.06
8/5/2012 0:43 29.79 30.02 29.71 78.83 81.16 77.93 3.07 159 0 25.52
8/5/2012 1:43 29.71 29.93 29.7 80.98 81.01 78 3.07 180 0 25.46
8/5/2012 2:43 29.51 29.71 29.47 80.78 81.58 79.13 3.21 222 0 25.5
8/5/2012 3:43 29.51 29.64 29.48 80.72 81.87 79.7 2.93 216 0 25.63
8/5/2012 4:43 29.44 29.56 29.4 81.89 81.89 80.09 3.35 49 0 25.64
8/5/2012 5:43 28.73 29.44 28.71 84.59 84.62 81.73 2.23 159 0 25.29
8/5/2012 6:43 29.56 29.57 28.63 82.55 85.22 82.55 1.39 257 0 26.27
8/5/2012 7:43 31.2 31.21 29.52 76.35 82.9 76.35 1.95 163 0 26.54
8/5/2012 8:43 32.55 32.68 30.94 72.58 77.26 72.38 3.07 252 0 26.93
8/5/2012 9:43 33.26 33.65 32.39 69.82 72.71 67.86 4.74 236 0 26.51
8/5/2012 10:43 33.7 34.23 33.1 68.89 70.46 66.47 5.44 255 0 26.57
8/5/2012 11:43 34.39 34.92 33.53 63.69 69.04 63.5 6 191 0 26.45
8/5/2012 12:43 35.26 35.76 34.19 62.44 64.9 58.64 5.72 241 0 25.92
8/5/2012 13:43 35.61 35.72 34.7 60.84 64.65 59.54 5.72 155 0 26.5
8/5/2012 14:43 35.05 35.77 34.8 60.44 63.89 58.23 5.72 215 0 25.6
8/5/2012 15:43 34.81 35.95 34.42 64.19 64.25 58.29 6.14 171 0 25.4
8/5/2012 16:43 34.74 35.51 34.16 58.97 64.36 56.94 6.28 247 0 24.94
8/5/2012 17:43 33.43 35.05 33.23 63.44 66.78 57.7 6.14 229 0 23.94
8/5/2012 18:43 31.69 33.52 31.67 72.22 72.71 62.43 5.86 211 0 23.62
8/5/2012 19:43 30.73 31.88 30.67 77.18 77.29 72.04 4.6 208 0 25.1
8/5/2012 20:43 30.51 30.74 30.42 78.07 79.12 77.11 4.6 248 0 26.04
8/5/2012 21:43 30.34 30.59 30.3 79.41 79.44 76.74 3.91 217 0 25.79
8/5/2012 22:43 30.19 30.37 30.17 79.81 80.35 79.11 3.77 181 0 26.16
8/5/2012 23:43 30.22 30.28 30.16 79.77 80.23 79.06 4.18 205 0 26.18
9/5/2012 0:43 30.1 30.23 30.06 80.42 81.12 79.14 4.6 285 0 26.08
9/5/2012 1:43 29.99 30.16 29.98 79.55 80.56 78.87 4.6 225 0 25.91
9/5/2012 2:43 29.89 30.06 29.82 78.06 80.56 77.18 4.74 200 0 25.45
9/5/2012 3:43 29.79 29.93 29.76 79.38 79.78 78.04 4.6 174 0 25.54
9/5/2012 4:43 29.8 29.94 29.75 80.92 81.37 78.67 4.46 207 0 25.69
9/5/2012 5:43 29.95 30.02 29.79 81.46 81.49 79.9 3.91 180 0 26.1
9/5/2012 6:43 30.26 30.27 29.86 78.71 81.77 78.44 4.46 261 0 26.08
9/5/2012 7:43 31.65 31.67 30.25 73.1 79.49 72.78 4.88 278 0 26.16
9/5/2012 8:43 33.02 33.27 31.14 69.63 76.35 69.48 6 252 0 26.68
9/5/2012 9:43 32.74 34.05 32.42 69.28 71.16 66.07 5.02 243 0 25.56
9/5/2012 10:43 34.66 35.08 32.52 64.62 70.07 63.05 5.16 174 0 26.58
9/5/2012 11:43 35.03 35.45 34.22 63.79 66.36 62.52 5.86 231 0 26.79
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 108 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
9/5/2012 12:43 34.96 35.74 34.04 63.59 67.25 61.77 6.28 207 0 26.52
9/5/2012 13:43 35.43 35.8 33.98 63.42 67.42 62.31 7.26 231 0 27.11
9/5/2012 14:43 34.67 35.9 33.99 64.84 66.66 60.75 7.82 99 0 25.96
9/5/2012 15:43 35.18 35.42 34.28 63.29 66.5 62.08 7.26 265 0 26.81
9/5/2012 16:43 34.15 35.18 33.91 66.36 67.42 63.16 7.68 189 0 26.13
9/5/2012 17:43 33.2 34.36 32.97 69.1 70.13 66.02 7.26 223 0 25.98
9/5/2012 18:43 31.97 33.46 31.84 74.7 74.73 68.62 6.42 202 0 25.47
9/5/2012 19:43 30.81 31.97 30.79 77.17 78.3 74.25 6.7 278 0 25.69
9/5/2012 20:43 30.53 30.87 30.49 79.07 80.61 77.11 6.28 239 0 26.06
9/5/2012 21:43 30.4 30.65 30.38 79.42 80.13 75.36 6.42 197 0 25.54
9/5/2012 22:43 30.18 30.46 30.16 80.57 81.13 79.1 6.14 188 0 26.15
9/5/2012 23:43 30.14 30.3 30.08 81.07 81.77 80.15 5.3 225 0 26.33
10/5/2012 0:43 29.5 30.27 29.49 81.55 83.17 80.32 6.42 205 0 25.75
10/5/2012 1:43 29.86 29.89 29.5 83.62 83.62 80.64 5.44 188 0 26.16
10/5/2012 2:43 29.88 30.06 29.84 83.67 83.7 82.7 6.98 230 0 26.61
10/5/2012 3:43 29.63 29.97 29.58 84.01 84.25 82.32 5.58 225 0 26.29
10/5/2012 4:43 29.89 29.9 29.6 81.69 84.17 81.66 5.44 232 0 26.41
10/5/2012 5:43 28.37 30.04 27.99 90.69 91.94 81.1 5.58 229 0 24.81
10/5/2012 6:43 29.27 29.29 28.33 85.88 90.94 85.83 4.18 211 0 26.65
10/5/2012 7:43 30.25 30.29 29.25 81.58 86.1 81.28 4.6 247 0 26.68
10/5/2012 8:43 31.07 31.36 29.98 78.41 82.55 77.52 5.16 234 0 26.67
10/5/2012 9:43 30.61 31.08 30.37 79.11 81.06 78.37 5.72 252 0 26.41
10/5/2012 10:43 31.47 31.53 30.55 76.55 79.45 76.32 5.02 244 0 26.79
10/5/2012 11:43 32.67 33.2 31.36 73.84 77.09 68.65 6.14 248 0 26.14
10/5/2012 12:43 33.94 34.33 32.51 68.19 74.59 67.74 8.24 265 0 27.12
10/5/2012 13:43 33.37 34.14 33.04 68.68 71.25 67.25 7.96 209 0 26.46
10/5/2012 14:43 29.06 35.32 29.06 78.36 79.96 63.2 7.26 235 0 21.35
10/5/2012 15:43 28.6 29.4 28.41 83.1 83.76 72.45 5.86 229 0 23.15
10/5/2012 16:43 32.33 32.4 28.6 73.11 84.21 73.08 6 227 0 26.88
10/5/2012 17:43 33.37 33.7 31.6 70.57 77.06 69.84 6.14 113 0 27.1
10/5/2012 18:43 31.1 33.51 31.1 77.11 77.11 69.99 5.72 158 0 24.97
10/5/2012 19:43 30.64 31.17 30.62 80.15 80.37 77.02 5.72 227 0 26.14
10/5/2012 20:43 30.59 30.75 30.46 80.95 81.09 78.67 5.44 208 0 26.45
10/5/2012 21:43 30.6 30.73 30.53 80.41 81.6 80.36 6.42 225 0 26.82
10/5/2012 22:43 29.5 30.65 29.24 87.36 88.98 80.13 5.58 225 0 25.71
10/5/2012 23:43 29.76 29.92 29.48 86.17 87.42 85.42 6.42 235 0 27.05
11/5/2012 0:43 29.75 29.89 29.71 85.05 86.53 84.79 5.02 220 0 26.91
11/5/2012 1:43 29.46 29.79 29.44 83.74 85.4 83.71 5.02 219 0 26.41
11/5/2012 2:43 29.14 29.49 29.12 84.22 84.24 82.88 6 229 0 25.93
11/5/2012 3:43 29.05 29.15 29.01 84.22 84.74 83.81 4.18 229 0 26.03
11/5/2012 4:43 28.91 29.07 28.88 84.19 84.48 83.88 3.91 237 0 25.9
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 109 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
11/5/2012 5:43 28.79 28.98 28.77 84.94 85.1 84.06 2.79 252 0 25.82
11/5/2012 6:43 29 29.04 28.53 83.9 86.02 83.9 2.79 254 0 26
11/5/2012 7:43 29.72 30.08 29.01 80.69 84.24 80.28 4.18 249 0 25.95
11/5/2012 8:43 31.74 31.74 29.7 74.91 81.41 74.57 4.46 270 0 26.66
11/5/2012 9:43 32.06 32.67 31.68 71.94 75.14 70.78 4.6 254 0 26.08
11/5/2012 10:43 33.95 34 31.6 64.66 74.13 63.92 5.02 304 0 26.15
11/5/2012 11:43 34.07 34.77 33.07 62.5 67.43 61.54 5.86 242 0 25.62
11/5/2012 12:43 34.06 34.87 33.87 66.26 67.19 60.51 4.32 16 0 25.32
11/5/2012 13:43 34.09 35.58 33.76 66.5 68.42 62.84 3.21 199 0 25.99
11/5/2012 14:43 33.77 34.31 33.51 70.65 71.64 66.3 4.6 280 0 26.6
11/5/2012 15:43 34.6 34.72 33.16 67.97 72.23 67.25 5.72 258 0 27.63
11/5/2012 16:43 34.38 35.18 34.12 68.62 68.89 66.31 6 201 0 27.18
11/5/2012 17:43 33.13 34.66 33.13 71.32 71.32 66.88 5.58 187 0 26.14
11/5/2012 18:43 32.43 33.22 32.16 75.3 76.37 71.22 5.72 203 0 26.54
11/5/2012 19:43 33.39 33.43 32.41 62.7 75.51 62.64 5.3 222 0 25.28
11/5/2012 20:43 33.05 33.42 33.04 62.89 62.95 61.19 6.56 232 0 24.56
11/5/2012 21:43 32.39 33.07 32.35 65.68 66.46 62.76 6.28 240 0 24.37
11/5/2012 22:43 31.75 32.39 31.71 67.9 68.31 65.57 6.42 239 0 24.5
11/5/2012 23:43 31.24 31.87 31.24 70.25 70.25 66.83 5.58 251 0 24.33
12/5/2012 0:43 30.72 31.26 30.71 71.55 72.07 70.13 5.72 255 0 24.64
12/5/2012 1:43 30.23 30.74 30.21 74.79 74.85 71.4 5.16 234 0 24.47
12/5/2012 2:43 29.98 30.24 29.94 74.94 75.28 74.71 4.74 284 0 24.99
12/5/2012 3:43 29.59 29.99 29.57 76.73 76.73 74.81 4.88 241 0 24.64
12/5/2012 4:43 29.52 29.66 29.28 77.27 78.01 76.02 3.77 260 0 24.84
12/5/2012 5:43 29.34 29.54 29.32 78.74 78.82 77.21 3.77 238 0 24.93
12/5/2012 6:43 29.86 29.88 29.16 76.81 79.66 76.79 3.63 242 0 25.34
12/5/2012 7:43 30.89 31.05 29.84 73.22 77.02 72.82 4.32 236 0 25.44
12/5/2012 8:43 32.1 32.18 30.76 68.94 73.99 68.58 4.88 234 0 25.58
12/5/2012 9:43 33.56 33.7 32.09 64.32 69.22 62.79 4.74 261 0 25.48
12/5/2012 10:43 34.01 34.29 32.81 62.58 66.37 61.22 4.88 262 0 25.47
12/5/2012 11:43 35.93 35.94 33.68 58.93 63.9 58.86 5.02 146 0 26.6
12/5/2012 12:43 35.74 36.55 35.62 60.82 61.42 57.56 5.02 215 0 26.05
12/5/2012 13:43 35.8 36.32 35.36 62.24 63.91 58.24 4.88 216 0 26.3
12/5/2012 14:43 35.58 36.41 34.65 65.44 67.24 59.63 6.42 169 0 26.5
12/5/2012 15:43 34.64 35.91 34.53 66.96 68.07 63.73 6.98 84 0 26.75
12/5/2012 16:43 34.44 35.57 34.28 65.38 67.16 64.71 8.24 215 0 26.82
12/5/2012 17:43 33.6 34.58 33.58 70.44 70.53 65.24 7.26 185 0 26.16
12/5/2012 18:43 32.38 33.87 32.38 74.49 74.49 69.16 8.1 246 0 25.99
12/5/2012 19:43 31.72 32.44 31.69 77.29 78.01 74.34 9.21 238 0 26.58
12/5/2012 20:43 31.52 31.88 31.51 78.2 78.31 76.33 7.96 221 0 26.84
12/5/2012 21:43 31.51 31.58 31.41 76.69 78.28 76.58 6.84 227 0 26.89
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 110 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
12/5/2012 22:43 31.38 31.56 31.33 77.28 77.64 76.11 5.72 235 0 26.66
12/5/2012 23:43 31.36 31.89 31.25 74.36 77.36 66.25 4.88 238 0 24.3
13/05/ 2012 0:43 30.7 31.36 30.68 75.16 75.7 72.32 6.56 224 0 25.14
13/05/ 2012 1:43 30.32 30.75 30.3 75.54 76.38 75.01 6.28 217 0 25.39
13/05/ 2012 2:43 30.01 30.35 30 77.26 77.34 75.48 5.44 227 0 25.19
13/05/ 2012 3:43 29.96 30.06 29.88 75.69 77.72 75.66 5.58 222 0 25.19
13/05/ 2012 4:43 29.9 30 29.85 75.26 76.15 74.84 4.18 260 0 24.94
13/05/ 2012 5:43 29.83 30 29.79 75.05 75.28 73.67 5.3 291 0 24.61
13/05/ 2012 6:43 30.15 30.15 29.65 74.8 75.98 74.78 4.6 239 0 25.17
13/05/ 2012 7:43 31.14 31.14 30.12 72 75.11 71.65 6 253 0 25.4
13/05/ 2012 8:43 32.28 32.28 31.08 68.79 72.24 67.84 6.42 220 0 25.57
13/05/ 2012 9:43 32.29 33.38 32.11 67.99 69.41 65.21 5.44 231 0 24.91
13/05/ 2012 10:43 34.42 34.88 32.26 58.8 69.94 57.88 5.44 216 0 24.91
13/05/ 2012 11:43 36.6 36.67 34.11 51.92 60.55 51.83 5.16 234 0 25.08
13/05/ 2012 12:43 35.43 36.85 35.2 62.9 62.99 51.67 6.7 139 0 23.95
13/05/ 2012 13:43 35.14 36.25 34.89 64.48 65.86 59.19 7.4 230 0 25.96
13/05/ 2012 14:43 35.05 36.36 34.54 65.75 66.36 60.41 7.82 153 0 26.22
13/05/ 2012 15:43 34.81 35.52 34.39 65.68 67.26 63.29 8.1 165 0 26.79
13/05/ 2012 16:43 33.83 35.2 33.59 68.47 69.12 63.94 9.49 232 0 26.04
13/05/ 2012 17:43 32.8 34.18 32.79 71.87 71.87 67.34 8.37 182 0 25.94
13/05/ 2012 18:43 23.77 32.81 22.69 93.98 94.02 68.51 11.45 325 0 17.63
13/05/ 2012 19:43 25.5 25.59 23.12 91.83 94.45 90.14 10.19 140 0 23.76
13/05/ 2012 20:43 27.54 28.63 25.46 77.18 92.38 76.63 6.84 51 0 23.06
13/05/ 2012 21:43 27.53 27.69 25.96 88.31 88.91 75.38 5.02 138 0 22.78
13/05/ 2012 22:43 29.72 29.77 27.49 85.02 88.83 85 6.14 239 0 26.92
13/05/ 2012 23:43 29.73 29.84 29.63 82.61 85 82.56 6.98 235 0 26.44
14/05/ 2012 0:43 29.85 30 29.61 80.5 83.03 79.85 7.82 214 0 25.99
14/05/ 2012 1:43 29.42 29.99 29.36 80.84 82.99 79.63 7.4 232 0 25.52
14/05/ 2012 2:43 29.21 29.5 29.15 80.12 80.82 78.82 7.12 245 0 25.15
14/05/ 2012 3:43 28.85 29.22 28.84 81.6 81.63 79.21 5.16 184 0 24.88
14/05/ 2012 4:43 28.74 28.91 28.62 81.47 82.79 81.34 3.91 222 0 25.22
14/05/ 2012 5:43 28.71 28.97 28.57 80.34 81.73 79.21 4.6 241 0 24.75
14/05/ 2012 6:43 29.08 29.08 28.63 79.69 80.96 79.66 4.46 226 0 25.2
14/05/ 2012 7:43 30.18 30.27 29.07 77.82 80.38 77.54 5.16 237 0 25.81
14/05/ 2012 8:43 30.86 30.9 30.12 74.32 78.34 73.3 6.56 244 0 25.52
14/05/ 2012 9:43 32.05 32.54 30.79 67.83 75.14 67.77 6.42 262 0 25.33
14/05/ 2012 10:43 33.43 33.57 31.98 65.58 70.11 62.67 5.58 218 0 25.32
14/05/ 2012 11:43 34.78 35.26 33.27 62.14 65.83 56.37 6 235 0 24.8
14/05/ 2012 12:43 34.16 35.54 33.99 68.05 69.15 59.11 6.42 207 0 25.02
14/05/ 2012 13:43 34.27 34.77 33.54 66.11 71 64.86 7.96 204 0 26.7
14/05/ 2012 14:43 34.02 34.8 33.73 66.82 68.68 64.7 8.65 222 0 26.42
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 111 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
14/05/ 2012 15:43 33.6 34.66 33.41 69.02 69.47 64.42 8.24 158 0 25.95
14/05/ 2012 16:43 33.1 33.94 32.79 69.38 70.55 67.77 9.07 236 0 26.33
14/05/ 2012 17:43 32.32 33.3 32.32 71.12 71.61 68.56 8.24 205 0 25.79
14/05/ 2012 18:43 31.39 32.59 31.36 75.72 75.86 70.86 9.07 223 0 25.46
14/05/ 2012 19:43 31.12 31.39 31.09 76.59 77.26 75.44 8.24 209 0 26.25
14/05/ 2012 20:43 31.13 31.24 31.04 74.2 76.65 73.72 8.37 236 0 25.87
14/05/ 2012 21:43 30.7 31.25 30.68 77.17 77.17 71.83 8.1 238 0 25.02
14/05/ 2012 22:43 30.74 31.47 30.56 71.52 77.43 66.66 8.24 241 0 23.81
14/05/ 2012 23:43 30.21 30.74 30.2 73.46 73.6 71.43 6 229 0 24.46
15/05/ 2012 0:43 29.64 30.27 29.63 77.05 77.07 72.92 5.02 229 0 24.26
15/05/ 2012 1:43 29.25 29.65 29.17 79.02 79.48 76.97 5.02 215 0 24.79
15/05/ 2012 2:43 29.06 29.27 29.01 79.06 79.66 78.93 5.58 227 0 25.03
15/05/ 2012 3:43 28.9 29.16 28.86 80.19 80.46 78.54 6.14 272 0 24.79
15/05/ 2012 4:43 28.85 28.98 28.82 80.75 80.91 79.83 6.42 235 0 25.01
15/05/ 2012 5:43 28.68 28.85 28.62 81.62 81.78 80.68 5.3 232 0 25.02
15/05/ 2012 6:43 29.25 29.25 28.6 80.05 82.16 80 5.44 224 0 25.44
15/05/ 2012 7:43 30.46 30.56 29.23 75.17 80.33 75.14 5.3 212 0 25.55
15/05/ 2012 8:43 31.2 31.24 30.41 74.1 76.3 73.87 6 217 0 25.98
15/05/ 2012 9:43 32.47 32.47 31.1 69.83 74.28 69.33 5.72 216 0 26.12
15/05/ 2012 10:43 33.6 33.78 32.36 62.14 70 62.14 5.3 228 0 25.34
15/05/ 2012 11:43 35.33 35.33 33.01 60.89 64.79 56.99 5.72 216 0 25.5
15/05/ 2012 12:43 35.31 35.74 34.16 64.67 67.19 60.92 6.84 171 0 26.61
15/05/ 2012 13:43 35.07 35.76 34.36 65.45 66.24 62.03 6.56 196 0 26.69
15/05/ 2012 14:43 34.49 35.11 34.12 65.33 67.05 63.77 7.54 177 0 26.62
15/05/ 2012 15:43 34.3 35.12 33.98 64.96 66.6 63.58 6.98 225 0 26.39
15/05/ 2012 16:43 33.73 34.59 33.39 66.17 67.49 64.07 7.96 191 0 25.98
15/05/ 2012 17:43 32.82 33.92 32.55 68.14 69.95 65.54 8.1 211 0 25.5
15/05/ 2012 18:43 31.71 32.93 31.7 72.71 72.71 67.42 8.37 210 0 24.92
15/05/ 2012 19:43 30.94 31.74 30.93 76.69 76.69 72.22 8.79 206 0 25.34
15/05/ 2012 20:43 31.02 31.08 30.87 75.34 77.35 74.97 8.1 239 0 26.05
15/05/ 2012 21:43 31.1 31.19 30.94 71.07 75.94 70.75 7.96 254 0 25.15
15/05/ 2012 22:43 30.48 31.2 30.47 75.37 75.77 69.79 7.82 238 0 24.33
15/05/ 2012 23:43 30.23 30.5 30.19 73.21 76.3 73.15 5.58 218 0 24.88
16/05/ 2012 0:43 29.76 30.25 29.74 74.9 74.95 72.75 6 238 0 24.34
16/05/ 2012 1:43 29.33 29.78 29.32 76.26 76.54 74.65 6.14 250 0 24.35
16/05/ 2012 2:43 29.03 29.37 28.97 78.95 79.65 75.93 5.44 209 0 24.35
16/05/ 2012 3:43 28.77 29.08 28.71 79.49 79.82 77.56 4.6 247 0 24.45
16/05/ 2012 4:43 28.62 28.87 28.53 81.07 81.26 77.99 4.6 232 0 24.4
16/05/ 2012 5:43 28.52 28.77 28.5 81.77 81.79 79.93 5.16 241 0 24.71
16/05/ 2012 6:43 28.76 28.79 28.47 81.37 82.32 81.29 3.35 216 0 25.23
16/05/ 2012 7:43 30.29 30.29 28.75 77.64 81.75 76.56 4.18 239 0 25.7
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 112 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
16/05/ 2012 8:43 31.32 31.58 30.29 72 77.85 71.98 4.88 227 0 25.65
16/05/ 2012 9:43 32.52 32.54 31.06 66.75 72.25 66.75 5.58 224 0 25.53
16/05/ 2012 10:43 33.7 34.53 32.34 61.2 68.47 57.71 5.3 226 0 24.19
16/05/ 2012 11:43 34.03 34.72 33.31 65.92 65.92 58.33 4.74 165 0 24.68
16/05/ 2012 12:43 35.23 35.42 33.87 59.55 66.3 59.3 4.88 236 0 26.08
16/05/ 2012 13:43 34.21 35.24 33.93 65.55 65.67 59.43 6.7 214 0 25.16
16/05/ 2012 14:43 34.41 35.19 33.73 65.34 66.56 62.27 8.24 165 0 26.14
16/05/ 2012 15:43 31.98 34.81 31.96 70.82 70.82 63 7.96 249 0 24.05
16/05/ 2012 16:43 31.8 32.82 31.72 71.28 72.7 69.09 7.12 175 0 25.42
16/05/ 2012 17:43 30.99 31.83 30.98 74.99 74.99 71.05 7.12 228 0 25.12
16/05/ 2012 18:43 27.19 31.04 26.93 77.05 83.14 72.92 10.05 99 0 21.91
16/05/ 2012 19:43 27.92 28.11 27.01 81.32 83.06 76.59 5.72 258 0 23.42
16/05/ 2012 20:43 30.45 30.5 27.91 76.46 81.86 76.01 4.46 214 0 25.74
16/05/ 2012 21:43 30.25 30.55 30.21 76.81 78.38 75.24 7.54 229 0 25.37
16/05/ 2012 22:43 29.94 30.31 29.92 79.25 79.27 75.86 7.96 245 0 25.21
16/05/ 2012 23:43 29.94 30.05 29.86 78.59 79.63 77.44 6 200 0 25.56
17/05/ 2012 0:43 29.68 29.95 29.66 77.55 78.84 76.64 5.72 241 0 25.13
17/05/ 2012 1:43 29.48 29.73 29.47 78.22 78.58 77.18 5.72 210 0 25.06
17/05/ 2012 2:43 29.2 29.5 29.18 79.8 79.93 78.17 6.56 232 0 25
17/05/ 2012 3:43 28.87 29.22 28.84 81.02 81.31 79.7 4.46 233 0 25
17/05/ 2012 4:43 28.76 28.96 28.69 81.26 81.82 80.62 4.32 212 0 25.09
17/05/ 2012 5:43 28.63 28.85 28.57 81.74 81.98 80.59 4.18 246 0 24.96
17/05/ 2012 6:43 29.02 29.04 28.56 81.58 82.59 81.53 4.74 245 0 25.53
17/05/ 2012 7:43 30.34 30.38 29.01 77.3 81.89 77.3 5.3 227 0 25.91
17/05/ 2012 8:43 31.63 31.98 30.34 72.12 77.66 70.93 6 193 0 25.7
17/05/ 2012 9:43 32.63 33.24 31.53 69.68 72.42 67.01 4.88 204 0 25.7
17/05/ 2012 10:43 34.38 34.68 32.55 61.96 70.28 60.99 5.02 224 0 25.76
17/05/ 2012 11:43 34.68 35.14 34.03 64.29 65.08 60.57 4.88 294 0 25.92
17/05/ 2012 12:43 34.93 35.58 34.25 61.17 64.48 59.79 6.56 113 0 25.94
17/05/ 2012 13:43 34.41 35.38 34.09 62.83 65.37 59.08 7.68 152 0 25.25
17/05/ 2012 14:43 32.95 34.57 32.94 62.87 65.53 59.52 7.54 213 0 24.01
17/05/ 2012 15:43 32.64 33.5 32.47 69.94 70 61.75 7.54 173 0 24.33
17/05/ 2012 16:43 33.27 33.68 32.04 62.8 70.17 61.19 8.51 231 0 24.77
17/05/ 2012 17:43 31.91 33.52 31.83 73.64 73.66 62.31 7.4 214 0 23.8
17/05/ 2012 18:43 31.2 32.09 31.03 74.84 77.47 72.9 6.98 216 0 25.75
17/05/ 2012 19:43 30.41 31.26 30.38 79.42 79.42 74.09 7.4 221 0 25.27
17/05/ 2012 20:43 30.47 30.62 30.38 77.13 79.63 76.35 6.56 220 0 25.83
17/05/ 2012 21:43 30.3 30.52 30.25 80.05 80.08 77.07 6.98 225 0 25.82
17/05/ 2012 22:43 30.38 30.43 30.27 79.58 80.18 79.14 6.84 244 0 26.35
17/05/ 2012 23:43 30.04 30.43 29.97 78.91 81.21 78.88 6.42 250 0 25.97
18/05/ 2012 0:43 29.59 30.12 29.58 80.66 80.74 78.38 6.28 223 0 25.42
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 113 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
18/05/ 2012 1:43 29.36 29.72 29.36 81.28 81.28 80.37 5.02 243 0 25.62
18/05/ 2012 2:43 29.07 29.38 29.04 81.27 81.83 80.52 5.44 246 0 25.37
18/05/ 2012 3:43 28.86 29.12 28.82 82.85 83 80.72 5.16 234 0 25.21
18/05/ 2012 4:43 28.64 28.88 28.62 83.66 83.92 82.72 3.63 231 0 25.41
18/05/ 2012 5:43 28.78 28.81 28.59 82.91 83.69 82.49 3.35 233 0 25.5
18/05/ 2012 6:43 28.99 29.01 28.6 82.98 83.82 82.9 2.37 229 0 25.78
18/05/ 2012 7:43 30.5 30.61 28.99 76.05 83.33 75.94 3.07 229 0 25.77
18/05/ 2012 8:43 32.02 32.2 30.34 69.92 76.6 69.92 3.63 235 0 25.83
18/05/ 2012 9:43 32.26 32.9 31.63 68.08 70.99 66.17 4.46 231 0 25.13
18/05/ 2012 10:43 34.42 34.47 32.2 62.95 68.81 61.87 4.46 245 0 26.04
18/05/ 2012 11:43 35.16 35.74 33.63 60.55 66.44 59.89 3.91 136 0 26.18
18/05/ 2012 12:43 36.14 36.84 35.08 60.82 61.92 56.53 3.91 148 0 26.11
18/05/ 2012 13:43 35.1 36.24 34.68 63.86 64.85 57.4 5.86 215 0 25.41
18/05/ 2012 14:43 35.17 35.98 34.55 63.84 66.26 60.74 5.72 337 0 26.43
18/05/ 2012 15:43 34.21 35.18 32.88 67.85 70.9 63.72 5.58 182 0 26.34
18/05/ 2012 16:43 33.43 34.44 32.71 69.55 72.25 66.72 6 213 0 26.38
18/05/ 2012 17:43 33.41 33.88 33.2 67.86 69.88 66.72 6.14 167 0 26.36
18/05/ 2012 18:43 31.68 33.46 31.67 74.7 74.7 67.41 8.24 191 0 24.89
18/05/ 2012 19:43 31.09 31.73 31.06 78.91 78.99 74.36 6.98 183 0 25.98
18/05/ 2012 20:43 31.42 31.5 31.02 75.58 79.08 75.1 7.4 206 0 26.47
18/05/ 2012 21:43 31.43 31.48 31.3 73.55 76.37 73.52 7.54 223 0 26.12
18/05/ 2012 22:43 31.14 31.48 31.1 71.74 74.09 71.71 5.02 204 0 25.42
18/05/ 2012 23:43 31.36 31.37 30.98 67.3 72.79 66.94 5.86 240 0 24.47
19/05/ 2012 0:43 30.31 31.36 30.31 76.29 76.29 66.76 4.88 186 0 23.43
19/05/ 2012 1:43 29.58 30.32 29.57 79.5 79.55 76.12 4.32 241 0 24.92
19/05/ 2012 2:43 29.3 29.62 29.28 79.22 79.47 77.86 4.32 231 0 25.03
19/05/ 2012 3:43 28.95 29.3 28.93 81.17 81.22 79.12 4.18 225 0 24.96
19/05/ 2012 4:43 28.76 29 28.74 82.59 82.59 81.1 4.18 218 0 25.19
