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TAX-CUTPACKAGE BOEHNER SAYS HE WILL VOTE TO EXTEND TAX CUTS ONLY FOR MIDDLE-CLASS EARNERS NATION
TAX-CUTPACKAGE BOEHNER SAYS HE WILL VOTE TO EXTEND TAX CUTS ONLY FOR MIDDLE-CLASS EARNERS NATION
TAX-CUTPACKAGE
BOEHNER SAYS HE WILL VOTE TO EXTEND TAX CUTS
ONLY FOR MIDDLE-CLASS EARNERS
NATION PAGE 7
PRACTICE MAKES HEALTH PERFECT NADAL WINS U.S. OPEN HEALTH PAGE 17 SPORTS PAGE 11 www.smdailyjournal.com
PRACTICE MAKES
HEALTH PERFECT
NADAL WINS
U.S. OPEN
HEALTH PAGE 17
SPORTS PAGE 11
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Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010 Vol XI, Edition 24

Tuesday • Sept. 14, 2010 • Vol XI, Edition 24 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Left :San Bruno
Tuesday • Sept. 14, 2010 • Vol XI, Edition 24 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Left :San Bruno
Tuesday • Sept. 14, 2010 • Vol XI, Edition 24 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Left :San Bruno
Tuesday • Sept. 14, 2010 • Vol XI, Edition 24 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Left :San Bruno

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Left:San Bruno residents Bill Magoolaghan (top),Julio Locon (middle) and Fred Gillen (bottom) along with hundreds more met Monday morning at the San Bruno Senior Center seeking answers from city officials as to their futures and status of their homes. Right: Officials speak at a forum for victims at the Church of the Highlands in San Bruno hosted by U.S.Rep.Jackie Speier,D-San Mateo.

Frustration mounts

Emotional residents demanding answers

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Bruno resident Bill Magoolaghan’s gratefulness to PG&E and city ofcials is waning as he and his family have been kept

away from their home since a raging

re destroyed most of the Glenview neighborhood Thursday night. Magoolaghan, 46, and hundreds

more gathered at the San Bruno Senior Center yesterday morning seeking answers from city ofcials as to when they could resume their normal lives or to just get a glimpse at what was once home. Julio Locon was not sure of the status of his home yesterday and wanted to gain access to it.

He has been staying in a hotel

See ANSWERS, Page 20

Healing begins

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Scores of people gathered at the Church of the Highlands in San

Bruno late last night to hear exactly how state and federal agencies are handling the response to last week’s

re that left four dead and a large

section of a neighborhood destroyed. “So many things can divide us in life,” said Pastor Leighton Sheley. “Religion divides us, politics divides us. But community unites.” Sheley offered praise for first

us. But community unites.” Sheley offered praise for first responders and expressed thanks for all the

responders and expressed thanks for all the donations coming in to help homeless victims survive. U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo, hosted the event and invited

See PROCESS, Page 20

Mateo, hosted the event and invited See PROCESS , Page 20 BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL Pacific Gas

BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Pacific Gas and Electric Company President Chris Johns met with San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane and residents to pledge $100 million in relief money to the city.

PG&E pledges $100 million to San Bruno

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

PG&E pledged $100 million to

by Thursday’s

natural gas explosion and to the

rebuilding of San Bruno during a press conference Monday afternoon. A large explosion Thursday afternoon led to a massive re destroying and damaging numer- ous homes in San Bruno while injur- ing and killing some people. Monday afternoon,

residents

affected

Inside

NTSB finishes investigation See page 3 Are aging gas pipe at risk? See page 4 Fire resources

See page 6 Disasters don’t happen here

Opinion

page 9

officials from the Pacic Gas and Electric Company, whose line it was that exploded, announced plans to dedicate $100 million to the affected residents and rebuilding on San Bruno. Of that, a $3 million check was given to city ofcials yesterday to start covering costs already incurred for dealing with the disaster. “Money can’t return lives. It can’t

See PG&E, Page 20

County schools score well

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Forty-six percent of schools in California, compared to 58 percent in San Mateo County, are meeting academic assessment goals, according to the 2010 academic performance report released by the California Department of Education Monday morning. The APR, which consists of three separate reports, is an annual report card for every

three separate reports, is an annual report card for every school in the state. Scores leveled

school in the state. Scores leveled off and in some cases decreased. In California, 46 per- cent of schools are meeting the target, which translates to 51 percent of elementary schools, 40 percent of middle schools and 25 percent of high schools scoring above 800 points. In San Mateo County, 58 percent of schools are at or above the procient mark, however, not every- one is making the grade.

See SCORES, Page 19

not every- one is making the grade. See SCORES , Page 19 Retrial for accused wife-killer

Retrial for accused wife-killer begins

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The girlfriend of the Daly City man charged with fatally stabbing his wife is the real killer, driven to that point by the knowledge that she would never have him all to herself, according to his defense attorney. Only one person understood how much Quincy Dean Norton Sr., 36, loved his wife, attorney Lisa Maguire told jurors yesterday during opening statements in his murder trial.

yesterday during opening statements in his murder trial. Quincy Norton “She is the woman who killed
yesterday during opening statements in his murder trial. Quincy Norton “She is the woman who killed

Quincy Norton

“She is the woman who killed Tamika Norton because of it and that is Anitra Johnson,” Maguire said. Although Johnson is not on trial and has never been charged in Tamika Norton’s July 22, 2006 death, the defense wants

See NORTON, Page 19

not on trial and has never been charged in Tamika Norton’s July 22, 2006 death, the

2 Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NEW BIBLE Jumble Books Go To: http://www.tyndale.com/jumble/

Quote of the Day

“I’m feeling this surge of frustration. I’m not paying my mortgage so I can live in a hotel.”

— Bill Magoolaghan

“Emotional residents demanding answers,” see page 1

Local Weather Forecast

Tuesday: Partly cloudy with patchy fog in the morning then mostly sunny. Highs in the upper 70s. West winds 5 to 15 mph. Tuesday night: Clear in the evening then partly cloudy with patchy fog. Lows in the mid 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph. Wednesday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming mostly sunny. Patchy fog in the morning. Highs in the upper 70s. Southwest winds 5 to 10 mph. Wednesday night: Mostly clear in the evening then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog after midnight. Lows in the mid 50s. Southwest winds 5 to 15 mph. Thursday: Partly cloudy in the morning then becoming most- ly sunny. Highs in the mid 80s.

morning then becoming most- ly sunny. Highs in the mid 80s. Lotto Sept. 11 Super Lotto

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Daily Four

1
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Daily three midday

 
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Daily three evening

 
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The Daily Derby race winners are Gold Rush,No. 1,in first place;California Classic,No.5,in second place; and Lucky Star, No. 2, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:40.00. race time was clocked at 1:40.00.

2, in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:40.00. State . . . .

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Publisher Jerry Lee jerry@smdailyjournal.com

Editor in Chief Jon Mays jon@smdailyjournal.com

Phone:

(650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290

To

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800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402

800 S. Claremont St., Ste. 210, San Mateo, Ca. 94402 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by Mike

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by Mike Argirion and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

NUDAT

letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. NUDAT ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All
letter to each square, to form four ordinary words. NUDAT ©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All

©2010 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

WOSOP

Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. WOSOP GABLEE SATTEE Answer: Yesterday’s Now arrange the circled
Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. WOSOP GABLEE SATTEE Answer: Yesterday’s Now arrange the circled

GABLEE

Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. WOSOP GABLEE SATTEE Answer: Yesterday’s Now arrange the circled
Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. WOSOP GABLEE SATTEE Answer: Yesterday’s Now arrange the circled
Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. WOSOP GABLEE SATTEE Answer: Yesterday’s Now arrange the circled
SATTEE Answer:
SATTEE
Answer:

Yesterday’s

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Jumbles:

Answer:

(Answers tomorrow) BOWER MAIZE MEMORY TRAGIC The graffiti vandal was arrested for a — GRIME CRIME

(Answers tomorrow) BOWER MAIZE MEMORY TRAGIC The graffiti vandal was arrested for a — GRIME CRIME
Answer: (Answers tomorrow) BOWER MAIZE MEMORY TRAGIC The graffiti vandal was arrested for a — GRIME

TO

TO
TO

Snapshot

vandal was arrested for a — GRIME CRIME TO Snapshot REUTERS Revellers covered in paint take

REUTERS

Revellers covered in paint take part in the annual Cascamorras festival in Guadix,southern Spain.

Inside

annual Cascamorras festival in Guadix,southern Spain. Inside Meridia FDA mulls pulling diet pill See page 18
annual Cascamorras festival in Guadix,southern Spain. Inside Meridia FDA mulls pulling diet pill See page 18

Meridia

FDA mulls pulling diet pill See page 18

Wall Street

Stocks climb on bank reform,China growth,deals See page 10

This Day in History

1814

Francis Scott Key wrote a poem after witnessing how Fort McHenry in Maryland had endured a night of British

bombardment during the War of 1812; that poem, “Defence of Fort McHenry,” later became the lyrics to “The Star-

Spangled Banner,” the American national anthem.

In 1836, former Vice President Aaron Burr died in Staten

Island, N.Y. at age 80. In 1847, during the Mexican-American War, U.S. forces under Gen. Wineld Scott took control of Mexico City. In 1901, President William McKinley died in Buffalo, N.Y., of gunshot wounds inflicted by an assassin. Vice President Theodore Roosevelt succeeded him. In 1927, modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan died in Nice (nees), France, when her scarf became entangled in a wheel of the sports car she was riding in. In 1948, a groundbreaking ceremony took place in New York at the site of the United Nations’ world headquarters. In 1960, representatives of Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela concluded a conference in Baghdad where they had created the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, or OPEC. In 1964, Pope Paul VI opened the third session of the Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, also known as “Vatican II.” (The session closed two months later.) In 1982, Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly actress Grace Kelly, died at age 52 of injuries from a car crash the day before; Lebanon’s president-elect, Bashir Gemayel, was killed by a bomb. In 1985, Shiite Muslim kidnappers in Lebanon released the Rev. Benjamin Weir (weer) after holding him captive for 16 months.

Thought for the Day

“Civilizations die from philosophical calm, irony, and the sense of fair play quite as surely as they die of debauchery.” — Joseph Wood Krutch, American author (1893-1970)

Birthdays

Russian President Actor Tyler Perry is Singer Amy Dmitry Medvedev 41. Winehouse is 27. is
Russian President Actor Tyler Perry is Singer Amy Dmitry Medvedev 41. Winehouse is 27. is
Russian President Actor Tyler Perry is Singer Amy Dmitry Medvedev 41. Winehouse is 27. is

Russian President

Actor Tyler Perry is

Singer Amy

Dmitry Medvedev

41.

Winehouse is 27.

is 45.

