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IN THIS ISSUE
06 FROM THE EDITOR
Goodbye summer, hello fall!

THE LIFE
09 Beauty-Conscious The facts on animal testing

10 Wayfarer Photographed by Helen Tran

18 On the Verge: Fashion These designers are breaking the mold

28 Dreaming on Paper Untapped interests can lead to newfound passions

BUZZWORTHY

30 Fashion’s Downsize The evolution of the “ideal” woman

32 On the Verge: Technology MIT’s media lab, wearable technology and more

41 Bravo’s Masterpiece Work of Art marries contemporary art with reality TV

FASHION FORWARD

42 Washed up Photographed by Kaylin Rodriquez

54 Last Rose of Summer Photographed by Lara Jade

66 Leave the Shouting to Others An interview with designer Teresa Crowninshield

76 The New York Chronicles F/W 2010 fashion recap

ON THE COVER
Photographed by LARA JADE
Styling IHUNNA EBERENDU
Makeup AMY SACHON
Hair TOMOYUKI OTSUKA
Headpiece UMA TURAN
Dress CHANG A. PARK
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Model TEGEN [STORM]


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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Hayley Maybury

CREATIVE DIRECTOR
Nicole Bechard

MARKETING AND TECHNICAL DIRECTOR


Jamall Oluokun

FASHION EDITOR
Nicole Herzog

COPY EDITOR
Nora E. S. Gilligan

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Nicole Bechard
Erin Berry
Brittnee Cann
Nora E. S. Gilligan
Hayley Maybury
Billie D. McGhee
Jamall Oluokun
D.K. Stewart

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS/PHOTOGRAPHERS
Nicole Bechard
Doug Eng
Nora E. S. Gilligan
James Graham
Justin Hogan
Lara Jade
Rick Louis
Jonas Lund
Kim Navarre
Steven Read
Kaylin Rodriquez
Anika Schwarzlose
Peter Stigter
Helen Tran

107 Merrimac Street, Boston, MA


p: 617-624-0202 f: 617-372-9809
www.papercutmag.com
flatironboston.com | bulfinchhotel.com 5
FROM THE EDITOR
GOODBYE SUMMER, HELLO FALL!

Now I know that many of you out there are sad to see summer
come to an end. As for myself, however, I couldn’t be more ready
for the fall—I love, love, love it! Ever since I can remember, I
have waited patiently for the fall fashion magazines to hit news-
stands. As I sit here writing this letter, I can’t help but be super
excited because, this year, I have been waiting patiently to share
Papercut’s first September issue with all of you as well!

My favorite part of this month’s issue is our On the Verge seg-


ment. We were lucky enough to interview some extremely tal-
ented individuals from around the globe who are really start-
ing to break the mold when it comes to innovative fashion and
technology. This is one part of the issue you do not want to miss!
We also had the honor of working with London-based fashion
photographer Lara Jade. It was a pleasure working with such
a lovely and talented individual; and even better luck that we
had the opportunity to catch up with her back in July.

As the leaves fall, www.papercutmag.com will be bringing you all


the latest updates on what you need to know about the season’s
runways and fall fashion. We did an exclusive online-only edito-
rial (it’s called “Fashion Rivalry;” be sure to check it out!) and we’ll
be covering a lot of great events, including...drumroll please…our
very own Papercut September issue release party! Thanks to the
very luxurious and chic Bulfinch Hotel in Boston, we are able to
bring together our Papercut contributors and supporters to cel-
ebrate all the hard work that has been done.

I hope you enjoy this issue and do keep the feedback coming. After
all, this is your magazine.

xoxo
Hayley

P.S. Don’t forget printed copies of Papercut Magazine are avail-


able for purchase on Magcloud (www.magcloud.com)!

TOP-BOTTOM: Editor-in-chief Hayley Maybury; creative director


Nicole Bechard and photographer Lara Jade in NYC; group shot of
the “fashion rivalry” editorial crew; fashion editor Nicole Herzog and
marketing/technical director Jamall Oluokun on the red carpet at the
FUZE iT fashion event in August.

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BEAUTY-CONSCIOUS
WHAT DO DOVE, GARNIER, PANTENE AND NEUTROGENA HAVE IN COMMON? ANIMAL TESTING.

Written by BILLIE D. MCGHEE

There are controversial topics out found under both lists were surprising. limit yourself to homemade soaps and
there that people tend to immediately Dove, Aveeno, Garnier, Glade, Ivory, obscure hippie remedies. In fact, many
shy away from: religion, politics, sexual- L’Oreal, Johnson & Johnson, Pantene, of the brands you know very well, some
ity, war. For whatever reason, anything Neutrogena and Old Spice were just of which may be in your home already,
PETA-related seems to fall on that list some of the common brands I found on are cruelty-free. On Caring Consumer’s
as well. No one wants to be preached to the “Do Test” list. It was then I decid- “Does Not Test” list you’ll be happy to
about why they shouldn’t eat meat or ed to make a change. Each time I run know I found M.A.C. Cosmetics, Urban
buy fur, and god forbid you see one of out of one of my products, be it mouth- Decay, OPI, Estée Lauder, Clarins, Bare
their promotional videos—those might wash, eye shadow, or shampoo, I have Escentuals, Aveda, and Bonne Bell.
scar you for life. People like the lives been making a conscious effort to re- I haven’t yet completely finished
they’ve grown accustomed to living, so place it with something cruelty-free. In my transition to cruelty-free beauty, but
we shield ourselves from the truth and all honesty, I was hesitant to let go of I have switched over about half of my
pretend that nothing is wrong. Up un- some of my favorite products—my Olay products so far, and I couldn’t be hap-
til recently, for example, I had no idea face wash and Jergens body lotion were pier. This started as just a personal
as to the realities behind products that particularly difficult to part with—but experiment, but I’m really hoping it is
tested on animals. We’ve always known if ever there was a time to make the something I can stick to, and maybe
it was happening, sure, but nobody ever switch this was it. even inspire others to try. I know that
seemed too concerned and it was cer- I quickly found that, especially in in PETA’s eyes I am far from perfect—I
tainly never discussed—at least that a time when everyone is trying to “go still eat meat, and you will find leather
was my perception. I had this naive green” and be more natural, cruelty- bags and suede boots in my closet, but
picture in my head of people in white free products are everywhere. No lon- does that mean that I shouldn’t try to
lab coats applying blush on bunnies ger do you have to venture out to the make a difference? Baby steps, I say, one
and mascaras on monkeys. What’s the Berkshires to find organic products, or product at a time.
harm in that, right?
Sadly this rose-colored ideal
couldn’t be further from the truth, as I
learned when I happened across a blog
that briefly spoke about the horrors of
animal testing. It took just a few facts
to completely change how I think of my
favorite products. Animal testing is not
like applying blush on bunnies at all;
instead, companies take hard chemicals
and pump them into animals’ stomachs,
rub them into their skins, squirt them
into their eyes, or force the animals to
inhale them as aerosol sprays. These
tests end up killing some animals, while
most others are euthanized at the end
of the experiment. In this day and age
it is hard to believe that animal test-
ing is still necessary, especially when it
has already been banned in the UK, the
Netherlands, and Belgium, and when so Here’s a list of products I have switched to.
many well-established brands manage URBAN DECAY All Nighter Long-Lasting Makeup Setting Spray ($29,.www.sephora.com)
to avoid it. BOSCIA Purifying Cleansing gel ($26, www.sephora.com)
After learning the grisly truth I AQUAGE “Beyond Shine” Spray (visit www.aquage.com for salon locations)
went into my bathroom and looked ST. IVES Energizing Citrus Body Wash ($5, drugstores)
through my products. Only two of them KORRES QUERCETIN & Oak Night Cream ($52, www.sephora.com)
had not been tested on animals. I was PAUL MITCHELL Color Protect Daily Shampoo & Conditioner ($11, drugstores)
appalled! After doing some research I JASON Aloe Vera All-Over Body Lotion ($7, www.drugstore.com)
came across the official list of compa- THE NATURAL DENTIST Healthy Teeth Anticavity Flouride Rinse ($7, drugstores)
nies that do and do not test on animals
on www.caringconsumer.com, a website FOR FOR MORE INFORMATION and to view a list of cruelty-free companies, visit
sponsored through PETA. The brands I http://www.caringconsumer.com/.