19/05/ 2012 5:43 28.67 28.83 28.65 83.09 83.12 82.36 3.91 227 0 25.36
19/05/ 2012 6:43 29.14 29.16 28.66 81.07 83.22 81.05 4.32 232 0 25.55
19/05/ 2012 7:43 30.36 30.42 29.14 77.02 81.33 76.63 5.3 240 0 25.79
19/05/ 2012 8:43 31.64 31.75 30.32 72.09 77.36 71.92 5.16 244 0 25.95
19/05/ 2012 9:43 32.6 33.01 31.63 66.88 72.59 66.01 5.44 232 0 25.41
19/05/ 2012 10:43 34.28 34.72 32.51 60.07 67.68 59.53 4.88 217 0 25.25
19/05/ 2012 11:43 35.82 36.04 34.25 58.21 61.96 56.32 4.88 218 0 25.75
19/05/ 2012 12:43 35.23 36.46 34.69 65.14 65.69 57.68 5.44 267 0 25.61
19/05/ 2012 13:43 35.1 35.74 34.64 64.6 66.64 62.81 6.28 186 0 26.93
19/05/ 2012 14:43 35.16 35.7 34.51 63.84 66.23 62.26 6.42 227 0 26.84
19/05/ 2012 15:43 34.8 35.62 34.28 64.15 66.05 60.59 7.82 183 0 26.04
19/05/ 2012 16:43 34.37 34.86 33.77 64.51 67.81 63.22 7.4 194 0 26.36
19/05/ 2012 17:43 32.71 34.39 32.54 70.81 71.33 64.18 7.96 165 0 25.04
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 114 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
19/05/ 2012 18:43 31.33 32.87 31.27 75.76 75.79 69.62 8.24 145 0 25.1
19/05/ 2012 19:43 30.81 31.36 30.77 77.33 77.33 74.42 8.37 245 0 25.73
19/05/ 2012 20:43 30.51 30.82 30.48 79.91 80.07 77.27 8.93 223 0 26.07
19/05/ 2012 21:43 30.36 30.54 30.34 80.25 80.69 79.55 7.96 237 0 26.42
19/05/ 2012 22:43 30.14 30.41 30.12 80.32 80.64 79.29 7.26 183 0 26.15
19/05/ 2012 23:43 29.96 30.21 29.92 79.44 80.33 79.28 6.42 227 0 25.97
20/05/ 2012 0:43 29.85 29.97 29.66 79.2 79.88 78.82 7.12 225 0 25.77
20/05/ 2012 1:43 29.5 29.86 29.46 80.02 81.39 79.13 7.12 237 0 25.5
20/05/ 2012 2:43 29.35 29.53 29.31 80.04 80.37 79.5 6.98 235 0 25.43
20/05/ 2012 3:43 29.12 29.38 29.09 80.51 80.56 79.78 6.28 232 0 25.26
20/05/ 2012 4:43 28.94 29.14 28.93 81.62 81.67 80.17 5.58 234 0 25.17
20/05/ 2012 5:43 28.9 29.02 28.86 82.17 82.38 81.1 5.16 222 0 25.33
20/05/ 2012 6:43 29.25 29.28 28.84 81.15 82.53 81.15 5.02 245 0 25.68
20/05/ 2012 7:43 30.58 30.58 29.25 76.37 81.46 76.37 4.74 200 0 25.94
20/05/ 2012 8:43 31.68 31.99 30.46 72.04 76.59 71.23 4.74 214 0 25.82
20/05/ 2012 9:43 32.55 33.01 31.58 68.3 72.58 67.56 5.44 254 0 25.76
20/05/ 2012 10:43 34.63 34.84 32.5 60.12 69.35 58.64 6.42 222 0 25.33
20/05/ 2012 11:43 35.61 36.28 34.32 59.86 60.87 56.9 6 212 0 25.73
20/05/ 2012 12:43 34.63 35.69 34.46 64.65 65.59 58.48 6.42 202 0 25.28
20/05/ 2012 13:43 34.81 35.33 34.33 64.98 67.2 62.18 6.98 160 0 26.49
20/05/ 2012 14:43 34.35 35.26 34.15 65.3 65.76 62.42 7.82 174 0 26.12
20/05/ 2012 15:43 34.54 35.37 33.99 64.91 65.67 62.42 8.37 244 0 26.3
20/05/ 2012 16:43 33.33 34.58 33.12 67.93 68.38 63.73 9.07 229 0 25.51
20/05/ 2012 17:43 32.44 33.54 32.37 70.03 70.87 67.21 8.79 220 0 25.56
20/05/ 2012 18:43 31.44 32.43 31.4 74.03 74.2 69.79 11.45 103 0 25.25
20/05/ 2012 19:43 30.59 31.46 30.58 77.68 77.71 73.87 10.05 237 0 25.39
20/05/ 2012 20:43 30.19 30.61 30.18 79.65 79.73 77.04 9.91 229 0 25.71
20/05/ 2012 21:43 30.03 30.21 29.99 80.29 80.86 79.43 9.77 227 0 26.07
20/05/ 2012 22:43 29.92 30.05 29.86 79.68 80.7 79.43 9.63 218 0 25.97
20/05/ 2012 23:43 29.68 29.95 29.62 79.63 80.63 79.22 7.12 223 0 25.69
21/05/ 2012 0:43 29.49 29.74 29.46 79.23 80.34 79.04 6.7 228 0 25.47
21/05/ 2012 1:43 29.28 29.54 29.27 79.71 79.79 78.7 6.14 233 0 25.19
21/05/ 2012 2:43 29.11 29.34 29.07 79.72 80.4 79.24 5.16 229 0 25.14
21/05/ 2012 3:43 29.08 29.16 29 78.69 80.04 78.58 5.72 230 0 24.97
21/05/ 2012 4:43 28.87 29.14 28.83 80.78 81.02 78.65 4.88 225 0 24.78
21/05/ 2012 5:43 28.76 28.89 28.72 81.55 81.58 80.46 4.74 219 0 25.06
21/05/ 2012 6:43 29.04 29.06 28.63 81.08 82.94 81.08 4.6 244 0 25.46
21/05/ 2012 7:43 30.04 30.16 29.03 77.54 81.32 77.51 6.7 256 0 25.67
21/05/ 2012 8:43 31.45 31.45 30.04 73.81 77.96 73.21 6.98 233 0 26.06
21/05/ 2012 9:43 32.81 33.08 31.32 66.47 74.15 65.96 7.26 233 0 25.6
21/05/ 2012 10:43 33.68 34.16 32.64 66.67 68.74 63.54 6.14 223 0 25.79
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 115 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
21/05/ 2012 11:43 34.04 34.87 33.46 63.94 68.41 61.75 6.14 220 0 25.65
21/05/ 2012 12:43 34.66 35.1 33.71 63.73 67.44 62.59 6.98 242 0 26.46
21/05/ 2012 13:43 34.84 35.55 34.21 63.3 66.54 61.09 6.42 294 0 26.22
21/05/ 2012 14:43 34.67 35.39 34.19 64.75 66.93 61.57 6.56 248 0 26.19
21/05/ 2012 15:43 34.31 34.98 33.9 64.9 66.42 62.84 6.98 212 0 26.2
21/05/ 2012 16:43 33.78 34.79 33.65 66.09 68.16 64.11 6.28 150 0 26.04
21/05/ 2012 17:43 31.89 33.79 31.81 73.72 74 65.77 6.84 209 0 24.68
21/05/ 2012 18:43 31.14 32.18 31.14 77.34 77.34 73.63 6.84 243 0 25.86
21/05/ 2012 19:43 30.44 31.24 30.44 80.05 80.49 77.15 7.26 199 0 25.98
21/05/ 2012 20:43 29.55 30.5 29.53 85.73 85.73 79.71 7.26 200 0 25.67
21/05/ 2012 21:43 30.06 30.11 29.41 83 86.57 81.78 6.7 252 0 26.6
21/05/ 2012 22:43 24.94 30.06 24.85 92.36 92.4 81.92 9.91 13 0 21.64
21/05/ 2012 23:43 24.26 24.97 23.64 93.55 93.97 92.19 8.1 120 0 22.91
22/05/ 2012 0:43 24.68 24.72 24.21 94.17 94.24 93.63 3.07 215 0 23.58
22/05/ 2012 1:43 27.44 27.46 24.66 94.45 95.06 94.43 2.37 225 0 26.46
22/05/ 2012 2:43 28.82 28.84 27.44 89.02 94.8 89.02 3.07 234 0 26.83
22/05/ 2012 3:43 28.92 29 28.8 87.1 89.04 87.08 3.35 232 0 26.55
22/05/ 2012 4:43 28.8 28.95 28.72 86.49 87.35 86.46 2.37 236 0 26.31
22/05/ 2012 5:43 28.65 28.86 28.61 86.56 86.76 85.97 2.09 227 0 26.07
22/05/ 2012 6:43 28.87 28.91 28.57 85.71 87.06 85.71 2.09 241 0 26.23
22/05/ 2012 7:43 30.28 30.28 28.86 78.91 86.08 78.82 2.79 227 0 26.19
22/05/ 2012 8:43 30.9 31.12 30.28 75.85 79.74 75.74 3.07 291 0 26.11
22/05/ 2012 9:43 32.28 32.67 30.78 72.24 76.79 70.38 2.51 244 0 26.19
22/05/ 2012 10:43 34.15 34.4 32.07 65.63 72.73 63.93 2.09 276 0 26.34
22/05/ 2012 11:43 34.06 35.17 33.75 60.69 67.7 58.97 3.07 261 0 24.89
22/05/ 2012 12:43 36.04 36.44 34.02 58.27 63.37 55.29 2.37 197 0 25.65
22/05/ 2012 13:43 36.5 37.07 35.4 57.57 61.5 54.6 3.49 177 0 25.86
22/05/ 2012 14:43 35.28 36.72 35.02 61.85 64.23 55.95 4.46 142 0 25.14
22/05/ 2012 15:43 34.17 35.35 33.86 67.15 68.5 61.12 5.72 213 0 25.6
22/05/ 2012 16:43 33.32 34.39 33.13 71.88 72.84 66.16 6.14 216 0 26.13
22/05/ 2012 17:43 32.4 33.38 32.28 73.24 75.09 71.71 6.14 257 0 26.62
22/05/ 2012 18:43 31.07 32.46 31.04 78.85 78.85 72.68 6.56 255 0 25.58
22/05/ 2012 19:43 30.38 31.11 30.33 79.61 82.01 78.65 5.58 207 0 26.25
22/05/ 2012 20:43 30.24 30.42 30.1 81.41 81.49 79.47 6 210 0 26.29
22/05/ 2012 21:43 30 30.3 29.99 81.95 82.38 80.83 6.84 202 0 26.34
22/05/ 2012 22:43 29.66 30.02 29.55 81.18 84.67 80.76 6.7 172 0 25.99
22/05/ 2012 23:43 28.71 29.85 28.68 78.04 83.6 78.04 7.12 228 0 24.5
23/05/ 2012 0:43 27.91 29 27.86 78.86 79.83 75.85 6 205 0 23.25
23/05/ 2012 1:43 28.09 28.26 27.54 88.2 88.42 78.38 5.44 216 0 23.97
23/05/ 2012 2:43 29.01 29.02 28.09 86.13 88.41 86.02 1.95 180 0 26.43
23/05/ 2012 3:43 29.29 29.46 28.97 80.11 86.27 78.51 2.51 227 0 25.16
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 116 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
23/05/ 2012 4:43 29.1 29.41 29.07 77.52 80.26 76.25 2.93 246 0 24.49
23/05/ 2012 5:43 28.5 29.13 28.48 80.57 80.73 77.18 1.53 215 0 24.11
23/05/ 2012 6:43 28.89 28.92 28.42 79.44 81.13 78.79 2.65 258 0 24.83
23/05/ 2012 7:43 30.39 30.46 28.88 75.22 79.94 74.79 2.23 241 0 25.41
23/05/ 2012 8:43 31.83 32.07 30.29 69.3 75.8 68.18 3.35 290 0 25.23
23/05/ 2012 9:43 32.68 32.85 31.66 64.51 69.39 63.87 3.07 248 0 24.93
23/05/ 2012 10:43 33.52 33.96 32.61 59.99 65.41 59.33 3.63 254 0 24.49
23/05/ 2012 11:43 35.07 35.68 33.36 59.27 61.75 56.18 3.77 142 0 25.02
23/05/ 2012 12:43 34.76 35.66 34.62 63.5 64.3 57.83 3.63 190 0 25.22
23/05/ 2012 13:43 35.09 35.84 34.49 62.38 64.72 59.06 4.46 161 0 25.88
23/05/ 2012 14:43 34.92 35.65 34.5 57.54 62.29 54.94 4.6 224 0 24.5
23/05/ 2012 15:43 34.85 35.2 34.36 58.2 63.95 55.57 5.3 227 0 24.63
23/05/ 2012 16:43 33.51 35.2 33.51 64.71 65.2 56.63 5.16 211 0 23.7
23/05/ 2012 17:43 32.81 33.79 32.65 67.07 67.28 63.37 5.86 223 0 24.93
23/05/ 2012 18:43 30.9 32.83 30.89 72.87 73.76 66.33 5.44 228 0 23.88
23/05/ 2012 19:43 30.15 30.92 30.14 78.14 79.02 72.73 6 205 0 24.71
23/05/ 2012 20:43 29.95 30.19 29.94 79.87 80.17 77.93 5.86 211 0 25.67
23/05/ 2012 21:43 29.85 30.05 29.8 81.87 81.97 79.72 5.44 197 0 25.96
23/05/ 2012 22:43 29.97 30.01 29.79 81.04 82.8 80.98 6.14 216 0 26.34
23/05/ 2012 23:43 29.85 30.03 29.8 81.01 81.63 80.66 6.7 219 0 26.16
24/05/ 2012 0:43 29.74 29.88 29.66 79.91 81.36 79.8 6 202 0 25.87
24/05/ 2012 1:43 29.59 29.9 29.58 80.74 80.77 79.72 5.02 218 0 25.71
24/05/ 2012 2:43 29.36 29.61 29.27 79.83 81.07 79.78 4.88 255 0 25.5
24/05/ 2012 3:43 29.08 29.44 29.01 80.31 80.69 79.37 3.49 213 0 25.14
24/05/ 2012 4:43 28.71 29.14 28.69 81.41 81.41 79.53 2.79 231 0 24.81
24/05/ 2012 5:43 28.2 28.75 28.18 83.28 83.28 81.17 1.11 232 0 24.66
24/05/ 2012 6:43 28.82 28.82 28.02 81.35 84.07 81.35 1.11 253 0 25.3
24/05/ 2012 7:43 30.91 30.95 28.81 74.24 81.8 74.19 1.81 239 0 25.77
24/05/ 2012 8:43 32.38 32.43 30.83 68.57 74.58 67.95 2.51 212 0 25.69
24/05/ 2012 9:43 32.61 32.76 31.92 65.95 69.06 65.14 4.05 255 0 25.2
24/05/ 2012 10:43 34.01 34.65 32.6 59.09 66.46 58.77 4.05 225 0 24.79
24/05/ 2012 11:43 34.39 35.79 33.92 59.49 60.9 54.28 3.07 244 0 23.81
24/05/ 2012 12:43 35.77 36.08 34.38 59.63 60.89 56.57 3.63 161 0 25.78
24/05/ 2012 13:43 35.08 36.25 35.06 60.19 62.5 58.17 3.91 218 0 25.61
24/05/ 2012 14:43 35.58 35.79 34.57 61.21 64.43 58.4 4.46 238 0 26.14
24/05/ 2012 15:43 35.02 35.83 34.33 58.73 64.53 56.24 5.16 200 0 24.99
24/05/ 2012 16:43 33.84 35.16 33.78 64.34 64.52 58.62 5.16 28 0 24.59
24/05/ 2012 17:43 32.65 34.23 32.61 71.09 71.09 63.62 4.88 197 0 24.84
24/05/ 2012 18:43 31.51 32.8 31.51 73.65 74.22 69.71 6 243 0 25.29
24/05/ 2012 19:43 30.34 31.6 30.3 78.84 78.89 73.43 6 209 0 25.05
24/05/ 2012 20:43 30.35 30.41 30.18 77.68 80.6 77.46 6 202 0 25.96
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 117 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
24/05/ 2012 21:43 30.24 30.41 30.16 76.53 79.8 76.5 6.14 238 0 25.64
24/05/ 2012 22:43 30.1 30.36 30 79.66 80.09 76.14 6.14 223 0 25.43
24/05/ 2012 23:43 30.02 30.14 29.94 80.67 80.83 79.02 5.44 219 0 25.98
25/05/ 2012 0:43 29.86 30.04 29.84 80.88 81.15 80.31 6.7 198 0 26.09
25/05/ 2012 1:43 29.76 29.89 29.68 80.88 81.77 80.51 6.14 224 0 26.04
25/05/ 2012 2:43 29.6 29.78 29.59 81.36 81.55 80.39 6 221 0 25.86
25/05/ 2012 3:43 29.38 29.62 29.36 81.87 82.01 80.37 4.6 221 0 25.64
25/05/ 2012 4:43 29.15 29.41 29.14 80.94 82.14 80.25 3.63 239 0 25.39
25/05/ 2012 5:43 28.84 29.18 28.82 81.84 81.97 80.66 3.49 226 0 25.18
25/05/ 2012 6:43 28.99 29.02 28.72 81.66 82.32 81.66 3.07 243 0 25.53
25/05/ 2012 7:43 29.86 29.9 28.99 78.85 81.87 78.74 2.51 252 0 25.76
25/05/ 2012 8:43 31.19 31.23 29.84 72.96 79.28 72.73 2.51 242 0 25.7
25/05/ 2012 9:43 33.58 34.27 31.12 62.73 73.58 61.74 2.65 277 0 25.21
25/05/ 2012 10:43 34.28 35.21 32.84 60.57 65.14 56.84 2.93 339 0 24.48
25/05/ 2012 11:43 34.9 35.2 33.75 58.04 60.66 56.35 2.23 316 0 24.91
25/05/ 2012 12:43 35.2 36.38 34.64 56.91 58.41 53.06 2.23 208 0 24.18
25/05/ 2012 13:43 36.18 37.4 35.17 56.27 58.9 52.86 4.18 151 0 25.02
25/05/ 2012 14:43 35.47 36.81 34.72 60.22 61.16 55.88 3.63 258 0 25.3
25/05/ 2012 15:43 34.28 36.24 34.14 69.79 69.85 56.94 4.6 230 0 24.51
25/05/ 2012 16:43 32.45 34.58 32.32 72.27 73.79 66.71 5.3 256 0 25.45
25/05/ 2012 17:43 32.37 33.24 32.21 70.77 72.26 65.76 5.02 214 0 25.13
25/05/ 2012 18:43 31.44 32.55 31.43 74.46 74.46 69.06 4.74 224 0 25.07
25/05/ 2012 19:43 30.45 31.47 30.42 78.26 79.49 74.27 5.58 209 0 25.35
25/05/ 2012 20:43 30.3 30.5 30.28 79.75 79.75 77.87 5.16 207 0 26
25/05/ 2012 21:43 30.31 30.38 30.22 80.38 80.41 78.64 4.88 206 0 26.18
25/05/ 2012 22:43 30.22 30.31 30.14 81.17 81.38 80.39 3.77 168 0 26.46
25/05/ 2012 23:43 30.19 30.35 30.16 82.74 82.84 81 2.79 166 0 26.56
26/05/ 2012 0:43 25.82 30.25 25.81 85.35 85.35 79.71 6.7 95 0 22.04
26/05/ 2012 1:43 25.6 25.83 24.88 88.41 91.45 85.3 7.68 126 0 22.95
26/05/ 2012 2:43 27.03 27.16 25.59 90.17 90.17 84.86 5.44 229 0 24.26
26/05/ 2012 3:43 26.74 27.07 26.58 88.23 90.15 85.66 4.74 245 0 24.13
26/05/ 2012 4:43 26.97 27.02 26.69 83.66 88.31 83.5 2.09 261 0 23.93
26/05/ 2012 5:43 26.8 27.25 26.78 84.19 84.19 82.22 0.97 275 0 23.51
26/05/ 2012 6:43 27.45 27.5 26.61 83.14 85.95 83.12 1.11 99 0 24.33
26/05/ 2012 7:43 29.86 29.9 27.43 79.17 83.64 78.11 0.83 102 0 25.63
26/05/ 2012 8:43 32.58 33.01 29.8 67.3 79.82 66.4 2.23 225 0 25.49
26/05/ 2012 9:43 33.67 34.32 32.18 64.89 68.47 63.79 2.37 277 0 25.85
26/05/ 2012 10:43 33.55 34.59 33.04 63.19 66.95 60.96 3.21 266 0 24.97
26/05/ 2012 11:43 34.54 34.9 33.4 59.35 64.85 57.83 2.37 247 0 25.01
26/05/ 2012 12:43 35.98 36.47 34.24 56.66 60.64 55.47 3.91 333 0 25.65
26/05/ 2012 13:43 34.73 36.8 34.46 57.83 58.56 53.38 2.65 306 0 23.85
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 118 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
26/05/ 2012 14:43 34.28 35.44 34 61.19 61.57 56.14 3.07 236 0 24.27
26/05/ 2012 15:43 35.95 36.3 34.1 58.96 63.94 57.91 2.51 218 0 26.35
26/05/ 2012 16:43 36.99 37.04 35.48 54.51 59.24 53.62 2.93 218 0 26.01
26/05/ 2012 17:43 34.01 37.09 34.01 65.64 65.64 54.1 3.49 225 0 23.41
26/05/ 2012 18:43 32.11 34.02 32.04 75.29 75.38 65.39 1.81 190 0 24.79
26/05/ 2012 19:43 31.38 32.11 31.35 77.56 77.84 74.53 2.79 233 0 26.3
26/05/ 2012 20:43 30.96 31.39 30.91 78.94 79.26 77.45 3.35 246 0 26.55
26/05/ 2012 21:43 31.12 31.26 30.95 76.7 79 76.56 2.79 213 0 26.5
26/05/ 2012 22:43 30.7 31.22 30.67 80.35 80.35 76.06 3.07 224 0 25.99
26/05/ 2012 23:43 30.55 30.7 30.53 82.02 82.07 79.75 2.51 191 0 26.65
27/05/ 2012 0:43 30.54 30.64 30.46 83.24 84.24 81.99 2.79 229 0 27.11
27/05/ 2012 1:43 30.71 30.75 30.44 80.84 83.48 79.98 3.35 203 0 26.85
27/05/ 2012 2:43 30.36 30.77 30.23 84.15 85.45 80.5 4.05 224 0 26.62
27/05/ 2012 3:43 29.77 30.6 29.76 87.27 87.27 79.73 3.63 123 0 25.88
27/05/ 2012 4:43 27.62 29.76 27.29 89.06 89.08 86.78 4.6 147 0 25.21
27/05/ 2012 5:43 28.06 28.08 27.57 89.63 90.57 89.16 2.93 246 0 26.1
27/05/ 2012 6:43 29.01 29.03 28.05 88.41 89.86 88.36 3.35 218 0 26.89
27/05/ 2012 7:43 30.08 30.13 28.99 78.4 88.66 78.4 2.23 266 0 25.9
27/05/ 2012 8:43 30.88 31.33 30.07 74.89 79.36 74.12 3.77 250 0 25.73
27/05/ 2012 9:43 31.75 32.29 30.74 72.43 75.56 70.05 3.35 227 0 25.61
27/05/ 2012 10:43 32.55 33.36 31.49 68.48 72.64 66.93 2.51 289 0 25.6
27/05/ 2012 11:43 33.11 33.2 32.28 66.97 70.12 66.94 2.09 286 0 26.13
27/05/ 2012 12:43 35.47 35.59 32.99 59.74 67.52 59.33 1.53 358 0 26.31
27/05/ 2012 13:43 36.56 36.57 34.75 57.04 61.92 55.97 1.81 313 0 26.34
27/05/ 2012 14:43 34.93 36.56 34.77 58.46 59.73 56.29 2.93 271 0 24.92
27/05/ 2012 15:43 35.3 35.66 34.45 61.88 64.54 56.31 3.49 142 0 25.27
27/05/ 2012 16:43 32.29 35.54 32.16 73.05 73.05 60.52 3.63 217 0 23.67
27/05/ 2012 17:43 31.8 32.53 31.79 75.91 76.36 71.49 4.18 234 0 26
27/05/ 2012 18:43 30.89 31.86 30.72 80.69 81.87 75.73 3.91 178 0 26.1
27/05/ 2012 19:43 30.6 30.94 30.59 80.74 81.46 80.22 4.74 141 0 26.79
27/05/ 2012 20:43 30.6 30.64 30.47 80.66 82.67 80.39 3.77 171 0 26.83
27/05/ 2012 21:43 30.66 30.69 30.4 80.05 82.65 79.99 5.44 186 0 26.8
27/05/ 2012 22:43 30.46 30.73 30.45 80.84 81.51 77.9 4.46 258 0 26.16
27/05/ 2012 23:43 29.58 30.45 29.49 89 89.02 80.66 5.72 186 0 25.9
28/05/ 2012 0:43 23.78 29.59 23.71 93.19 93.24 85.49 7.68 24 0 21.2
28/05/ 2012 1:43 23.78 24.23 23.59 94.03 94.03 93.21 4.88 78 0 22.62
28/05/ 2012 2:43 24.3 24.36 23.76 94.3 94.32 94.16 5.02 88 0 23.3
28/05/ 2012 3:43 24.53 24.6 24.29 94.36 94.45 94.34 2.65 78 0 23.56
28/05/ 2012 4:43 24.72 24.79 24.52 94.36 94.41 94.32 1.11 24 0 23.74
28/05/ 2012 5:43 24.78 24.8 24.68 94.49 94.52 94.38 2.37 65 0 23.81
28/05/ 2012 6:43 25.05 25.07 24.69 94.49 94.59 94.49 2.79 88 0 24.1
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 119 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
28/05/ 2012 7:43 26.36 26.48 25.02 94.46 94.85 94.41 3.07 106 0 25.39
28/05/ 2012 8:43 27.66 27.78 26.35 91.74 94.79 91.71 4.18 135 0 26.19
28/05/ 2012 9:43 29.88 30.38 27.63 84.46 92.28 83.83 3.21 223 0 26.84
28/05/ 2012 10:43 31.27 31.28 29.84 81.79 84.82 81.61 2.79 175 0 27.74
28/05/ 2012 11:43 34.24 34.67 31.23 67.19 82.48 65.83 2.37 147 0 26.92
28/05/ 2012 12:43 32.38 35.5 32.29 73.55 73.55 64.43 2.51 239 0 24.8
28/05/ 2012 13:43 27.74 32.61 27.56 90.79 90.79 70.77 3.35 337 0 21.94
28/05/ 2012 14:43 29.24 29.58 27.73 85.72 91.79 85.72 3.35 246 0 26.6
28/05/ 2012 15:43 31.08 31.24 29.25 79.15 86.13 78.93 3.49 149 0 26.98
28/05/ 2012 16:43 30.3 31.93 30.23 79.24 82.92 76.82 4.18 142 0 25.77
28/05/ 2012 17:43 30.21 30.93 30.19 80.6 80.68 78.32 5.3 287 0 26.01
28/05/ 2012 18:43 29.86 30.27 29.8 80.82 82 76.7 4.32 165 0 25.32
28/05/ 2012 19:43 29.44 29.88 29.37 81.7 81.7 79.71 3.91 222 0 25.56
28/05/ 2012 20:43 29.15 29.46 29.12 83.15 84.09 81.64 3.07 216 0 25.68
28/05/ 2012 21:43 29.05 29.17 29 83.44 84.27 83.1 2.93 171 0 25.88
28/05/ 2012 22:43 29.18 29.24 28.93 83.1 83.96 83.02 2.09 146 0 25.99
28/05/ 2012 23:43 29.24 29.26 28.7 82.37 85.54 81.58 2.65 241 0 25.76
29/05/ 2012 0:43 29.28 29.36 29.2 83.86 83.91 82.38 2.37 226 0 25.96
29/05/ 2012 1:43 29.02 29.34 29 85.2 85.23 82.96 1.95 224 0 25.83
29/05/ 2012 2:43 27.05 29.04 27.04 90.1 90.13 84.66 3.07 331 0 24.24
29/05/ 2012 3:43 26.87 27.08 26.78 92.74 92.77 90.04 0.69 214 0 25.1
29/05/ 2012 4:43 26.91 26.97 26.85 93.09 93.13 92.75 0.83 215 0 25.63
29/05/ 2012 5:43 27.01 27.26 26.84 92.73 93.25 92.73 0.97 224 0 25.73
29/05/ 2012 6:43 27.86 27.87 26.99 88.54 92.99 88.54 1.25 239 0 25.79
29/05/ 2012 7:43 29.2 29.21 27.84 83.92 88.86 83.81 1.67 236 0 26.17
29/05/ 2012 8:43 30.46 30.62 29.17 76.74 84.27 76.38 3.63 248 0 25.83
29/05/ 2012 9:43 31.72 31.79 30.4 74.6 78.07 73.46 3.35 229 0 26.38
29/05/ 2012 10:43 32.22 32.33 30.89 73.21 77.36 73.15 3.91 256 0 26.79
29/05/ 2012 11:43 32.92 33.42 32.1 73.11 75.22 69.82 4.05 237 0 26.67
29/05/ 2012 12:43 32.91 33.74 32.3 71.48 74.11 69.4 3.91 252 0 26.55
29/05/ 2012 13:43 31.3 33.42 30.13 70.87 77.43 69.12 4.88 252 0 24.95
29/05/ 2012 14:43 30.73 31.88 30.7 78.06 78.26 70.48 3.91 240 0 24.73
29/05/ 2012 15:43 31.85 31.87 30.11 76.26 80.51 76.12 3.07 210 0 27.11
29/05/ 2012 16:43 31.6 32.78 31.59 75.31 76.24 70.34 4.6 280 0 25.53
29/05/ 2012 17:43 27.22 31.61 26.54 91.7 91.73 73.96 5.3 37 0 22.17
29/05/ 2012 18:43 28.12 28.2 27.22 92.91 92.91 91.92 0.13 111 0 26.68
29/05/ 2012 19:43 27.87 28.22 27.37 90.62 92.95 90.6 1.39 225 0 26.19
29/05/ 2012 20:43 29.5 29.53 27.82 86.67 91.02 86.06 4.46 231 0 26.92
29/05/ 2012 21:43 29.7 29.72 29.41 82.53 86.87 82.47 4.32 229 0 26.39
29/05/ 2012 22:43 29.43 29.74 29.4 80.57 82.49 80.03 4.6 234 0 25.62
29/05/ 2012 23:43 29.14 29.51 29.1 80.91 81.15 79.89 5.44 228 0 25.31
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 120 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
30/05/ 2012 0:43 28.8 29.17 28.79 82.78 82.78 80.2 4.88 223 0 25.04
30/05/ 2012 1:43 28.64 28.84 28.61 83.77 83.87 82.61 4.74 262 0 25.38
30/05/ 2012 2:43 28.58 28.69 28.56 83.75 84.12 83.6 4.46 218 0 25.53
30/05/ 2012 3:43 28.52 28.66 28.44 83.85 84.26 83.32 5.16 233 0 25.41