Actress Zoe Caldwell is 77. Feminist author Kate Millett is 76. Actor Walter Koenig is 74. Basketball Hall of Fame coach Larry Brown is 70. Singer-actress Joey Heatherton is 66. Actor Sam Neill is 63. Singer Jon “Bowzer” Bauman (Sha Na Na) is 63. Rock musician Ed King is 61. Rock musician Steve Berlin (Los Lobos) is 55. Country singer-songwriter Beth Nielsen Chapman is 54. Actress Mary Crosby is 51. Singer Morten Harket (a-ha) is 51. Country singer John Berry is 51. Actress Melissa Leo is 50. Actress Faith Ford is 46. Actor Jamie Kaler is 46. Actress Michelle Stafford is 45. Rock musician Mike Cooley (Drive-By Truckers) is 44. Actor Dan Cortese is 42. Contemporary Christian singer Mark Hall is 41. Actor Ben Garant is 40. Rock musician Craig Montoya (Tri Polar) is 40. Actress Kimberly Williams-Paisley is 39. Rapper Nas is 37. Country singer Danielle Peck is 32. Pop singer Ayo is 30. Actor Adam Lamberg is 26.

California church members show faith with tattoos

ANAHEIM — Church logo tattoos are the latest in offbeat testimony at an Orange County church that holds Sunday services in a punk rock night- club and collects offerings in KFC buckets. City Church of Anaheim is celebrat- ing its first year in operation and the goal of reaching a 200-member flock with a radical commitment to the con- gregation and community: Tattoos of the red-heart church logo. Pastor Kyle Steven Bonenberger told worshippers that God “tattooed your name on his heart” and it was time for an everlasting commitment to Him and the church. The Orange County Register reports about a dozen people got inked, fulfill- ing the pledge they made if the church doubled its normal attendance. City Church started in a living room and moved to Anaheim’s Chain Reaction Club as the congregation grew.

Deputies handcuff gator near school

OLDSMAR, Fla.— Deputies in Florida had to handcuff a rather unusu- al suspect — a 7-foot-long alligator. A crossing guard at a Tampa-area

Strange but True

school spotted the gator lounging near an elementary school Monday morning around the time children would be walking to school. As she and three deputies waited for a trapper to arrive, the alligator started walking toward the children. Three deputies roped the gator’s neck and tail as the animal rolled and thrashed. Its tail broke off chunks of stucco from a nearby wall. Deputies later secured the gator’s mouth with electrical tape and hand- cuffed its hind legs. Florida Fish and Wildlife officials took custody of the animal until the trapper arrived.

Police: Street musician hit man with guitar

MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin police say a street musician apparently upset by criticism of his music bashed a man over the head with his guitar, slammed another person into a wall and wrestled with an officer before being arrested. Madison police spokesman Joel DeSpain tells The Capital Times that 31-year-old Brandin Hochstrasser, known as “Bongo Jesus,” was perform- ing Thursday when a 54-year-old man knocked his music. DeSpain says the two argued and police were called when Hochstrasser began hitting his critic with his guitar.

DeSpain says Hochstrasser then charged the man, knocking him down. An officer used a stun gun to subdue and arrest Hochstrasser. Online court records show no formal charges had been filed by Sunday. A listed phone number for Hochstrasser couldn’t be found.

Five-year-old boy wins Alaska moose calling contest

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — For 5- year-old Andrew Polasky, being loud has paid off. Andrew was the winner of this week- end’s moose calling contest at the Alaska Zoo in Anchorage. He lives with his parents, Janessa and Ray, on Elmendorf Air Force Base in Anchorage. He really hasn’t been around moose that much, even though they’re ever- present in Alaska’s largest city. Instead, he’s more used to deer from his native Wisconsin. So what’s his secret for winning a moose calling contest? His mom says he just likes making a lot of noise, and, she says, “He’s good at it.” For his efforts, Andrew won a calen- dar, a $25 gift certificate to an Anchorage restaurant — the Moose’s Tooth, of course — and a moose cutout to hang on his wall.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

3

Alleged fire gawker charged with three felonies

By Michelle Durand

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

A Millbrae man who prosecutors say led

law enforcement on a high-speed chase and dragged an ofcer after they spotted him

gawking at the San Bruno re wreckage was charged yesterday with three felonies.

A San Bruno ofcer and a gang enforce-

ment ofcer spotted Paul Lee, 34, driving a

motorcycle with a female passenger near the edge of the re scene, said Chief Deputy District Attorney Steve Wagstaffe.

Lee allegedly told the ofcers he was riding around, looking at the remains, and when asked to dismount the bike, instead sped away. One ofcer grabbed Lee’s jacket and was dragged several feet before Lee drove over his foot and sped up to 60 mph through the city to Highway 101, Wagstaffe said. The chase ended in San Carlos when the motorcycle died. Lee later told authorities he ed because he was scared. Lee is currently on parole, having been sent to prison in 2003 for possession of a con- trolled substance and a rearm, in 2005 for

attempted kidnapping and in 2009 for posses- sion of methamphetamine. On Monday, prosecutors charged Lee with reckless evading, assault on a peace ofcer and alliterative charges of assault with a dead- ly weapon and battery on a peace ofcer in performance of his duties. Lee did not waive his right to a speedy trial and returns to court Sept. 23 for a preliminary hearing. If tried and convicted, he faces 11 years and four months in prison as a second- striker, Wagstaffe said. Lee remains in custody in lieu of $50,000 bail.

NTSB finishes investigation of gas-line explosion site

BAY CITY NEWS SERVICE

Federal investigators Monday nished their initial investigation of the site of Thursday’s gas-pipe explosion in San Bruno and are now focusing on reviewing documents and inter- viewing witnesses, a spokesman said. The National Transportation Safety Board

nished examining pipes that were laid under the gas line that exploded and concluded they

did not contribute to the blast, board vice chairman Christopher Hart said. It was initially unclear whether the excava- tion and installation of those pipes damaged the gas line, he said. Investigators have now turned the ditch over to the city of San Bruno and PG&E so infra- structure can be restored, Hart said. Transportation safety board investigators are now looking at documents from PG&E, visiting control and monitoring sites, and

examining valves that have been preserved for evidence, Hart said. The transportation safety board is also look- ing at seismic records to see if any activity has occurred recently that could have affected the pipes, Hart said. The agency has also begun to receive results of toxicology tests conducted on PG&E employees. So far the workers have tested negative for drugs and alcohol, Hart said.

County,union reach contract agreement

San Mateo County negotiators and the union representing approximately 2,000 of its employees tentatively reached a new, 26-month contract at the end of August which includes no salary increases. The contract, which was ratied by AFSCME Local 829 on Sept. 9, also includes higher med- ical co-pays and

Local brief

provides that employees pay a greater per- centage of health premiums, reduces retirement and retiree health benets for newly hired employees and requires new hires pay up to 50 percent of the cost of retire- ment cost-of-living adjustments. Laid-off employees will receive one week’s pay for each full year of county service up to 10 weeks and provides two days of paid bereave-

ment leave. To help offset the impact of higher co-pays and higher medical premiums, the county agreed to contribute $200 to a exible spending account for each employee in 2011 and 2012. These changes also apply to all management and condential employees. AFSCME leaders say they agreed to the con- tract to achieve both long-term and short-term savings and board President Rich Gordon said the move is welcome.

Police reports

Fore shame

A woman complained that someone near- by was hitting golf balls into her backyard and feared being hit by a stray ball on the 1300 block of Columbus Avenue in Burlingame before 5:15 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 9.

BURLINGAME

Dog off leash. A mild-mannered gray pit bull with a pink collar was seem roaming around the 1300 block of Broadway before 1:50 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 9.

Suspicious person. A juvenile stood in a carport

in front of an entrance gate but wouldn’t move

when motorists honked at him on the 1400 block

of Floribunda Avenue before 6:17 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 9. Harassing calls. A risk manager for the hospital received threatening phone calls on the 1800 block of Trousdale Drive before 1:15 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7. Solicitor. Five men were selling bed sheets from

a van and harassing customers on the 1100

block of Broadway before 7:43 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7. Vandalism. A vehicle was egged and the lock was jammed on the 1800 block of Ashton Avenue before 7:43 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 7.

BELMONT

Disturbance. Several juveniles were jumping on the roof of a shed at a school on Biddulph Way before 7:48 p.m. Monday, Sept. 6. Noise complaint. Two women were ghting on Cornish Way before 5:32 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 5. Vandalism. The lock to a gate was cut at the intersection of Wakeeld and Somerset drives before 4:10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 4.

eld and Somerset drives before 4:10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 4. The League of Women Voters will

The League of Women Voters will present the pros and cons of the Nov. 2 state ballot measures 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 25 at the San Mateo County Community College District boardroom in a joint meeting with AAUW, 3401 CSM Drive in San Mateo. For more info call

342-5853.

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4 Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

LOCAL/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CITY GOVERNMENT • The Belmont City Council will consider a resolution tonight in support of

CITY

GOVERNMENT

• The Belmont City Council will consider a resolution tonight in support of a cut-and-cov- ered trench for the vertical align- ment of a four-tracked high-speed train system. The council will also discuss whether to form an ad-hoc high-speed rail subcommittee and will review the construction right-of-way maps for the Belmont segment. The council does not favor an elevated viaduct for Belmont and wants the tracks to be buried underground. The draft res- olution points out that the California High-Speed Rail Authority is nancially supporting tunneling in San Francisco and San

Jose. The meeting is 7:30 p.m., tonight, City Hall, One Twin Pines Lane, Belmont. • The San Mateo Planning Commission will consider updat- ing the city’s general plan to reclassify zoning of Fifth Avenue between South Delaware Street and South Amphlett Boulevard from R3 (multiple family dwellings) to R2 (two family dwellings). The commission will consider other updates to the gen- eral plan including the re-designa- tion of the city’s waste water treat- ment plant from regional commu- nity commercial to public facility on the land use plan. The commis- sion meets 7:30 p.m., tonight, City Hall, 330 W. 20th Ave., San Mateo. • The San Bruno City Council has canceled its regularly sched- uled meeting Tuesday, Sept. 14.

Aging gas pipe at risk of explosion nationwide

By Garance Burke and Jason Dearen

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN BRUNO — An ominous theme has emerged from the wreck- age of a deadly pipeline explosion in California: There are thousands of pipes just like it nationwide. Utilities have been under pressure for years to better inspect and replace aging gas pipes — many of them laid years before the suburbs expanded over them and now are at risk of leaking or erupting. But the effort has fallen short. Critics say the regulatory system is ripe for problems because the gov- ernment largely leaves it up to the

“If this was the FAA and air travel we were talking about,I wouldn’t get on a plane.”