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wayfarer
GO BOLD THIS FALL
WITH THE LATEST LOOKS IN BEAUTY.

Photography by HELEN TRAN


Hair/Make-up by HAYLEY ALYS
Styling by CHRISTOPHER MASSARDO
Model SHANNON WALKER (ELITE MODEL MANAGEMENT)

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BEAUTY NOTES: Foundation: MAKE UP FOR EVER HD #153; brow powder: YABY #002; eyeshadows: MAKE UP FOR EVER in "Soft Pink" "Eggshell" and "Black" and YABY in "Sand Dune" "Pa-
paya Milk" and "Sexy Salmon"; blush: YABY #029 and #011; lipstick: MAKE UP FOR EVER in "Woodsy Pink 210" and YABY in "Seductionism"; mascara: MAKE UP FOR EVER Aqua Smoky Lash.

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PART ONE OF OUR ON THE VERGE DOUBLE FEATURE BRINGS YOU
THREE VERY TALENTED DESIGNERS AND ALUMNI OF THE GERRIT
RIETVELD ACADEMIE FOR CONTEMPORARY ART IN AMSTERDAM.

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DREAM WEAVER
DESIGNER AIDA SARACINI SEEKS TO EXPLORE THE MYSTERIES OF OUR DREAMS.

Interview by NICOLE BECHARD

PHOTOS BY ANIKA SCHWARZLOSE AND JONAS LUND

20 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


Name and age: to us at night. They are afraid of things they cannot un-
My name is Aida Saracini and I am 24 years old. derstand. We all dream every night but the dreams that
give us anxiety and a tense feeling are the ones that we
Where you’re from: remember; those are the ones that leave traces in us. They
I was born in Skopje, Macedonia. left traces in me.

Where you live now: I love the delicate construction of your pieces. Did this
Due to a really good job offer after my graduation in 2009, I technique come naturally to you in your development of
moved to Prishtina, Kosovo, where I live with my boyfriend. the collection, or was it something you had to work at?
In dreams we always see things that we can recognize but
Education credentials: are still somehow different. I chose generic garments like
I finished high school in Skopje, Macedonia and [attended] the trench coats, sweaters, pants, and dresses, and transformed
Gerrit Rietveld Academie for contemporary art in Amsterdam, them. Using my fragile [methods] of dealing with the fabric,
The Netherlands. my technique becomes quite important into creating a cer-
tain atmosphere—which in this case is a dreamy one. I left
When/where did you first find yourself interested in most of the outfits looking unfinished since I believe that the
fashion design? dream is never finished but always “saved by the bell”—[say,
Well, I always used to dress up my dolls when I was [young- the] phone, or a partner’s voice.
er]. My father is a painter and I used to go to his workplace
and draw, paint, and make fabrics. I decided to go into art Your work has been described as “the soul of the cloth-
high school since that was my passion. When I finished in ing; a mere suggestion [of] the actual piece”. Would
2004 there was no fashion study in my country. I wanted you agree with this observation?
to study somewhere abroad, and since my brother was al- When I was nominated for the GRA (Gerrit Rietveld Acade-
ready living in Den Haag, The Netherlands, I thought that mie) Award in 2009 the judges described my work as [such].
it would be a nice chance for me to move and at the same I was quite happy with their observation since every art-
time be close to my brother. I started looking for fashion ist and designer hopes that the public evaluates their work
studies there but most of them concentrated more on the and understands it almost in the same way and reason it
technical part of fashion. I was more interested in learning was created for. I think that my intention was just that; for
about concepts and how to integrate my thoughts and ideas people to recognize the pieces of clothing [even] it’s not what
into clothing. I am really glad I chose the Gerrit Rietveld they are used to seeing. Same as in dreams, we know the
Academie, as they teach technical skills but also develop objects or the situation or the place, but it’s not really how
your artistic side. [My studies in The Netherlands] helped we are used to seeing it in reality. So yes, I really agree with
me to really know what I want to do, what I want to say, their comments.
and how to say it.
What was it like to participate in Amsterdam Fashion
While studying fashion design at the Gerrit Rietveld Week last year?
Academie, you had the opportunity to be taught by Oh, that was an amazing experience for me. I really didn’t
many well known lecturers, artists and designers. expect that I would be chosen as one of the 14 best students
Is there any specific individuals that inspired you in fashion design in The Netherlands. Also I was the first
above the rest? Why? Albanian to participate there, so I [received] recognition
Yeah, I really feel lucky that I had a chance to study at Ri- in my country as well. To think that just one year before I
etveld Academie. The [faculty] are all really dear to me and was at the same place backstage helping the designer Claes
I respect them very much. Even though they all had a quite Iversen for his show, and during the whole day hoping that
important part in my development, I could say that the peo- one time I could be showing there also. It was amazing that
ple who most impacted my work and really got me to develop my wish turned into reality in such a short time. It was a
as a designer are Wojciech Dziedzic (also a teacher at Central really good place to do a lot of networking and to meet the
Saint Martins College in London), Giene Steenman (artist), competition.
and Anne-Grethe Filtenborg (fashion designer). They did
the best for all of us to find ourselves and find what we love. What are you working on right now? Are there any new
Teachers that tried to bring up our best side but also made us collections in the works?
work hard on our weaknesses. Right now I am working on my new wearable collection. I am
collaborating with a fashion designer from Croatia and prepar-
Your graduation collection focuses on the theme of ing for my first fashion shows in Skopje and Prishtina, Kosovo,
“dreams and nightmares”. What fueled the idea behind and perhaps Croatia. In the meantime I also have some offers
this concept? for knitwear projects, which I enjoy quite a lot.
I chose the theme “dreams and nightmares” right after I
had a dream about my uncle who I hadn’t seen for over a What are your plans for the future? Anything in
year. After I called to ask whether he was okay, I found out particular you hope to accomplish?
that he was in a coma. I went to see him in hospital, and For now I am concentrating on the collection. [I also have
the next day he died. This had such an impact on me that plans of] opening a shop in Prishtina, Kosovo in October
I started paying more attention to dreams and trying to 2010. We are collaborating with some shops in Amsterdam so
figure out how other people experience them. In my opinion, will be selling there soon too. I am really looking forward to
the reason some people are not interested in knowing more everything that is coming up next year, keeping in mind that
about dreams is that [they] are afraid of the unknown. They I am also [considering doing] a master’s study in Barcelona.
are afraid of the mysteriousness of the images that appear One thing at a time I guess!

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OPPOSITES
ATTRACT
YOU KNOW HOW THE OLD SAYING GOES. DESIGNER DENISE ESSER
TAKES IT ONE STEP FURTHER.

Interview by NICOLE BECHARD

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Name and age: I see that you participated in Amsterdam Fashion Week!
Denise Esser, 25. What was that like?
It was really exciting and fun because it was the first time
Where you’re from: that I showed only my own creations, and it’s good to see all
Amersfoort, The Netherlands. the different reactions of people. Last summer I participated
again as one of the nominated designers of the Frans Mole-
Where you live now: naar Award, [an award for the most promising couturier in
Amsterdam. The Netherlands].

Education credentials: What is the meaning behind your exhibition name


Gerrit Rietveld Academy School of Art (GRA), 2006-2009. “Future Perfect”?
“Future Perfect” evolves around the concept of transformation
When and where did you first find yourself interested in from rigidity to movement; hence the mutation of matter into
fashion design? ideas through our creative process. Purposely dramatic and al-
As a child I was always busy being creative with all sorts of most cinematographic, “Future Perfect” shows the duality be-
things, such as making clothes for my dolls or making things tween fragility and strength inherent to our human condition
with dough for my dollhouse. My interest in fashion started and deals with our relationship or interaction to the world.
around [the age of] fifteen.
What are you working on right now? Are there any
Your graduation collection is very sculptural in its new collections in the works?
construction. What influenced this concept? I did make some new creations for the Frans Molenaar Award;
I always start designing from the standpoint of material and I and now I’m working on a new collection and website.
always challenge myself to work with various components that
are not necessarily compatible to create a combination of oppo- Do you have any specific plans for the future?
sitions. In my creations the focus lies on the transformation of To show my work and [introduce my] name to the world. I
a structured movement into more organic features to underline also would love to design for a fashion company, because I
the exaggeration phase that [results from] this process. would like to work with a team of creative people.