30/05/ 2012 4:43 28.46 28.54 28.34 84.2 84.69 83.81 4.05 235 0 25.45
30/05/ 2012 5:43 28.47 28.54 28.35 83.89 84.56 83.26 4.32 246 0 25.35
30/05/ 2012 6:43 28.54 28.56 28.33 83.8 84.68 83.69 3.49 232 0 25.5
30/05/ 2012 7:43 28.49 28.64 28.39 85.5 85.7 83.47 4.6 229 0 25.41
30/05/ 2012 8:43 29.59 29.66 28.45 81.65 85.82 81.65 3.77 225 0 26.11
30/05/ 2012 9:43 30.39 30.53 29.56 79.04 82.38 78.35 4.05 268 0 26.19
30/05/ 2012 10:43 31.44 32.24 30.22 74.83 79.58 72.29 4.32 254 0 25.84
30/05/ 2012 11:43 32.26 32.55 31.35 74.16 76.53 72.84 4.88 260 0 26.76
30/05/ 2012 12:43 32.27 33.29 31.73 71.02 76.23 69.47 4.18 242 0 25.96
30/05/ 2012 13:43 33.59 33.86 32.05 71.4 72.94 66 4.32 274 0 26.35
30/05/ 2012 14:43 32.16 34.07 32.08 74.65 75.5 69.27 4.46 210 0 25.81
30/05/ 2012 15:43 31.75 32.72 31.62 76.71 76.91 72.86 6.14 239 0 26.27
30/05/ 2012 16:43 31.42 32 31.32 75.89 77.54 74.74 7.54 237 0 26.39
30/05/ 2012 17:43 29.97 31.42 29.4 74.54 83.3 74.32 7.54 222 0 24.89
30/05/ 2012 18:43 30.27 30.4 29.92 80.72 80.99 74.57 6.28 229 0 25.24
30/05/ 2012 19:43 30.22 30.34 30.11 80.28 81.3 80.06 6.14 237 0 26.39
30/05/ 2012 20:43 30.14 30.33 30.08 80.94 81.85 79.86 5.86 233 0 26.27
30/05/ 2012 21:43 30.22 30.4 30.13 76.16 80.95 75.83 4.88 253 0 25.47
30/05/ 2012 22:43 29.66 30.29 29.64 77.66 77.79 75.58 5.44 226 0 24.88
30/05/ 2012 23:43 29.2 29.69 29.19 78.82 78.85 77.34 5.44 226 0 24.82
31/05/ 2012 0:43 28.89 29.23 28.82 80.33 80.81 78.16 5.02 231 0 24.7
31/05/ 2012 1:43 28.52 28.9 28.51 82.32 82.35 80.22 4.32 223 0 24.77
31/05/ 2012 2:43 28.45 28.6 28.44 83.2 83.26 82.15 4.88 232 0 25.1
31/05/ 2012 3:43 28.28 28.51 28.23 83.77 84.05 83.14 4.05 234 0 25.14
31/05/ 2012 4:43 28.29 28.36 28.2 83.25 83.79 82.91 5.02 243 0 25.1
31/05/ 2012 5:43 28.25 28.32 28.1 83.99 84.2 83.24 4.74 224 0 25.13
31/05/ 2012 6:43 28.5 28.51 28.23 83.06 84.28 82.95 4.6 239 0 25.32
31/05/ 2012 7:43 29.43 29.56 28.48 79.66 83.6 79.66 4.32 234 0 25.54
31/05/ 2012 8:43 30.44 30.5 29.43 77.84 80.14 76.98 5.44 249 0 25.94
31/05/ 2012 9:43 30.94 31.19 30.25 75.88 78.57 75.24 6.56 244 0 26.04
31/05/ 2012 10:43 32.36 32.71 30.93 70.16 76.44 68.95 6.42 204 0 25.92
31/05/ 2012 11:43 33.74 33.94 32.25 70.23 71.17 63.8 7.4 234 0 25.92
31/05/ 2012 12:43 32 33.92 31.84 71.06 71.78 66.51 7.96 257 0 24.97
31/05/ 2012 13:43 33.32 34.12 31.98 67.48 73.01 65.95 8.65 228 0 26.08
31/05/ 2012 14:43 33.43 33.65 32.26 68.99 72.6 63.72 7.68 238 0 25.6
31/05/ 2012 15:43 31.52 33.7 31.51 74.16 74.61 67.56 7.82 226 0 24.78
31/05/ 2012 16:43 33.05 33.12 31.43 71.54 75.25 70.4 8.65 229 0 26.93
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 121 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
31/05/ 2012 17:43 31.9 33.11 31.85 72.54 72.8 69.93 8.93 218 0 25.72
31/05/ 2012 18:43 30.6 31.92 30.59 76.77 76.79 72.33 8.65 225 0 25.04
31/05/ 2012 19:43 30 30.66 29.92 78 78.77 76.17 9.77 243 0 25.34
31/05/ 2012 20:43 29.87 30.03 29.78 76.76 79.26 76.68 8.24 206 0 25.32
31/05/ 2012 21:43 29.71 29.88 29.68 78.43 79.12 76.73 7.26 229 0 25.18
31/05/ 2012 22:43 29.58 29.8 29.53 79.01 79.2 77.83 7.12 229 0 25.29
31/05/ 2012 23:43 29.55 29.69 29.52 77.96 79.82 77.96 5.72 235 0 25.29
1/6/2012 0:43 29.15 29.57 29.14 79.38 80.76 77.88 5.44 224 0 24.89
1/6/2012 1:43 28.84 29.18 28.78 81.92 82.15 79.02 6.14 229 0 24.83
1/6/2012 2:43 28.8 28.88 28.7 80.49 82.6 79.58 5.02 243 0 24.91
1/6/2012 3:43 28.4 28.8 28.39 83.22 83.24 80.36 4.88 232 0 24.69
1/6/2012 4:43 28.48 28.54 28.4 83.31 83.86 83.03 5.02 236 0 25.31
1/6/2012 5:43 28.26 28.51 28.25 84.52 84.54 82.9 4.88 234 0 25.07
1/6/2012 6:43 28.39 28.41 28.19 83.29 84.91 83.29 4.32 231 0 25.28
1/6/2012 7:43 28.97 29.01 28.4 81.68 83.45 81.25 4.6 233 0 25.43
1/6/2012 8:43 28.83 29.22 28.27 81.7 83.81 81.33 4.6 255 0 25.31
1/6/2012 9:43 30.95 31.11 28.73 73.77 82.21 73.48 3.63 238 0 25.65
1/6/2012 10:43 32.88 32.98 30.91 68.95 74.7 68.03 4.74 234 0 26.19
1/6/2012 11:43 33.1 33.83 32.5 66.25 70.09 64.88 4.32 249 0 25.6
1/6/2012 12:43 33.77 34.69 33.08 68.61 69.82 64.26 4.46 21 0 26.07
1/6/2012 13:43 33.48 34.75 33.04 69.15 70.56 64.34 6.14 225 0 25.81
1/6/2012 14:43 33.41 34.13 32.67 66.87 70.9 63.16 6.7 222 0 25.43
1/6/2012 15:43 33.76 34.6 33.08 68.34 68.57 59.27 7.4 156 0 24.7
1/6/2012 16:43 32.05 33.81 31.74 71.5 72.97 66.88 6.7 218 0 25.11
1/6/2012 17:43 29.4 32.13 29.11 81.34 82.35 70.27 6.56 234 0 23.41
1/6/2012 18:43 30.34 30.47 29.35 78.86 82.18 77.52 6.14 217 0 25.96
1/6/2012 19:43 30.09 30.36 30.06 79.17 79.52 77.85 6.7 236 0 25.79
1/6/2012 20:43 29.87 30.13 29.75 80.75 81.95 79.12 6.42 216 0 25.85
1/6/2012 21:43 29.88 29.97 29.85 80.32 80.96 80.05 6.56 200 0 26.06
1/6/2012 22:43 29.77 29.99 29.74 79.37 80.29 76.71 6.28 192 0 25.23
1/6/2012 23:43 29.61 29.79 29.59 81.41 81.44 79.31 6.14 234 0 25.64
2/6/2012 0:43 29.42 29.65 29.41 80.76 81.48 80.65 5.86 232 0 25.74
2/6/2012 1:43 29.18 29.48 29.17 80.6 81.19 79.69 4.88 233 0 25.3
2/6/2012 2:43 28.81 29.2 28.76 81.35 81.83 80.39 5.02 213 0 25.09
2/6/2012 3:43 28.51 28.85 28.5 83.32 83.32 81.26 5.02 223 0 24.98
2/6/2012 4:43 28.32 28.52 28.3 84.06 84.5 83.28 3.77 231 0 25.21
2/6/2012 5:43 28.07 28.34 28.04 85.48 85.68 84.01 2.51 233 0 25.11
2/6/2012 6:43 28.13 28.15 27.9 85.65 86.05 85.44 1.95 225 0 25.45
2/6/2012 7:43 29.53 29.65 28.12 80.14 85.99 80.14 3.07 227 0 25.74
2/6/2012 8:43 30.93 31.24 29.52 73.79 80.45 73.71 3.21 249 0 25.68
2/6/2012 9:43 32.01 32.21 30.92 71.12 75.56 70.91 3.77 278 0 26.06
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 122 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
2/6/2012 10:43 33.02 33.08 31.75 69.63 72.66 68.45 3.77 285 0 26.43
2/6/2012 11:43 33.99 34.52 32.64 67 71.36 65.33 2.93 275 0 26.55
2/6/2012 12:43 34.99 35.71 33.82 60.93 67.65 58.95 3.77 261 0 25.75
2/6/2012 13:43 36.55 36.68 34.62 51.42 61.95 51.42 2.65 301 0 24.9
2/6/2012 14:43 35.66 37.17 34.84 61.63 65.03 51.31 3.91 219 0 24.04
2/6/2012 15:43 34.51 35.76 34.06 65.72 67.24 60.57 5.3 224 0 25.76
2/6/2012 16:43 33.23 34.66 33.23 68.96 69.25 63.26 6.56 244 0 25.29
2/6/2012 17:43 31.93 33.57 31.88 72.61 72.69 66.41 6 225 0 24.88
2/6/2012 18:43 30.8 31.98 30.74 76 76.25 71.91 7.4 280 0 25.14
2/6/2012 19:43 30.16 30.82 30.14 78.25 78.88 75.84 6.14 223 0 25.42
2/6/2012 20:43 30.08 30.22 29.99 80.44 80.52 78.24 5.02 243 0 25.87
2/6/2012 21:43 29.96 30.15 29.95 79.87 80.71 78.7 5.86 231 0 25.85
2/6/2012 22:43 29.93 29.99 29.83 82.23 82.71 79.87 5.58 239 0 26.07
2/6/2012 23:43 29.89 30.02 29.84 81.87 82.41 81.55 5.44 227 0 26.38
3/6/2012 0:43 29.05 29.92 28.85 84.38 85.8 80.87 5.58 223 0 25.42
3/6/2012 1:43 26.15 29.39 25.72 91.75 91.75 82.49 5.86 188 0 22.93
3/6/2012 2:43 26.04 26.32 25.49 92.54 92.58 91.7 4.32 230 0 24.58
3/6/2012 3:43 26.99 27.02 25.98 92.75 92.8 92.65 1.81 229 0 25.7
3/6/2012 4:43 27.57 27.6 26.94 85.75 92.89 85.7 3.63 252 0 24.95
3/6/2012 5:43 27.63 27.71 27.49 86.96 86.96 85.43 3.63 250 0 24.96
3/6/2012 6:43 27.81 27.83 27.52 86.24 87.28 86.21 1.81 250 0 25.29
3/6/2012 7:43 28.39 28.41 27.78 83.74 86.5 83.56 2.09 242 0 25.33
3/6/2012 8:43 29.1 29.15 28.37 81.49 84.03 81.39 2.93 244 0 25.58
3/6/2012 9:43 29.37 29.51 28.98 79.94 81.74 79.51 3.35 246 0 25.45
3/6/2012 10:43 29.68 29.77 29.27 79.49 81.11 79.27 3.77 238 0 25.7
3/6/2012 11:43 30.27 30.32 29.54 78.16 80.51 77.75 3.21 243 0 25.94
3/6/2012 12:43 31.14 31.33 29.9 74.34 79.9 74.34 2.93 301 0 26.03
3/6/2012 13:43 31.15 31.6 30.99 73.21 75.53 72.66 4.18 315 0 25.65
3/6/2012 14:43 31.29 31.5 30.83 73.78 75.3 72.66 3.21 307 0 25.78
3/6/2012 15:43 31.77 31.89 31.2 71.54 74.55 69.58 2.65 217 0 25.51
3/6/2012 16:43 30.9 32.3 30.71 77.46 78.59 68.2 3.07 231 0 24.35
3/6/2012 17:43 30.32 30.91 30.05 79.84 80.03 77.29 4.05 216 0 25.89
3/6/2012 18:43 29.62 30.55 29.51 84.3 85.47 79.7 3.77 233 0 25.73
3/6/2012 19:43 29.62 29.76 29.56 81.63 84.3 80.96 4.88 223 0 26
3/6/2012 20:43 29.65 29.71 29.46 79.76 81.9 79.13 5.86 242 0 25.64
3/6/2012 21:43 29.49 29.78 29.38 80.29 81.63 78.33 6 199 0 25.31
3/6/2012 22:43 29.49 29.53 29.33 79.86 82.16 79.45 7.26 194 0 25.55
3/6/2012 23:43 29.36 29.5 29.25 80.91 81.63 79.48 6.84 238 0 25.43
4/6/2012 0:43 29 29.38 28.98 81.45 82.16 80.67 7.68 273 0 25.33
4/6/2012 1:43 28.13 29.05 27.88 86.89 87.55 81.02 6.42 254 0 24.56
4/6/2012 2:43 28.45 28.46 28.03 84.87 87.45 84.87 2.93 209 0 25.65
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 123 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
4/6/2012 3:43 28.42 28.56 28.41 84.24 84.99 84.14 3.63 227 0 25.48
4/6/2012 4:43 28.45 28.53 28.36 82.02 84.25 81.99 3.21 248 0 25.07
4/6/2012 5:43 28.3 28.48 28.18 83.38 83.67 81.91 3.21 252 0 24.91
4/6/2012 6:43 28.23 28.36 28.11 84.82 84.87 83.1 1.67 211 0 25.08
4/6/2012 7:43 29.85 29.85 28.19 79.44 85.21 79.44 2.51 225 0 25.9
4/6/2012 8:43 31.4 31.58 29.83 73.91 80.15 73.43 2.79 210 0 26.07
4/6/2012 9:43 32.46 32.6 31.05 70.32 75.5 69.71 3.91 244 0 26.2
4/6/2012 10:43 33.06 33.12 31.72 69.46 72.67 68.04 3.49 207 0 26.36
4/6/2012 11:43 33.9 34.4 33.08 67.94 70.08 64.8 3.07 207 0 26.33
4/6/2012 12:43 34.65 35.14 33.71 64.16 68.58 63.51 2.93 135 0 26.7
4/6/2012 13:43 34.97 35.43 34.56 65.8 66.65 62.67 3.49 226 0 26.77
4/6/2012 14:43 34.66 35.28 34.49 65.26 67.44 62.16 4.32 203 0 26.34
4/6/2012 15:43 31.84 35.18 31.84 72.76 73.59 63.95 6 238 0 24.16
4/6/2012 16:43 31.44 33.52 31.4 74.46 74.46 69.38 6 206 0 25.15
4/6/2012 17:43 30.64 31.46 30.45 76.75 77.49 74.25 6.56 190 0 25.52
4/6/2012 18:43 29.25 30.65 28.7 81.53 82.27 76.36 6.42 235 0 24.65
4/6/2012 19:43 27.57 29.26 27.53 88.77 88.77 80.1 6.7 205 0 23.82
4/6/2012 20:43 28.26 28.26 27.17 89.04 89.23 88.34 4.6 190 0 26.14
4/6/2012 21:43 28.91 29.39 28.24 83.77 89.19 81.11 5.72 239 0 25.34
4/6/2012 22:43 26.82 29.5 26.77 89.78 89.78 79.95 5.3 252 0 23.07
4/6/2012 23:43 27 27.09 26.76 89.48 90.51 89.33 2.79 241 0 25.09
5/6/2012 0:43 27.24 27.25 26.86 89.71 90.03 89.34 1.25 228 0 25.33
5/6/2012 1:43 27.88 27.92 27.2 87.29 89.89 87.09 2.65 236 0 25.53
5/6/2012 2:43 27.57 27.9 27.54 88.22 88.22 87.2 1.39 223 0 25.25
5/6/2012 3:43 27.66 27.68 27.5 87.9 88.3 87.49 1.39 230 0 25.39
5/6/2012 4:43 27.59 27.74 27.58 88.98 88.98 87.88 1.11 222 0 25.4
5/6/2012 5:43 27.56 27.69 27.53 88.45 89.02 88.42 2.37 227 0 25.47
5/6/2012 6:43 28.22 28.22 27.51 86.2 88.63 86.15 1.95 239 0 25.68
5/6/2012 7:43 29.38 29.87 28.18 80.96 86.47 80.21 2.37 234 0 25.61
5/6/2012 8:43 30.44 30.75 29.32 77.15 81.4 76.12 2.65 246 0 25.75
5/6/2012 9:43 33.76 33.8 30.4 66.3 77.84 66.08 2.37 182 0 26.53
5/6/2012 10:43 34.1 34.39 33.15 60.79 68.19 60.01 3.07 252 0 25.22
5/6/2012 11:43 34.02 34.44 32.89 62.92 68.02 59.9 3.63 229 0 25.12
5/6/2012 12:43 33.98 34.66 33.23 65.18 65.55 58.92 3.91 208 0 24.8
5/6/2012 13:43 35.15 35.68 33.97 64.33 67.01 61.17 4.05 220 0 26.53
5/6/2012 14:43 33.49 35.38 33.36 68.74 69.8 61.91 4.18 217 0 25.17
5/6/2012 15:43 33.66 33.91 32.62 66.97 72.2 66.43 5.16 178 0 26.53
5/6/2012 16:43 33.41 33.89 32.78 67.89 69.4 65.94 5.16 201 0 26.16
5/6/2012 17:43 31.8 33.5 31.42 73.87 74.89 67.52 5.58 228 0 25.03
5/6/2012 18:43 30.62 31.93 30.56 76.57 76.74 73.22 5.72 207 0 25.27
5/6/2012 19:43 30.34 30.64 30.24 77.02 77.68 75.93 5.86 230 0 25.61
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 124 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
5/6/2012 20:43 29.54 30.37 28.99 81.93 84.23 76.86 5.72 213 0 25.04
5/6/2012 21:43 29.62 29.73 29.46 81.34 81.98 79.59 5.72 239 0 25.71
5/6/2012 22:43 29.51 29.65 29.32 80.67 81.37 79.21 5.44 219 0 25.52
5/6/2012 23:43 29.4 29.55 29.38 81.93 81.93 80.38 5.86 232 0 25.66
6/6/2012 0:43 29.3 29.41 29.18 80.52 82.23 80.17 5.02 205 0 25.52
6/6/2012 1:43 28.85 29.32 28.84 79.24 81.17 78.37 4.74 250 0 24.7
6/6/2012 2:43 28.46 28.86 28.43 81.14 81.22 78.94 5.16 232 0 24.45
6/6/2012 3:43 28.38 28.5 28.24 81.18 81.71 80.75 4.32 243 0 24.75
6/6/2012 4:43 28.49 28.63 28.38 80.88 81.5 80.43 3.77 235 0 24.79
6/6/2012 5:43 28.52 28.65 28.49 80.94 80.94 80.25 3.35 230 0 24.78
6/6/2012 6:43 28.66 28.66 28.27 80.65 82.33 80.65 3.49 204 0 25
6/6/2012 7:43 29.85 29.94 28.65 77.64 80.93 77.28 4.32 238 0 25.44
6/6/2012 8:43 30.07 30.33 29.61 77.38 78.12 76.3 4.6 234 0 25.43
6/6/2012 9:43 30.94 30.95 29.84 75.46 77.72 74.67 3.91 224 0 25.91
6/6/2012 10:43 31.86 32.04 30.62 70.54 75.7 70.24 4.74 230 0 25.76
6/6/2012 11:43 32.54 32.84 31.62 70.1 72.2 68.51 4.46 260 0 25.98
6/6/2012 12:43 34.68 34.85 32.47 61.01 71.45 60.82 5.86 223 0 25.99
6/6/2012 13:43 33.71 34.91 32.8 65.96 70.46 59.89 5.86 228 0 24.82
6/6/2012 14:43 31.92 33.74 31.7 72.69 73.21 64.57 7.54 251 0 24.4
6/6/2012 15:43 32.98 33.99 31.38 68.79 73.18 60.37 7.68 228 0 24.27
6/6/2012 16:43 31.68 33.56 31.65 72.59 72.85 68.18 7.54 264 0 25.08
6/6/2012 17:43 27.64 31.73 26.47 89.24 89.38 71.84 8.1 275 0 22.09
6/6/2012 18:43 29.76 30.16 27.64 82.49 89.79 81.53 4.6 212 0 26.25
6/6/2012 19:43 29.99 30 29.7 80.02 82.59 79.85 6.14 183 0 26.12
6/6/2012 20:43 29.9 30.01 29.78 79.89 81.98 79.86 6.14 214 0 26.04
6/6/2012 21:43 29.8 29.98 29.72 79.76 80.78 79.52 5.16 234 0 25.87
6/6/2012 22:43 29.77 29.89 29.68 76.32 80.21 75.07 4.32 229 0 24.87
6/6/2012 23:43 29.47 29.86 29.32 73.97 76.74 72.66 5.02 238 0 24.04
7/6/2012 0:43 29.13 29.61 29.12 76.25 76.31 73 4.74 261 0 23.79
7/6/2012 1:43 28.66 29.16 28.64 78.22 78.33 76.13 4.18 232 0 24.03
7/6/2012 2:43 28.32 28.68 28.29 79.35 79.45 78.07 4.46 230 0 24.13
7/6/2012 3:43 28.3 28.37 28.22 79.58 79.93 79.12 3.49 229 0 24.33
7/6/2012 4:43 28.16 28.35 28.08 80.17 80.52 79.26 3.63 212 0 24.22
7/6/2012 5:43 28.16 28.29 28.06 79.85 80.49 79.26 3.63 220 0 24.22
7/6/2012 6:43 28.35 28.35 28.13 78.7 79.89 78.54 4.6 225 0 24.25
7/6/2012 7:43 29.36 29.48 28.29 77.05 79.67 77.05 3.91 268 0 24.91
7/6/2012 8:43 29.41 29.8 29.24 75.86 77.17 75.11 4.74 247 0 24.53
7/6/2012 9:43 30.92 30.93 29.38 73.22 76.58 73.08 3.49 245 0 25.53
7/6/2012 10:43 32.83 32.87 30.64 67.67 74.01 66.53 4.46 237 0 25.76
7/6/2012 11:43 34.18 34.24 31.79 62.48 70.07 62.48 5.16 235 0 25.98
7/6/2012 12:43 33.91 34.72 33.3 65.2 68.33 61.85 3.63 204 0 25.55
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 125 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
7/6/2012 13:43 32.18 34.61 32.18 68.77 70.24 63.43 6.28 219 0 24.35
7/6/2012 14:43 33.55 34.75 31.91 67.34 72.12 63.03 7.54 223 0 25.53
7/6/2012 15:43 33.39 33.53 31.66 68.72 73.48 66.72 7.12 234 0 26.34
7/6/2012 16:43 32.2 33.41 31.9 71.99 73.72 68.27 7.12 205 0 25.6
7/6/2012 17:43 31.37 32.27 30.95 72.59 75.55 71.55 8.24 252 0 25.6
7/6/2012 18:43 30.84 31.72 30.78 72.69 73.21 66.44 8.51 210 0 23.85
7/6/2012 19:43 30.35 30.85 30.28 72.26 74.36 72.17 5.3 224 0 24.77
7/6/2012 20:43 30.5 30.55 30.32 71.19 72.51 70.03 5.86 235 0 24.41
7/6/2012 21:43 30.26 30.66 30.24 70.08 71.18 66.81 4.46 227 0 23.4
7/6/2012 22:43 29.54 30.28 29.53 71.53 71.56 68.11 5.72 244 0 23.03
7/6/2012 23:43 29.33 29.63 29.31 72.75 72.78 70.75 5.44 221 0 23.46
8/6/2012 0:43 29.19 29.34 29.14 73.04 73.6 72.41 5.02 252 0 23.71
8/6/2012 1:43 28.92 29.21 28.9 75.04 75.18 72.93 4.32 230 0 23.57
8/6/2012 2:43 28.82 28.96 28.71 75.69 76.41 74.94 4.05 245 0 23.93
8/6/2012 3:43 28.58 28.87 28.56 77.6 77.6 75.51 3.21 234 0 23.82
8/6/2012 4:43 28.44 28.67 28.41 78.61 78.72 77.52 3.07 227 0 24.12
8/6/2012 5:43 28.34 28.52 28.31 78.37 78.86 78.05 4.05 239 0 24.14
8/6/2012 6:43 28.31 28.38 28.09 78.61 79.34 78.37 2.51 231 0 24.18
8/6/2012 7:43 29.54 29.56 28.28 75.75 78.89 75.58 3.35 234 0 24.76
8/6/2012 8:43 30.97 30.97 29.53 71.71 76.06 70.84 4.18 226 0 25.05
8/6/2012 9:43 31.78 31.78 30.76 70.11 71.92 68.64 4.05 230 0 25.29
8/6/2012 10:43 32.88 33.14 31.38 67.56 70.52 65.52 5.3 235 0 25.55
8/6/2012 11:43 34.3 34.66 32.52 63.24 68.04 60.76 5.02 229 0 25.62
8/6/2012 12:43 33.67 35.23 33.49 65.71 66.52 57.48 5.58 203 0 24.1
8/6/2012 13:43 33.05 34.07 32.85 66.09 69.96 63.63 5.86 202 0 25.22
8/6/2012 14:43 33.51 34.19 32.73 69.12 69.89 60.08 5.16 173 0 24.69
8/6/2012 15:43 33.68 33.89 32.66 64.31 69.78 64.22 6.56 180 0 25.97
8/6/2012 16:43 32.25 33.95 31.95 67.57 68.16 63.8 7.26 255 0 24.51
8/6/2012 17:43 31.04 33.1 31.03 73.01 73.19 65.09 6.7 221 0 23.7
8/6/2012 18:43 30.09 31.06 29.58 79.03 80.41 72.58 7.26 172 0 24.61
8/6/2012 19:43 29.98 30.22 29.95 78.54 79.06 77.58 5.58 210 0 25.63
8/6/2012 20:43 29.81 30.03 29.78 80.84 80.95 78.48 6.28 211 0 25.66
8/6/2012 21:43 29.79 29.96 29.76 76.8 80.86 75.97 6.14 218 0 25.09
8/6/2012 22:43 29.48 29.8 29.43 78.2 78.82 76.68 5.58 231 0 24.95
8/6/2012 23:43 29.31 29.53 29.26 76.65 78.3 76.62 5.72 214 0 24.77
9/6/2012 0:43 28.9 29.33 28.88 77.39 77.42 76.54 4.74 241 0 24.36
9/6/2012 1:43 28.57 28.92 28.52 78.77 78.99 77.14 4.18 225 0 24.17
9/6/2012 2:43 28.59 28.6 28.46 78.64 79.18 78.53 3.77 233 0 24.48
9/6/2012 3:43 28.49 28.63 28.45 79.41 79.46 78.51 3.63 228 0 24.38
9/6/2012 4:43 28.03 28.52 27.92 81.37 81.9 79.29 2.79 236 0 24.1
9/6/2012 5:43 27.98 28.06 27.87 81.04 82.02 81.04 2.93 235 0 24.42
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 126 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Date Time Air Max. Min. RH Max. Min. Wind Wind Rainfall Dew
Temp. Temp. Temp. RH RH Speed Dir. Pt.
DD/MM/YYYY HH:MM °C °C °C % % % m/sec ° mm °C
9/6/2012 6:43 27.93 28.16 27.87 82.77 82.88 80.2 2.79 239 0 24.2
9/6/2012 7:43 29.17 29.21 27.92 78.82 83.04 78.54 2.79 238 0 25.05
9/6/2012 8:43 30.11 30.4 29.16 74.77 79.2 74.43 3.63 229 0 25.05
9/6/2012 9:43 32.13 32.3 30.08 68.62 75.47 68.32 3.35 257 0 25.55
9/6/2012 10:43 33.22 33.39 31.87 65.99 70.02 65.09 4.46 222 0 25.76
9/6/2012 11:43 34.91 35.07 32.92 63.28 67.42 62.78 4.6 285 0 26.74
9/6/2012 12:43 32.99 35.26 32.86 69.03 69.33 62.39 3.63 236 0 24.83
9/6/2012 13:43 32.39 33.18 31.17 72.95 74.44 67.95 4.18 215 0 25.7
9/6/2012 14:43 33.44 33.94 32.38 69.08 73.64 68.64 5.16 213 0 26.87
9/6/2012 15:43 32.96 33.62 32.55 69.71 72.45 68.52 5.16 225 0 26.39
9/6/2012 16:43 31.52 33.84 31.38 75.8 75.86 67.09 6.7 228 0 24.66
9/6/2012 17:43 31.63 33.26 31.48 74.58 75.88 70.76 4.6 210 0 25.66
9/6/2012 18:43 30.94 31.73 30.91 75.94 75.97 74.05 5.02 159 0 25.77
9/6/2012 19:43 30.22 30.92 30.05 78.89 79.74 75.8 5.16 172 0 25.47
9/6/2012 20:43 30.3 30.42 30.17 79.13 79.43 77.9 6 230 0 26.01
9/6/2012 21:43 30.34 30.39 30.24 79.6 80.14 79.14 5.86 235 0 26.31
9/6/2012 22:43 30.23 30.36 30.17 77.94 80.01 77.94 4.46 236 0 25.95
9/6/2012 23:43 30.07 30.32 30.04 78.01 78.04 75.8 4.32 223 0 25.32
10/6/2012 0:43 30.07 30.12 29.9 75.94 78.7 75.32 3.91 246 0 25.22
10/6/2012 1:43 29.82 30.17 29.8 74.74 76.17 73.7 4.18 233 0 24.61
10/6/2012 2:43 29.54 29.84 29.51 75.5 75.72 74.4 3.91 255 0 24.5
10/6/2012 3:43 29.02 29.55 29.01 77.53 77.53 75.17 3.91 249 0 24.17
10/6/2012 4:43 28.71 29.05 28.7 79.13 79.13 77.41 3.21 254 0 24.36
10/6/2012 5:43 28.48 28.73 28.4 80.24 80.45 79.05 2.51 246 0 24.49
10/6/2012 6:43 28.65 28.66 28.47 80.68 80.86 80.19 2.23 245 0 24.89
10/6/2012 7:43 29.26 29.27 28.64 80.03 81.31 79.97 2.79 225 0 25.44
10/6/2012 8:43 30 30.12 29.24 76.79 80.21 76.12 3.49 245 0 25.33
10/6/2012 9:43 32.18 32.69 29.84 70.13 77.47 68.77 3.63 288 0 25.7
10/6/2012 10:43 33.33 33.56 32.14 65.83 70.6 63.43 3.77 308 0 25.43
10/6/2012 11:43 34.56 34.56 33.34 59.92 66.16 57.39 3.35 344 0 24.9