— Rick Kessler,a former congressional staffer

companies to do inspections, and utilities are reluctant to spend the money necessary to properly x and replace decrepit pipelines. “If this was the FAA and air trav- el we were talking about, I wouldn’t get on a plane,” said Rick Kessler, a former congressional staffer spe- cializing in pipeline safety issues who now works for the Pipeline Safety Trust, an advocacy group based in Bellingham, Wash. Investigators are still trying to g- ure out how the pipeline in San

Bruno ruptured and ignited a gigan- tic reball that torched one home after another in the neighborhood, killing at least four people. Pacic Gas and Electric Co., the pipeline’s owner, said Monday it has set aside up to $100 million to help residents recover. Experts say the California disaster epitomizes the risks that communi- ties face with old gas lines. The pipe was more than 50 years old — right around the life expectancy for steel pipes.

ties face with old gas lines. The pipe was more than 50 years old — right
ties face with old gas lines. The pipe was more than 50 years old — right
ties face with old gas lines. The pipe was more than 50 years old — right
ties face with old gas lines. The pipe was more than 50 years old — right
ties face with old gas lines. The pipe was more than 50 years old — right
ties face with old gas lines. The pipe was more than 50 years old — right

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/STATE

Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

5

W ith their “We Believe in Youth” program, the San Carlos Chamber of Commerce awarded

$11,000 in scholarships to nine local high school seniors in May. Six students are gradu- ating from Carlmont High School: Brittany Hernandez, Alex Kelson, Kyle McKee, Kevin Muller, Nolan Richins and Victoria Wood. Three other schools had one recipi- ent each:

Dylan Hruska

from Sacred

Heart Prep,

William Juri

from

Bellarmine College Prep, and Marisa Mendenhall from Notre Dame High School. San Carlos chamber members provided $6,000 to the scholarship fund, while the chamber contributed $5,000 from proceeds generated at the annual San Carlos Art and Wine Faire held in October. In applying for the scholarships, students were asked to write two essays; one outlining their future academic and career plans, and one providing examples of any leadership roles held in community service, school, team sports, church or work, and how these leader- ship roles have influenced their personal development. ***

ship roles have influenced their personal development. *** In May, the Redwood City Rotary Club announced

In May, the Redwood City Rotary Club announced the 2010 Scholarship Recipients, awarding $14,250 to 11 promising young men and women to assist them in completing their higher education. All of the students are Redwood City resi- dents who come from variety of backgrounds. Nine students will receive $1,500 college scholarships and one student will receive a

$1,500 college scholarships and one student will receive a In May,the Rotary Club of Foster City

In May,the Rotary Club of Foster City honored Kelsi Kobara,second from the left,of San Mateo High School as student of the month.Also pictured are Assistant Principal Cynthia Rapaido, left to right,teacher Natalie Montoya and President Linda Grant.

$750 community college scholarship. The awards were based on a number of criteria including: scholastic ability, community serv- ice, responsibility toward education and nan- cial need. $1,500 scholarship recipients will attend four-year schools, including Harvard, Northeastern, Cal-State, Humboldt, University of Portland, Notre Dame de Namur and the University of California at Berkeley. They are: Clarisa Ontiveros from Sequoia High School; Sarah Ducker from Sequoia; Jennifer Cabello-Chavez from Sequoia; Victoria Tinoco from Sequoia; Elizaveta Novikova from Carlmont High School; Jessica Thatcher from Notre Dame High School; Daniel Perez from Woodside

High School; William Roller from Bellarmine College Prep; and Whitney Olson from Woodside. Ann Smith, who attends Redwood High School, received the $750 Community College scholarship and will study nursing at College of San Mateo. These 11 recipients were selected from among 35 applicants and were selected by a Scholarship committee headed by Karen Krueger.

Class notes is a twice weekly column dedicated to school news. It is compiled by education reporter Heather Murtagh. You can contact her at (650) 344- 5200, ext. 105 or at heather@smdailyjournal.com.

Scandal-ridden city must return $3M in state property tax

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BELL — Lt. Gov. Abel Maldonado signed a bill Monday ordering the return of nearly $3 million in property taxes the state says was illegally collected in the blue-collar sub- urb of Bell, where one in six people live in poverty. An audit by state Controller John Chiang’s office determined the City Council passed an illegal resolution in 2007 that resulted in a 50 percent tax hike over three years. The tax rate was later rolled back, but the money collected could not be refunded until Maldonado signed Assembly Bill 900 into law. “I know that the residents of Bell are work- ing hard to reform the way business has been done in the past, and AB 900 will help them on their way,” said Maldonado, who signed the bill in his capacity as acting governor while Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is out of state. Four of Bell’s five City Council members have been targeted for recall since a wide- ranging scandal surfaced involving the high taxes, huge salaries paid to former city employees and allegations of racial profiling of drivers. Property owners in the scandal-plagued city learned earlier this year they were pay- ing the second-highest property taxes in Los Angeles County, ahead of Beverly Hills and other wealthy cities The median household income in Bell is

$40,556.

in Los Angeles County, ahead of Beverly Hills and other wealthy cities The median household income
in Los Angeles County, ahead of Beverly Hills and other wealthy cities The median household income
in Los Angeles County, ahead of Beverly Hills and other wealthy cities The median household income
in Los Angeles County, ahead of Beverly Hills and other wealthy cities The median household income
in Los Angeles County, ahead of Beverly Hills and other wealthy cities The median household income

6 Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Local briefs

County campaigns against lead-based projects

San Mateo County health officials are using a two-year grant from the Environmental Protection Agency to raise awareness that dust and paint chips can be dangerous and lead to childhood lead poisoning. The county’s “Get the Lead Out” campaign encourages residents to report any unsafe work practices and asks those who are in contact with unsafe areas to do the same. Eighty-four percent of the county’s 253,000 housing units were built before 1980, according to county housing data. If the structures are sanded or scraped without proper contain- ment, traces of lead in the dust and chips can enter the blood- stream and lead to health problems for adults and children. Lead is especially harmful for young children and unborn babies. Exposed children often have slowed development and lifelong learning difficulties. Some have hearing loss, delayed physical growth, speech deficits and anemia. Other signs of lead poisoning include appetite loss, vomiting, irri- tability, stomach aches and fatigue. Most children, though, are asymptomatic and can only be diagnosed through a blood screening. For more information on the “Get the Lead Out” campaign or to report unsafe work practices, call 372-6200 or visit www.getleadout.org.

Redwood City plans fall cleanup day

Redwood City is inviting the public to spruce up the city as part of the annual Fall Clean Up/Coastal Cleanup Day at the end of September. This year, the focus is on cleaning up Jefferson and James Avenue, Little River Park, Redwood Village neighborhood, Hoover Park, Union Cemetery, the Port of Redwood City, Whipple Avenue/Highway 101 interchange and Woodside Road/El Camino. Volunteers will receive a complimentary continental break- fast before moving out in teams to the targeting areas. At noon, the volunteers will receive a free lunch as a thank you. Participants meet at 8:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 25 at the Redwood City Public Works Services building, 1400 Broadway (near Woodside Road). Call 780-7300 for more information.

To donate to the Red Cross visit www.redcrossba- yarea.org or call (888) 4-HELP-BAY or (800) RED-Cross and specify“San Bruno Fire.”Donated items should be brought to the First Tongan United Methodist Church, 560 El Camino Real, San Bruno. Officials say that there are enough donated items now,and that further donations should be made in cash to imme- diately help the victims. Red Cross Hotline, (888)

443-5722.

*** To volunteer visit www.thevolunteercenter.net. *** To donate blood to the Blood Centers of the Pacific visit bloodcenters.org or call (888) 393-GIVE.The centers need universal Type O negative blood. *** The Salvation Army is providing families with assis- tance at the local assistance center at the San Bruno Veterans Recreational Center. It is supplying vouchers to Salvation Army Family Thrift Stores,to assist with the purchase of household items, clothing or other resources as families begin to move into new housing;Target gift cards,giving families the ability to purchase the supplies they need;Long dis- tance phone cards;and the option to sign-up for free appointments with a Salvation Army Caseworker,for helpful assistance and additional counseling well into the future.Some of the services include rental assis- tance, utility assistance, clothing/furniture vouchers, food and referrals. San Bruno Fire survivors seeking caseworker or counseling support can contact The Salvation Army of South San Francisco at (650) 266- 4591 to schedule an appointment or inquire about additional services. The Salvation Army is asking for financial gifts give a greater ability to provide the appropriate goods to

familiesforrebuildingtheirhomesandlives.Hundred-

percent of all donations made to the Salvation Army San Bruno Fire Disaster Relief fund will go to help those affected by this catastrophe. For more infor- mation visit www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or call (800) Sal-Army ((800) 725-2769). *** Donations to the San Bruno Lions Club for fire victims can be sent to San Bruno Lions Club,PO Box 242,San Bruno,CA 94066.Please write fire in the memo section of your check.Donations can also be sent to the Mill- braeLionsClub,P.O.Box328,Millbrae,CA 94030-0328. All money received will go directly to fire victims. *** The Second Harvest Food Bank announced that in-

dividuals and families in need of food should contact (800) 984-3663 for referrals to local food resources through Second Harvest’s Food Connection Hotline.

Fire resources

*** PHS/SPCA is offering temporary shelter,pet food and supplies for displaced animals.Two humane officers are stations at the Red Cross trailer at 251 City Park Way.The emergency veterinary clinic closest to San Bruno is at 227 N.Amphlett Blvd.and can be reached at 348-2575.

*** White Ivie Pet Hospital in San Bruno is offering free boarding for pets belonging to people who have been displaced by the fire.The hospital is at 1111 El Camino Real in San Bruno.

*** The SiliconValley Community Foundation will match up to $100,000 on all financial gifts to its San Bruno Fire Fund. For questions to donate, contact 450-5444 or donate@siliconvalleycf.org. *** Wells Fargo customers can donate to the American Red Cross at 85 Wells Fargo ATMs in San Mateo County. Customers will not be charged a fee and 100 percent of the donation will be sent to the American Red Cross. Customers also can contact Wells Fargo 24 hours a day,seven days a week at (800) TO-WELLS ((800) 869-

3557).

*** Safeway stores are collecting donations at check- stands for the American Red Cross’ San Bruno relief effort.

*** The Silicon Valley Community Foundation is offering an initial $100,000 match on all gifts to aid in the re- sponse and recovery of this neighborhood.The San Bruno Fire Fund is designed to help rebuild the com- munity today and in the weeks to come. All contributions will be granted to qualified nonprofit organizations and programs serving those whose lives have been impacted. For any questions about the fund or how to make a gift please contact the community foundation at (650) 450-5444 or do- nate@siliconvalleycf.org. ***

OptumHealth announced a free help line established for people in San Bruno faced with the emotional con- sequences of the recent gas explosion. Staffed by experienced master’s-level behavioral health spe- cialists, the free help line offers assistance to callers seeking help in dealing with stress, anxiety and the grieving process.Callers may also receive referrals to a database of community resources to help them with specificconcerns,includingfinancialandlegalmatters. The toll-free help line number,(866) 342-6892,is open

24 hours a day,seven days a week for as long as nec- essary. The service is free of charge and open to anyone.Resources and information are also available via the Internet in English at www.liveandwork-

Spanish at

www.mentesana-cuerposano.com. *** The State Bar Association of California is coordinating legal services for potential victims. Rules prohibit lawyers from soliciting clients at an accident scene,at a hospital or on the way to a hospital;seeking clients who, because of their physical, emotional or mental state, are unable to exercise reasonable judgment; seeking employment by mail unless the letter and envelope are clearly labeled as an advertisement. For more information the association can be reached at (800) 843-9053 to obtain the names of certified

lawyer referral services or to report lawyer solitication. *** Noble Construction is offering free board-up services

foraffectedhomes.Forinformationcontact(650)458-

8797.Lic.No.799602.