I love the way you juxtapose different materials, such “‘FUTURE PERFECT’ EVOLVES AROUND THE
as fur, pins, and nails. What are your feelings on work-
ing with such mixed media, and do you hope to con-
CONCEPT OF TRANSFORMATION FROM
tinue to craft in this way? RIGIDITY TO MOVEMENT...[IT] SHOWS THE
I love working with different fabrics and materials. I’m always DUALITY BETWEEN FRAGILITY AND STRENGTH
working on making combinations of opposite materials and to
make it unexpected. For example, many pins together look soft
INHERENT TO OUR HUMAN CONDITION
and look more like jewelry. I would like to continue this way AND DEALS WITH OUR RELATIONSHIP OR
and try to find other combinations of materials. INTERACTION TO THE WORLD.”

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LAYERS AND LINES
DESIGNER DAPHNE VAN DEN HEUVEL DRAWS INSPIRATION FROM HER ROOTS.

Interview by NICOLE BECHARD

Full name and age: clothing), and that is where the idea sprouted. You can also
Daphne van den Heuvel, 29. see the layers of time in layers and lines, for example when
you cut through a tree trunk. I abstracted the layers of cloth-
Where you’re from: ing so only lines and layers remained.
The Netherlands.
The beautiful layered pieces of your collection are so
Where you live now: careful and precise! What was it like working with
The Netherlands. laser-cut fabrics?
I enjoyed working with the laser-cut techniques. You can use
Education credentials: the laser on different kinds of fabrics and it gives a different
2009 graduate of fashion design at Gerrit Rietveld Academie. result. Also you can make any design you want—as tiny as
you want—in Illustrator, and the laser can cut it out very
What first sparked your interest in fashion and design? precisely, something you cannot accomplish with scissors. In
I liked clothing ever since I was a child and always wanted the Root Route collection I used the technique for the first
to wear pretty dresses. I used to draw little dolls with nice time but it opened up a world of possibilities.
dresses, hats, and shoes. Later on I wanted to make clothing,
instead of only drawing it; bit by bit it started. What are you working on right now? Are there any
new collections in the works?
You say you enjoy drawing from an early age. Do you feel I have a small new collection and I am still adding pieces. I
interest in this has influenced your design at all? How? am using the laser cut technique again and combining it with
It has influenced it a lot. My design process always starts self designed knitwear (on my own knitting machine). I really
with drawings and collages. It is a 2-D process, which also find it important to alter or create my own new fabrics so a
comes back in my fabrics. I design prints in [Adobe] Illus- design is totally my own, from fabric cut to final garment.
trator and then laser them into the fabric. After this process
starts the 3-D part, in which I sculpt it around the body. I understand you are currently in South America
working. What made you decide to travel there?
Your recent collection “Root Route” focuses on the idea My sister lives and works in Suriname. She organizes events
of one’s journey from childhood to adulthood. What and invited me to help with a fashion show. It is really nice
inspired this and how do you feel you exemplified this because I am working with local fashion designers; we are
idea in your pieces? making a collection together. It is inspiring to exchange ideas
I’m a nostalgic person. I wanted to tell a story about a mem- with people from the other side of the world.
ory of something nice. Your favorite piece of clothing when
you were a kid or a beautiful dress your mother used to wear. What are your plans for the future? Anything in
Something like that gives me inspiration for a collection be- particular you hope to accomplish?
cause it is so personal. For “Root Route” I found a small baby I hope I can keep on [creating and drawing]. It is my passion
dress which my mother made for me and I started to wonder and I hope I can keep on doing this. I want to try to have a
what happened through the years with my clothing. What small production so people can maybe purchase my designs,
happened over time? I started layering [garments] on top of but I also want to keep it special and have my special touch
each other from small to big (children’s clothing to [adult] in each design.

PHOTOS BY PETER STIGTER

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DREAMING ON PAPER
UNTAPPED INTERESTS CAN OFTEN LEAD TO NEWFOUND PASSIONS.

Written by NORA E. S. GILLIGAN

“I JUMPED INTO THIS WITH NO IDEA This past summer found me laid off from a consulting
firm, and lost in the middle of the cliché “search for one’s
OF EXPECTATIONS...I AM STILL NOT true passion versus practicality.” In a moment of inspiration
COMPLETELY SURE OF THE POINT OR one late afternoon, while trying to keep myself busy with
something other than job applications, I strolled into the
OF MY PURPOSE. IT MAY VERY EASILY summer study office at my local art school and signed up for
BE NOTHING MORE THAN TRYING an introductory course in fashion illustration.
SOMETHING IN MY GUT, DESPITE For as long as I can remember, I’ve had this pull to-
wards my creative mind and appreciation for fashion and
FEAR…OF NOT BEING GOOD ENOUGH, the arts in general. As a little girl, I dreamed of being a chil-
OF SUCCESS, OF NOT BEING WHAT I dren’s book illustrator or a fashion designer, at least until
I decided, for sure, that I was destined to be an astronaut,
WAS MEANT TO DO. I DO KNOW THAT truck driver, or veterinarian. As a slightly older child, I was
THIS “NOW” EXPERIENCE LED ME TO content to sit for hours with my Barbie dolls, not just mak-
SOMETHING TO GET LOST IN.” ing them “sex it” with Ken and cruise around in their pink
corvette, but also dying their hair pink and altering, drap-
ing, and hand-sewing their clothes as best an eight-year-old
could. Fast-forward to high school, when I toyed endlessly
with the idea of applying to the Rhode Island School of De-
sign, only to drop out of my advanced placement art class.
Outside of my studio art minor in college, and the Fash-
ion Design Drawing course book that has been sitting un-
touched on my bookshelf for years, I’d been on something
of a right-brain hiatus since graduating from college. I reg-
istered for the course literally five minutes before the first
class started, with no real direction or purpose other than
exploring an untapped interest.
Walking into class, I half-expected a room full of impec-
cably-styled, fashion-forward students who all knew exact-
ly what they were doing (the other half of me knows better
than to live with expectations!!). The four-hour class time