The salient observations on study of the data are discussed in the following
paragraphs.

 Ambient Temperature
The highest and lowest temperature recorded during the study period is as
follows:
Lowest Recorded 22.69 °C

Highest Recorded 39.27 °C

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 127 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 Wind Speed
Wind speed determines the rate of diffusion and travel time of air pollutants. The
maximum and minimum speed recorded as follows:

Minimum Recorded 0.13 m/sec

Maximum Recorded 11.45 m/sec

 Relative Humidity
The hourly data of humidity was collected at the project site. The variations of
highest and lowest humidity during the monitoring period are recorded as
follows:

Lowest Recorded 38.05 %

Highest Recorded 95.06 %

 Wind Direction
This is important in air pollution since it determine the direction of transport of air
pollutants. The mean wind direction will be indicative of the direction of travel of
the pollutants.

Wind Rose Diagram has been prepared using the Automatic Weather Station
(AWS) data for the Summer Season of 2012. Wind Rose Diagram has been shown
in Figure No. 3.2.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 128 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. 3.2

Wind Rose Diagram

WIND ROSE PLOT: DISPLAY:

Station # 1 Wind Speed


Direction (blowing from)

NORTH

45%

36%

27%

18%

9%

WEST EAST

WIND SPEED
(m/s)
>= 11.1
SOUTH
8.8 - 11.1
5.7 - 8.8
3.6 - 5.7
2.1 - 3.6
0.5 - 2.1
Calms: 0.21%

COMMENTS: DATA PERIOD: COMPANY NAME:

2012
May 1 - Jun 10
00:00 - 23:00 MODELER:

CALM WINDS: TOTAL COUNT:

0.21% 956 hrs.

AVG. WIND SPEED: DATE: PROJECT NO.:

5.04 m/s 7/26/2012


WRPLOT View - Lakes Environmental Software

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 129 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.3.2 Secondary Meteorological Data

The data for secondary meteorological parameters namely humidity and rainfall
have been taken from authentic sources i.e. Book of Climatological Tables of
Observation in India 1951-1980 by India Meteorological Department (IMD),
Website of India Meteorological Department & Gujarat State Disaster
Management Authority (GSDMA). The data in respect of the above parameters
have been briefly discussed in the following paragraphs.

3.3.2.1 Relative Humidity & Vapour Pressure:

Morning and evening mean monthly relative humidity (%) and vapour pressure
(hPa) data for Bharuch station is given in the Table No. 3.5.

Table No. 3.5 – Details of Relative Hunidity & Vapour Pressure

Relative Humidity % Vapour Pressure (hPa)


Month Morning Evening Morning Evening
(At 08:30 (At 17:30 (At 08:30 (At 17:30
hrs. IST) hrs. IST) hrs. IST) hrs. IST)
January 69 34 10.9 13.7
February 61 29 11.4 13.1
March 62 26 15.5 14.4
April 63 27 21.4 17.1
May 73 38 28.3 23.2
June 80 59 31.2 29.6
July 88 74 31.4 30.8
August 90 77 30.8 30.6
September 87 65 29.3 27.7
October 75 44 23.9 21.9
November 68 37 15.8 17.0
December 70 37 12.3 15.1
Source: Climatological tables of observatories in India 1951 – 1980 by India
Meteorological Department.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 130 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
The mean monthly average of Relative Humidity values for Bharuch station
was recorded for 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Based on above stated data it can be
concluded that the Relative Humidity is generally high during the period from
June to September.

3.3.2.2 Rainfall:

Rainfall data collected by India Meteorological Department for Bharuch station


are presented in the Table No. 3.6. The observed average rainfall (1982 to 2011) for
Vagra Taluka is 627 mm as per Gujarat State Disaster Management Authority
(GSDMA).

Table No. 3.6 – Details of Average Monthly Rainfall

Year 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011

Month
January 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
February 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
March 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
April 0.0 3.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
May 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
June 72.5 47.1 12.0 47.4 18.9
July 445.7 267.7 250.8 290.5 151.3
August 218.1 226.3 81.2 247.1 309.2
September 189.6 209.7 44.7 286.5 130.6
October 0.0 2.8 38.4 11.8 0.5
November 0.0 0.9 3.3 19.3 0.0
December 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0
Total 925.9 757.5 430.4 902.6 610.5
Average 77.16 63.13 35.87 75.22 50.88
Source: India Meteorological Department Website

Based on above stated data it can be concluded that rainy season in the Bharuch
region extends from June to September and high rainfall is seen in the month of
July, August & September.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 131 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.4 Water Environment

Water is the most vital resources for all kinds of life. It should not only be available in
sufficient quantity but also should be of good quality as well. Defilement of water, as a
result of human and industrial activities and consequent pollution of water causes
deterioration of the environment.

3.4.1 Baseline Data

Physico-chemical parameters have been used for assessing the base-line quality of
water environment and identification of impacts due to the industrial project.
Representative underground water samples from Three (3) different locations were
collected and surface water samples from four (4) different locations has been also
collected. Locations of the sampling points are as shown in Figure No. 3.1. Photograph
showing water sample collection is attached as Annexure-3.5.

3.4.2. Analysis of Samples

The samples under all categories were analyzed for various parameters specified by
the Ministry of Environment and Forests. For the collection, preservation and analysis,
APHA/IS methods were followed. The requisite procedure laid down in APHA/IS
methods were adopted for preserving the samples with suitable preservative
chemicals.

The results obtained from physico-chemical characteristics of surface water samples


& ground water samples of the study area during Summer & Winter Season of Year
2012 are presented in the Table No. 3.7 (a) & Table No. 3.7 (b) respectively.

The physico-chemical characteristic data indicates that both ground water & surface
water quality is satisfactory to serve domestic purpose as per drinking water quality
standards IS: 10500:2004 except three locations i.e. Galenda, Jageshwar & Padariya
villages. Our findings states that due to salanity ingress in the stated villages had
impact on both surface water & ground water quality.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 132 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No - 3.7(a)
Physico Chemical Characteristic of Surface & Ground Water Samples - 1

Parameters Concentration

A B C D E F G
pH 8.3 7.7 7.7 9.6 8.1 8.4 8.3
Colour CLS CLS CLS CLS CLS CLS CLS
Odour * * * * * * *
Taste * * * * * * *
Total Hardness 140 150 200 90 150 200 130
Calcium Hardness 60 70 100 30 60 40 70
Magnesium Hardness 80 80 100 60 90 160 60
Chloride 34.9 74.9 284.9 474.8 24.9 49.9 19.9
Sulphate 3.5 31.2 26.8 34.9 3.8 10.7 4.2
Phenolic Compound ND ND ND ND ND ND ND
Fluoride 0.59 0.54 0.43 0.56 0.54 0.47 0.29
Mineral Oil ND ND ND ND ND ND ND
Total Dissolved Solids 212 430 1250 1596 254 462 216
Suspended Solids 29 68 72 69 36 29 33
Chemical Oxygen 64 48 200 160 24 88 24
Demand(COD)
Biological Oxygen 20.1 14.2 56.4 47.3 ND 26 ND
Demand (BOD)
Ammonical Nitrogen 4.6 6.7 9.1 10.1 2.1 4.5 2.4
Alkanity 100 200 300 500 120 330 130

A - Project Site (Narmada Water) - Surface Water Sample


B - Village : Janiadara - Surface Water Sample
C - Village : Galenda - Surface Water Sample
D - Village: Jageshwar - Surface Water Sample
E - Village: Janiadara - Ground Water Sample
F - Village: Galenda - Ground Water Sample
G - Village: Vadadla - Ground Water Sample

Note : The above parameters are expressed in mg/L except pH & colour
CLS Colourless
* Unobjectionable
ND Not Detectable
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 133 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No - 3.7(b)
Physico Chemical Characteristic of Surface & Ground Water Samples - 2

Parameters Concentration

A B C D E F G H I
pH 7.5 7.4 8.1 7.1 7.0 7.6 7.8 7.6 7.2
Colour CLS CLS CLS CLS CLS CLS CLS CLS CLS
Total Hardness 150 140 130 130 160 150 190 160 150
Calcium Hardness 60 80 80 70 50 80 90 80 110
Magnesium 90 60 50 60 110 70 100 80 40
Hardness
Chloride 9.9 194.9 34.9 97.9 84.9 19.9 59.9 19.9 29.9
Sulphate 5.4 35.7 19.5 38.2 16.8 5.3 5.3 5.3 6.2
Phenolic ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND
Compound
Fluoride 0.21 0.21 0.05 0.005 0.15 0.12 0.35 0.15 0.05
Total Dissolved 144 506 340 402 272 690 370 178 162
Solids
Suspended Solids 65 86 70 78 160 40 84 114 78
Chemical Oxygen 15.2 53.4 48 40 32.1 30.5 45.7 47.6 24
Demand (COD)
Biological Oxygen ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND ND
Demand (BOD)
Ammonical 4.7 5.9 5.5 6.4 6.4 4.4 4.2 4.2 4.5
Nitrogen
Alkanity 120 190 160 160 160 120 320 100 120

A - Project Site (Narmada Water) - Surface Water Sample


B Village: Padariya - Surface Water Sample
C - Village : Janiadara - Surface Water Sample
D - Village : Vadadla - Surface Water Sample
E - Village: Jageshwar - Surface Water Sample
F - Village: Padariya Ground Water Sample
G Village: Janiadara - Ground Water Sample
H - Village: Vadadla - Ground Water Sample
I - Village: Galenda - Ground Water Sample

Note : The above parameters are expressed in mg/L except pH & colour
CLS Colourless
ND Not Detectable

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 134 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.5 Noise Environment

Noise, often defined as unwanted sound, interferes with speech communication,


causes annoyance, distracts from work, and disturbs sleeps thus deteriorating quality
of human environment.