*** San Bruno residents can pick up their mail at the San Bruno Main Post Office,located at 1300 Huntington Ave. Customers who may be affected long term have the option of setting up either a temporary change of ad- dress or renting a P.O. Box. P.O. Box availability and pricing can be checked by visiting usps.com or by call- ing (800) ask-usps ((800) 275-8777). For more information call (650) 952-2901. *** The San Mateo County Community College District is offering several brand-new apartments to be used as temporary housing for victims of the San Bruno fire. The district opened Cañada Vista,a 60-unit complex on the Cañada campus in Redwood City,three weeks ago and not all apartments have yet been rented to faculty and staff.The college district had reserved sev- eral apartments to be used to recruit new faculty and staff.For information on available apartments contact christensen@smccd.edu. *** Subsidiaries of AT&T Inc.in San Bruno are providing vic- tims with free access to phone and computer services to help them keep in touch with loved ones during the disaster’s aftermath,the company announced Friday. Employees of AT&T stores in San Bruno provided wire- less phones to people who needed them at the Veterans Memorial Recreational Center,located at 251 City Park Way at Crystal Springs Road.The company also made computers and cellular phone chargers available at that location.

well.com and

in

Springs Road.The company also made computers and cellular phone chargers available at that location. well.com and
Springs Road.The company also made computers and cellular phone chargers available at that location. well.com and
Springs Road.The company also made computers and cellular phone chargers available at that location. well.com and
Springs Road.The company also made computers and cellular phone chargers available at that location. well.com and
Springs Road.The company also made computers and cellular phone chargers available at that location. well.com and
Springs Road.The company also made computers and cellular phone chargers available at that location. well.com and
Springs Road.The company also made computers and cellular phone chargers available at that location. well.com and

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL/NATION

Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

7

Boehner for middle-class tax cut

By Douglas K. Daniel

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — House Minority Leader John Boehner says he would vote

for President Barack Obama’s plan to extend tax cuts only for middle-class earners, not the wealthy, if that were the only option avail- able to House Republicans. Boehner, R-Ohio,

said it is “bad poli- cy” to exclude the highest-earning Americans from tax relief during the recession, and later Sunday he accused the White House of “class warfare.” But he said he wouldn’t block the breaks for middle-income individuals and families if Democrats won’t support the full package. Income tax cuts passed under President George W. Bush will expire at the end of this year unless Congress acts and Obama signs the bill. Obama said he would support continuing the lower tax rates for couples earning up to $250,000 or single taxpayers making up to $200,000. But he and the Democratic leadership in Congress refused to back continued lower rates for the fewer than 3 percent of Americans who make more than that. The cost of extending the tax cuts for everyone for the next 10 years would approach $4 trillion, according to con- gressional estimates. Eliminating the breaks for the top earners would reduce that bill by about $700 billion. Boehner’s comments signaled a possi- ble break in the logjam that has prevent- ed passage of a tax bill, although

Republicans would still force Democrats to vote on their bigger tax-cut package in the nal weeks before the November congressional elections. “I want to do something for all Americans who pay taxes,” Boehner said in an interview taped Saturday for “Face the Nation” on CBS. “If the only option I have is to vote for some of those

tax reductions, I’ll vote for

If that’s

some of those tax reductions, I’ll vote for If that’s John Boehner REUTERS Barack Obama said

John Boehner

tax reductions, I’ll vote for If that’s John Boehner REUTERS Barack Obama said he and his

REUTERS

Barack Obama said he and his economic team are looking for additional steps to promote economic growth,including tax cuts for businesses.

what we can get done, but I think that’s bad policy. I don’t think that’s going to help our economy.” White House press secretary Robert Gibbs issued a statement Sunday saying, “We welcome John Boehner’s change in position and support for the middle class tax cuts, but time will tell if his actions will be anything but continued support for the failed policies that got us into this mess.” Boehner responded to that press release with one of his own. “Instead of resorting to tired old class warfare rheto- ric, pitting one working American against another, the president and the Democratic leadership should start working with us this week to ensure a fair and open debate to pass legislation to cut spending and freeze tax rates with- out any further delay,” he said. Austan Goolsbee, new chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, said on ABC’s “This Week” that he hopes that Democratic law- makers who also want an across-the- board extension will join Obama and others in the party in supporting legis- lation aimed at the middle class before

the November elections.

In response to Boehner’s initial com-

ments, Goolsbee said, “If he’s for that, I would be happy.” With congressional elections less than two months away, both parties have been working to score points with voters gen-

erally unhappy with Congress. Democrats are bearing the brunt of voter anger over a stubborn recession, a weak job market and a high-spending govern- ment, giving the GOP an opening for

taking back control of the House and possibly the Senate. Democratic leaders would relish put- ting up a bill that extends only the mid- dle-class tax cuts and then daring Republicans to oppose it. In response, GOP lawmakers probably would try to force votes on amendments to extend all the tax cuts, arguing that it would be a boost to the economy, and then point to those who rejected them.

A compromise over the tax-cut exten-

sions had been suggested by some senior Democrats. In a speech last week in Cleveland, Obama rejected the idea of temporarily extending all the tax cuts for one to two years.

Imam: N.Y. mosque site is not ‘hallowed ground’

By Jennifer Peltz

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — It is two blocks from ground zero, but the site of a proposed mosque and Islamic center shouldn’t be seen as “hallowed ground” in a neigh- borhood that also contains a strip club and a betting parlor, the cleric leading the effort said Monday. Making an ardent case for the compat- ibility of Islam and American values, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf reiterated that he is searching for a solution to the furor the project has created. But he left unan- swered exactly what he had in mind. If anything, Rauf only deepened the questions around the project’s future, telling an audience at the Council on Foreign Relations think tank that he was “exploring all options” — but declining

that he was “exploring all options” — but declining Feisal Rauf to specify them — while

Feisal Rauf

to specify them — while also arguing that a high-profile site is necessary to get across his mes- sage of moderate Islam. While opponents of the project see it as insulting the

memories of the thousands killed by Muslim extremists in the 2001 terrorist attacks, Rauf said he doesn’t see the spot as sacred memorial space. “It’s absolutely disingenuous, as many have said, that that block is hallowed ground,” Rauf said, noting the nearby exotic dance and betting businesses. “So

let’s clarify that misperception.” Some Sept. 11 victims’ families and

others view the proposed mosque site — in a building damaged by debris from the attacks — as very much part of the

terrain of death and sorrow surrounding the trade center.

“I just think he’s being very insensi-

tive to say it’s not hallowed ground because of who’s occupying the build- ings,” said Jim Riches, a former New York City deputy re chief whose son, Jimmy, was killed at the trade center. “The strip club didn’t murder my son.” The project has become a ashpoint for worldwide debate about Islam’s place in America nine years after the Sept. 11 attacks. The controversy has colored the fall campaign season and cast a shadow on this past weekend’s commemoration of the attacks, with sup- porters and opponents of the mosque project holding rallies nearby.

and opponents of the mosque project holding rallies nearby. School sports lights issue heads to court

School sports lights issue heads to court

By Heather Murtagh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Days after lights were erected on the Menlo-Atherton High School football eld, lawyers met Monday morning because of a resident petition to bar the bulbs from being turned on. Five temporary light towers were installed Saturday for use during the current school year while the Sequoia Union High School District evaluates the impacts of possibly placing per- manent lights at the location. Banded together under the moniker Protect Atherton’s Residential Character, a number of residents have sued the district in hopes of barring lights from being used. An injunction hearing was held Monday, at which no decision was made. There’s no timeline for when Judge Marie Weiner must give her decision. Anna Shimko, who is representing the PARC group, was con- cerned that lights could begin to be used at any point this week. “They could start using them right away for practices until

8:30 p.m. I trust that the judge will act very quickly,” said Shimko. District spokeswoman Bettylu Smith con rmed the school has no plans to use the lights for practices this month given the later sunset time. The rst night football game is scheduled for

Thursday, Oct. 7. Installing temporary lights — albeit with the plan to use them for a limited number of games — will create a slippery slope of increased requests for use during practices, other sports or rental purposes ultimately creating a large, unwanted impact on the neighbors, according to the lawsuit led with the San Mateo County Superior Court Aug. 11. The group noted the environmental impact report doesn’t take the neighbors’ concerns into account. Lights could lead to

a number of problems like increased trafc, noise and negative

behavior during late-night hours like drinking, drugs, rob- beries or violence, according to the lawsuit. “They want to go ahead and have the impact without study- ing it,” said Shimko. Timothy Fox, deputy county counsel representing the dis- trict, argued the temporary nature of these lights exempted the district from such a study. Permanent lights, on the other hand, will need to be and are already being studied, he said. Late last month, the district approved a usage policy for the temporary lights, which are slated to be taken out in March, requiring lights to be off by 8:30 p.m. except for four evening

football games when they will be off by 10:30 p.m. District ofcials have pointed to a later start time for students, and thus

a later release time, as a practical reason for needing lights.

Having lights would allow students to miss less class on game days. Shimko questioned how getting out of class 30 minutes later necessitates the need for two additional hours of light for prac- tice or games. Not allowing the use of the lights, Fox argued, affects more than the M-A players. It would also affect schools scheduled to participate in those night games, he said.

Heather Murtagh can be reached by e-mail: heather@smdailyjour- nal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 105.

he said. Heather Murtagh can be reached by e-mail: heather@smdailyjour- nal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200

8 Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

NATION/WORLD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Jailed American’s family asking Iran to drop bail

By Nasser Karimi and Brian Murphy

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

TEHRAN, Iran — A day after Iran

offered a detained American woman

Shaei. But it comes as powerful voices within Iran challenge the decision to grant bail to the reported- ly ailing Shourd, who was detained along the Iraq border in July 2009 with two American friends who are

a

chance for release on $500,000

also jailed and face spy charges.

bail, her family countered with a

The Revolutionary Guard — the

request Monday to drop or lower the sum because they are struggling to raise the cash. The appeal — delivered by Swiss diplomats, who handle U.S. affairs

country’s military and economic powerhouse — used its allies in the Fars news agency to issue a sharply worded commentary decrying the move as a slap against Iran’s securi-

in

Iran — was another potential snag

ty and intelligence services. A law-

in

a process already complicated by

maker, Ahmad Tavakkoli, called the

political feuds among Iran’s leader- ship and questions over how a pay- ment could be made for Sarah Shourd’s freedom without violating international sanctions. There’s been no immediate word from Iranian authorities on the bid by Shourd’s family to drop or reduce her bail, said her attorney, Masoud

possible release a “bonus for Quran burners” in a clear reference to anti- Muslim factions in the United States. There was a time when no one in Iran dared question the country’s judiciary, which is directly under the wing of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Clinton says time is ripe for Mideast deal

SHANNON, Ireland — Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Monday that the “time is ripe” for Mideast peace, but that without face-to-face talks Israel can’t expect lasting security and the Palestinians can’t create an

independent

state. Clinton spoke with reporters Monday during a flight from Washington to Egypt for the latest round of the current Mideast peace talks, which began earlier this month.

Cuba to cut 500,000 gov’t workers, reform salaries

HAVANA — Cuba announced Monday it will cast off at least half a million state workers by early next year and reduce restrictions on pri-

workers by early next year and reduce restrictions on pri- Hillary Clinton Around the world vate

Hillary Clinton

Around the world

vate enterprise to help them nd new jobs — the most dramatic step

yet in President Raul Castro’s push

to radically remake employment on

the communist-run island. Castro suggested during a nation- ally televised address on Easter Sunday that as many as 1 million Cuban workers — about one in ve — may be redundant. But the gov- ernment had not previously laid out specific plans to slash its work force, and the speed and scope of the coming cutbacks were astound- ing.