28 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


was daunting, and I was really thrown off when I was asked me to feel such clarity and vision, to allow my mind to slow
to introduce myself first and pronounced Lee McQueen as down from one-million-times-infinity-miles-per-minute. I
my favorite designer. To be sure, I love his work! But is know I’m in a good place, wherever I am, when I don’t feel
that the best I can come up with when put on the spot in the need to constantly check my email and phone messages
front of a bunch of fashionistas? Some obscure, anonymous for stimulation. To be able to tune out the rest of the world
or up-and-coming designer would have been much more im- and get out of my head for a little, and to focus solely on
pressive, or at least Alber Elbaz, who truly is my closet’s creation, is necessary and significant.
soulmate. I was reassured when three other students of Now my class is starting to wind down, and I am now
twelve listed McQueen as their favorite, and was then able starting to think about ideas for my final portfolio proj-
to take off my blinders to find an eclectic group of all ages ect, for which I want to reflect and give insight into my
and experience levels and reasons for being there. I still own style and outlook. After this, who knows? Sometimes I
don’t have enough cool words to say about our chill-as-hell consider taking more classes: sewing, tailoring, Photoshop.
professor, who has all the skills and patience in the world Maybe I imagine myself as the next Garance Dore, illus-
(and cut class time down to three-and-a-half-hours; some- trating my fashion-related thoughts in words and pictures
how, far less daunting). as small doses of daily blogger inspiration. Perhaps one
The initial intimidation that I felt did not last long, and day I will take on freelance work, or Papercut will let me
I quickly found myself excited to immerse my hands and illustrate some written features (hint, hint!). On the other
mind and heart in everything from human and exaggerated hand, my future in fashion illustration might not be too
stylized anatomy to garment detail and color rendering. It bright: as noted in obvious blog’s 2008 archives, “the first
felt good to once again have a reason to browse forever in photographic cover of Vogue was a watershed in the his-
Utrecht, feeling the wrinkles develop in my brow as I decid- tory of fashion illustration and a watershed mark of its
ed between marker brands and colors like my life depended decline.”1 Either way, I jumped into this with no idea of
on it. It felt great to flip through Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar expectations, from the class or from myself. I am still not
for my homework; this came somewhat more naturally than completely sure of the point or of my purpose. It may very
when I once had to “flip through” Satre and Camus for phi- easily be nothing more than trying something in my gut,
losophy class. It felt empowering to look through illustra- despite fear…of not being good enough, of success, of not
tion examples from well-known designers (many of whom doing what I was meant to do. I do know that this “now”
have miserable drawing abilities), and to think, “I could do experience led me to something to get lost in. To a new
this.” What felt best, though, was sitting on the floor of my passion found. To a way of dreaming on paper. And, for the
room, iPod tuned to my mood of the moment, and losing time being, maybe that is enough.
myself in drawings and sketches. It is a rare moment for 1. http://obviousmag.org/en/archives/2008/04/the_first_covers_of_vogue.html

29
FASHION’S “DOWNSIZE”
FROM RUBENESQUE TO HEROIN CHIC; THE EVOLUTION OF THE “IDEAL” WOMAN.

Written by D.K. STEWART

A few years back I watched a video Come the 1960s, a waifish 16-year- Karen Alexander, Christie Brinkley,
on fashion shows in the Grand Houses old Cockney, at 5’6”, 91 pounds, and Carol Alt, Cheryl Tiegs, Naomi Camp-
of Paris. The shows were held in private slight 31”-22”-32” measurements, be- bell, Tyra Banks, Claudia Schiffer, Lin-
rooms, and both the models and dress came a model by dint of a haircut. Thus da Evangelista, Cindy Crawford, Chris-
forms were a size 6/8. One couture Lesley Hornby (aka Twiggy) gave birth ty Turlington, and so many more. The
house in particular belonged to none to the size zero model and unisex cloth- supermodels were gorgeous bombshells
other than the Grand Dame of style and ing. Even in her time, however, the of Amazonian proportions, at towering
fashion herself, Madame Coco Chanel. general public criticized Twiggy’s body heights of 5’9”, but women around the
Her models were graceful; their cloth- image as “unhealthy.” Twiggy herself world could still relate to them for their
ing draped and hung beautifully from looked up to supermodel Jean Shrimp- beautiful curves and athletic figures.
their bodies as Madame had intended. I ton, who at 5’10” and 34”-23”-35” had Sadly, if these women were to approach
could see myself, mid-century, in those the perfect and acceptable body im- a modeling agency today, they would
elegant dresses and suits. These mod- age. Twiggy’s modeling career lasted be told to go home and lose at least 20
els were women, not teenage girls. It approximately four years, and upon pounds. The Centers for Disease Con-
was during this time, circa World War her retirement she paraphrased Fons- trol and Prevention data states that
II, that the first “supermodel” was dis- sagrives: “You can’t be a clothes hanger the average American woman weighs
covered. Lisa Fonssagrives had the per- for your entire life!”2 164 pounds with a 37-inch waist (2002–
fect non-androgynous measurements From the late 1960s through the 2004). Those are not the measurements
at 5’7” and 34”-23”-34”, yet ironically 1990s fashion designers had their pick of a size 8, which is telling of how the
described herself as a “good clothes of models within the 6/8 size range: Vic- human body has evolved over the years.
hanger.”1 Here, I submit a heartfelt sor- toria Hamel, Catherine Oxenberg, Su- So why is it that today’s artists of
row that I’ve burst Janice Dickinson’s san Blakely, Peggy Dillard, Cybil Shep- fashion demand that female models
ego bubble. herd, Beverly Johnson, Renee Russo, should be literal “human hangers?”

30 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


The fashion industry’s demand for the cide to create a new extreme of the hu- They tell us what these men imagine,
androgynous, heroin, starved, pre-pu- man form, this speaks to another issue and in turn that they fashion clothing
bescent look is very removed from Coco entirely. Sometimes I fear designers for the woman of their imagination:
Chanel’s observation: “You cannot have just might be suffering a kind of Peter a woman without breasts or curves.
fashion out of touch with street life.” Pan syndrome, where women remain These images have in turn created
This statement itself gives me pause childlike, languishing forever between body image issues that have produced
as the current Creative Director of the tween and teen. a multi-million dollar diet industry
House of Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld, lost 93 where lives are indeed lost or maimed.
pounds in 13 months at 69 years of age Over the years, fashion insiders have

“AND
THE CENTER FOR
on an extreme diet. Why? Because he defended their use of the size zero
wanted to dress in fashions “modeled by model as an economic necessity. They
very, very slim boys—and not men my DISEASE CONTROL disingenuously explain that the larger
age.” He then of course published a book PREVENTION’S the model, the more money they have
called The Karl Lagerfeld Diet.3 to spend on clothing. Yet they cannot
During an interview about the CURRENT DATA STATES explain the exorbitant salaries they
fashion industry with CTV’s Canada THAT THE AVERAGE pay the waifs to show a piece of cloth-
AM, supermodel Iman was quite can-
did in her assessment of the demands
AMERICAN WOMAN ing in four hours, or the amount they
waste to produce a fashion show.
being made for girls to be a size double- WEIGHS 164LBS WITH There is some light at the end of
zero. She said, “I find that the fashion
business and the beauty industry re-
ally have an assault on identity when
it comes to young models because they
A 37-INCH WAIST.

Crystal Renn is a current plus-size


” the tunnel, however. Some advertising
companies, who until recently would
only hire size 8 or smaller women, are
now using plus-size models to market
have to conform to these impossible de- model who started modeling at 14 years their products (most notably is the
mands. They’re becoming like human old. It is reported that to be initially Dove campaign). Models like Emme,
hangers. Obviously the designers have successful she had to lose a full quar- Renn, Whitney Thompson, Toccara,
a lot of influence in this. Because the ter of her body weight. Is it truly sur- and Barbara Brickner are steadily
designer can say, ‘I will not hire you at prising then, that she became anorexic, climbing the ladder as they reflect
that body weight.’”4 starving herself to size zero (not quite a population that is indeed putting
In recent years there have been the coveted industry standard of dou- some pressure on fashion designers to
several “outings” of designers who have ble-zero)? Eight years later, Renn’s ex- produce clothing that better reflects
taken the “human hanger” look to an- perience and survival prompted her to society. It behooves more established
other level in their Photoshopped ad- write a book: Hungry: A Young Model’s designers to tap into this growing mar-
vertisements. Designer Ralph Lauren, Story of Appetite, Ambition and the Ul- ket, if only for their own financial ben-
for example, recently found himself timate Embrace of Curves. Renn made efit, because the “plus-sized” woman’s
having to defend a model’s image that a comeback after her recovery and, purchasing power is increasing. The
had been altered to such a degree that at a curvy and beautiful size 16, was plus-size woman is loyal to the brands
a blogger commented, “Dude, her head’s the belle of Jean Paul Gaultier’s 2005 that see her as attractive, with a sense
bigger than her pelvis.”5 Filippa Hamil- spring show.7 Fast-forward to 2010, of style. She is loyal to the brands that
ton, the model in question, addressed when Renn found herself in yet another respect her, and refuse to marginalize
the controversy, telling the Daily Mail type of image controversy, wherein she her or treat her as a second-class citi-
she’d been fired by Ralph Lauren “be- had to defend herself in print and the zen. Mintel International Group mar-
cause they said I was overweight and I mainstream media regarding a Photo- ket researchers back up that reason-
couldn’t fit in their clothes anymore.”6 shopped image that looks nothing as ing in a report that states, “there is an
At a size 4! she currently does. Renn has been very untapped reserve for financial growth
It is fair to say that Photoshopping forthcoming in her assessment of the in the fashion industry if only design-
is not new to the fashion industry, and industry, her journey, and, most impor- ers and their marketers would engage
that its use is actually very necessary. tantly, the message that these pictures with the plus-size woman as they do
Using the software to remove flaws give young women and society at large.8 their smaller-sized counterparts.”
such as shadows or hair over the eye To me, these industry examples That’s about two-thirds of the 152 mil-
is important to the portrayal of product tell the story of just how much we are lion women in the U.S. Translate those
and to setting a mood. However, when manipulated by a mostly male-dom- numbers into dollars, and see what
designer and photographer then de- inated world that caters to women. size “clothes hanger” develops.