3.5.1 Baseline Data

Noise levels in the study area have been measured at selected locations to provide the
base-line data to describe the existing situation. The results are depicted in the Table
No. 3.8

Table No. 3.8 – Noise Levels in the Study Area

Sr. Location of Monitoring Noise Level (dB)

No. Station Day Night Permissible Limit

Day Night

1 Project Site 48.1 40.8 75 70

2 Village: Padariya 51.1 45.3 55 45

3 Village: Janiadara 46.1 41.8 55 45

4 Village: Galenda 42.1 40.1 55 45

5 Village: Vadadla 45.5 42.2 55 45

6 Village: Jageshwar 46.7 43.8 55 45

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 135 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.6 Land Environment

The soil of an area has a direct/indirect effect on the plants and animals. Any
industrial activity is accompanied by releases of gaseous and liquid pollutants and
disposal of solid wastes which may have adverse impacts on the characteristics of soil,
which in turn may affect the plant and animal lives.

3.6.1 Baseline Data

The soil samples were collected from 6 different location of the study area as shown in
Figure No. 3.1. Photograph showing soil sample collection is attached as Annexure -
3.6. At each sampling site, samples were collected at random at a depth of 15 cm and
mixed together to form composite sample. Large stones, gravels and plant roots were
removed from soil. The soil was then crushed and water suspension was prepared.
The supernatant was then subjected to physico-chemical analysis. Standard
procedures were followed for analysis. The results of Physico-chemical analysis of soil
samples are tabulated in Table No. 3.9.

Table No. 3.9 – Physico Chemical Analysis of Soil Samples

Sr. Concentration
Parameters
No. A B C D E F

1 pH Value 8.24 8.33 8.54 8.45 8.19 8.28

2 Moisture Content (%) 2.07 1.75 1.59 3.54 2.31 1.87

3 Nitrogen as N (%) 0.019 0.047 0.053 0.064 0.038 0.082

Total
4 Phosphorous as P (%) 0.021 0.068 0.075 0.053 0.081 0.069

5 Potassium as K (%) 0.0058 0.0065 0.0057 0.0083 0.0068 0.0077

6 Sodium Absorption 6.99 7.42 7.84 8.25 8.59 7.28

Ratio (%)

A - Project Site D - Village; Galenda


B - Village: Padariya E - Village: Vadadla
C - Village: Janiadara F - Village: Jageshwar

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 136 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.6.2 Land Use Pattern as per District Census Record

The study area up to 10 km radius from the project site comprises of total 18 villages
of Taluka: Vagra, District: Bharuch.

The important land uses as classified by the District Census records are the Forest,
Land irrigation by different water sources, Unirrigated areas, Cultivable waste land
and Area not available for cultivation. The land distribution data have been taken
from Gujarat Village Dictionary, Census of India, 2001.

Land distribution in the study area of each category is as given in the Table No. 3.10.
Graphical representation of percentage distribution of land use as per district census
records is shown in the Figure No. 3.3

Table No. 3.10

Land Distribution in the Study Area as per District Census Records

Sr. Name of LAND USE Total area of


No. Villages (area under different types of land use in hectares) Villages
(Hectares)
Forest Irrigated Un- Cultivable Area not
by Irrigated Waste available
Source Land for
Cultivation
Taluka: Vagra

1 Paniadara 0 0 692.5 66.0 3,386.1 4,144.6

2 Narnavi 0 0 577.3 16.9 72.7 666.9

3 Padariya 0 0 147.5 53.1 338.9 539.4

4 Janiadara 0 15 950 6 65.3 1,036.3

5 Kadodara 0 0 1,142.4 89.2 93.7 1,325.2

6 Sambheti 0 0 296.5 8.2 46.4 351.1

7 Vav 0 0 588.9 11.7 43.0 643.5

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 137 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Name of LAND USE Total area of
No. Villages (area under different types of land use in hectares) Villages
(Hectares)
Forest Irrigated Un- Cultivable Area not
by Irrigated Waste available
Source Land for
Cultivation
8 Samatpur 0 0 271.2 9.2 15 295.4

9 Galenda 0 3 526.2 11 30.7 571.0

10 Vadadla 0 0 631.1 4.0 44.0 679.1

11 Jolva 0 0 654.8 106.2 113.9 874.9

12 Dahej 0 0 1,087.3 369 6174.3 7,630.5

13 Rahiad 0 0 948 84.1 404.5 1,436.6

14 Suva 0 0 735.2 293.3 255.0 1,283.5

15 Lakhigam 0 0 698.8 204.2 160.3 1,063.3

16 Ambheta 0 0 96.1 16.4 1,403.6 1,516.1

17 Luvara 0 0 320.0 8.7 561.8 890.5

18 Jageshwar 0 0 18.0 10.2 486.8 515.0

TOTAL 0 18 10,381.8 1,367.4 13,696 25,462.90

Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001

Sr. No. Category % Distribution

1 Forest 0

2 Irrigated 0.06

3 Un-irrigated 41

4 Cultivable Waste Land 6.2

5 Area not available for cultivation 52.74

Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 138 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. - 3.3

Percentage Distribution of Land Use of the Study Area as per


District Census Records

3.6.3 Land Use Pattern as per Remote Sensing Study

Land use pattern, covering a study area of 10 km radius, based on Remote Sensing
data obtained from National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC) were studied and
incorporated.

Method of Data Preparation

The land use/land cover has been presented in the form of a map prepared by using
the LISS - IV, procured from the National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC), Hyderabad.
The satellite data has been processed using Imaging Software supported with ground
checks and ground truth verification by qualified and experienced professionals.

Land Use Pattern

A map depicting major land use/ land cover classes comprising lands under
agriculture, , forest, treeclad areas, industrial area, water body, Sea & Rivers, saltpans,
open/degraded vegetation, fallow land, coastal land, open/barren lands, waste land,

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 139 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
jetty and lands occupied by inhabitation is attached as Figure No. 3.4. Percentage
distribution of the same is presented in Table No. 3.11.

Table No. 3.11

Area Statistics of Land Use/ Land Cover as per Remote Sensing Study

Area Statistics of Land Use / Land Cover

Sr. Class Name Area within 10 km of Area Percentage


No. Project Location
(Area in km)
1 Water Bodies 1.39 0.43
2 Open Plots 0.55 0.17
3 Barren Land 15.76 4.85
4 Agriculture Land 55 16.92
5 Fallow Land 52.31 16.09
6 Sea 85.02 26.15
7 Rivers 2.18 0.67
8 Coastal Land 17.67 5.43
9 Settlement and Habitation 4.06 1.25
10 Salt Pans 46.68 14.36
11 Roads 8.45 2.60
12 Forest 5.19 1.60
13 Industrial Area 22.60 6.95
14 Jetty 0.38 0.12
15 Treeclad Area 7.64 2.35
16 Wastelands 0.24 0.07
Total 325.15 km 100 %

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 140 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure No. 3.4 –Land Use/Land Cover Map

-141-
3.7 Biodiversity & Ecology

3.7.1 Biodiversity of Terrestrial Environment:

The variety and variability of organisms and ecosystems is referred as biological


diversity or Biodiversity. The biodiversity we see today is the fruit of billions of years
of evolution, shaped by natural processes. The vast array of interactions among the
various components of biodiversity makes the planet habitable for all species,
including humans. There is a growing recognition that, biological diversity is a global
asset of tremendous value to present and future generations. At the same time, the
threat to species and ecosystems has never been as great as it is today. Species
extinction caused by human activities continues at an alarming rate. Protecting
biodiversity is in our self-interest.

Ecological Impact Assessment (EcIA) is used to predict and evaluate the impacts of
development activities on ecosystems and their components, thereby providing the
information needed to ensure that ecological issues are given full and proper
consideration in development planning. Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) has
emerged as a key to sustainable development by integrating social, economic and
environmental issues in many countries. EcIA has a major part to play as a component
of EIA but also has other potential applications in environmental planning and
management. Ecological Impact Assessment provides a comprehensive review of the
EcIA process and summarizes the ecological theories and tools that can be used to
understand, explain and evaluate the ecological consequences of development
proposals.

At the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro, world leaders agreed on a comprehensive
strategy for "sustainable development” to meet our needs while ensuring that we
leave a healthy and viable world for future generations. One of the key agreements
adopted at Rio de Janerio was the Convention on Biological Diversity. Article14 of
Convention on Biodiversity (Impact Assessment and Minimizing Adverse Impacts),
stressed the need to Introduce appropriate procedures of environmental impact
assessment for proposed projects that are likely to have significant adverse effects on
biological diversity with a view to avoiding or minimizing such effects.

Environmental impact assessments have become an integral part of development


projects in India ever since 1994, to formulate policies and guidelines for
environmentally sound economic development. Proper assessment of biological
environment and compilation of its taxonomical data is essential for the impact
prediction.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 142 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.7.2 Period of the study and Study area:

The baseline study, for the evaluation of the floral and faunal biodiversity of the
terrestrial environment of the study area, within 10 km radius from the proposed site
near Dahej village, in Bharuch District has been conducted during February, 2012.

3.7.3 Methodology:

The primary objective of survey was to describe the floral and faunal communities
within the study area. The sampling plots for floral inventory were selected randomly
in the suitable habitats within the 10 km radius from the project site. The methodology
adopted for faunal survey involve; Random survey, Opportunistic observations,
Diurnal bird observation, active search for reptiles, faunal habitat assessment, active
search for scats and foot prints and review of previous studies, Desktop literature
review was conducted to indentify the representative spectrum of threatened species,
population and ecological communities listed by IUCN, WCMC, ZSI, BSI and Indian
wild Life Protection act, 1972.

3.7.4 Terrestrial Floral and Faunal Components of the Study Area:

The villages covered for the present baseline study are given in the Table No. 3.12.
The study area falls under Bharuch District of Gujarat state. The area of for the
present biological baseline survey falls under 18 villages. Southern part of the study
area is characterised by the large scale industrial development in demarcated areas of
Dahej GIDC, Dahej SEZ -I and Dahej SEZ -II.

Table No. 3.12


List of villages covered under the present baseline study

Sr. No. Village/Location Name Taluka District

1 Project Site Vagra Bharuch


2 Galenda Vagra Bharuch
3 Vadadla Vagra Bharuch
4 Dahej Vagra Bharuch
5 Ambheta Vagra Bharuch
6 Suva Vagra Bharuch
7 Jolva Vagra Bharuch
8 Rahiad Vagra Bharuch
9 Vav Vagra Bharuch

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 143 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. No. Village/Location Name Taluka District

10 Kadodara Vagra Bharuch


11 Sambheti Vagra Bharuch
12 Janiadara Vagra Bharuch
13 Padaryia Vagra Bharuch
14 Paniadara Vagra Bharuch
15 Samatpur Vagra Bharuch
16 Lakhigam Vagra Bharuch
17 Luvara Vagra Bharuch
18 Jageshwar Vagra Bharuch
19 Narnavi Vagra Bharuch

3.7.5 Habitats:

3.7.5.1 The Project Site:


The project site is located in a Dahej – GIDC Industrial Estate. The project site is a
fallow land without any vegetation. The immediate surroundings of the project site
are fallow land & agricultural fields.

3.7.5.2 Study area:

The study area within 10 km radius from the project site located in Bharuch district of
South Gujarat region is observed to be with vast areas barren lands, salt ingressed
region and fallow lands. Agriculture is active mainly in monsoon season. During
summer season limited cotton and Castor cultivation are practiced. Tree cover in the
study area is very scanty and restricted only in the habituated areas of the village and
few along the boundary of the agricultural fields and along the road sides.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 144 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Almost entire western part of the study area is occupied by vast mud flats and salt
pans. Mangrove patches of Avicennia alba, is observed along the right side of Dahej
jetty and also along the few creeks along the western boundary of the project site. The
landward portion of these mangrove patches were occupied by an associate species
Salvadora persica.

The tree species shrubs, herbs, climbers and crops, were documented during this base
line study. The list of floral species documented in the study area is enlisted in table #
2-6.

3.7.6 Floral Diversity of the Study Area:

The objective this floral inventory of the study area, is to provide necessary
information on floristic structure in the study area for formulating effective
management and conservation measures. The climatic, edaphic and biotic variations
with their complex interrelationship and composition of species, which are adapted to
these variations, have resulted in different vegetation cover, characteristic of each
region. The following account of floral inventory has been, based on the field survey
conducted for a short duration in the Februry, 2012, is not very comprehensive data
and is aimed only to give a general pattern of vegetation of this region during the
study period as a baseline data in absence of available secondary data. Listing of the
endangered, threatened and endemic species of flora in a locality and drawing the
attention to the occurrence of such species, would aid in creating awareness amongst
the local people as a whole to protect such species from extinction, and to take
necessary measures for their conservation. These type of floristic study is an inventory
for such purpose and hence a necessity.

The tree species observed in the study area is enlisted in the Table No. 3.13. The
undergrowth during the summer season was almost in dry state. The shrubs observed
in the study are documented in the Table No. 3.14. Herbs and climbers in the study
area are represented in Table No. 3.15 and Table No. 3.16 respectively.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 145 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.7.6.1 Trees:

The dominant trees in the study area are Prosopis cineraria (Khijado.), Azadirachta indica
(Limbado), Mangifera indica (Ambo), Salvadora oleoides and Salvadora persica (Piludo). 42
species of trees belong to 21 families are enumerated from the study area.

Table No. 3.13 – List of Trees in the Study Area

Sr. Family & Scientific Name Vernacular Name


No.
1 Anacardiaceae
1/1 Mangifera indica L. Ambo
2 Annonaceae
2/1 Polylathia longifolia (Conn.) Thw. Asopalav
3 Apocynaceae
3/1 Plumeria rubra L. Champo
4 Arecaceae
4/1 Cocos nucifera L. Narial
5/2 Phoenix sylvestris Khajuri
5 Avecenniaceae
6/1 Avicennia alba Blume Patcheradi
6 Caesalpiniaceae
7/1 Delonix regia (Boj.) Raf. Gaulmor
8/2 Delonix elata (L.) Gamble. Sandsro
9/3 Cassia fistula L. Garmalo
10/4 Cassia siamea Lam. Kasid
11/5 Peltophorum pterocarpum (DC.) Backer ex Sonmukhi
Heyne
12/6 Tamarindus indicum L. Amali
7 Caricaceae
13/1 Carica papaya L. Papaya
8 Casuarinaceae
14/1 Casuarina equisetifolia L. Sharu
9 Combretaceae
15/1 Terminalia catappa L. Badam
10 Malvaceae
16/1 Thespesia populnea (L.) Sol.ex Corr. Paras piplo
11 Meliaceae
17/1 Azadirachta indica A.Juss Limbado
18/2 Melia azadirachta L. Bakanlimdo
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 146 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Family & Scientific Name Vernacular Name
No.
12 Mimosaceae
19/1 Acacia auriculiformis L. Australian baval
20/2 Acacia leucophloea (Roxb) Willd. Hermo baval
21/3 Acacia nilotica (L.) Del.subsp.indica (Bth.) Baval
Brenan
22/4 Acacia Senegal (L.) Willd. Goradio baval
23/5 Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) De Pardesi Baval
24/6 Albizia lebbeck (L.) Bth. Siris
25/7 Albizia procera (Roxb.) Bth. Kalo siris
26/8 Pithecellobium dulce (Roxb.) Bth. Gorasmli
27/9 Prosopis cineraria (L.) Khijado
13 Moraceae
28/1 Ficus benghalensis L. Vad
29/2 Ficus racemosa L. Umaro
30/3 Ficus religiosa L. Piplo
14 Moringaceae
31/1 Moringa oleifera Lam Sargavo
15 Myrtaceae
32/1 Eucalyptus citriodora Hk. Nilgiri
33/2 Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels. Jambu
16 Papilionaceae
34/1 Erythrina variegata L. Pagario
35/2 Pongamia pinnata (L.) Pierre Karanj
17 Sapotaceae
36/1 Manilkara hexandra (Roxb.) Dub. Rayan
37/2 Manilkara zapota (L.) Chikoo
18 Salvadoraceae
38/1 Salvadora persica L. Pilva, Piludi
39/2 Salvadora oleoides L. Piludi
19 Simaroubaceae
40/1 Ailanthus excelsa Roxb. Aurdso
20 Rhamnaceae
41/1 Zizyphus glabrata Heyne ex Roth. Bor
21 Verbenaceae
42/1 Tectona grandis L.f. Sag

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 147 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.7.6.2 Shrubs:

Shrubs encountered during the present survey are given in the Table No. 3.14. 28
shrub species belong to 19 families are enumerated from the study area. The dominant
shrub community in this area was represented by Prosopis Juliflora (Gando baval),
Balanites aegyptiaca (Ingorio), Calotropis procera, C. gigantea (Akado), Thevetia peruviana
(Pilikarean), Ipomoea fistulosa (Nasarmo), Lawsonia inermis (Mendhi), Abutilon indicum
(Khapat) and Lantana camara (Ganthai).

Table No. 3.14 - Lists of Shrubs in the Study Area

Sr. Family & Scientific Name Vernacular Name


No.
1 Apocynaceae
1/1 Nerium indicum Lal Karen
2/2 Thevetia peruviana Merr. Pili Karen
2 Asclepiadaceae
3/1 Calotropis gigantea (L.) R. Br Akado
4/2 Calotropis procera (Ait.) R.Br Akado
3 Balanitaceae
5/1 Balanites aegyptiaca (L.) Del. Ingorio
4 Bignoniaceae
6/1 Tecoma stans (L.) H.B.& K. Peilafol
5 Cactaceae
7/1 Opuntia elatior Mill. Fafda Thor
6 Caesalpiniaceae
8/1 Cassia auriculata L
7 Capparaceae
9/1 Capparis decidua (Forsk.) Edgew Kerdo
8 Compositae
10/1 Xanthium strumarium L. Gokhru
9 Convolvulaceae
11/1 Ipomoea fistulosa Mart.ex Choisy Nasarmo
10 Euphorbiaceae
12/1 Euphorbia neriifolia L. Thor
13/2 Jatropha curcas L. Ratanjot
14/3 Jatropha gossypifolia L. Pardesi Devalo
15/4 Ricinus communis L. Devalo
11 Lythraceae
16/1 Lawsonia inermis L. Mendhi

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 148 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Family & Scientific Name Vernacular Name
No.
12 Malvaceae
17/1 Abelomoschus manihot (L.) Medic. Jagali bhindi
18/2 Abutilon indicum (L.) Sw. Khapat
19/3 Hibiscus rosa sinensis Jasud
13 Musaceae
20/1 Musa paradisiaca L. Kela
14 Mimosaceae
21/1 Prosopis juliflora DC Gando Baval
15 Nyctaginaceae
22/1 Bougainvillea spectabilis Willd. Bougainvel
16 Papilionaceae
23/1 Sesbania sesban (L.) Merr. Shevari
17 Rhamnaceae
24/1 Zizyphus nummularia (Burm.f.) W. &. Chanibor
18 Solanaceae
25/1 Datura metel L Daturo
26/2 Solanum incanum L Ubhi ringan
19 Verbenaceae
27/1 Clerodendrum inerme (L.) Gaertn. Madhi
28/2 Lantana camara L.var.aculcata (L.) Mold. Ganthai

3.7.6.3 Herbs:
As the most of the undergrowth was dried up, except near water pools the herbaceous
layer document in the report may be incomplete for this region. The 35 species of
herbs observed in the study area have been enlisted in the Table No. 3.15

Table No. – 3.15 - List of Herbaceous Species observed in the Study Area

Sr. Family & Scientific Name Vernacular Name


No.
1 Acanthaceae
1/1 Hygrophila auriculata (Schum.)Heine Kanta Shelio
2 Amaranthaceae
2/2 Aerva javanica (Burm.f.) Juss
3 Asteraceae
3/1 Blumea sps.
4/3 Echinops echinatus Roxb Shulio
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 149 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Family & Scientific Name Vernacular Name
No.
5/4 Tridax procumbens L Pardesi bhangro
4 Boraginaceae
6/1 Trichodesma indicum l. Undha fuli
5 Cannaceae
7/1 Cana indica
6 Caesalpiniaceae
8/1 Cassia tora L Kuvandio
7 Chenopodiaceae
9/1 Suaeda nudiflora (wild) Moq. Moras
10/2 S. fruticosa L.
8 Cyperaceae
11/1 Cyperus bulbosus Vahl.
12/2 Cyperus difformis L.
13/3 Cyperus stoloniferus Retz.
14/4 Cyperus rotundus L.
9 Lamiaceae ( Labiatae)
15/1 Ocimum basilicum L. Damaro
16/2 Ocimum sanctum L. Tulsi
10 Liliaceae -
17/1 Aloe barbadensis Mill. Kunvarpato
11 Nymphaeaceae
18/1 Nymphaea pubescens Willd Kamal
19/2 Nymphaea stellata
12 Nyctaginaceae
20/1 Boerhavia diffusa L.
21/2 Boerhavia chinensis Druce
13 Papaveraceae
22/1 Argemone mexicana L. Darudi
14 Papilionaceae -
23/1 Cortalaria medicaginea Lam Ran methi
24/2 Indigofera oblongifolia Forks.
15 Poaceae (Gramineae)
25/1 Phragmites karaka Steud -
26/2 Aleuropus lagopoides Trin -
27/3 Cynodon dactylon Pers. -
28/4 Sorghum bicolar L. Jowar
29/5 Pennisetum typhoides ( Burm.) Bajri
16 Poligonaceae

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 150 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Family & Scientific Name Vernacular Name
No.
30/1 Poligonum sp.
17 Pontederiaceae
31/1 Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Kanphutti
18 Potamogetonaceae
32/1 Potomogeton sp.
19 Solanaceae
33/1 Solanum surattense Burm. Bhoringini
20 Typhaceae
34/1 Typha angustata Bory & Chaub
21 Zygophyllaceae
35/1 Tribulus terrestris L Gokhru

3.7.6.4 Climbers and Twiners:


The climbers and twiners observed along the agricultural hedges and road side
hedges of the study area are given in the Table No. 3.16. 9 species of climbers/ twiners
belongs to 3 families are recorded from the area

Table No. 3.16 - List of Climbers Observed In the Study Area

Sr. Family & Scientific Name Vernacular Name


No.
1 Convolvulaceae
1/1 Ipomoea pes-caprae Dariani vel
2/2 Ipomoea pes-tigridis L. Wagpadi
3/3 Ipomoea aquatica Forsk. Nali ni Bhaji
4/4 Ipomoea nil(L.)Roth Kaladana
5/5 Ipomoea obscura (L.) Ker – Gawl. Vad fudardi
2 Cucurbitaceae
6/1 Citrulus colocynthis (L) Indravarna
7/2 Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt Ghiloda
8/3 Luffa cylindrica (L.) M.J.Roem Galka
3 Cuscutaceae
9/1 Cuscuta chinensis Lam. Amarval

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 151 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.7.6.5 Cultivated Plants in the Study Area:

The Tuver (Cajanus indica), Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Cotton (Gossypium
herbaceum) are cultivated as major crops in this area. Bajra (Pennisetum typhoides) and
Jowar (Sorghum bicolar) are cultivated in few pockets immediately after monsoon
period.

The prevalent cropping systems of this area are the cumulative results of past and
present decisions by individuals; these decisions are usually based on experience,
tradition, expected profit, personal preferences and resources.

In northern India, there are two distinct seasons, Kharif (July to October), and Rabi
(October to March). Crops grown between March and June are known as zaid. In some
parts of the country including Gujarat, there are no such distinct seasons, but there
they have their own classification of seasons.

South-westerly monsoon crops (Kharif), and post-monsoon crops, after the Kharif
crops harvesting (Rabi), can be considered to be the base of cropping patterns of this
region.

The crop occupying the highest percentage of the sown area of this region is taken as
the major crop and all other possible alternative crops which are sown in this region
either as substitutes of the base crop in the same season or as the crops which fit in the
rotation in the subsequent season, are considered as minor crop.