Plane crashes with 51 aboard in Venezuela

CARACAS, Venezuela — A plane carrying 51 people crashed Monday in eastern Venezuela, and

ofcials said 33 survived while at least 14 were killed. The French-built ATR 42 from the state airline Conviasa slammed into

a lot used by the state-run Sidor

steel foundry, leaving its smashed

and partly scorched fuselage among

barrels and shipping containers. At least 14 people were killed and four others were missing after the

crash about six miles (10 kilome- ters) from the eastern city of Puerto Ordaz, Bolivar state Gov. Francisco Rangel Gomez told reporters. Steel plant worker Oscar Crespo said he heard the thunderous noise of the impact and found the plane in

ames.

Fifteen killed in disputed Kashmir in deadly protests

SRINAGAR, India — Indian forces fought Kashmiri demonstra- tors in street battles Monday that killed 15 people — including one police ofcer — in the deadliest day in a summer of violence challenging Indian rule in the disputed territory. Reports of a Quran desecration in the United States intensified the anger, with activists chanting “Down with America” and burning

an effigy of President Barack Obama in a rare anti-U.S. protest here.

chanting “Down with America” and burning an effigy of President Barack Obama in a rare anti-U.S.
chanting “Down with America” and burning an effigy of President Barack Obama in a rare anti-U.S.
chanting “Down with America” and burning an effigy of President Barack Obama in a rare anti-U.S.
chanting “Down with America” and burning an effigy of President Barack Obama in a rare anti-U.S.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

OPINION

Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

9

Disasters don’t happen here

D isasters happen in other states, other countries, the other end of the television

news channel. Disasters are wild- res in Southern California and annual hurricanes in the Caribbean and earthquakes in seismically questionable Third World coun- tries. There are oods in North Korea, tsunamis in Thailand, school campus shootings in Virginia, terrorist attacks in New York City. Disasters happen there, not here. When they happen there, those here respond with aid. Regional emergency responders and re- ghters speed off to bolster local ranks with manpower and equip- ment while those in the serene Bay Area suburbs spring to action giv- ing blood, donating money and organizing fundraisers. That’s not to say residents of San Bruno and the Peninsula don’t know tragedy. Every day there is at least one person whose world is shaken by death or foreclosure or any number of personal calamities. Less often, there are the more pub- lic heartaches, the car accidents and plane crashes and Caltrain fatalities. Yet even these don’t cut a swath through the entire communi- ty, leaving some fallen and others barely standing both guratively and literally.

‘A disaster is that delicate balance of feeling lucky that you were untouched while recognizing others were not so fortunate.’

Certainly those here plan for grand-scale, life-altering events. They attend disaster preparedness days and assemble kits with food and water supplies. They make the children practice getting out of the house when the smoke alarm goes off and submit emergency contact information to schools and employ- ers. But they also joke about when The Big One hits, still feeling safe and secure. They forget to change the batteries in the emergency kit every year and might not know even if they still have power. They roll their eyes when ofcials at the scene of other misfortunes speak of how survivors are grateful and immediately thanking higher pow- ers that they belong to that particu- lar community. After all, their world was just turned upside down. In the middle of twisted metal and hastily aban- doned teddy bears, loved ones in the hospital and roll calls of the missing, is the rst thought really gratitude for where they call home? When the ground buckles and the

skies roar, cursing one’s location seems a more likely reaction. Disasters happen in places where the adjectives awful and catastro- phe mean things quite different than the weather, the state of base- ball or commuter trafc. When you say an area is hellish there, a city is leveled, a neighborhood has oated away, scores are missing or dead. Those are what disasters are. Those are what happen to other people in other towns. Disasters don’t happen here. Until they do. When they do, a disaster is sud- denly not something ignored by a switch of a channel, or sympa- thized with from afar. A disaster isn’t the stuff of headlines and tax- deductible donation checks. At that moment, a disaster is what is out- side the front door — if there is a front door left to peek through. A disaster is telling the same story a million times for curious reporters and letting acronyms like FEMA and NTSB roll off the tongue in every-day conversation. A disaster is that delicate balance of feeling

Letters to the editor

Thank you to first responders

Editor,

I am a longtime San Bruno resi-

dent and having arrived within two minutes after the blast on San

Bruno Avenue, two things became immediately clear. First, a massive tragedy had occurred and I needed to assist all I could within the community I lived. Second, the amount of response from the entire Bay Area was a humbling and awesome sight to behold. Within 15 minutes of the blast, I spotted two San Carlos squad cars pull onto San Bruno Avenue and the ofcers ran from their units without even a thought as what to expect upon their arrival. A few minutes later, units from Redwood City, Daly City, Colma, Pacica and San Mateo County Sheriff’s Ofce arrived. Shortly, we had Alameda, San Francisco, Menlo Park and other outside agencies all parked on San Bruno Avenue taking both direc- tions — not to mention the myriad of unmarked squad cars and vehi- cles.

I say it is humbling because we

were thought of in our time of need — we were embraced by the rst response community with wide- reaching open arms. Our city is now known worldwide due to this event and while the human tragedy is huge and unforgiving, our feel- ing of helplessness and despair was answered by the men and women who make up our rst responders. Ordinary citizens shopping at the Lunardi’s market who left lled shopping carts next to their carts to run across the street to see what assistance they could provide. All those who assisted in even the smallest ways as to provide a jack- et to those waiting to see if their loved ones on Glenview or Claremont were OK, these are all heroes to me. From the bottom of my heart and with every ber my being — I

thank all those present during the rst few hours of this tragedy.

Thank you from me, my family,

friends and unknown neighbors within San Bruno. We are forever in your debt and cannot express from our heart of hearts what it means to us, all you provided.

Allessandra Clark

San Bruno

A mending heart

Editor, “The City With A Heart,” San Bruno, is in the midst of a cardiac infarction. As a result of Thursday’s Pacic Gas and Electric gas line explosion, our collective heart is bruised, singed and, for many, torn. This is a good opportunity for those who seek smaller government and a reversal of social programs to make a serious review of what is happening even as the ashes of our heart cool. Thursday, San Bruno had 10 re-

ghters and a battalion chief on

duty with three pieces of equip- ment in two re houses. They were probably preparing dinner when shaken and deafened by the blast of a 30-inch-diameter pipe pres- sured with natural gas. These are the same brave folks who were criticized a while back for wasting time working out in a local gym. You see, San Bruno can- not afford exercise equipment for its own rst responders. It is not an uncommon story repeated by many

cash-strapped communities around the state. Some must close re sta- tions. We may complain about high taxes and wasteful spending but last week there were many San Bruno hearts thankful that, in lots of similar communities, brave, fit professionals and their equip- ment, sponsored by other taxpay- ers, were ready to join our fight

for survival. Thank you. Some politicians wish to elimi- nate the social programs that right now are coming to aid San Bruno hearts. Too bad they did not own homes on Glenview Drive. Too bad they do not have only the clothes on their backs. Ironically, they too could lose their homes and all their possessions next because they live near hidden explosions waiting to ignite. Like many broken hearts, ours is now mending thanks to the unbe- lievable outpouring of love and kindness from countless individu- als, businesses and governmental entities at all levels across the nation. Thank you.

Alice Bisson-Barnes

San Bruno

Rate increases

Editor, When I open my PG&E bill in the next few months or years, I do not want to see any request to the

PUC for a PG&E rate increase to pay for the repairs and payments to residents who were killed, wound- ed or displaced due to the natural gas explosion and res in San Bruno. PG&E regularly applies for rate increases, some of which are pro- posed for expenses that should be considered a part of the cost of doing business and as routine over- head required to fulll their obliga- tions to their customers.

Tom Elliott

San Mateo

China invests in HSR

Editor, In her letter “Looking deeper into trade trip” in the Sept. 8 edi- tion of the Daily Journal, Mary L. Hunt complains that Gov. Arnold

the Daily Journal, Mary L. Hunt complains that Gov. Arnold lucky that you were untouched while

lucky that you were untouched while recognizing others were not so fortunate. A disaster is also learning what mettle people are made of, what they’ll do to help and — sadly — sometimes how they’ll take advantage. A disaster becomes part of a per- son’s and a community’s history and therefore part of its future. Sept. 9 is burnt into San Bruno’s narrative, proving that disasters do happen here. Thankfully, so does recovery.

Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat” runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be reached by e- mail: michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think of this column? Send a letter to the editor:

letters@smdailyjournal.com.

Schwarzenegger is going to China partly to scare up investment capi- tal for California’s high-speed rail line. She wonders why China would invest in HSR when Wall Street would not, and feels there may be national security implica- tions. The reason why China is inter-

ested and Wall Street is not is sim- ple: the Chinese actually have experience with HSR, know how wonderful it is and Wall Street doesn’t. Recent experiences in

nance should have taught every-

one by now that Wall Street’s out- rageous salaries and high-class image do not mean that those peo- ple really are geniuses and know everything. In many ways,Wall Street remains very conservative. HSR is new to America, and until they get more comfortable with it, it is understandable that they would be hesitant to invest in it. They will all jump on the bandwagon eventu- ally and then they will tell every- one how smart they are. Ultimately, it is America’s vast purchases of Chinese-made goods that is fueling the Chinese desire to invest here. They have to do some- thing with their dollars, which are accumulating at a rapid clip. Countries routinely invest in each other; that’s good because it ties them together and helps prevent

war. So any national security impli- cations of Chinese HSR investment in America are likely to be positive. If Hunt really is concerned about Chinese investment, she should ask herself how many Chinese-made products she buys. If, as I suspect, most everything she purchases comes from China, she should stop blaming Schwarzenegger for over- seas Chinese investment and look in the mirror instead.

Roderick Llewellyn

San Francisco

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OUR MISSION It is the mission of the Daily Journal to be the most accurate, fair and relevant local news source for those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula. By combining local news and sports coverage, analysis and insight with the latest business, lifestyle, state, national and world news, we seek to provide our readers with the highest quality information resource in San Mateo County. Our pages belong to you, our readers, and we choose to reflect the diverse character of this dynamic and ever-changing community. Publisher Jerry Lee

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10 Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

10 Tuesday • Sept. 14, 2010 BUSINESS THE DAILY JOURNAL Dow 10,544.13 +81.36 10-Yr Bond 2.7410%

Dow

10,544.13

+81.36

10-Yr Bond 2.7410% -0.5400

Nasdaq 2,285.71

+43.23

Oil (per barrel)

77.19

S&P 500 1,121.90 +12.35

Gold

1,245.10

Stock rally continues

Wall Street climbs on bank reform,China growth,deals

By Stephen Bernard

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Investors looking for reassurance about the health of the glob- al economy received just that Monday. Stocks extended their rally into a third week after global regulators agreed to new rules for how much money banks must hold in reserves, China reported its economy remains robust and companies announced a urry of takeovers. “The package of catalysts is a perfect backdrop for a market trying to conrm global economic growth,” said Quincy Krosby, a market strategist at Prudential Financial. Dealmaking and the expan- sion in China further reduced worries about the economy falling back into recession, Krosby said. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 81 points for its eighth gain in the past nine days. The Dow did close off its high after some traders pulled money out of retail stocks ahead of the government’s monthly retail sales report due out Tuesday.