1. Ranck, Rosemary. (February 9, 1997). “The First Supermodel.” The New York Times. <http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9902E2DE153DF93AA35751C0A961958260>
2. Slater, Anna. (September 13, 2009). “Twiggy at 60: The super-skinny model who found fame in the Sixties has finally come of age. Anna Slater lists the triumphs, the tragedies and the
trivia.” Independent on Sunday: p. 48.
3. Lagerfeld, Karl and Houdret, Jean-Claude. (May 2005). The Karl Lagerfeld Diet.
4. http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7008760759#ixzz0xjmQbCoI
5. http://boingboing.net/2009/10/06/the-criticism-that-r.html
6. http://www.examiner.com/celebrity-headlines-in-san-francisco/model-filippa-hamilton-speaks-out-against-ralph-laurenhttp://www.examiner.com/celebrity-headlines-in-san-francisco/model
filippa-hamilton-speaks-out-against-ralph-lauren
7. http://www.plus-size-tall.com/crystal-renn-in-new-jean-paul-gaultier-ad-campaign-7495/.
8. http://jezebel.com/5590811/an-analysis-of-crystal-renns-photoshop-of-horrors
9. http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/38358777/ns/today-today_fashion_and_beauty/

31
32
ON THE
VERGE
PART TWO OF OUR ON THE VERGE DOUBLE
FEATURE EXPLORES THE EVER-EXPANDING
REALMS OF TECHNOLOGY; FROM THE FIFTH
FLOOR OF MIT’S MEDIA LAB, TO GARMENTS
THAT LIVE AND BREATHE.

33
HIGH-LOW TECH
MIT’S HANNAH PERNER-WILSON IS HANDCRAFTING HUMAN-COMPUTER INTERFACES.

Interview by JAMALL OLUOKUN

Full name and age: goal of which is to motivate and enable ing and posting this work online [and] I
Hannah Perner-Wilson, 27. others in exploring this area too. have continued to do this ever since.

Where you’re from: What made you want to get into this What inspires your ideas and how
Born in England, grew up in Austria. type of field? do you go about executing them?
During my undergraduate studies in The process of making something always
Where you live now: industrial design I took a class on sen- inspires me. One idea always leads to
Currently in Cambridge, Massachusetts. sors. The class taught me how to make another. Some ideas I realize right away
circuits and interface sensors with a and others take years for me to start.
Education credentials: computer. Soon after this I discovered I begin by making prototypes, to make
I received my undergraduate [degree] in conductive fabrics and was simply fas- sure that the parts of a project are pos-
Industrial Design from Art University cinated by the possibility of creating sible before bringing them all together. I
in Linz, Austria. [I am] currently a grad- soft technology (in contrast to what is want to make sure that the materials I
uate student at the MIT Media Lab in traditionally hard). After finishing my want to use will work and look the way
the High-Low Tech research group lead undergraduate degree, I was fortunate I want them to. And that the solutions I
by Leah Buechley. to be unemployed for a year yet have imagine really work. I totally enjoy the
the resources to pursue my interest in challenge that comes from combining
What exactly do you do? making things. I never thought of what I materials in new ways.
I’m fascinated by the possibility of hand- was doing as research until starting my
crafting human-computer interfaces graduate degree at the Media Lab. What first got you interested in the
that are unusual and allow you to inter- field of “wearable technology”?
act with your computer in unexpected How long have you been doing this In 2006, [my colleague Mika Satomi and I]
ways. Who would have thought that you type of research? had the idea for our first wearable technol-
could knit a stretch sensor, embroider In 2006 I first started playing with cir- ogy project titled “Massage Me.” We want-
resistors, paint a circuit, or fold a bat- cuits and conductive fabrics, but in 2008 ed a free back massage and so we modified
tery pouch from paper? Or that the ma- I really began working intensely with a traditional game controller. [By] making
terials, tools, and techniques you need to these mediums. I spent a whole year textile buttons and embedding them in
create these things are readily available gathering materials and testing their the back of a jacket, [it forced] the gamer
and waiting to be used? I share my re- electrical properties. This process led to give you a back massage in order to
search with others in the form of online me to begin creating a range of textile play the game. The interface was a success
tutorials that include lots of photos, vid- sensors and to realize small interactive and Mika and I have been collaborating
eos and step-by-step instructions. The projects with them. I began document- on such projects ever since.

34 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


LEFT TO RIGHT:
“TILT SENSING BRACELET” by
Hannah Perner-Wilson is
a bracelet decorated with
conductive fabric petals
and a dangling metal bead
that makes contact with the
petals, allowing for tilt detec-
tion; the “LIVING WALL” by
High-Low Tech is interactive
wallpaper that serves as a
beautiful and unobtrusive
way to enrich environments
with computation.

What is your favorite project that that include a programmable microcon- current social and/or technological
you are working on? troller, LED lights, switches, sensors state of our culture?
That is a hard question to answer [be- and other actuators. The work that Mika and I collaborate on
cause] every week I have a new favorite. has a strong emphasis on opening the
One project I’ve recently been thinking What type of materials do you use black box of consumer technology, in order
a lot about involves using my textile for these projects? to hack, modify, and customize it to better
sensors to collect data from everyday I use a lot of electrically conductive fab- suit our needs and desires. Manufactured
activities, rather than intentional inter- rics and threads as well as yarns, paints, goods are often a great starting point to
actions with them. For example, I might and tapes. I’m especially interested in begin playing with the customization of
wear a version of the fabric tilt sensor materials whose electrical resistance circuits and interactive technology. We
on my ankle while I cycle to work. Then changes over distance or under certain want to promote awareness and a critique
I would compare the data I get from my circumstances, such as when they are of the ways in which we currently inter-
textile version of a tilt sensor with that pressured, stretched, or bent. act with computers, and propose a more
of a commercial tilt switch mounted in hands-on personalized approach to creat-
the same position. I would like to do this What are conductive fabrics / textiles ing technology and interfacing with them.
to test the reliability and durability of and which ones do you work with?
my sensors as well as to be able to com- Conductive textiles are often regular Any advice for anyone interested in
pare them with commercially available textiles that are coated in metal par- being in the Media Lab / High-Low
solutions. This might not sound very in- ticles such as silver, copper, or nickle. Tech group?
teresting, but I’m excited about it. One of my favorite conductive fabrics is Make stuff, document it, and share your
a stretchy silverized lycra that Sparkfun knowledge. Think about how you’d like
How do you see these projects being and LessEMF distributes. It is wonder- future technology to look and feel and
commercially viable in the future? fully soft and very conductive. I also like what role the creation of such technol-
The “LilyPad Arduino” is a great exam- a stainless steel-resistant yarn that is ogy should play in our everyday lives.
ple of how e-textile tools and technology now available from Plug and Wear as
have become commercially available well as the range of piezoresistive fabrics Any links you’d like to share?
and are being used by a diverse audi- that Eeonyx manufactures. Plusea: http://plusea.at/
ence of educators, artists, designers, High-Low Tech: http://hlt.media.mit.edu/
hobbyists and engineers. The LilyPad Has your research dictated any Kobakant: http://www.kobakant.at/
kit is a collection of sewable components noteworthy commentary on the Massage me: http://www.massage-me.at/

LEFT TO RIGHT:
“TILT SENSING QUILT” by
Hannah Perner-Wilson is a
quilt made up of an array of
41 textile tilt sensors, show-
casing different materials
and techniques that can be
used to create fabric tilt sen-
sors; “FAB FM” radio by David
Mellis and Dana Gordon
explores the possibilities for
personal fabrication of con-
sumer electronic devices.