3.7.6.5.1 Major Crops:


Major crops in the study area are Tuver (Cajanus indica), Wheat (Triticum aestivum) and
Cotton (Gossypium herbaceum),

3.7.6.5.2 Minor Crops:


The minor crops of this region are Bajra (Pennisetum typhoides), Jowar (Sorghum bicolar)
and Divel (Ricinus communis)

3.7.6.5.3 Vegetables:
The vegetables grown in the study area are Rigan (Solanum melongena), Tomato
(Lycopersicon lycopersicum) and Val, Valpapadi (Lablab purpureus)

3.7.6.6. Horticultural Practices and Fruits Grown:

Not much horticulture activity observed in the study area.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 152 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.7.6.6.1. Horticultural Crops

Keri (Mangifera indica L.), Chikoo (Manilkara zapota (L.)), Papaya (Carica papaya L.), and
Banana (Musa Paradisiaca L.)

3.7.7 Rare and Endangered Flora in the Study Area:

The IUCN Red List is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global
conservation status of plant and animal species. It uses a set of criteria to evaluate the
extinction risk of thousands of species and subspecies. These criteria are relevant to all
species and all regions of the world. With its strong scientific base, the IUCN Red List
is recognized as the most authoritative guide to the status of biological diversity.

Out of 17000 species of higher plants known to occur in India, nearly 614 higher plant
species were evaluated by IUCN. Among them 247 species are under threatened
category (IUCN, 2007).

Among the enumerated flora in the study area, none of them were assigned any threat
category, by RED data book of Indian Plants. (Nayar and Sastry,1990) and Red list of
threatened Vascular plants (IUCN,2010, BSI, 2003)

3.7.8 Endemic Plants of the Study Area:

De Candolle (1855) first used the concept of “Endemic”, which is defined as an area of
a taxonomic unit, especially a species which has a restricted distribution or habitat,
isolated from its surrounding region through geographical, ecological or temporal
barriers.
Out of 17000 species of known flowering plants of India nearly 5000 species are said to
be endemic. Nearly 58 genera and 1932 taxa are found to be endemic to peninsular
India (Ahmedulla & Nayar, 1987).

Among recorded plant species, none can be assigned the status of endemic plant of
this region.

3.7.9 Status of the Forest, their Category in the Study Area

No forest observed in the study area except few scrub land and Goucher lands with
thick vegetation cover of Prosopis Juliflora. The mangrove patches were observed along
the mud flats on the either side of Dahej jetty and few creeks along the coast.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 153 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.7.10 Faunal Biodiversity of the Study Area

For the documentation of the faunal biodiversity of the study area with respect to
birds, reptiles, amphibians, and butterfly species, a baseline survey had been
conducted. The study area falls under Bharuch District of Gujarat state. All together 18
villages were covered for the present biological baseline study.

3.7.10.1 Birds of the Study Area:

The sightings of bird species were very lass during the study period during February,
2012. The most commonly spotted bird species of this area were; Cattle Egret,
Intermediate Egret, Black-winged Stilt, Red-wattled Lapwing, Rock Pigeon, Eurasian
Collared-Dove, Spotted Dove, Chestnut-headed Bee-eater, Grey Francolin, House
Crow, Purple Sunbird, and common Myna.

1,224 bird species reliably recorded from India, together with their status categories. In
total there are 1219 extant native species including migrants and vagrants (but
excluding 3 species now known to be extinct in the country, and 2 introduced species).
There are 923 breeding species (911 residents, plus 12 suspected residents).

IUCN evaluated 1254 bird species from India and categorized 77 species as threatened
(13 species as critically endangered, 10 species as Endangered and 54 species as
Vulnerable).

Systematic account of the birds in the study area with the status of occurrence is given
in the Table No. 3.17.

Table No. 3.17 - Systematic Lists of Birds in the Study Area with its Distribution
and Migratory Status

Old Common Name New Common Name Scientific Name Dist.

I. ORDER: APODIFORMES
Family: Apodidae (Swifts)
Common Swift Common Swift Apus apus R
II. ORDER: FALCONIFORMES
Family: Accipitridae (Vulture, Sparrow Hawk, Eagle, Harrier, Kite and Vulture)
Shikra Shikra Accipiter badius R
R
Black-winged Kite Black-winged Kite Elanus caeruleus

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 154 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Old Common Name New Common Name Scientific Name Dist.

III. ORDER: : CICONIIFORMES


Family: Ardeidae (heron, Egret, Bittern)
Cattle Egret Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis R
Mesophoyx intermedia
Median or Smaller Egret Intermediate Egret R
Egretta intermedia
Little Egret Little Egret Egretta garzetta R
Pond Heron Indian Pond-Heron Ardeola grayii R
Family: Charadriidae (Plover, Stilt, Oystercatcher, Lapwing, Avocet )
Black-winged Stilt Black-winged Stilt Himantopus himantopus R
Red-wattled Lapwing Red-wattled Lapwing Vanellus indicus R
IV. ORDER: COLUMBIFORMES
Family: Columbidae (Pigeon, Dove)
Blue Rock Pigeon Rock Pigeon Columba livia R
Eurasian Collared- Streptopelia decaocto
Ring Dove R
Dove
V. ORDER: CORACIFORMES
Family: Dacelonidae (King Fishers)
White breasted White-throated Halcyon smyrnensis
R
Kingfisher Kingfisher
Family: Meropidae (Bee Eater)
Chestnut-headed Bee- Chestnut-headed Bee- Merops leschenaulti
R
eater eater
Merops persicus
Blue-cheeked Bee-eater Blue-cheeked Bee-eater R
Merops superciliosus
VI. ORDER: CUCULIFORMES
Family: Centropodidae (Cocucal)
Crow-Pheasant or Centropus sinensis
Greater Coucal R
Coucal
Family: Cuculidae (Cuckoo, Koel)
Koel Asian Koel Eudynamys scolopacea R
Indian Drongo Cuckoo Drongo Cuckoo Surniculus lugubris R
VII. ORDER: GALLIFORMES
Family: Phasianidae (Peafowl , Partridge, Quail, Francolin, Spur Fowl, Jungle Fowl,
Monal)
Common Peafowl Indian Peafowl Pavo cristatus R
Grey Partridge Grey Francolin Francolinus pondicerianus R

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 155 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Old Common Name New Common Name Scientific Name Dist.

VII. ORDER: GRUIFORMES


Family: Rallidae (Waterhen, coot, crake water cock, Moorhen, Rail,)
White-breasted Water hen White-breasted Water Amaurornis phoenicurus R
hen
IX. ORDER: PASSERIFORMES
Family: Paridae (Tit )
Grey Tit Great Tit Parus major R
Family: Corvidae
Coracina macei
Large Cuckoo-shrike Large Cuckoo-shrike R
Coracina novaehollandiae
Raven Common Raven Corvus corax R
House Crow House Crow Corvus splendens R
Dicrurus macrocercus
Black drongo- King Crow Black Drongo R
Dicrurus adsimilis
Tree Pie Rufous Treepie Dendrocitta vagabunda R
Family: Laniidae (Shrike)
Rufous backed Shrike Long-tailed Shrike Lanius schach R
Grey Shrike Northern Shrike Lanius excubitor R
Family: Muscicapidae ( Short Wing, Chat, Robin, Shama)
Indian Robin Indian Robin Saxicoloides fulicata R
Pied Bushchat Pied Bushchat Saxicola caprata R
Family: Nectariniidae ( Sun Birds, Flower Pecker, Spider Hunter )
Purple Sunbird Purple Sunbird Nectarinia asiatica R
Small Sunbird Crimson-backed Nectarinia minima
R
Sunbird
Family: Passeridae ( Avadavat, Pipit, Wagtail, Munia, Snowfinch, Sparrow, Weaver,
Accentor)
House Sparrow House Sparrow Passer domesticus R
Grey Tit Great Tit Parus major R
Family: Pycnonotidae (Bulbul)
Red-whiskered Bulbul Red-whiskered Bulbul Pycnonotus jocosus R
Red-vented Bulbul Red-vented Bulbul Pycnonotus cafer R
Family: Sturnidae (Myna, Starling)
Indian Myna Common Myna Acridotheres tristis R
Family: Sylviidae (Warbler, Browning, Fulvetta ,Babbler, Laughing thrash, Tailor
Birds)
Common Babbler Common Babbler Turdoides caudatus R
Jungle Babbler Jungle Babbler Turdoides striatus R

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 156 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Old Common Name New Common Name Scientific Name Dist.

Tailorbird Common Tailorbird Orthotomus sutorius R


X. ORDER: PSITTACIFORMES
Family: Psittacidae (Parrot and Parakeet)
Rose-ringed Parakeet Rose-ringed Parakeet Psittacula krameri R

Note: R = Widespread Resident, r = Very Local Resident, W = Widespread Winter


Visitor, w = Sparse Winter Visitor, RW =Resident and winter visitor
As per the distribution given in WCMC, Check list of Indian Birds

3.7.10.2 Butterflies from the Study Area:


Butterflies observed during the present study are documented in the Table No. 3.18.

Table No. 3.18. - Butterflies in the Study Area

Scientific Name & Family Common Name

Family Pieridae
Eurema hecabe Common Grass yellow
Ixias marianne White Orange Tip
Family: Nymphalidae
Danaus genutia Cramer Stripped Tiger
Hypolimanas misippus Danaid Egg Fly
Mycalesis perseus Common Bush Brown

3.7.10.3 Herpetofauna :

No amphibians were sighted during the study period during Feb., 2012. The reptiles
document in the region is given in the Table No. 3.19

Table No. 3.19 - Reptiles in the Study Area

Sr. Common Name Scientific Name


No.
1 Common garden lizard Calotes versicolor (Daudin)
2 Common rat snake Ptyas mucosus (Linn.)
3 Common Indian monitor Varanus bengalensis ( Daudin)
4 House Gecko Hemidactylus flaviviridis (Ruppell)

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 157 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Common Name Scientific Name
No.
5 Fan-Throated Lizard Sitana ponticeriana ( Cuvier)
6 Indian Cobra Naja naja (Linn.)

 = Not sighted but included as per the information provided by villagers, during the
interaction with them with pictorial presentation.

3.7.10.4 Mammals:

The wild mammals observed other than the domesticated ones in the study area is
given in the Table No. 3.20

Table No. 3.20 - Mammals in the Study Area

Sr. Common Name Scientific Name


No.
1 Five Striped Palm Squirrel Funambulus pennanii ( Wroughton)
2 Common Mongoose Herpestes edwardsii (Geoffroy)
3 Indian Field Mouse Mus booduga (Gray)
5 Hare Lepus sp.
7 Nilgai Boselaphus tragocamelus (Pallas)
8 Jungle Cat Felis Chaus (Guldenstaedt)

3.7.10.5 Rare and Endangered Fauna of the Study Area

The IUCN Red List is the world's most comprehensive inventory of the global
conservation status of plant and animal species. It uses a set of criteria to evaluate the
extinction risk of thousands of species and subspecies. These criteria are relevant to all
species and all regions of the world. With its strong scientific base, the IUCN Red List
is recognized as the most authoritative guide to the status of biological diversity.
IUCN, (2007) has evaluated 1976 animal species from India, among them 313 have in
recognized as threatened species. Among them one species is considered as extinct
,while 44 species are in critically endangered(CR) catogery,88 is in endangered
category(EN), while 181 is considered as vulnerable (VU).

Wild Life (Protection) Act, 1972, amended on 17th January 2003, is an Act to provide
for the protection of wild animals, birds and plants and for matters connected
therewith or ancillary or incidental thereto with a view to ensuring the ecological and
environmental security of the country.
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 158 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Some of the sighted fauna was given protection by the Indian Wild Life
(Protection)Act,1972 by including them in different schedules .Among the birds in the
study area, Pea fowl (Pavo cristatus), is included in schedule I .of Wild life protection
Act (1972), while many other birds are included in schedule IV.

Among the reptiles, Indian Cobra (Naja naja), and Common rat snake (Ptyas mucosus)
were provided protection as per Schedule-II of Wild life protection act, (1972)

Among mammals; Common Mongoose (Herpestes edwardsi) and Jungle cat (Felis
Chaus) are a schedule –II animals. Nilgai (Boselaphus tragocamelus) is protected as
Schedule-III animal and all Hares are included in schedule IV of Wild Life Protection
Act 1972.

3.7.10.6 Endemic Fauna of the Study Area

None of the sighted animal species can be assigned endemic species category of the
study area.

3.7.11 Aquatic Environment:

Large inland water bodies observed in Vav village and Jholva village were sampled to
assess their plankton diversity.

3.7.11.1 Methodology:

The samples for qualitative analysis of plankton were collected from the sub surface
layer of the pond. Water sample were filtered through plankton net of 20 µ mesh size.
The filtered samples were concentrated by using the centrifuge. The standard flora
and other literature were followed for the qualitative evaluation of Plankton.

3.7.11.2 Plankton Community of inland water bodies covered under the study area:

Table No. 3.21 - Plankton Community of the Study Area

Plankton Community Vav Jolva


Village Village
PHYTOPLANKTON
Sub Phylum Chlorophyceae
Order: Chlorocococcales
Family:
Closteridium sp.  

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 159 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Plankton Community Vav Jolva
Village Village
Family:Scenedesmaceae  

Scenedesmus sp.
Family : Hydrodictyacea
Hydrodictyon sp.  
 
Pediastrum sp.

Order: Zygnematles
Family: Zygnemataceae
Spirogyra sp.
 
Zygnema sp.
Family : Desmidiaceae
Closterium sp.  
Cosmarium sp.  
Euastridium sp. 

Staurastrum sp.  

Phylum: Euglenophyta
Order Euglenales
Family Euglenaceae
Phacus sp..  

Phylum: Pyrrhophyta
Class: Dinophyceae
Ceratium sp.  

Phylum: Chrysophyta
Sub Phylum: Bacillariophyceae
Order: Centrales
Melosira sp.  
Order: Pennales
Family: Fragilariaceae
Fragilaria sp.  
Synedra sp.  

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 160 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Plankton Community Vav Jolva
Village Village
Family: Naviculaceae
Navicula sp.  
Pinnularia sp.  

ZOOPLANKTON:
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class Brabchiopoda
Order Cladocera
Famliy Daphnidae
Daphnia sp.  
Class : Crustaceae
Sub class Copepoda
Order: Calanoida
Family: Diaptominae
Neodiaptomus sp.  
Order: Cyclopoida
Family: Cyclopidae
Sub family: Eucyclopinae
Eucyclops sp.  
 
Ectocyclops sp.
Nauplius larvae
 

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 161 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
3.8 Socio-Economic Environment

This study has been taken up to visualize and impacts on the socio-economic profile.
Base-line data has been collected for 18 Villages of Taluka: Vagra, District: Bharuch

To define Socio-economic status of the study area, base-line data for the following has
been collected.
 Demographic Structure

 Economic Status and Occupational Pattern

 Socio Economic Amenities

3.8.1 Demographic Status


The comparative demographic status of Gujarat and Bharuch District shows that
percentage increase of population in Gujarat is 19 % while in Bharuch district it is 13 %
from 2001 to 2011. However the decadal population growth rates in the State of
Gujarat and Bharuch District have decreasing trend during 2001 to 2011. On the
contrary the population density showed an increasing trend between 2001 to 2011 for
the State of Gujarat and Bharuch district. This shows an increasing trend for migratory
population.

Table 3.22: Comparative Demographic Information

S. Demographic Information Gujarat State Bharuch District


No. 2001 2011 2001 2011
1 Total Population 5,06,71,017 6,03,83,628 13,70,656 15,50,822
2 Decadal Population Growth 22.66 19.17 19.37 13.14
Rate
3 Density of population 258 308 210 238
(Per Sq km)
4 Sex Ratio 920 918 921 924
5 Total Literacy Rate 69.14 66.39 74.41 83.03
6 Male Literacy Rate 79.66 79.45 82.98 88.80
7 Female Literacy Rate 57.8 52.57 65.11 76.79
Source: Gujarat State Census Book and Bharuch district Census Book 2001 and Provisional Census
figures of State Gujarat and Bharuch District 2011

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 162 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Further in Gujarat, the sex ratio and total literacy rate showed decresing trend while
for Bharuch district it is vice versa during 2001 and 2011. Further looking sexwise, the
male literacy rate in Gujarat State remianed same while in Kutch district it has
increasing trend during 2001 to 2011. However the vice versa trend is found for the
female literacy as indicated in Table 3.22. The population in the study region is
predominantly rural.

Table 3.23 : Comparative Demographic Information at Macro Level (2001)

Sr. State District Taluka


Demographic Information (2001)
No. Gujarat Bharuch Vagra
1 Total Area (in sq km) 1,96,024 5,253 883.42
2 Total Population 5,06,71,017 13,70,656 82,647
3 Decadal Population Growth Rate
(1991-2001) Total 22.7 19.37 20.0
3a Males 23.6 19.6 20.84
3b Females 21.7 19.1 19.1
4 Density of population (Per Sq km) 258 210 93.6
5 Sex Ratio (Females per 000' males) Total 920 921 913
5a Rural 945 925 913
5b Urban 880 907 0
6 Proportion of Urban 37.4 25.72 0
7 Proportion of Scheduled caste 7.1 4.5 5.4
8 Proportion of Scheduled tribes 14.8 32.4 25.7
9 Proportion Literate 69.1 74.41 61.2
10 Work Participation rate 41.9 41.6 42.7
(Main + Marginal Workers)
(Source: Gujarat State Census Book 2001 and Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001)

The area of Vagra taluka is just 0.45% of the Gujarat State and 2.7% of the Bharuch
district. The decadal population growth of Vagra taluka (1991-2001) is greater than
Bharuch district but less than total Gujarat state show that population growth is
dynamic in the taluka lead to greater growth rate and is also true for the male
population. However the sex ratio of Vagra taluka is less than Bharuch district and the
state of Gujarat. These suggest more influx of male population in the taluka due to
industrilization. The proportion of Scheduled caste is less compared to scheduled
tribes in the Vagra taluka. The proportion of the scheduled caste in Vagra taluka is
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 163 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
lower to the Gujarat State but more compared to Bharuch District. While the
proportion of Scheduled tribes is less in Vagra taluka compared to Bharuch district
but more compared to the total state of Gujarat. It is astonishing to note that
proportion of literate population in Vagra Taluka is less when compared to Bharuch
district and the State of Gujarat as whole. The work participation rate of Vagra taluka
is more compared to the State of Gujarat and native Bharuch district. The summarized
details of the variation of the Vagra Taluka with Bharuch district and State of Gujarat
are indicated in Figure 3.5 (A) & 3.5 (B).

Figure 3.5 (A): Comparative Demographic Status of Vagra Taluka

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 164 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure 3.5 (B): Comparative Status of Sex Ratio & Population Density in Vagra Taluka

At micro level, the demographic analysis between the total villages coming in 10 km
radius from the project site and Village Dehej where the project unit is located shows
that the sex ratio for the total population is more skewed towards male in total villages
in 10 km radius compared to Dehej Village where the similar situation also exist. This
is also true for Literate population. The sex ratio of 0-6 population and ST population
is more skewed towards female in total villges coming in 10 km when compared to
Dahej Village. Further though sex ratio is more skewed towards female, the sex ratio is
more in total villages coming in the radius of 10 km from project unit compared to
village Dehej where the site is located as indicated in Figure 3.6 (A).

Further at micro level it was found that the proportion of literate male population is
smaller in Dahej villages when compared with total villages coming in the radius of 10
km and vice versa for female literate population. This trend is also found true for the
SC population. While for total population the proportion of male population is
greater for Dehej village compared total villages in 10 km radius and vice versa
situation is found for total female population.This trend is also true for 0-6 and ST
population as shown in Figure 3.6 (B). The demographic details for the
villages/Town/City in the 10 km radius could be seen in Table No. – 3.24, 3.25 & of
3.26.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 165 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Figure 3.6 (A): Comparitive Analysis of Sex Ratio at Micro Level

Figure 3.6 (B): Comparitive Analysis of Demographic varibales at Micro Level

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 166 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table 3.24:- Demographic Profile of Villages in 10 km radial area from Project Site

Name of Villages Total Population Population between 0 to 06


(10 km Radius) Total Male Female Total Male Female
Dahej 6846 3756 3090 1145 582 563
Galenda 513 254 259 108 53 55
Vadadla 606 305 301 109 53 56
Narnavi 596 317 279 75 37 38
Ambheta 1330 695 635 232 120 112
Suva 1664 830 834 293 140 153
Jolva 814 436 378 138 76 62
Rahiad 1315 692 623 213 104 109
Vav 676 355 321 101 53 48
Kadodara 1811 933 878 323 163 160
Sambheti 391 205 186 59 24 35
Janiadara 621 314 307 80 42 38
Padariya 569 299 270 80 39 41
Paniadara 2330 1244 1086 440 218 222
Samatpor 332 172 160 50 20 30
Lakhigam 3357 1939 1418 485 249 236
Luvara 1393 689 704 257 129 128
Jageshwar 1465 861 604 242 135 107
(Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001)

Table 3.25:- Population Distribution by Caste of Villages in 10 km Radial Area from


Project Site

Name of Villages Total Scheduled Caste Scheduled Tribe


(10 km Radius) Population Total Male Female Total Male Female
Dahej 6846 365 185 180 1398 745 653
Galenda 513 0 0 0 75 36 39
Vadadla 606 60 31 29 320 154 166
Narnavi 596 39 21 18 132 74 58
Ambheta 1330 94 48 46 199 103 96
Suva 1664 62 30 32 321 166 155
Jolva 814 103 54 49 170 92 78

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 167 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Name of Villages Total Scheduled Caste Scheduled Tribe
(10 km Radius) Population Total Male Female Total Male Female
Rahiad 1315 88 48 40 80 39 41
Vav 676 25 14 11 171 91 80
Kadodara 1811 36 15 21 488 250 238
Sambheti 391 14 9 5 43 22 21
Janiadara 621 31 18 13 178 92 86
Padariya 569 14 6 8 115 61 54
Paniadara 2330 33 16 17 735 405 330
Samatpor 332 0 0 0 37 21 16
Lakhigam 3357 79 44 35 434 222 212
Luvara 1393 81 42 39 792 383 409
Jageshwar 1465 23 9 14 75 40 35
(Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001)

Table 3.26:- Literate Population of Villages in 10 km radial area from


Project Site

Name of Villages Total Literate Population Illiterate Population


(10 km Radius) Population Total Male Female Total Male Female
Dahej 6846 4552 2734 1818 2294 1022 1272
Galenda 513 316 184 132 197 70 127
Vadadla 606 288 185 103 318 120 198
Narnavi 596 376 236 140 220 81 139
Ambheta 1330 901 538 363 429 157 272
Suva 1664 942 558 384 722 272 450
Jolva 814 470 298 172 344 138 206
Rahiad 1315 797 525 272 518 167 351
Vav 676 435 278 157 241 77 164
Kadodara 1811 1008 647 361 803 286 517
Sambheti 391 245 161 84 146 44 102
Janiadara 621 428 229 199 193 85 108
Padariya 569 405 247 158 164 52 112
Paniadara 2330 1243 806 437 1087 438 649
Samatpor 332 206 140 66 126 32 94
Lakhigam 3357 2204 1472 732 1153 467 686

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 168 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Name of Villages Total Literate Population Illiterate Population
(10 km Radius) Population Total Male Female Total Male Female
Luvara 1393 750 454 296 643 235 408
Jageshwar 1465 855 593 262 610 268 342
(Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001)

3.8.2 Economic Status & Occupational Pattern


The economic status of a person has been broadly classified in to 3 categories (i) Main
workers (ii) Marginal workers (iii) Non-workers. Main workers are a person who
works for a major part of the year i.e more than 6 months in one or more than one
activity. A marginal worker is a person who works for a period less than 6 months in
one or more than one activity. A non worker is a person who has no economic
activity. Details of the economic status for study region are given in Table 3.27 the
occupational pattern of workers in the study region is given in Table 3.28.

Table 3.27: Percentage of Main Workers, Marginal Workers and Non- Workers for
Rural Population

Type of % of Worker % of Main % of Marginal % of Non-Worker


Area Population from Worker Worker Population from
Total Population Population from Population from Total Population
Total Worker Total Worker
Population Population
T M F T M F T M F T M F
Bharuch
41.6 56.6 25.4 34.3 52.5 14.5 7.4 4.1 11 58.4 43.4 74.6
District
Vagra
42.7 58.9 24.9 34.1 54.3 12 8.6 4.6 12.8 57.3 41.1 75.1
Taluka
Total
Village in 46.0 60.7 28.9 77.2 91.5 42.3 2.3 8.5 57.7 54.0 39.3 71.1
10 km

Only Dahej 39.3 61.7 11.9 93.9 95.5 83.7 7.1 4.5 16.3 60.7 38.3 88.1

(Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001) Note: T = Total, M = Male & F = Female

The proportion of the worker population in village Dehej is less compared to villges
falling in the radius of 10 km from the project site, Vagra taluka and Bharuch district.
While vice versa situation is found in for the proportion of main worker population.
The proportion of marginal worker population in village Dehej is almost equivalent to
Bharuch district, greater than villages coming in 10 km radius from the project site but
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 169 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
less than Vagra taluka. However proportion of non workers is highest in Dahej village
compared to Bharuch district; Vagra Taluka and villages coming in the radius of 10
km from the project site. Sexwise varition is indicated in Table 3.27.