Wall Street

But overall sentiment remained posi- tive, pushing major indexes to their highest closes in more than a month and the Standard & Poor’s 500 and Nasdaq composite indexes back into positive ter- ritory for the year. Hewlett-Packard Co. agreed to pur- chase security software provider ArcSight Inc. and Dollar Thrifty Automotive Group Inc. said it accepted Hertz Global Holdings Inc.’s acquisition offer. Acquisitions are often a sign that companies are condent the economy is going to expand soon. Global regulators agreed to reforms that could help avoid another credit cri- sis like the one that plagued nancial markets worldwide in 2008 and early 2009. Banks will gradually have to increase their reserves to protect against potential losses. “The agreement itself was a little lighter than expected,” said Mitch Schlesinger, managing director at FBB Capital. Because reserve requirements

will be rolled out slowly and not be quite as strong as expected, it reduces short- term worries that banks would have to further cut back on lending and raise cash quickly to meet new standards, Schlesinger said. The new regulations have added to con dence in Europe’s banks, which have been slower than their U.S. coun- terparts to bolster reserves. European markets rose sharply Monday. Investors entered trading in the U.S. Monday already heartened by the latest signs of growth out of China. The coun- try reported industrial production accel- erated again in August when many had predicted slower growth. Strong expan- sion in China is considered vital to a global recovery because if demand remains high there, it will offset sluggish growth in the U.S. where economic expansion is not as strong. The Dow rose 81.36, or 0.8 percent, to 10,544.13. The S&P 500 index rose 12.35, or 1.1 percent, to 1,121.90, while the Nasdaq composite rose 43.23, or 1.9 percent, to 2,285.71.

Budget deficit on pace to hit $1.3T

By Martin Crutsinger

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The federal gov- ernment is on track to record the second- highest decit of all time with one month left in the budget year. The decit totaled $1.26 trillion through August, the Treasury Department said Monday. That puts it on pace to total $1.3 trillion when the budget year ends on September 30, slightly below last year’s record $1.4 trillion decit. Soaring decits have become a major issue with voters heading into the midterm elections. Republicans say the decits illustrate the growth of spending under Democrats and show their poor

handling of the economy. The Obama administration contends the record decits were necessary to combat the most serious economic crisis since the Great Depression. About one-third of the higher decits are a result of a drop in government tax revenues. The other two-thirds of the decit increases reect higher government spending to stabilize the nancial system and boost the economy. Decits of $1 trillion in a single year had never happened until two years ago. The $1.4 trillion decit in 2009 was more than three times the size of the previous record-holder, a $454.8 billion decit recorded in 2008. Last year’s decit was equal to 9.9 per-

cent of the total economy — the highest percentage in 65 years. The de cit equaled 21.5 percent of the economy in 1945, at the height of the U.S. involve- ment in World War II. The 2010 decit is expected to show only a slight improvement, dipping to 9.1 percent of the economy as measured by the gross domestic product. That would be the second-highest level in the past 65 years. For August, the decit totaled $90.5 bil- lion. The government has run decits in August every year over the past 57 years. The Congressional Budget Ofce is forecasting that the decit for this budget year will total $1.3 trillion, about $70 bil- lion lower than last year.

$1.3 trillion, about $70 bil- lion lower than last year. Hewlett-Packard buying ArcSight for $1.5 billion

Hewlett-Packard buying ArcSight for $1.5 billion

By Andrew Vanacore

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Hewlett-Packard Co. wants to have the answer to all of its customers’ technology problems. So it is buying net- work-security provider ArcSight Inc. to help them respond to the growing threat posed by hackers, computer viruses and digital fraud. The $1.5 billion deal announced Monday extends HP’s recent

spate of acquisitions and could help signal that even after ousting CEO Mark Hurd, it hasn’t lost its footing in the effort to win fat- ter prot margins beyond the personal-computer business. HP continued to brush off concerns that it is paying too much

to grow in new areas. The new deal came just weeks after HP won

a bidding contest with Dell Inc. over the data-storage company

3Par Inc., agreeing to pay $2.07 billion, or $33 per share. ArcSight’s products pull in data from across an organization’s computer networks and translate the information into a format that can be combed for evidence of a security breach, either in real time or after the fact. Nearly a third of its revenue comes from fed- eral agencies looking to protect sensitive data. The deal gives HP a major presence in an industry in which some of its main tech rivals, including IBM Corp. and EMC Corp., have already planted themselves through acquisitions. The company wouldn’t say whether Hurd had signed off on recent acquisitions before he stepped down Aug. 6 in a dispute over his relationship with a former HP contractor. Hurd has since moved to a job with rival Oracle Corp. But the moves don’t appear to take HP in a markedly different direction. Writing about the ArcSight deal in a note to investors Monday, Barclays Capital analyst Ben Reitzes said, “A software acquisition was highly expected for HP and the deal makes sense, providing a good t with HP’s existing security offerings.” Last month, HP said it was buying privately held Fortify Software for an undisclosed amount. It also spent $2.7 billion for 3Com, which came with a security-software subsidiary called TippingPoint; that purchase closed in April.

BASEBALL STILL WRONG: APPEALS COURT, AGAIN, RULES MLB ILLEGALLY SEIZED DRUG LIST >>> PAGE 12
BASEBALL STILL WRONG: APPEALS COURT, AGAIN, RULES MLB ILLEGALLY SEIZED DRUG LIST >>> PAGE 12
Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2010
<< 49ers need to right the ship, page 13
• Same problems plague Raiders, page 13

It’s Naufahu’s time

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

San Mateo running back George Naufahu has come a long way since cracking the varsi- ty squad as a sophomore. His rst two years, he played more of a sup- porting role to David Rango, although he showed glimpses of what could be late last season and in the playoffs. This is the year Naufahu gets to be “The Man” and he started his senior year with a bang. The 6-foot-1, 220-pound Naufahu gashed Aragon for 159 yards and two touchdowns on 21 carries as San Mateo snapped an 11-game losing streak to Aragon. For his efforts, Naufahu is this week’s Daily Journal Athlete of the Week. “We made history. I was like 3 years old when [San Mateo] last beat them,” Naufahu said. “It’s nice to be part of history.” Naufahu was an uncertain runner his soph- omore year. He would take a handoff, get the line of scrimmage — and then stop, looking for a hole to run through. While the San Mateo offensive line opened plenty of holes against the Dons Friday night, Naufahu now runs with condence and makes things hap- pen instead of waiting for the play to develop. “The game slows down with experience,” Naufahu said. “You have more knowledge of where to go.” San Mateo coach Jeff Scheller believes Naufahu’s improved game is the result of maturing on and off the eld. Naufahu was like a wild stallion his sophomore year — tons of talent, but he didn’t really know what to do with it. As he’s gotten older and more familiar with the Bearcats offense, Naufahu has blossomed. “Sometime this summer, he grew up; took on more of a leadership role,” Scheller said. “There are a lot of positive things that turned over the summer. I think he always wanted to be [the man]. He just didn’t know how to get there.” On the eld, one thing that changed is

See AOTW, Page 14

Athlete of the Week

e A O T W , P a g e 1 4 Athlete of the Week

NATHAN MOLLAT / DAILY JOURNAL

San Mateo running back George Naufahu rushed for 159 yards and two touchdowns as the Bearcats snapped an 11-game losing streak to Aragon.

A dubious beginning

T hank God for the San Francisco Giants winning Sunday and mov- ing into a rst-place tie with the

Padres, because there was not a lot of good news otherwise for local professional sports teams. Sunday was the season opener for the San Francisco 49ers and Oakland Raiders and let’s just say the only Super Bowl either of these two teams will play in this year will be the one for Bay Area bragging rights when the two teams meet in San Francisco Oct. 17. Both teams were absolutely atrocious Sunday. I can’t really blame the Raiders. Their offensive line is an absolute sieve, Darrius Heyward-Bey is a bust and their defense can’t stop any opponent’s running game. But the Niners? Wow. I’ve followed the team for over 30 years and can remember only a handful of games that were worse than the perform- ance they gave against the Seattle Seahawks. If the 49ers somehow come back to win the NFC West and make the playoffs, there is something tragically wrong with the NFL. I know a lot of people are taking the, “It’s only the rst game of the season” tact, but the problem is, the 49ers’ mistakes made Sunday were the same ones made last season — and the season before that. First and foremost, I’ve given Alex Smith the benet of the doubt for ve, six sea- sons: No continuity among offensive coor- dinators; bought into the Urban Meyer’s assertion Smith would be “non-functional” (Meyer’s word) until Smith knew every- thing about the offense. And for the rst quarter, Smith looked

until Smith knew every- thing about the offense. And for the fi rst quarter, Smith looked

See LOUNGE, Page 14

Nadal completes career Grand Slam with U.S.Open win

By Howard Fendrich

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — The list was long. Everyone, even Rafael Nadal himself, tried to explain why he kept leaving the U.S. Open without a trophy, why it was the only Grand Slam tournament he hadn’t conquered. His grinding style exhausts him. The wind plays havoc with his spin-lathered strokes. The

The wind plays havoc with his spin-lathered strokes. The R a f a e l N

Rafael Nadal

courts are too hard and too fast. The balls are too soft. And so on. Two marvelous, nearly perfect weeks — and one thrilling victory in a tight nal — make that all sound rather silly. Nadal won his rst U.S. Open title to complete a

silly. Nadal won his fi rst U.S. Open title to complete a Novak Djokovic career Grand

Novak Djokovic

career Grand Slam, beating Novak Djokovic 6-4, 5-7, 6- 4, 6-2 Monday in a match lled with fantastic shot- making by both men and interrupted by a thunder- storm a day after it was post- poned by rain. It’s Nadal’s third consecu- tive major championship

and ninth overall. He is the seventh man in tennis history with at least one title from each Grand Slam tournament. Rain pushed the men’s nal from Sunday to Monday for the third consecutive year, and play was interrupted for nearly two hours during the second set. When they resumed, Djokovic took that set, the only one Nadal lost in the tourna- ment.

See TENNIS, Page 14

second set. When they resumed, Djokovic took that set, the only one Nadal lost in the
second set. When they resumed, Djokovic took that set, the only one Nadal lost in the
second set. When they resumed, Djokovic took that set, the only one Nadal lost in the

12 Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cramer wins first game as A’s top Royals

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Bobby Cramer kept believing in himself all those years, even if few others did. Cramer’s long and winding trek culminated with a win in his major league debut Monday when he pitched the Oakland Athletics past the Kansas City Royals 3-1. “Just getting here was amazing in itself, but now that I’m here I want to pitch well and want to show everybody who I think I can be up here,” he said. Cramer (1-0), a left-hander who turns 31 next month, started his pro career in 2003 in the Tampa Bay system. Cut by the Rays, he was a substitute high school math teacher and worked in pipeline maintenance while out of baseball in 2005-06. Cramer played in an independent league in 2008, then began this year in the Mexican League. “There were times I felt this was an uphill battle, that I may never get over that hump,” he

A’s 3, Royals 1

that I may never get over that hump,” he A’s 3, Royals 1 Bobby Cramer said.