35
PHOTO BY JAMES GRAHAM

36 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


FAIRYTALE
FASHION
GARMENTS THAT HAVE BLOOMING FLOWERS, BREATHE, CHANGE
COLOR, AND TRANSFORM. YES, YOU READ CORRECTLY.

Interview by HAYLEY MAYBURY

37
Full name and age: that I am trying to start my own line, I realize that you are
Diana Eng, 27. not just making one garment to send down the runway, but
you are making something that is going to be sent out to a
Where you’re from: manufacturer and to vendors, so the design process becomes
Jacksonville, Florida. very different. There are millions of small things you need to
consider when you are having a garment manufactured. For
Where you live now:
Upstate New York.
“PROJECT RUNWAY ONLY SHOWS A
Education credentials: TENTH OF WHAT IT ACTUALLY TAKES
Rhode Island School of Design for Apparel Design. TO BE A FASHION DESIGNER.”
How did you get into designing clothing? instance, you can’t just pick out a pretty button you like, you
I have always loved clothing. When I was little I used to have to think about how it will wear on the garment or how
play dress up and pretend that I owned a fashion store. [To it will with hold up to everyday use. Project Runway really
design clothing] has always been a dream of mine and just captures all the excitement and hard work of being a fashion
feels so natural to me. designer, and for that it is great!

On your website you mention having the opportunity What made you want to incorporate science and tech-
to work at multiple fashion companies. Where did you nology into your fashion design?
work? Anywhere notable (to you) in particular? Ultimately I like to invent new things in fashion, and there
One of the places I worked was Victoria’s Secret in Re- are always these things that I want to [create] that you
search and Development; I really enjoyed working there. couldn’t make with traditional apparel material. [I like]
The great thing about working for a [big] corporation is the possibility of being able to use both technology and sci-
that they have such a large budget, so you could go shop- ence. My favorite material is wool, because you can mold it
ping for inspiration and swatches. The sky was the limit into different shapes, and it always has a nice bounce to it.
when it came to getting stuff together. I also freelanced at
Kenneth Cole and Gap Body. So, in a nutshell, tell us—for the sake of our readers—
what exactly is Fairytale Fashion?
Has working at such places influenced you as a Fairy Tale Fashion is a project that I did to explore the pos-
designer? How? sibility of what technology can add to fashion. I worked with
Definitely. I guess at Victoria’s Secret I really learned the a bunch of classrooms and talked to groups of children asking
most. It really changed my perspective as a designer. I al- them what they would want their fairy tale clothing to be. I
ways thought that I wanted to be a high-end designer but then selected the ideas that I thought would be fun and made
working [there] I got to see different shopping behaviors, dif- them into actual clothing.
ferent stores, and different locations. It made me realize that
Victoria’s Secret in some way is providing a luxury brand for Have any of your viewers ever surprised or maybe even
middle-America; [shoppers] really feel like they are getting stumped you in their suggestions for the next design?
something special. Everyone was so happy when they bought Yes, a lot of kids wanted clothing that gave them super
something [at Victoria’s Secret], so I wanted to do that same hero powers. Not quite in my ability to help people fly…yet.
thing with my company. Not make it so high-end but just But you never know!
make it so everyone could be happy.
What are you future plans for Fairytale Fashion?
What was it like to be a designer on Project Runway? Right now I am working on designing my own line. I want to
A lot of fun. The thing is that Project Runway only shows a create products based on Fairytale Fashion, but that people
tenth of what it actually takes to be a fashion designer. Now can buy and wear on a day-to-day basis.

PHOTOS BY DOUG ENG

38 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


PHOTO BY RICK LOUIS

PHOTOS BY DOUG ENG

39
SAVINGS ON-THE-GO
PEEKABOO MOBILE MAY JUST BE YOUR NEW FAVORITE APP.

Interview by HAYLEY MAYBURY

Full name and age: 24 hours. You will then have access to post coupons and
Ben Dolgoff, 25 and Mike Fruzzetti, 25. promotions to thousands of potential consumers directly
around your business location.
Where you’re from:
Ben: West Barnstable, Massachusetts. How has the feedback on the application been so far?
Mike: Onset, Massachusetts. The feedback so far has been great—both businesses post-
ing deals and consumers redeeming deals love it. We have
Where you live now: had dozens of users sending comments describing how much
Both: the North End in Boston. money they saved by using Peekaboo.

Education credentials: Do you have an approximate timetable on when consum-


[We both attended Suffolk University and studied finance.] ers will see Android and Blackberry versions of the app?
Android should be available by the second week of September.
How did you two decide to come together and create A mobile web version—compatible with all Internet-enabled
an application like Peekaboo Mobile? phones—is also slated for release in early October.
We have always had an entrepreneurial mentality. Since we
have self-funded all of our previous companies to date we How has the business been expanding so far? Where
are constantly looking for ways to save money. Through our are the latest/newly added locations?
experience we found it was difficult to find good deals around Business has been expanding rapidly. In the month of July
the area. We created Peekaboo with two key features, us- both business locations and user accounts nearly tripled.
ing GPS and redeeming coupons/deals from the phone. The August has also shown steady growth. We now have coupons
GPS element makes it extremely easy to find deals around in 17 different states.
you while having the convenience of redeeming the coupons
straight from your phone. Where do you see Peekaboo Mobile going in the future?
We have big plans for Peekaboo Mobile in 2011. While we
Did you find this was an easy concept to implement? currently only offer mobile coupons for local merchants,
Mobile coupons are still relatively new so there is some in the coming months we will be expanding our platform
adoption that needs to take place. Since we are still early to include exciting new savings options. These new fea-
in the mobile coupon trend it was a little difficult at first to tures will provide added value to businesses and users.
get people to jump on the bandwagon. After the first month With support from local and national partners, we will
of launching Peekaboo, businesses and smart phone users have an opportunity to reach a more diversified group of
started to trust the idea and take advantage of its benefits. merchants, brands, and users. Peekaboo Mobile’s mission
is to connect merchants and users through an innovative
Tell us about the different kinds of features Peekaboo suite of services. Executing this strategy over the next few
Mobile has. months will transform what began as a two-man operation
Peekaboo has a variety of features listed below that makes it into a leading mobile company with millions of satisfied
a convenient app to have as a user: (1) GPS capability helps users and businesses.
you to easily locate deals around your current location; (2)
Get a list of deals presented in either list or map format; (3)
Call, get directions, or view the business’s website; (4) Re-
deem coupons straight from your phone.—no printing or clip-
ping; (5) Share coupons with friends, family, and colleagues “PEEKABOO MOBILE’S MISSION IS
through Facebook, Twitter, email, and text message.
TO CONNECT MERCHANTS AND
How/where can I get the Peekaboo Mobile application USERS THROUGH AN INNOVATIVE
on my phone?
Peekaboo can be downloaded straight on your smart phone SUITE OF SERVICES. EXECUTING
for free by visiting www.PeekabooMobile.com. If it is not THIS STRATEGY OVER THE NEXT FEW
available yet for your [particular] phone then you can enter
your email address and we will notify you when it is compat- MONTHS WILL TRANSFORM WHAT
ible with your model. BEGAN AS A TWO-MAN OPERATION
How can you use Peekaboo if you are a business owner? INTO A LEADING MOBILE COMPANY
It’s simple! Go to www.PeekabooMobile.com and click on the
“register” tab on the top right of the page. Enter in the nec-
WITH MILLIONS OF SATISFIED USERS
essary information and you will be up and running within AND BUSINESSES.”

40 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


BRAVO’S MASTERPIECE
BRAVO’S LATEST SERIES WORK OF ART MARRIES CONTEMPORARY ART WITH REALITY TELEVISION.