Table No. 3.28 - Occupational Pattern (Industrial Categories of Main Workers) for
Rural Population

Type of No. of Cultivator (Average) Agriculture Labourers (Average)


Area Villages 1 2
T M F T M F
Bharuch 663 88,406 71,581 16,825 2,25,637 1,21,036 1,04,601
District (133) (108) (25.4) (340) (182) (158)
Vagra 67 7,743 6,995 748 20,943 11,304 9,639
Taluka (115.5) (104) (11.2) (312) (169) (144)
Total
2,252 1,987 265 1,698 1,275 423
Village 18
(125) (110) (14.7) (94.3) (70.8) (23.5)
in 10 Km
Only Dahej 1 8,939 7,010 1,929 13,801 7,873 5,928

Type of No. of Manufacturing processing, Other workers


Area Villages servicing repairs in household (Average)
industry (Average)
3 4
T M F T M F

Bharuch 663 8579 6253 2326 248071 204787 43284


District (13) (9.5) (3.5) (374) (308) (65.2)
Vagra 67 662 499 163 11152 9293 1859
Taluka (9.9) (7.5) (2.4) (166) (139) (27.8)
Total
40 34 06 5462 4648 814
Village 18
(2.2) (1.9) (0.3) (303) (258) (45.2)
in 10 Km
Only Dahej 1 328 264 64 12,201 10,308 1,893
(Source: Kutch District Census Handbook 2001)
Note: T = Total, M = Male, F = Female; AVERAGE worker for each category in villages is
calculated by dividing workers from number of villages

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 170 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
From the above table it is clear that the occupational pattern is far better in Dahej
village for average number of cultivators, agricultural labourers household industrial
workers and other workers compared to total villages coming in the 10 km radius
from the project site, Vagra taluka and Bharuch District. The sexwise variation could
be refered from Table 3.28. The villages wise occupational details in the 10 km radius
could be seen in Table 3.29

Table 3.29:- Occupational Status of Villages in 10 km radial area from Project Site

Name of Main Main Main Non Work


Villages Cultivator Agriculture Household Population
(10 km radius) Population Labours Worker
Population Population
T M F T M F T M F T M F
Dahej 220 218 2 588 417 171 10 9 1 4158 1437 2721
Galenda 93 93 0 56 33 23 0 0 0 325 92 233
Vadadla 56 56 0 65 33 32 0 0 0 340 110 230
Narnavi 90 87 3 65 52 13 0 0 0 216 110 106
Ambheta 26 25 1 99 89 10 0 0 0 925 348 577
Suva 143 141 2 50 42 8 1 1 0 911 355 556
Jolva 90 86 4 102 70 32 11 9 2 443 171 272
Rahiad 167 158 9 18 14 4 0 0 0 689 258 431
Vav 120 120 0 54 51 3 0 0 0 374 135 239
Kadodara 250 243 7 184 176 8 2 2 0 807 389 418
Sambheti 80 51 29 32 24 8 0 0 0 148 78 70
Janiadara 83 78 5 3 2 1 0 0 0 218 103 115
Padariya 58 55 3 27 27 0 4 2 2 265 113 152
Paniadara 499 322 177 36 25 11 2 2 0 961 483 478
Samatpor 70 64 6 50 28 22 0 0 0 186 67 119
Lakhigam 102 91 11 192 131 61 3 2 1 1728 750 978
Luvara 99 95 4 73 59 14 7 7 0 837 295 542
Jageshwar 6 4 2 4 2 2 0 0 0 856 321 535
(Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001) Note: T = Total, M = Male & F = Female

3.8.3 Socio Economic Amenities


Since village Dehej is a located near Bharuch and Ankleshwar town, the basic
parameters like education, water, medicine, post and telegraph communication road
development and power supply are readily available which decide the measure of this
development as indicated in table 3.30. Educational facilities are available to almost

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 171 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
100% of the population and the literacy rate is above 61%. All the villages have a
minimum of one primary school. Higher secondary education is available with 10 km
of any village.

Table 3.30:- Distribution of village according to the availability of different


amenities

Area No. of No. (with percentage) of villages having one or more of the
Inhabited following amenities
Villages Education Medical Drinking Post and Telephone
water Telegraph

1 2 3 4 5
Bharuch
District 663 645 (98.2) 403 (61.3) 635 (96.7) 430 (65.4) 464 (70.6)
Vagra
Taluka 67 66 (98.5) 67 (100) 59 (88.1) 45 (67.2) 47 (70.1)
Total
Village in 18
10 Km 18 (100) 18 (100) 18 (100) 16 (88.9) 13 (22.2)
Only
1
Dahej Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Area No. of No. (with percentage) of villages having one or more of the
Inhabited following amenities
Villages Transport Banks Agriculture Pucca Power
Communication Credit Approach Supply
Societies Road

6 7 8 9 10
Bharuch
District 663 591 (90) 65 (9.9) 347 (52.8) 600 (91.3) 656 (99.8)
Vagra
Taluka 67 67 (100) 6 (9) 57 (85.1) 66 (98.5) 66 (98.5)
Total
Village in 18
10 Km 18 (100) 1 (5.6) 15 (83.3) 18 (100) 18 (100)
Only
1
Dahej Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
(Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001)

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 172 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
However the situation differs when compared with the total 18 village’s falls in the
radius of 10 km from the village Dehej points out to have bank and agriculture credit
society (83.3%) in one villages and only 88.9% villages have post and telegraph
facilities and 22.2% villges have only land line connection The villageswise amenties
details in the 10 km radius could be seen in Table 3.31.

Table 3.31:- Status of Amenities of villages in 10 km radial area from Project Site

Communication
Drinking Water

Credit Societies
Transportation

Power Supply
Approach to
Name of

Telegraph
Education

Facilities
Banking
Medical

Village
Post &
Villages

and
in 10 km
Radius

Dahej Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes


Galenda Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Vadadla Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Narnavi Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Ambheta Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Suva Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No No Yes
Jolva Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Rahiad Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Vav Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Kadodara Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Sambheti Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Janiadara Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Padariya Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No Yes Yes
Paniadara Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Samatpor Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Lakhigam Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Luvara Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
Jageshwar Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No No Yes
(Source: Bharuch District Census Handbook 2001)

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 173 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
CHAPTER – 4
IMPACT
ASSESSMENT
CHAPTER – 4
ENVIRONEMTAL IMPACTS PREDICTION & ASSESSMENT

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an activity or an attempt to identify,


evaluate and communicate the environmental impacts of an existing project on the
environment. For, any proposed project, impacts are predicted depending upon the
inputs from source, efficacy of pollution control equipment and capacity of receiving
environment.

Environmental Impact Assessment Study for the proposed project includes:

 Identification of all components of the project and the environmental impact


associated by the existing project as well as prediction of impacts that may be
caused by the proposed project

 Evaluation of the impacts i.e. quantitative & qualitative assessment of the


impacts

 Communication to the general public, interested parties and controlling


authorities

4.1 Impact Identification

Identification of significant environmental impact is essential in the preparation of


EIA report, an attempt has been made here through the use of "Activity Effect"
matrix.

4.1.1 Identification Matrix

Impact Identification Matrix is shown in the Table No. 4.1 (for construction phase of
the proposed project) and Table No. 4.2 (for operation phase of proposed project).
For simplicity the entire project has been divided into two phases.

1. Construction Phase
2. Operational Phase

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 174 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Various activities belonging to industrial project have been grouped and arranged in
rows. The environmental factors, which are being potentially impacted, have been
arranged in columns. A preliminary scrutiny has been done and the cells, which fall
at the junction of the “Activity” and “Factor” that have possible interaction with
each other, have been crossed.

The Matrix, thus, establishes the possible “cause-effect” relationship and identifies
the environmental factors being impacted and activities responsible for the same.

A. Construction Phase

Generally construction phase involves following activities:


 Site Cleaning
 Excavation
 Construction
 Installation of Equipment
 Transportation
 Material Handling
 Employment of Labour
 Greenbelt Development

Green belt development is proposed to be taken up at the initial stage and hence it
has been considered in this phase.

Generally, Air, Noise level and Soil are likely to be affected by these activities.
Although Flora & Fauna factors are also identified but impacts marginal.

B. Operational Phase

This phase of project is important as it generates long term impact as the production
starts. The primary impact causing likely deterioration will be on Air, Water, Noise,
Soil and Flora – Fauna due to gaseous emission, wastewater discharge,
transportation etc.

This phase includes following activities:


 Raw Material Storage & Handling
 Production

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 175 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 Product Storage & Handling
 Transportation
 Gaseous Emission
 Wastewater Discharge
 Solid & Hazardous Waste Generation
 Employment
 Infrastructure Development
 Greenbelt Development

Table No. 4.1

Prediction of Impacts
(“Cause – Effect” Relationship) during Construction Phase

Parameter
Health
Socio
Air Water Noise Soil Flora Fauna &
Activity Economic
Safety

Site Cleaning √ - √ √ √ √ - √

Excavation √ - √ √ √ √ - √

Construction √ √ √ √ √ √ - √

Installation of
√ - √ - - - - √
Equipments

Transportation √ - √ √ √ √ - √

Material
√ - - - - - - √
Handling

Employment - - - - - - √ √

Greenbelt
√ √ √ √ √ √ - √
Development

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 176 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. 4.2

Prediction of Impacts
(“Cause – Effect” Relationship) during Operation Phase

Parameter
Health
Socio
Air Water Noise Soil Flora Fauna &
Activity Economic
Safety

Raw Material
Storage & √ - √ - - - - √
Handling

Production √ √ √ - - - - √

Product
Storage & √ - √ √ - - - √
Handling

Transportation √ - √ √ √ √ - √

Gaseous
√ - √ √ √ √ - √
Emission

Wastewater
- √ - √ √ √ - √
Discharge

Solid Waste
- √ - √ - - - √
Generation
Hazardous
Waste - √ - √ √ √ - √
Generation

Employment - - - - - - √ √

Infrastructure
- - - - - - - √
Development

Greenbelt
√ √ √ √ √ √ - √
Development

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 177 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
4.2 Assessment of Impacts

This section is devoted to the assessment of impacts, which are the most important
components of EIA, due to the industrial project. Assessment involves
determination of nature and extent of impacts due to the industrial activities or the
actions involved. Here it is determined whether the environmental impacts are:

1. Positive or Negative impact


2. Short term or Long term impact

Based on Environmental Impact Analysis, the Environmental Impacts under this


step are quantitatively and qualitatively assessed. Please refer Table No. 4.3 (for
construction phase of proposed project) and Table No. 4.4 (for operation phase of
proposed project).

Quantitative assessment, with the help of a mathematical model, has been done
wherever possible. In other cases, the impact assessment has been qualitative which
is based on available scientific knowledge and judgment.

The mathematical model used for assessment in the present study includes
“Industrial Source Complex Short Term” (ISCST-3) Dispersion Model for air quality.
For other cases i.e. Water, Noise, Land / Soil, Ecology, Socio-economic etc. The
available scientific knowledge & judgment have been used.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 178 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. 4.3

Assessment of Predicted Impacts during Construction Phase

Parameter
Health
Socio
Air Water Noise Soil Flora Fauna &
Activity Economic
Safety

(-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)


Site Cleaning - -
S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T
(-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
Excavation - -
S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T
(-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
Construction -
S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T
Installation of (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
- - - - -
Equipments S.T S.T S.T
(-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
Transportation - -
S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T
Material (-ve) (-ve)
- - - - - -
Handling S.T S.T
(+ve) (+ve)
Employment - - - - - -
L.T L.T
Greenbelt (+ve) (+ve) (+ve) (+ve) (+ve) (+ve) (+ve)
-
Development L.T L.T L.T L.T L.T L.T L.T
(-ve): Negative (+ve): Positive S.T: Short Term L.T: Long Term

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 179 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. 4.4

Assessment of Predicted Impacts during Operation Phase

Parameter Health
Socio
Air Water Noise Soil Flora Fauna &
Economic
Activity Safety
Raw Material
(-ve) (-ve)
Storage & - - - - - -
L.T L.T
Handling
(-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
Production - - - -
S.T L.T L.T L.T
Product Storage (-ve)
- - - - - - -
& Handling L.T
(-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
Transportation - -
S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T S.T
Gaseous (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
- - -
Emission L.T L.T L.T L.T L.T
Wastewater (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
- - -
Discharge L.T S.T L.T L.T L.T
Solid Waste (-ve) (-ve)
- - - - - -
Generation L.T S.T
Hazardous
(-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve) (-ve)
Waste - - -
L.T L.T L.T L.T S.T
Generation
(+ve)
Employment - - - - - - -
L.T
Infrastructure (+ve) (+ve)
- - - - - -
development L.T L.T
Greenbelt (+ve) (+ve) (+ve) (+ve) (+ve) (+ve) (+ve)
-
development L.T L.T L.T L.T L.T L.T L.T
(-ve): Negative (+ve): Positive S.T: Short Term L.T: Long Term

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 180 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
4.2.1 Air Environment

Air emissions have no boundaries and can migrate from one place to another
depending upon the wind direction and wind speed. The impact has been predicted
separately for construction phase and operational phase of the proposed project.

4.2.1.1 During Construction Phase

The impact due to construction activities will be limited to the period of construction
i.e. short-term impacts only. The air quality will be marginally affected by the
activities like excavation, civil construction, transportation & handling of
construction materials and installation of equipments. The main problem anticipated
will increase in SPM level due to dust contamination.

It may be noted that the causes of Suspended Particulate Matter in ambient air may
be due to loose topsoil and local meteorological conditions at the site.

Because of vehicular traffic there may be marginal increase in concentration of NOx


and CO. Regular sprinkling of water is proposed during construction activities for
the suppression of dust. The approach roads and vehicles will be kept in good
condition to minimize automobile exhaust.

The impact will be confined within the project premises and is expected to be
negligible outside the plant premises. Proper upkeep and maintenance of vehicles,
sprinkling of water during this phase, providing sufficient vegetation etc. are some
of the measures that would greatly reduce the impacts during the construction
phase.

4.2.1.2 During Operational Phase

The operational activities are usually expected to have long-term impacts on air
quality.

The major source of air pollution due to proposed project will be flue gas emissions
from Boilers & process emissions from product manufacturing plants. The
significant pollutants identified due to flue gas emissions are PM, SO2 and NOx

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 181 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
whereas from manufacturing plants are HCl, HBr, Cl2 & SO2.

The fugitive emissions of particulate matter will likely to arise during various stages
of operations such as material unloading, material transfer and storage etc. The
concentrations of pollutants at the ground levels have been computed using
computer simulation model to assess the impact of emissions for the proposed
project.

4.2.1.3 Air Dispersion Model Used

Air dispersion modeling can be used to predict atmospheric concentrations of


pollutants at specific locations (receptors) over specific averaging times (i.e. annual,
daily and hourly). An atmospheric dispersion model accounts for the emissions
from a source; estimates how high into the atmosphere they will go, how widely
they will spread and how far they will travel based on temporal meteorological data;
and outputs the pattern of concentrations that will occur for various exposure
periods, thereby providing the exposure risks for different receptors.

A mathematical model namely “Industrial Source Complex Short Term (ISCST-3)


Dispersion Model”, developed by the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) was
used to predict and calculate ground level concentration (GLCs) of the contaminants
emitted during operational phase. This is based essentially, on the original Gaussian
Plume Model equation but is defined in terms related to atmospheric phenomenon.

Brief description of dispersion model used is given in the Annexure 4.1. Data used
for the evaluation of the ground level concentration for the proposed stacks & vents
is given in Table No. 4.5. The results of GLCs due to the proposed flue gas stack &
process vents are given in the Annexure 4.2.

When the above stated GLCs results are added into the 98% percentile concentration
of ambient air parameters, it gives overall AAQ of the surrounding study area. Air
quality contours for the various pollutants are given in the Annexure 4.3.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 182 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. 4.5

Data used for the Evaluation of the Ground Level Concentration

Stack Internal
height stack Exit gas Emission
Stack /Vent Type of Velocity Expected
from diameter Temp. Rate
attached to Fuel (m/s) Pollutant
ground at top (K) g/sec
level (m) (m)
Flue Gas Stack

SPM 0.408
Boiler Imported
30.0 0.60 418 18 SO2 0.400
(1 + 2 + 3) Coal
NOx 0.479

Process Vent

Plant – 1 SO2 0.0032


15 0.15 - 313 8
(DVAC Mfg.) HCl 0.0016
Plant – 2
(PMT & DMT 15 0.15 - 313 8 HCl 0.0016
Mfg.)
HCl 0.0016
Plant – 3
15 0.15 - 313 8 Cl2 0.0005
(MPB Mfg.)
HBr 0.0005

SO2 0.0032
Plant – 4
(Thimethoxame 15 0.15 - 313 8 HCl 0.0016
etc. Mfg.)
Cl2 0.0005

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 183 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
4.2.1.4. Assessment of Impact on Ambient Air Quality

Baseline AAQ data indicates that concentration of ambient air quality parameter
such as PM2.5, PM10, SO2, NOx, VOC in the surrounding areas are well within the
permissible limits of National Ambient Air Quality (NAAQ) standards.
Subsequently, the concentration of baseline AAQ parameters like HCl, Cl2, HBr, HC
at all monitoring locations are much below the satisfactory level.

The company will store and transport raw materials, products and hazardous
chemicals in closed containers to reduce the fugitive emissions.

Thus, there would be marginal adverse impact on the air environment due to the
proposed project.

4.2.2 Water Environment

4.2.2.1 During Construction Phase

During construction phase, quantity of wastewater generated will be very less and
the same will be treated by means of a septic tank/soak pit system.

4.2.2.2 During Operation Phase

Industrial effluent will be segregated considering its pollution load & treated
separately. The wastewater generated from the process will be equalized,
neutralized and treated through Multiple Effect Evaporator (MEE) & Agitated Thin
Film Dryer (ATFD). Thus, obtained wet inorganic salt are sent to the TSDF site. The
condensate water from MEE and ATFD along with non process effluent such as
boiler blow down, domestic wastewater etc. will be treated in the Bio-treatment ETP.
The treated effluent is finally process through sand filter and activated carbon filter
and discharged to GIDC effluent discharge drain meeting CPCB/GPCB norms.

Thus, it can be concluded that there will not be any significant adverse impact on the
water environment.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 184 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
4.2.3 Noise Environment

4.2.3.1 During Construction Phase

During construction, construction equipment, including dozer, scrapers, concrete


mixers, generators, vibrators and power tools, and vehicles will be the major noise
sources. Construction noise is difficult to predict because the level of activity will
constantly change. Most of construction activities are expected to produce noise
level within the prescribed limit. The noise generated from various sources will be of
short duration. Therefore, no significant impact is envisaged in the construction
phase.

4.2.3.2 During Operation Phase

The impact of noise depends mainly on the characteristic of the noise generating
sources, topography and atmospheric conditions. The noise generating sources will
be enclosed with acoustic proof material to cut down the noise levels. Further, 30 %
green belt will be developed in the periphery of the proposed plant. So, the
significant adverse impact of noise will be minimized.

4.2.4 Land Environment

4.2.4.1 During Construction Phase

Any construction activity brings significant change to the site topsoil. Excavation
and construction material waste disposal is likely to affect land. However, such solid
wastes are inert in nature and will be collected and utilized in filling of low lying
areas within the premises of proposed plant and road construction at the site.

4.2.4.2 During Operation Phase

During operation activity the impact of air, water and solid waste pollution on soil
causes direct / indirect effect on soil. As all necessary air pollution control steps will
be provided and based on the results of the dispersion model for the ground level
concentrations of various pollutants after the commissioning of the proposed
project, there will not be any adverse impact on soil.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 185 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
There will be no adverse effect of wastewater on soil since treated wastewater from
the effluent treatment plant with prescribed norms will be discharged to GIDC
Common Effluent Discharge through pipeline and ultimately disposed into deep
sea.

All necessary control steps will be provided for handling, storage and disposal of
solid waste generated from the plant. Thus, there will not be any significant impact
of solid waste on the soil environment.

4.2.5 Ecology & Biodiversity

4.2.5.1 During Construction Phase

Any construction activities can bring changes to the local terrestrial ecosystem.
However, these adverse impacts will be restricted to the proposed project
construction site and to some extent it‘s immediate vicinity.

4.2.5.2 During Operation Phase

Impacts on terrestrial ecosystem during the operation of plant will occur mainly
from air emissions. Air pollutants can interfere with the biotic and abiotic
components of the ecosystem and may include injurious effects when concentrations
exceed permissible limits. As all the necessary air pollution control measures will be
provided for the proposed project, there will not be any adverse impact of air
pollution on the surrounding ecology.

It may be noted that a green belt area in and around the premises will be developed
which will help in inviting small birds & animals and other creatures to proliferate.

Thus, the proposed project will not have any adverse impact on the ecology.

4.2.6 Forest/National Park/Sanctuary/Historical Place

There is no Forest / National Parks / Sanctuaries / Historical Places within 10 km


radius from the proposed project site.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 186 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
4.2.7 Socio-Economic Environment

The construction activities and development will make the area an attractive place
for people to move in or return to the area. A change in the demographic profile will
be observed as early as the initial phase of construction.

During operational phase the proposed project will generate direct employment for
about 830 person viz. including skilled labour, unskilled labour and office staff. The
indirect employment will also be generated by way of transportation, shopkeepers
and other casual employment for many people.

Local people will be given preference wherever found suitable for all the jobs in the
plant, direct as well as indirect. Economic status of the local people will improve
due to the increased business opportunities, thereby, making a positive impact.
Educational, medical and housing facilities in the study area will considerably
improve.

Thus, the proposed project will have significant positive impact on the employment
pattern of the study area.

4.2.8 Health and Safety

4.2.8.1 During Construction Phase

Health problems are also likely to be experienced in the area as a result of immigrant
labor being careless about personal hygiene. Such problems will be minimized by
provision of adequate sanitary and health services.

4.2.8.2 During Operation Phase

Impacts on Health and Safety could be due to the operation of project activities like
processing, storage and transport facilities.

However, the industry has incorporated all the necessary safety aspects in planning,
designing and operation of the plant as per standard practices. Hence, there will be
minimal impact on this account.
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 187 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Health problems are also likely to be experienced in the area as a result of immigrant
labour being careless about personal hygiene. Such problems will be minimized by
provision of adequate sanitary and health services.

Pre-employment and periodical medical examinations will be carried out to assess


the health status of the workers and medical records for the same will be maintained
for each employee.

A qualified doctor will be appointed on a permanent basis and required medicines,


antidotes and first-aid box will be procured under the guidance of appointed Doctor
as per guidelines of Factory Act.

For the safety of workers, personal protective appliances like hand gloves, helmets,
safety shoes, goggles, aprons, nose masks and ear protecting devices will be
provided which meet Bureau of Indian Standards (BIS).

Thus, no significant impact on health and safety will be occurred due to the
proposed project.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 188 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
CHAPTER – 5
ENVIRONMENTAL
MANAGEMENT
PLAN
CHAPTER 5
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT PLAN

5.1 Introduction

Any industrial development is associated with certain positive as well as negative


impacts on the environment. However, the negative or adverse impacts cannot
possibly rule out scientific development. At the same time, adverse impacts cannot
be neglected.

An Environmental Management Plan (EMP) has been formulated for the mitigation
of adverse impacts. It is based on the present environmental conditions and the
environmental impact appraisal. This plan helps in formulating, implementing and
monitoring the environmental parameters during and after commissioning of the
project.

The Environmental Management Plan describes in brief, the management's plan for
proper and adequate implementation of treatment and control system for pollutants
and for maintaining the environment. It also includes development of green belt
around the plant, proper safety of the workers, noise control, fire protection systems
and measures.

5.2 Objectives of Environmental Management Plan

The main objectives in formulating this environmental management plan are:

 To treat all the pollutants viz. liquid and gaseous those contribute to the
degradation of the environment with appropriate technology.

 To comply with all regulations stipulated by the Central / State Pollution Control
Boards related to air emission and liquid effluent discharge as per air and water
pollution control laws.

 To handle hazardous wastes as per the Hazardous Waste (Management &


Handling Rules) Rules 1989 and subsequent amendments.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 189 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 To encourage support and conduct developmental work for the purpose of
achieving environmental standards and to improve the methods of
environmental management.

 To create good working conditions (avoidance of air and noise pollution) for
employees.

 To reduce fire and accident hazards.

 Perspective budgeting and allocation of funds for environment management


expenditure.

 Continuous development and search for innovative technologies for a cleaner


and better environment.

5.3 Environmental Management Cell

Apart from having an EMP, it is also necessary to have a permanent organizational


set up charged with the task of ensuring its effective implementation. Conscious of
this, M/s. Tagros Chemicals India Ltd. will create a department consisting of officers
from various disciplines to co-ordinate the activities concerned with management
and implementation of the environmental pollution measures.

Basically, this department will undertake to monitor the environmental pollution


levels by measuring stack emissions, ambient air quality, wastewater quality, noise
level etc., either departmentally or by appointing external agencies wherever
necessary. The main purpose of the monitoring is to ensure the pollution is limited
to the allowable values and to take corrective action by either providing new
equipment or by improving the performance of the installed pollution control
equipments.

In case monitored results of environmental parameters are found to exceed the


allowable values, the Environmental Management Cell will suggest remedial action
and get these suggestions implemented through the concerned plant authorities. The
actual operation and maintenance of pollution control equipment of each unit will be
under the respective plant managers.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 190 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
The Environmental managers Cell will also co-ordinate with all the related activities
such as collection of statistics of health of workers and population of the region,
afforestation and greenbelt development.

Proposed Environmental Management Cell of the company is attached as


Annexure:- 5.1.

5.4 Fire and Safety

The company will provide sufficient fire extinguishers and fire hydrant systems for
protection of the plant building against fire due to electrical spark and short circuit.
Automatic type fire extinguishing system will be provided to protect the control and
computer rooms areas from fire hazards.

Qualified and trained officers will manage the environment and safety department.
All persons in operation and maintenance of the plant will be given basic fire
fighting training.