Bobby Cramer

said. “I never doubted my own ability. I had a lot of internal condence. I felt like I was good enough. That’s what made me per- sist. I wanted to challenge myself to get to the next level.” Cramer held the Royals to one run and four hits in

5 1-3 innings. He struck out four and walked one. Cramer went 13-3 with a 2.95 ERA in 22 games with Quintana in Mexico this season. At that point, he wasn’t about to give up. “When I got released in ’05, I tried to con- vince myself I was done,” he said. “I was with Tampa and at the time they were a struggling organization, that would give young guys a chance and promote you if you played well. I couldn’t even get out of A ball with them. I thought that was God’s way of trying to tell me

that this just isn’t it. The problem is I quit physically, but I never quit mentally.” Cramer became the oldest pitcher in Athletics franchise history to make a start in his big league debut since Steve Gerkin for the Philadelphia A’s on May 13, 1945. “When you travel a road as tough as the one he has, I think he’s more appreciative of this opportunity, a little older, more mature, tougher mentally sometimes than a young kid,” A’s manager Bob Geren said. “I’m very happy with him going that deep into the game and keeping a lead. You’ll denitely see him again.” Andrew Bailey worked the ninth for his 24th save in 27 opportunities. Jack Cust hit his 100th home run, connect- ing in the Oakland sixth off Bryan Bullington. Mike Aviles homered in the fourth for the only run off Cramer. Aviles hit his rst home run since May 9, a span of 316 at-bats, and n- ished with three of the Royals’ seven hits. Luke Hochevar (5-5) lost in his rst start since missing nearly three months with a

sprained right elbow. He gave up two unearned runs and two hits in ve innings. He walked three and threw just 39 strikes in 78 pitches. “I didn’t feel like my command was sharp,” Hochevar said. “I had too many three-ball counts. I put myself in that situation. If I’m on top of my game the defense is going to be there. But when I’m lulling my defenders to sleep, that’s when errors happen. I’m past the elbow issue. Now it’s about executing pitches and getting batters out.” The A’s took advantage of sloppy Royals elding to take an early lead. “I wouldn’t even classify it as an eyesore,” Royals manager Ned Yost said of his defense. “It was worse. It wasn’t good baseball. We’d still be out there playing if we hadn’t given them a couple.” In the rst inning, Aviles and Hochevar made errors and rookie catcher Lucas May was charged with a passed ball. Aviles’ wild throw from second base on what could have been a double-play grounder by Kurt Suzuki allowed Coco Crisp to score.

Court again says feds wrongly seized MLB drug list

By Paul Elias

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — A federal appeals court on Monday reafrmed its ruling that investigators illegally seized a list of baseball players who allegedly tested positive for steroids during a 2004 drug lab raid. It’s the fourth time the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled on the issue during six years of litigation. Three trial courts also have issued separate rulings in the case. On Monday, the 11-judge panel again ordered investigators to return the list of 104 players to the labs, effectively barring them from using the players to expand their sports

doping investigation. The appeals court was revisiting its August 2009 ruling at the request of the Obama administration. Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan, who was solicitor general at the time, and 22 other high-ranking federal lawyers told the court last year that “computer searches have ground to a complete halt” in many regions of the country because of strict guide- lines the court told judges to follow when authorizing searches of computers. Those guidelines were removed from Monday’s ruling, which was far narrower in scope than the August ruling. The convoluted case began in April 2004 when agents seized urine samples and records

in April 2004 when agents seized urine samples and records from Comprehensive Drug Testing Inc. and

from Comprehensive Drug Testing Inc. and Quest Diagnostics Inc. They were armed with a search warrant authorizing them to seize the results of 10 players. But the agents seized an entire hard drive and retrieved a spreadsheet with the names of 104 players who allegedly tested positive during the 2003 Major League Baseball season. Those test results were sup- posed to remain anonymous and were to be used only to determine if baseball should institute mandatory drug testing. The players’ union went to court almost immediately after the raids, complaining that the raids were illegal and asking that the records and samples be returned. Three different trial judges ruled in favor of the union, but a divided three judge panel of

the 9th circuit in 2006 ruled in favor of the government. But a larger, 11-judge panel voted 9-2 in August 2009 and again Monday that the government was wrong to seize the entire list. The 9th Circuit on Monday also closed its doors to any further appeals. The government still could appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. U.S. Attorney spokesman Jack Gillund declined comment. Although the names of the players in dis- pute have remained under seal during all the legal wrangling and were to remain conden- tial, the identities of four have been leaked to the media: Alex Rodriguez, Manny Ramirez, David Ortiz and Sammy Sosa.

tial, the identities of four have been leaked to the media: Alex Rodriguez, Manny Ramirez, David

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

13

49ers know they have to get on track in a hurry

By Janie McCauley

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SANTA CLARA — The San Francisco 49ers who were so condent only days ago about their playoff chances and the realistic opportunity to win the NFC West have been brought down a notch. No touchdowns in an embarrassing 31-6 season-opening loss at division rival Seattle. Zero points after halftime. Miscues and poor execution — down to problems getting the offensive plays to quarterback Alex Smith in time. A late Sunday night meeting back at team headquarters led by coach Mike Singletary, who had some brutally honest criticisms of his players after

the game. All this after such high hopes on the heels of a perfect preseason, the fran- chise’s rst unbeaten exhibition cam- paign since 1992. “I just felt that after the game some of the comments that I made were very hard comments, very honest com- ments,” Singletary said Monday. “And I just wanted to make sure that every- body was on the same page and didn’t leave here having conversations in the parking lot and having conversations in the bathroom, not fully understanding what I was saying. “Because there was only so much time after the game to talk about those things. And while we were on the plane, while we were on the bus, I

And while we were on the plane, while we were on the bus, I heard guys

heard guys say- ing, ’Well, coach, that may have been a little too harsh.’ Or, ’I did- n’t understand what you meant by that.’ I said, ’You know what, we’re going to get

together and get this all ironed out so that when we come in today, we can look at the game for what it is as a team and learn from it, put it behind us, and get on to New Orleans.”’ Star linebacker Patrick Willis didn’t mind Singletary telling it like it is. They all know he’s no-nonsense, ery

Mike Singletary

and doesn’t settle for anything less than playing to your potential. Perhaps this team needed a wakeup call of sorts, even if it was only Week

1?

“Coach Sing is coach Sing,” Willis said. “He speaks from his heart, so when he says things sometimes he just says what he feels. Especially at a time like this when there’s a lot of emotion from players, from coach, sometimes things can be misinterpreted.You never know. He just wanted to clear the air.” The Niners (0-1) know they had bet- ter get things straightened out in a hurry with the defending Super Bowl champion New Orleans Saints coming to town for a Monday night game next week.

San Francisco’s players said all training camp that the team had learned from its mistakes on the road last season, when the 49ers lost six straight away from home and ve in a row by a combined 19 points. It large- ly cost them a playoff berth and a win- ning season. They went 8-8. Some of the same things that hurt them last season during that stretch showed up again: penalties, miscom- munication, mental errors. “I think he was just disappointed in us,” tight end Delanie Walker said of Singletary’s postgame remarks. “We had that game and we didn’t nish. All year and all training camp we talked about nishing and we came out in our opener and didn’t nish.”

Same old Raiders

By Josh Dubow

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALAMEDA — All that offseason optimism in Oakland was erased by a season-opening blowout that brought up the same problems that have plagued the Raiders the past seven sea- sons. There was an offensive line that gave quarter- back Jason Campbell little time to throw the ball, receivers who struggled to get open down the eld, a run defense that once again got gashed by the big play and 10 penalties that hurt the team on both sides of the ball. It added up to a 38-13 loss to Tennessee on Sunday that showed the Raiders have plenty of work to do if they want to end a streak of seven straight seasons with at least 11 losses. “It’s a wake-up call for our guys,” tight end Zach Miller said Monday. “We had a lot of con- dence, maybe we were overcondent going into the season. Maybe because of the things we did we thought we could just show up.” As hard as it is to imagine a team being over- condent after going 29-83 over the past seven seasons, the Raiders had so much excitement after their offseason that it apparently was a fac- tor. The biggest change was the trade that brought Campbell in from Washington and led to the eventual release of former No. 1 overall pick JaMarcus Russell. With the hiring of Hue Jackson as offensive coordinator, the Raiders expected bigger things from an offense that scored the second-fewest points and gained the second-fewest yards in the league a year ago. Instead, the Raiders gained just 106 yards in

the rst half and failed to convert a single third down as the Titans defenders seemed to be quicker off the ball than the Raiders offensive line. This marked the 10th time in Tom Cable’s 29 games as coach that the Raiders lost by at least 20 points. “We had a bad day,” coach Tom Cable said. “We’re not going to sit around and overanalyze it or overcook it. We’re going to look at what the issues are and x it. We feel great about our team. We just really did not play very well yes- terday, but the cool thing is you can put your hand on what it is. It’s unfortunate at the same time.” Rookie center Jared Veldheer, who was a starting tackle at Division II Hillsdale College a year ago, had problems with the loud noise and the stiffer competition in his NFL debut. That was part of a bad day of pass protection from the entire offensive line. The line commit- ted four false starts, one holding call, and allowed four sacks. Cable said getting better play from tackles Mario Henderson and Langston Walker will be a big focus this week. “It’s like anything in life, little things here, lit- tle things there, and the outcome is totally dif- ferent,” Walker said. “So, I think it’s very x- able. The world isn’t caving in on us.” The Raiders also made big changes on defense in hopes of shoring up a unit that has been the worst in the NFL the past seven sea- sons. They brought in a whole new starting line- backing unit, led by rst round pick Rolando McClain, and also put second-round pick Lamarr Houston in as a starting defensive end.

pick Lamarr Houston in as a starting defensive end. PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN!
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 9/17/10 Pigskin Pick ‘em Week Two
PICK THE MOST NFL WINNERS AND WIN! DEADLINE IS 9/17/10
Pigskin Pick ‘em Week Two
Win Dinner For Two and a Limo Ride* to Broadway Grill
ROAD TEAM
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Cleveland
Pittsburgh
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TIEBREAKER: Total Points scored Saints @ 49ers
How does it work?
Each Monday thru Friday we will list the upcoming weeks’ games. Pick the winners of each game
along with the point total of the Monday night game. In case of a tie, we will look at the point total on
the Monday night game of the week. If there’s a tie on that total, then a random drawing will deter-
mine the winner. Each week, the Daily Journal will reward a dinner for two and a limo ride* to Broad-
way Grill in Burlingame. The Daily Journal Pigskin Pick’em Contest is free to play. Must be 21 or over.
Winners will be announced the following Wednesday through Weekend in the Daily Journal.
What is the deadline?
All mailed entries must be postmarked by the Friday prior to the weekend of games, you may also
drop off your entries to our office by Friday at 5 p.m. sharp.
Send entry form to: 800 S. Claremont Street, #210, San Mateo, CA 94402. You may enter as many times as
you like using photocopied entry forms. Multiple original entry forms will be discarded.
NAME
Mail or drop off by 9/17/10 to:
AGE
CITY
PHONE
Pigskin Pick’em, Daily Journal,
800 S. Claremont Street, #210,
San Mateo, CA 94402
The Daily Journal will not use
your personal information for
marketing purposes. We respect
your privacy.
PRIZE INCLUDES DINNER FOR TWO AND A LIMO RIDE*
TO THE RESTAURANT COURTESY OF THE BROADWAY GRILL
1400 Broadway • Burlingame, CA 94010 • (650) 343-9333
*Must be within 25 mile radius of restaurant
We are not responsible for late, damaged, illegible or lost entries. Multiple entries are accepted. One prize per household. All applicable Federal, State & Local
taxes associated with the receipt or use of any prize are the sole responsibility of the winner. The prizes are awarded “as is” and without warranty of any kind,
express or implied. The Daily Journal reserves the right in its sole discretion to disqualify any individual it finds to be tampering with the entry process or the
operation of the promotion; to be acting in violation of the rules; or to be acting in an unsportsmanlike manner. Entry constitutes agreement for use of name &
photo for publicity purposes. Employees of the Daily Journal and Broadway Grill are not eligible to win. Must be at least 21 years of age. Winners will be notified
by phone. Call with questions or for clarification (650) 344-5200.
Each winner, by acceptance of the prize, agrees to release the Daily Journal and the Broadway Grill from all liability, claims, or actions of any kind whatsoever for
injuries, damages, or losses to persons and property which may be sustained in connection with the receipt, ownership, or use of the prize.