Written by ERIN BERRY

For every talent, every skill, and every goal that we ability to run with a theme in a short amount of time. Art is
have in life there is a reality television contest to achieve a very fickle and subjective thing to judge, unlike, say, food
it. From losing weight, to making cakes, and even to finding where you can unanimously determine whether a dish is too
a spouse, American television has reached the farthest cor- spicy or salty or bland. However, there are still certain con-
ners of human desire. For all the viewers not participating ventions that artists must be aware of in order to execute a
in the action, we are hanging on the edge of our chairs, soak- successful piece. Work of Art competitors struggled not only
ing in each long dramatic pause as we wait to hear the next with the limited amount of time in each challenge, but also
elimination. Bravo’s Work of Art: The Search for America’s with successfully communicating their ideas to the general
Next Great Artist is just another reality show to the general public. Artists know that one of the most difficult challenges
public. For working artists struggling everyday to gain ex- in art is maintaining a balance between the work’s relation-
posure in such a competitive field, however, it is a contest ship with its audience while still keeping that personal,
that is long overdue. sometimes mysterious connection to their work. The pieces
In the show’s first season, each artist had to complete that were either too literal or too vague were problematic
ten challenges for a grand prize of one hundred thousand because they did not successfully convey the central idea,
dollars and a solo show at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. The or because they were far too self-explanatory, making them
chosen artists included painters, photographers, sculptors, amateur or mundane. As competitors were slowly elimi-
architects, and teachers. The players worked both individu- nated, it became more difficult for the judges to determine
ally and in teams throughout the challenges, which were which person should go home, as each artist’s work devel-
based around common artistic themes. The main goal of the oped drastically throughout the competition.
competition was to focus on the artists’ versatility and their Similar to Project Runway, the three chosen final-
ists (Miles Mendenhall, Peregrine Honig, and Abdi Far-
ah) were each sent home with five thousand dollars and
three months to fully create and develop their final gallery
show. Each contestant created a cohesive body of work that
shared a common theme of death. Miles created a series
of black and white abstract screen prints using surveil-
lance video pictures featuring a homeless man that had
died days after he the artist had photographed him inside
a White Castle restaurant. Peregrine presented an interac-
tive carnival-like spilling of wax sculptures of heads and
horses with a beautiful large-scale photograph of dead twin
fawns that she considered her “muses”. Abdi’s final show,
titled “Luminous Beings,” featured life-size sculptures of
metallic-painted basketball players splayed on the gallery
floor, accompanied by paintings of figures and particularly
arresting images of body bags. Although the group show
was very successful as a collaboration, ultimately it was
Abdi who was awarded the prize. It was very encouraging
to see a winner who struggled with consistency throughout
the competition break through his insecurities to create a
body of work that was effective, powerful, and deeply mov-
ing on both a personal and universal level.
The “Art World” has always felt very separate from the
real world to me and I, like many other artists, have been
waiting to see a program such as this that celebrates and
pushes contemporary artists into the celebrity spotlight. As
funding is the largest hurdle for most artists, many would
drool at the chance to be able to create in a large space with
endless supplies. Even the artists who were eliminated first
are popping into more galleries, simply as a result of their
television appearance. Hopefully there will be many seasons
to follow, so artists can start to gain some true recognition.
PHOTO BY KIM NAVARRE
As a working artist myself, I must say “bravo” to Bravo for
A piece from Work of Art winner Abdi Farah’s exhibit currently on view at the Brooklyn
creating a true “work of art” that finally brings visual artists
Museum from August 14–October 17, 2010. into the foreground.

41
washed up Photography by KAYLIN RODRIQUEZ
Hair by WILLIAM BLAIR
Makeup by KAYLIN RODRIQUEZ
Designer/Styling ALEX HANCOCK
Model SARAH JEAN REBELLO (SMG)

42 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


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last rose of summer
Look at her: a thing of beauty and majesty. This is how
she sometimes chooses to be. She surrounds herself with
organic beauty. That's where she feels safe. You may look
but not see her. What is she thinking? Maybe she won-
ders about the flowers? If they die, will she? She likes to
look pretty. Look how the flowers adorn her hair. Roses
are her favorite. Her clothing; she draws on the earth for
her wardrobe. Mother nature’s palette. A shade of grey
here, an earthy cream there, and grass green. She loves
yellow too; it reminds her of the sunset. She pays homage
to the sweet wild berries with her lip color.

Nature personified…

54 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


Headpiece by UMA TURAN
Dress by HOLLY WOODS

Photography by LARA JADE at www.sarahdaw.com


Introduction & Styling by IHUNNA EBERENDU
Model TEGEN of STORM
Make-up by AMY SACHON
Hair by TOMOYUKI OTSUKA
Assistant STEVEN READ
Post-production/Retouching by LARA JADE

55
56 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com
THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE
Headpiece by UMA TURAN
Dress by MALENE ODDERSHEDE BACH
Shoes are stylist’s own

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Headpiece by UMA TURAN
Dress by CHANG A PARK
Leggings are model’s own

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Headpiece by UMA TURAN
Dress by HOLLY WOODS

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE
Headpiece by UMA TURAN

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE
Headpiece by UMA TURAN
Blouse by CHANG A PARK
Cape by HOLLY WOODS

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE
Shirt by MRIKA SINANI
Leggings are model’s own

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LEAVE
THE
SHOUTING
TO
OTHERS
AN INTERVIEW WITH
TERESA CROWNINSHIELD
Designer Teresa Crowninshield’s
adventure began while teaching in
China. She went from knowing noth-
ing about sewing to designing and
creating her own line of silk and cash-
mere coats. As if that isn’t admirable
enough, she was even able to surpass
her debut with a second and third line;
both met with rave reviews. And just
how does one find such success? It
takes two parts learning and one part
passion. After exploring the local silk
markets, Crowninshield began to play
and explore with fabric. Once she knew
she had the drive, the rest was simply
understanding the technical aspect of
design. “Being self-taught was liberat-
ing for me—just following my passion,
following what excited me about fab-
rics and design. When I met a technical
problem in creating the look I wanted,
I learned how to solve that problem.”
And once she had both down? Well,
let’s just say the rest is history...
Interview by HAYLEY MAYBURY & NICOLE BECHARD