To avoid short-circuiting an earthing system will be designed and installed for a


ground fault short circuit. Grid resistance will be decided based on soil resistively
and allowance for corrosion. Electrical equipments will be flame proof. To avoid
road accident due to spillage of fuels and blockages of road, proper parking and
road safety signs both inside and outside the plant will be displayed.

Good housekeeping, proper and adequate ventilation and lighting will be arranged
for better workplace area as per guidelines of Factory Act. Personal protective
equipments like helmet, goggles, hand gloves, safety shoes, nose masks and ear
protecting devices like ear plugs/ear muffs will be provided to all the workers.

5.5 Noise and Communication

Care will be taken during selection of the equipments like compressors, pumps and
other machinery so that noise generation can be reduced. In addition to this,
effective earplugs will be provided and their use will be made obligatory in specified
areas where noise level is high and unavoidable. Sufficient number of dial type
telephones will also be provided in soundproof cabin with suitable flasher indication
to indicate incoming calls.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 191 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
5.6 Occupational Health and Safety

 All precautionary methods will be adopted by the company to reduce the risk
of exposure of hazards to employees.

 Pre-employment and periodical medical examinations will be carried out to


assess the health status of the workers and medical records for the same will
be maintained for each employee.

 A qualified doctor will be appointed and required medicines, antidotes and


first-aid box will be procured under the guidance of appointed doctor as per
the guidelines of Factory Act.

 For the safety of workers, personal protective appliances like hand gloves,
helmets, safety shoes, goggles, aprons, nose masks and ear protecting devices
will be provided. Earplugs and earmuffs will be provided at places, where
there is possibility of noise.

 Proper ventilation system will be provided in the process area.

5.7 Green Belt Development

A Green Belt will be developed based on the following principles:


 Plants that grow fast will be preferred.
 Preference for high canopy covers plants.
 Perennial and evergreen plants will be preferred.
 Plants which have a high Air Pollution Tolerance Index (APTI) will be
preferred.

The development of Green Belt is an important aspect for any plant because:
 It acts as a 'Heat Sink'.
 It improves the ambient air quality by controlling Suspended
Particulate Matter (SPM) in air.
 It helps in noise abatement for the surrounding area.
 It helps in settlement of new birds and insects within itself.
 It maintains the ecological balance.
 It increases the aesthetic value of site.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 192 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Name of tress to be planted: Asopalav, Banyan, Eucalyptus, Garmalo, Gulmohor,
Jamun, Mango, Neem, Nimbu, Pipal etc.

Industry will develop a greenbelt area of 30 % within its premises. It will also
identify a common/public land in the vicinity of the proposed plant and develop
trees on the said land in association with concerned local authorities.

Industry will plant approx. 2,100 nos. of various types of trees within premises. The
detail of proposed greenbelt development is as follows:

No. of Trees No. of Trees No. of Trees


Details Total
during 1 Year
st
during 2 Year
nd
during 3rd Year
No. of Trees to
840 840 420 2100
be planted
% each year 40 % 40 % 20 % 100 %

5.8 Pollution Control Arrangement/ Mitigative Measures

Environmental Management Plan would specifically consist of the following and we


commit to follow the said plan physically as well as in spirit. Pollution control
arrangements/mitigative measures for different types/sources of pollution are
presented in the Table No. 5.1.

Table No. 5.1 - Pollution Control Arrangements/Mitigative Measures

Sr. Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for


Types of Pollution
No. the proposed project
1 Air Pollution

Construction  Excavation
Phase During excavation, care shall be taken that the excavator
will not release the sand from higher elevation. The piling
of sand will be done uniformly and proper storage will be
maintained to avoid dusting because of wind. If required,
temporary windshield barrier shall be provided with the
help of galvanized sheets and bamboos.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 193 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for
Types of Pollution
No. the proposed project
 Mechanical Erection
Fume generation will be there due to welding and allied
activities; this impact will be negligible and restricted to
project site. The workers would be trained to use welding
shield and use safer practice.
 Vehicular Movement
The proper maintenance of construction machines will be
ensured and the engine oils after filter will be replaced
regularly. When the machinery is not in use the engine
shall be switched off. All vehicles will be properly
maintained and should have valid PUC registration. This
has to be checked periodically.

Operation Phase  Flue Gas Emission


Sr. Stack Attached to Air Pollution Control
No. Measure (APCM)
1 Boiler- 1 ,2 & 3 Bag Filter
(Common Stack)

 Process Emission
Sr. Stack Attached to Air Pollution Control
No. Measure (APCM)
1 DVAC Two stage water scrubber
Manufacturing followed by alkali scrubber
2 Permethrin & Two stage water scrubber
Deltamethrin
Manufacturing
3 MPB Two stage water scrubber
Manufacturing followed by alkali scrubber
4 Thiomethoxam, Two stage water scrubber
Carfentrazone & followed by alkali scrubber
Sulfentrazone
Manufacturing

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 194 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for
Types of Pollution
No. the proposed project
 Dusting during Storage & Handling
Tarpaulin sheet will be covered on the material during
the transportation. Adequate stockpile height will be
maintained. Nose masks will be provided to all workers.

 Evaporation Loss from Storage Tanks


All the storage tanks will be provided with proper dip
arrangements for exhausts/vents and breather valve.

 Loading & Unloading of Materials


Loading and unloading of materials from tankers may
lead to fugitive emissions. To avoid the same, the
materials transfer will be done through fixed piping
connections.

2 Water Pollution

Construction  Domestic Effluent


Phase Domestic effluent will be treated through septic tank/soak
pit arrangement.

Operation Phase  Domestic Effluent


Domestic effluent will be treated in the proposed ETP
along with the industrial effluent.

 Industrial Effluent
Industrial effluent will be segregated considering its
pollution load & treated separately. The wastewater
generated from the process will be equalized, neutralized
and treated through Multiple Effect Evaporator (MEE) &
Agitated Thin Film Dryer (ATFD). Thus, obtained wet
inorganic salt are sent to the TSDF site.

The condensate water from MEE and ATFD along with


non process effluent such as boiler blow down, domestic
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 195 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for
Types of Pollution
No. the proposed project
wastewater etc. will be treated in the Bio-treatment ETP.
The treated effluent is finally process through sand filter
and activated carbon filter and discharged to GIDC
effluent discharge drain meeting CPCB/GPCB norms.

3 Noise Pollution

Construction as The following measures will be taken to reduce the noise


well as Operation level to acceptable limits:
Phase  All the vibrating parts will be checked periodically and
serviced to reduce the noise generation. Sound
producing equipments will be enclosed in the sound
proofing enclosure to give residual sound pressure
level of 75 dB (A).
 To minimize the adverse effects on health suitable ear
protecting devices will be provided for working
personnel.
 To reduce the noise generation during the
transportation activities; the vehicle will be kept
periodically serviced and maintained as per the
requirement of latest trend in automobile industry.
 The vehicles having PUCs and spark arrestors will only
allowed for the transportation.
 Sources of high noise level such as D.G. set etc. will be
provided adequate sound enclosures.
 The industry will develop in 21,359 m2 within the
industrial premises for the abatement of noise pollution

4 Solid & Hazardous Waste

Construction  During construction phase major solid waste generated


Phase is construction and domestic solid waste. The
construction waste will be utilized for leveling and
road construction in plant premises. Generated
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 196 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for
Types of Pollution
No. the proposed project
domestic waste will be sent to nearest municipal solid
waste landfill sites.
 The used welding roads will be disposed off through
registered metal recyclers.
 Used oil generated from construction machinery will
be collected, stored separately and sold to authorized
recyclers.

Operation Phase  Used Oil will be collected in drums and reused or sold
to registered recyclers
 Residues after distillation, fractionation,
condensation, recovery etc. will be collected in HDPE
bags and stored in hazardous waste storage area and it
will be sent for incineration to the nearest common
incinerator facility.
 ETP Sludge will be collected in HDPE bags and stored
in hazardous waste storage area and will be disposed
off to TSDF site developed by M/s. Bharuch Enviro
Infrastructure Ltd. (BEIL).
 Date expired/ off specification product will be stored
in hazardous waste storage area and it will be sent for
incineration to the nearest common incinerator facility.
 Spent solvent will be stored in hazardous waste
storage area and it will be sent for incineration to the
nearest common incinerator facility.
 Packing Materials – discarded carboys/ drums/
HDPE bags will be stored in go-down and sold to
GPCB authorized recyclers/vendors.
 Spent Carbon will be stored in hazardous waste
storage area and it will be disposed off to TSDF site
developed by M/s. Bharuch Enviro Infrastructure Ltd.
(BEIL).
 Sludge from Wet Scrubber will be collected in HDPE
bags and stored in hazardous waste storage area and

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 197 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Mitigation measures incorporated/ to be provided for
Types of Pollution
No. the proposed project
will be disposed off to TSDF site developed by M/s.
Bharuch Enviro Infrastructure Ltd. (BEIL).
 Resins will be given back to the supplier
(manufacture) against new resins.
 MEE Salt will be collected in HDPE bags and stored in
hazardous waste storage area and will be disposed off
to TSDF site developed by M/s. Bharuch Enviro
Infrastructure Ltd. (BEIL).

It may be noted that the company will provide separate


storage area of each type of hazardous area of 1500 m2 for
the storage of each type of hazardous wastes proposed to
be generated from the unit.

The hazardous waste storage area will have RCC flooring


and asbestos roof covering on the top so as to avoid
rainwater mixing with the same.

A leachate collection system will be provided for the


treatment and disposal of leachate, which will be
generated from the storage area. The leachate if any, will
be discharged to equalization tank of Effluent Treatment
Plant.

5.9 Monitoring of Environment

Regular Monitoring of environmental parameters like air, water, noise, soil and
meteorological data and safety measures in the plant are vital for proper
environmental management of any industry.

Environmental Monitoring Program to be adopted by M/s. Tagros Chemicals India


Ltd. is given in Table No. 5.2

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 198 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. 5.2 – Environmental Monitoring Program

Sr. Analysis and record


Particulars Parameters Frequency
No. keeping

1 Ambient air PM2.5, PM10, SO2,


quality within NOx, HC, VOC, Monthly GPCB approved
premises HCl, Cl2, HBr agency will carry out
2 Ambient air PM2.5, PM10, SO2, monitoring and data
Once in
quality outside NOx, HC, VOC, analysis as accordance
every season
premises HCl, Cl2, HBr with the Environment
3 Stack SPM, SO2, NOx, Clearance.
Monthly
Emissions HCl, Cl2, HBr
4 Meteorological Wind velocity,
Wind direction, Monitored as required
--
temperature and by statutory authority
relative humidity
5 Wastewater pH, Color, SS, Oil & GPCB approved
Quality Grease, BOD, COD, agency will carry out
TDS, Heavy Metals, monitoring and data
Phenolic analysis as accordance
Monthly
Compounds, with the Environment
Pesticides, Cyanide, Clearance.
Nitrate, Sulphur,
Phosphate
6 Hazardous pH, Organic matter, Monthly GPCB approved
Waste Moisture content, agency will carry out
Total inorganic monitoring and data
matter, Chloride, analysis as accordance
Sulphate, Calcium with the Environment
hardness as Ca, Clearance.
Magnesium
hardness as Mg Monthly records of
each type of hazardous
waste generation,
collection, storage and

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 199 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Analysis and record
Particulars Parameters Frequency
No. keeping
disposal will be
maintained as per the
Hazardous Wastes
(Management and
Handling) Amendment
Rules, 2003.
7 Ambient Noise - Once in GPCB approved
Environment every season agency will carry out
8 Work Zone - Once in monitoring as
Noise every season accordance with the
Environment Environment
Clearance.

5.10 Cleaner Production

We anticipate the following re-use/recycling probabilities and shall focus our


attention on these as a cleaner production alternative which are given in Table No.
5.3.
Table No. 5.3 – Cleaner Production Aspects

Sr. Focus Area Probability of incorporation of cleaner


No. production activity

 Liquid raw materials will be charged by


pumping & closed loops and dosing will be
done by metering system to avoid fugitive
emissions. Dedicated measuring tanks will
be provided for each reactor.
1 Control of reactants used
 Suitable stoichiometric calculations will be
done and followed to regulate the quantity
of reactants to be charged to reaction vessels
in order to avoid use of excess chemicals,

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 200 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Focus Area Probability of incorporation of cleaner
No. production activity

which in turn will minimize organic load in


the effluent.
 Storage tanks will be provided with proper
arrangements for exhausts/vents and
breather valve.
2 Evaporation loss from
storage tanks
 Vapour recovery system will be installed for
process/storage tank vents.
 Loading / unloading of materials from
Loading / Unloading of tankers may lead to fugitive emissions. To
3 avoid the same, the material transfer will be
materials
done through fixed piping connections.

 Flue gas analysis will be carried out at


4 Analysis of flue gas regular intervals and based on the results;
necessary actions will be taken.

 Use of high pressure hoses for equipment


5 Equipment cleaning washing / cleaning to reduce wastewater
generation.

 It would not be out of place to mention that


we will put our continuous efforts to
maintain and improve housekeeping
practices will be accepted as presented
below:
 Follow safe work procedures and the
requirements of the law.
6 House keeping
 Keep work areas clean.
 Keep aisles clear.
 Keep exists and entrances clear.
 Keep floors clean, dry and in good
condition.
 Stack and store items safely.
 Use proper waste containers.
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 201 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Sr. Focus Area Probability of incorporation of cleaner
No. production activity

 Store all materials in approved, clearly


labeled containers in designated storage
areas only.
 Keep sprinklers and fire extinguishers
clear.
 Clean up spills and leaks off any type
quickly and properly.
 Fix or report broken or damage tools,
equipment etc.
 Keep lighting sources clean and clear.
 Follow maintenance requirements.

 The above are the primary focus areas that we envisage to study and carryout
cleaner technology activities. Further focus area will be identified on continues
basis.

5.11 Rain Water Harvesting

Roof top rain water harvesting will be done in such a manner that first water is
excluded and subsequently roof top rain water will be harvested. Rain water
harvesting scheme is attached as Annexure – 5.2.

5.12 Risk Assessment

Industry has carried out Risk Assessment study. The detailed report has been
attached with this EIA Report as Annexure: 5.3.

5.13 Budgetary Allocation toward Pollution Control Measures

Budgetary allocation towards pollution control arrangements for the proposed


project is presented in the Table No. 5.4

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 202 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Table No. 5.4 – Capital & Recurring Cost for Environmental Management Plan

Recurring
Sr. Area of Capital Cost
Cost/Annum Remarks
No. Expenditure (Rs.)
(Rs.)
Capital cost would include air
pollution control devices and the
Air Pollution recurring cost would include
1 1,00,00,000 5,00,000
Control operation and maintenance of
pollution control devices and stack
emission monitoring.
Capital cost would include cost of
septic tank, ETP , MEE etc. and
Water Pollution
2 23,14,00,000 5,45,00,000 recurring cost would include
Control
membership of CETP, maintenance
charges, manpower salary etc.
Capital cost would include
Noise Pollution providing adequate sound
3 5,00,000 10,000
Control enclosures and recurring cost would
include monitoring of noise level.
Capital cost would include expense
for providing storage area for
Solid/Hazardous hazardous waste and recurring cost
4 Waste 40,00,000 2,15,00,000 would be for solid/ hazardous
Management waste packing & its disposal and for
the membership of TSDF site &
Incineration Facility.
Capital cost would include
development of green belt and
5 Green Belt 35,00,000 10,00,000
recurring cost would include
maintenance charges.
Capital cost would include
development of Rain water
Rain water
6 6,00,000 35,000 harvesting and recurring cost
harvesting
would include maintenance
charges.
Total --
25,00,00,000 7,75,45,000

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 203 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
CHAPTER – 6
ENVIRONMENTAL
IMPACT
STATEMENT
CHAPTER–6
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT
Generally any project or action includes various impacts, which vary in magnitude
as their beneficial or adverse classification. At the same time it is very important to
conclude that the “overall” or “collective” impact of the proposed project is
beneficial or detrimental.

In case of the proposed project, impacts are evaluated with respect to various
activities during construction and operational phase.

6.1 Air Environment

The general meteorological data collected during the study period confirms that
climatic status of the study area is consistent with the regional meteorology.

Based on the ambient air quality monitoring carried out in the study area and
ground level concentration evaluated by Dispersion Modelling, it is found that due
to the operation of proposed project incremental values of various parameters are
well within the permission limits as prescribed in the National Ambient Air Quality
(NAAQ) standards.

Hence, it may be concluded that there would not be any adverse impacts on
surrounding air environment within the study area due to the proposed project.

6.2 Water Environment

Base - line data reveal that as per drinking water quality standards IS 10500:2004
overall quality of both surface & ground water is satisfactory to serve for domestic
purposes except for three locations.

The total water requirement for the proposed project will be 1,383 KL/ day. Water
will be obtained through the GIDC reservoir to fulfill such requirements.

From proposed product manufacturing plant a total of 904 kl/day of effluent


including 36 kl/day of domestic wastewater will be generated. Industrial effluent

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 204 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
will be segregated considering its pollution load & treated separately. The
wastewater generated from the process will be equalized, neutralized and treated
through Multiple Effect Evaporator (MEE) & Agitated Thin Film Dryer (ATFD).
Thus, obtained wet inorganic salt are sent to the TSDF site. The condensate water
from MEE and ATFD along with non process effluent such as boiler blow down,
domestic wastewater etc. will be treated in the Bio-treatment ETP. The treated
effluent is finally process through sand filter and activated carbon filter and
discharged to GIDC effluent discharge drain meeting CPCB/GPCB norms.

Thus, it can be concluded that there would not be any significant adverse impact on
the water environment due to the proposed project.

6.3 Noise Environment

Noise level in the project premises will be controlled at the source itself by
appropriate use of noise suppressing systems. Noise level in the surrounding study
area is well within the permissible limits given by the National Noise Quality
Standards.

Thus, noise generated due to the project activity shall create minor impact in
surrounding environments. This shall further be attenuated by a barrier of
plantation at the periphery of the plant.

6.4 Land Environment

The soil pollution is generally due to wastewater and solid waste. There will be no
adverse impact of industrial wastewater discharge as effluent from the proposed
product manufacturing will be segregated considering its pollution load & treated
separately using proper treatment methods. Solid waste generation will be very less
during operation phase of the proposed project. Hazardous waste will be properly
collected, stored & ultimately disposed to secured landfill/TSDF site.

Therefore, there would be no adverse impact on the land environment due to this
proposed project.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 205 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
6.5 Ecology & Biodiversity

The flora and fauna of the study area indicate that there are well diversified species
in the study area. There would be no adverse impact of air pollution on the
surrounding ecology as all the necessary air pollution control measures will be
provided.

It may be noted that the M/s. Tagros Chemicals India Ltd. will develop a large green
belt area, which will help in inviting birds and other creatures to proliferate.

Thus, the proposed project would not have any adverse impact on the ecology.

6.6 Socio - Economic Environment

The proposed project will generate employment during operation phase. The
indirect employment will also be generated by way of transportation, shopkeepers
and other casual employment for many people. Local people will be given
preference for the jobs in the proposed project. Economic status of the local people
will improve due to the increased business opportunities, thereby making a positive
impact. Educational, medical and housing facilities in the study area will
considerably improve.

Thus, the proposed project will have significant positive impact on the employment
pattern of the study area.

6.7 Summary of the EIA Study

The salient features of the impact on environment due to the proposed project can be
summarized as follows:

 Construction phase will not impart appreciable impact, as indicated mitigation


measures will be followed.

 Negligible impacts will occur on air quality. However, all the necessary air
pollution control measures will be provided.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 206 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
 No ecological damage will occur.

 No adverse impacts will occur on water environment.

 Local employment opportunities will increase.

 Various other environmental parameters like Forest / National Park / Sanctuary


and Religious / Historical Places will not be affected.

 Environmental Management Plan has been formulated to control all the pollution
control measures and Environmental Management Cell has been set-up to follow
the formulated environmental management plan.

 On-site emergency plan has been prepared to prevent the occurrence of any
disaster and take care of all required safety measures.

Thus, the proposed project will have overall minor negative impacts on the
environment and these impacts will be encountered with proper mitigative
measures.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 207 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
CHAPTER – 7
P U B L IC
CONSULTATION
CHAPTER - 7
PUBLIC CONSULTATION

7.1 Introduction

It may be noted that the manufacturing of Pesticides Technical Products and


Agrochemicals fall under Clause No. 5 (b) of Category “A” as stated in the
Environmental Impact Assessment notification dated 14-09-2006 and therefore
Environmental Clearance for these products is required to be obtained. It was due to
this fact that an application was made to Ministry of Environment and Forests, New
Delhi for obtaining the related Environmental Clearance. As a part of this procedure
Public Hearing is required to be carried out as per the TOR granted to the unit by the
Expert Appraisal Committee (Industry – 2).

As per the requirement of the notification, an application in Form-1 was submitted


to Ministry of Environment and Forests in December 2011. The proposal was
considered by Expert Appraisal Committee (EAC) (Industry-2) in its 35 th meeting
held on 11th - 12th May, 2012 has issued the approved TOR (Terms of References) vide
Letter F. No. J-11011/20/2012-IA II (I) dated 10 th October, 2012. All the aspects of the
TOR are incorporated in the draft EIA/EMP report, the same may be submitted to
the Gujarat Pollution Control Board (GPCB) for conducting public hearing/public
consultation as per EIA Notification, 2006.

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 208 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
CHAPTER – 8
CONSULTANT
ENGAGED
CHAPTER  8
CONSULTANT ENGAGED

INTRODUCTION

A NAND CONSULTANTS (An ISO 9001:2008 Certified Consultancy) is a


group of young professionals dedicated to assignments in Pollution
Control under the dynamic leadership of Mr. Rakesh Shah be it Air,
Solid or Water related Pollution Control. Since 1978, Anand Consultants
have been working as Environmental Engineers in India as well as
Bangladesh. During the said 33 years Anand Consultants have worked for
different type of industries providing various services related to consultancy,
laboratory, field studies, project execution as well as operation and
maintenance. Turnkey assignments are undertaken by a sister concern.

Anand Consultants happen to be Environmental Auditors appointed by the


Gujarat Pollution Control Board as per the directives of the Honourable High
Court of Gujarat. Anand Consultants has already made application to
NABET/QCI for the accreditation as EIA consultant organization.
NABET/QCI has given provisional accreditation (S. N. - 3 of List – “A”) to
our organization. The certificate of the same has been attached herewith as
Annexure:- 8.1

Anand Consultants have the necessary manpower and expertise in various


fields as also the required infrastructure facilities to carry out work related to
environmental engineering.

CONTACT INFORMATION:
ANAND CONSULTANTS
16, Everest Tower, Naranpura, Ahmedabad – 380 013, Gujarat.
Phone: 079-27484871; Fax: 079-27480116
E-mail: environment@dataone.in; anandconsultants2009@gmail.com
ANAND CONSULTANTS - 209 - Rapid EIA
(NABET/QCI Accredited)
LIST OF TECHNICAL EXPERTS

Name Designation Degree Years of


Experience
Mr. Rakesh C. Shah Environmental M.S. (U.S.A.) 34
( Sole Proprietor ) Engineer B.Tech (IIT),

Dr. Gautam K. Trivedi Environmental Ph.D. 35


Scientist M.Sc.
(Organic Chemistry)
Mr. Vimal Chokhavatia Environmental M.S. (Env. Engineering) 36
(Empanelled Expert) Engineer B.E. (Civil)
Mr. Sureshchandra Vyas Geo-Hydrologist M.Sc. 44
(Empanelled Expert) (Applied Geology)
B.Sc. (Geology)
Dr. Harshit Sinha Socio-Economic Expert Ph.D. (Geography) 24
(Empanelled Expert) M.Sc. (Geography)
Dr. Manoj Eledath Biodiversity Expert Ph.D. 21
(Empanelled Expert) M.Sc. (Biosciences)

Mr. Nirzar Lakhia GIS/ Land Use Expert M.Sc. (Applied Geology) 11
(Empanelled Expert) M.Sc. (Geology)
B.Sc. (Geology)
Mr. Mukesh Suroliya Geologist M.Sc. (Geology) 7
(Empanelled Expert) B.Sc. (Chemistry)

Mr. M. M. Khatri Chemist M.Sc. 25


(Organic Chemistry)
B.Sc. (Chemistry)
Mrs. Purvi A. Patel Environmental M.Sc. (Env. Science) 6.0
Scientist B.Sc. (Microbiology)

Ms. Dipal H. Shah Environmental M.Sc. (Env. Science) 4.0


Scientist B.Sc. (Bio-Chemistry)

Mr. Hardik P. Patel Environmental M.E. (Environment) 3.5


Engineer M. Env. (Env. Protection)

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 210 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)
Name Designation Degree Years of
Experience
Mr. Awadhesh Kumar Environmental M. Tech. 2.5
Engineer (Civil – Env. Engg.)
M.Sc. (Env. Sciences)
Mrs. Chandralekha Bharti Environmental M. Tech. 2.1
Engineer (Civil – Env. Engg.)
M.Sc. (Env. Science)

Mr. Kandarp N. Patel Chemist D. Pharm. 1.5


B.Sc. (Chemistry)
Mr. Vishal Kumar Verma Environmental M. Tech. 0.3
Engineer (Env. Science & Engg.)
M.Sc. (Env. Sciences)
Mr. Hitesh N. Soni Chemist Diploma in Chemical 0.3
Engineering

Mr. Ashvin R. Zala AutoCAD I.T.I. 15


Expert

ANAND CONSULTANTS - 211 - Rapid EIA


(NABET/QCI Accredited)