66 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


You started out as an English teacher living in China. “ULTIMATELY, IT’S
How did that lead to becoming a fashion designer?
Once I got settled in to my teaching life in China, I started
A LIFESTYLE AND
venturing out to the local silk markets. I guess you could ARTISTIC CHOICE. WE’D
say it was love at first sight. I started buying silk and play- RATHER DIE LEADING
ing around with it at home. I got some ideas for clothes I THAN LIVE TRYING TO
wanted to make, made some sketches and had a tailor stitch
some things for me. When I wore those pieces, people no- FOLLOW.”
ticed. People seemed to think I had an eye for putting the beautiful curve. These are the key Shirley lessons…these and
right fabric with the right design. As time went on I started watch out for bulk! She’s very serious about eliminating fab-
to believe it too. ric bulk at seams. Bulk is what makes garments have the
“loving hands at home” look. Great design is in the details.
It was in China that you created your first line. What did
you find beneficial about this (or not so much)? The Teresa Crowninshield brand is indifferent when it
It was exhilarating. Things were really seat-of-the-pants in comes to what is considered trendy in the fashion in-
a lot of ways. I had pencil-sketched designs, a world of fab- dustry. Have you found this to be a beneficial approach,
ric and lots of passion, but I needed know-how and some or is it an uphill struggle?
skilled stitchers. How to find this when you don’t speak much Who would’ve thought you could completely ignore fashion
Chinese? I just pushed and searched until I found a cloth- trends and seasonal fashion cycles and still be in business
ing design school in a bad part of town. I went in and found eight years later? We did, especially our Creative Director,
the head teacher. She didn’t speak of word of english, but Gary Temple. He has always argued that when you create
she understood what I wanted to do. Gradually, sometimes honestly and from the intuition, things of lasting aesthetic
painfully, we got on the same page and made some beautiful value can be created. While others focus on making dispos-
things together. able copycat fashion, we’re trying to make things that cut
through the noise and stand alone. We think following trends
At first you were completely self-taught; do you feel this is a losing proposition. You may ride a wave this year, but this
enabled more creativity in your initial work or served is no strategy. Consumers are too finicky, rip-offs too easy, and
as more of a boundary as an amateur designer? margins too low. We want to make our own wave and do what
If I had known what you’re “supposed” to know to be a designer, we do better than anyone else. We work on the designs that
I might have been discouraged. Instead, through that period of excite us, with the material that excites us. When the design
childlike curiosity, I found out who I wanted to be; who I was as a is finished, we start selling it regardless of season. People
designer. As my business grew, [so did I]. I realized that to be suc- have a hard time believing that long cashmere coats can be
cessful and stay independent, I needed to know everything about sold in the summer, but I can tell you, we sell all our styles,
all year round. Ultimately, it’s a lifestyle and artistic choice.
my business—which is how to make elegant, beautifully fitting
We’d rather die leading than live trying to follow.
garments. Now, I sketch, drape, sew the muslin, make the paper
pattern, and stitch the final production sample. When I get to the
Do you have any plans to expand your line beyond
manufacturing stage, I know for a fact the design works.
jackets/coats?
We will likely offer more skirts and perhaps slacks in the fu-
How did apprenticeship influence your design work? ture. As a business proposition, it probably makes sense, but
My mentor, Shirley Willett, grew up in Boston clothing manu- we’re focused on whether a skirt or slacks will improve or
facturing, starting at 16 years old as a stitcher. She’s 77 now complete a look we’re going for. We’re only going to put time
and has spent her whole career thinking about elegant solu- into things that raise a design to a higher level. We’re not
tions to complex pattern problems. She saw where my natural selling widgets, we’re selling design.
instincts were—tailored, classic jackets with edge and finish—
and has helped me to capture the images in my mind. Every How about any menswear?
time [Shirley and I] meet, she amazes me. It’s like a magic We get a fair number of requests for a line of menswear. My
show. She can sit across the room, look at a muslin I’ve sewn design instincts are in the same neighborhood and I think it
and notice the slightest hint of tension in a shoulder seam. You would be an exciting challenge. For now, though, it’s impor-
don’t believe it’s there at first, and then you really look, and tant for us to continue focusing on making beautiful women’s
sure enough it’s there. So, Shirley has taken me a long way to- wear. Versatility, like trendiness, is not a strategy.
wards achieving that level of detail and finish in my own pat-
tern making. As a result, my coats are fitting better and better. What can we expect to see from your brand in the
That’s one of the things I hear most often from women—that near future?
no brand fits them as well as Teresa Crowninshield. Teresa Crowninshield has been known for elegant classic de-
signs with a twist. That will still form the core of our brand, but
Any specific lessons or words of wisdom that really we’ve got lots of edgy progressive designs in development. By
stuck with you? building relationships with customers one-at-a-time over the
Hawkish attention to detail [and] training and trusting your years, we’ve got a very loyal following that trusts us to push their
eye. That’s the big lesson. Fine details matter a lot to Shirley. boundaries. We’re focused on glorifying feminine strength—on
A little tension here and a slight pull there will spoil a good real elegance with a confident edge. We’ll keep focusing on mak-
design. There’s a big difference between a good curve and a ing beautiful statements and leave the shouting to others.

67
Photography by NICOLE BECHARD
Jackets by TERESA CROWNINSHIELD
Styling by NICOLE HERZOG
Model KIMBERLY RYDZEWSKI
Hair/Make-up by JANEEN JONES

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TERESA CROWNINSHIELD Safari Jacket, $275

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TERESA CROWNINSHIELD Silk Racer (reversible), $355

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THIS PAGE: TERESA CROWNINSHIELD Isabella, $325; OPPOSITE: TERESA CROWNINSHIELD Diamond Bolero, $345

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TERESA CROWNINSHIELD Azurean Evening Coat, $615

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THE NEW YORK CHRONICLES
NEW YORK FASHION WEEK RECAP: FALL/WINTER 2010

Written by BRITTNEE CANN

Trends seen at the fall collections during New York Fashion


Week in early February seem ubiquitous and obvious at the
time but then, when the colder seasons finally start creeping
up, everything from eight months ago becomes suddenly and
impossibly hard to remember. Need some brushing up on what
to wear this coming fall/winter? We’ve got you covered—al-
most literally. NY Fashion Week was stocked with layering of
all kinds, indicating that now is the time to lose tank tops and
sandals, and to pile on the heavy textiles. From the good, to the
bad, and even to the things we’re a little on the fence about, it’s
time to study up, buttercup. Here, the lowdown on everything
you need to have a chic and stylish autumn.

PRINTED PANTS
As seen at: Diesel Black Gold , Proenza Schouler, Rodarte, Tory Burch…
Tops and accessories aren’t the only place for prints anymore.
This season a whole slew of NY-based designers showed print
on the lower half of the body.

CAMEL
As seen at: 3.1 Philip Lim, Derek Lam, DKNY, Oscar de la Renta,
Rachel Comey, VPL…
Call it camel, call it butterscotch. No matter the name, this PHOTO BY JUSTIN HOGAN
golden hue is the coming season’s hottest neutral. In vary-
ing shades within the spectrum—from rose gold to desert
orange—it’s an update on the old khaki yellow we’ve by now wear-inspired blazers and tailored pants give an office-appro-
grown bored of. priate yet fashion-forward look.

MODERN METALLIC CAPES, HOODS, AND PONCHOS


As seen at: Badgley Mischka, Carolina Herrera, Diane Von Furstenberg, As seen at: 3.1 Phillip Lim, Altazurra, Isaac Mizrahi, J. Mendel, United
Marc Jacobs… Bamboo, Y-3…
Shiny metallic is back in a big way. Many-a-designer showed Perhaps a result of the extreme winter we had earlier in the
long evening wear in brilliant, beaming, textiles. Metallics year, this season outerwear has us fully covered. Capes, pon-
aren’t limited to only silver, gold, and bronze—try a sparkling chos, and oversized hoods not only look cool but are more than
emerald green, cloudy blue, or red tint. practical for the coming cold weather.

MILITARY FURRY ACCENTS


As seen at: Banana Republic, Jill Stuart, Marc by Marc, Rag & Bone, As seen at: Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors,Vena Cava…
Tory Burch… Fur is another popular trend seen during European fashion
Hints of military influences were sprinkled all around New weeks that made it over to the U.S. Fuzzy trim was seen on
York Fashion Week, but not in a too exaggerated way. Subtle everything from jackets to bags, shoes, gloves, and more.
detailing in jackets and deep army green are ways to play
boot camp without looking overly G.I. Jane. VOLUMINOUS PANTS
As seen at: Behnaz Sarafpour, Charlotte Ronson, Richard Chai Love,
LADY-LIKE Zac Posen…
As seen at: Chris Benz, Jason Wu, Peter Som… We are long overdue for a break from the skinny jean. This
A huge trend overseas in Paris, Milan, and London, it looks season it seems size does matter and to speak quite frankly—
like classic, lady-like shapes will be making their way over to the bigger the better. Fluid, forties-inspired pants will give us
this side of the Atlantic as well if the above designers have all room to breathe.
anything to do with it. Longer hemlines and boxy bags are
very grown up; fun colors and modern styling keep the over- BED HEAD
all look young and fresh. As seen at: Isaac Mizrahi, Proenza Schouler, Rebecca Taylor…
Beauty trends are not always as easily spotted as fashion
MENSWEAR TAILORING trends, but one thing seen on more than just a few catwalks
As seen at: Alexander Wang, Jason Wu, Ralph Lauren, Yigal Azrouel… was messy, slept-in, hair. Hey, the less time it takes us to get
Dude looks like a lady? This season the reverse is true. Mens- ready in the morning the better. We’re fully backing this.

76 SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2010 www.papercutmag.com


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