14 Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOUNGE

Continued from page 11

like a legit NFL quarterback. His only incompletion was on an overturned instant replay call. The nal three quarters he revert- ed to his old form: Indecisive, scared and off the mark. On top of that, the team is stuck with him as their starter, unless he gets injured. After making him a captain, they can’t bench him. I’m done with him. I’m also done with coach Mike Singletary’s and Jimmy Raye’s three-yards-and-a-punt offense. Singletary is trying to mold the 49ers into the 1985 Chicago Bears. That was 25 years ago and that team had Walter Payton, one of the greatest running backs of all time. Frank Gore is good, but is no Hall of Famer. No matter what anyone says, the NFL is a pass- ing league now. If you can’t throw the ball effectively, you can’t win. What happened to the spread offense the 49ers put in midway through last year? What’s wrong with setting up the

run with the pass? Another maddening development was clock management. Once again — just as we’ve seen the last several years — the 49ers burned all their timeouts early. Once again, the coaching staff blamed the headset tech- nology. Smith, to his credit, didn’t buy it. What is Raye doing in the coaches’ box? How do you not plan for the next play before the current one is run? What happened to scripting the rst 15 plays? Hell, putting the play sheet on the wall and throwing a dart at it would be faster than the time it takes the get plays in now. Can Raye not nd his read- ing glasses? Time and again, the 49ers were breaking the huddle and lining up with 10 seconds or less on the play clock. Smith has to worry about getting the play off before he can even think about getting the play run correctly. And from now on, NO ONE sits out the preseason. Michael Crabtree looked lost out there Sunday after basically missing the entire training camp and preseason with a neck injury — apparently from looking down, counting his money. He was just as responsible for Smith’s two interceptions as Smith was. Frank Gore had one carry in the

preseason and was deemed ready to go, then goes out and rushes for 38 yards. Sure, the offensive line had something to do with that, but it seems to me Gore just wasn’t ready for the speed and physicalness of a regular sea- son game. Once again, the defensive secondary was a mess, there was no pressure on the opposing quarterback. The list goes on and on and on. Does this sound familiar? Maybe the 49ers recover and nd a way to make the playoffs. But with New Orleans, Kansas City, Atlanta (which whipped the 49ers last season) and Philadelphia all com- ing up, there is a real possibility they could be 0-5 going into the showdown with the Raiders. After all the hype about how this is the year the 49ers break their playoff drought, the good will built on an undefeated presea- son was just that — hype. *** There were a lot of similarities between the San Mateo-Aragon and Palo Alto- Burlingame football games Friday night. So much so that if you read the game stories in the Daily Journal Saturday, you could swap the two teams in the articles.

Both Aragon and Burlingame trailed 7-2 at halftime. Both committed ve turnovers. Burlingame turned the ball over twice inside the Palo Alto 10-yard line, Aragon coughed it up three times in the same area of the eld. Aragon’s defense gave up a number of big plays, as did the Panthers. *** Just a bit of an English lesson for my read- ers. I chastised a Facebook friend over the weekend and then I saw it again in another post. While I’m generally kidding, this really is starting to drive me crazy. It’s the use word “lose.” Or, as I’ve seen dozens of times recently, “loose.” “Lose” means not winning, while “loose” means not tight. So if you’re favorite team is “loosing,” well, that’s not actually a word. “Losing,” which in the case of sports means behind in the score, would be the appropriate terminol- ogy. Just a pet peeve of mine.

Nathan Mollat can be reached by e-mail:

nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: (650) 344-5200 ext. 117.

AOTW

Continued from page 11

Naufahu now knows he can be a game chang- er. Early against Aragon, the Bearcats concen- trated on probing the edges of the Dons defense, using pitches and sweeps to get into open space. In the fourth quarter, with Aragon trying to rally and having cut the San Mateo lead to 21-15, Naufahu and the offensive line went right at the Dons defense. The Bearcats embarked on a seven-play, 62-yard scoring drive during which Naufahu accounted for 37

yards — including a 9-yard touchdown run. “He just has sheer will and want,” Scheller said. “He almost runs angry.” While the offensive line of David Aranda, Kevin Gruber, Ophir Gam, Tim Niupalau and

Eddie Trujillo, along with tight end Alex Strathearn, did a ne job of giving all the San Mateo running backs plenty of room to roam

— the Bearcats nished with 286 yards rush-

ing — Naufahu showed he can make some- thing out of nothing. In the third quarter, Naufahu started sweeping left, but was stacked up by the Aragon defense. Naufahu reversed direction, cut upeld, weaved through the Aragon defense and high-stepped into the end zone along the right sideline for a 29-yard

scoring run. “He has a bunch of agility moves and quick- ness,” Scheller said. “It’s just his will. Toward the end of the game, I asked him if he wanted to be left or right. He said. ‘I don’t care.’” Naufahu is not a one-man show, however. Lemoto Filikitonga and Michael Latu would be featured backs on most any other team in the Peninsula Athletic League, and Naufahu is happy to share the load. “They feed off each other,” Scheller said. “But [the other backs] know he has that extra gear.” As strong as Naufahu was offensively, he was an equally disruptive force from his line- backer position. He was in on a number of

tackles, including one play in which he was in the Aragon backeld so quickly he nearly took the handoff from the Aragon quarterback. “He did a lot better than we expected (defen- sively),” Scheller said. Although it was only one game, the Bearcats have lofty ambitions this season. One was to nally knock off Aragon, but Naufahu is hop- ing it is only the beginning of a magical sea- son. He wants to be mentioned in the same sentence with great San Mateo running backs Toke Kefu and Albert Tiupulotu — the top two rushers in school history. “I want to be remembered as one of the greats,” Naufahu said. He’s off to a good start.

TENNIS

Continued from page 11

But the No. 1-ranked Spaniard quickly took a lead in the third set and never let it go. Viewed for quite some time as Roger Federer’s nemesis, Nadal now has made his own greatness quite clear. He stretched his Grand Slam winning streak to 21 matches by adding the U.S. Open to his titles at the French Open in June, then Wimbledon in July. No man had won those three tournaments in the same year since Rod Laver won a true Grand Slam in 1969. Now Nadal heads to the Australian

Open in January with a chance to claim a Rafa Slam of four consecutive major championships

— something that also hasn’t been done since

Laver. No. 3 Djokovic, the 2008 Australian Open champion, made Nadal earn it. The Serb played superbly for long stretches, showing off the ter- ric returning, retrieving and big forehand he used to knock off 16-time Grand Slam champion Federer in Saturday’s seminals. Coming out of the rain delay with Djokovic serving at 4-all, 30-all in the second set, both players clearly beneted from a bit of rest. Fresh of body and clear of mind, and with conditions perfect for tennis — calm and cool, the tempera- ture in the 70s — they were superb, engaging in 10-, 15-, 20-stroke points that drew standing ova-

tions and camera ashes from the stands, no mat- ter who hit the winner. And there were winners aplenty at both ends, as well as point-extending defense, sneakers squeaking as they scurried around the court. Djokovic claimed the second set by breaking Nadal in the nal game, getting back a deep return off a 122 mph serve. Nadal was on his heels — a rare sight, indeed — and slapped a forehand into the net. That gave Djokovic three breaks in a span of 10 service games, against a player who was broken twice the rst 92 times he served. It would be the only set lost of 22 played by Nadal in New York this year, as he came oh-so- close to being the rst man in a half-century to win this tournament without dropping a set.

Nadal was back to his relentless best in the third and fourth, hitting shots so well that Djokovic was moved to applaud on occasion. Nadal broke for 2-1 leads in each of those last two sets, and got to match point by sprinting to reach a drop shot and whipping a forehand that landed right on the baseline. Djokovic hit a forehand wide to end it, and Nadal fell backward onto the court with a shout. He rolled onto his stomach, his chest heaving — nally the champion in New York after losing in the seminals the last two years. Now he’s the rst left-hander to win the U.S. Open since John McEnroe in 1984, and the rst Spaniard since Manuel Orantes in 1975.

rst left-hander to win the U.S. Open since John McEnroe in 1984, and the fi rst
rst left-hander to win the U.S. Open since John McEnroe in 1984, and the fi rst
rst left-hander to win the U.S. Open since John McEnroe in 1984, and the fi rst

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Tuesday Sept. 14, 2010

15

 

TUE

WED

THUR

FRI

SAT

SUN

MON

vs. Dodgers14 7:15 p.m. CSN-BA HD 15 16 17 18 19   20

14

7:15 p.m.

CSN-BA HD

15

16

17

18

19

 

20

vs.Dodgers

vs.Dodgers

vs.Brewers

vs.Brewers

vs.Brewers

OFF

7:15 p.m.

7:15 p.m.

7:15 p.m.

6:05 p.m.

1:05 p.m.

 

CSN-BA HD

NBC-11

CSN-BA HD

CSN-BA HD

CSN-BA HD

CSN-CAL@Royals 5:10 p.m. @Royals   @ Twins @ Twins @ Twins vs. White Sox 7:05

@Royals

5:10 p.m.

@Royals

 

@ Twins

@ Twins

@ Twins

vs. White Sox 7:05 p.m. CSN-CAL

5:10 p.m.

OFF

5:10 p.m.

10:10 a.m.

11:10 a.m.

CSN-CAL

CSN-CAL

CSN-CAL

CSN-CAL

Sept. 15 Sept. 25 Sept. 29 Oct. 2 Oct. 9 Oct. 16   Oct. 16

Sept. 15

Sept. 25

Sept. 29

Oct. 2

Oct. 9

Oct. 16

 

Oct. 16

vs.Philly

@Toronto FC

vs.Chicago

@Columbus

@DC United

vs.Houston

vs.Houston

7 p.m.

7 p.m.

1 p.m.

8 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

7 p.m.

CSN-CAL

ESPN 2

CSN-CAL

CSN-CAL

Sept. 26            

Sept. 26

           

vs.TBD

@ CSUEB

2:30 p.m.

Sept. 12 Sept. 20 Sept. 26 Oct. 3 Oct. 10 Oct. 17 Oct. 24

Sept. 12

Sept. 20

Sept. 26

Oct. 3

Oct. 10

Oct. 17

Oct. 24

@

Seattle

vs.Saints

@ Chiefs

@ Falcons

vs. Eagles

vs. Raiders

@

Panthers

L

31-6

5:30 p.m.

10 a.m.

10 a.m.

5:20 p.m.

1:05 p.m.

10 a.m.

 

ESPN

FOX

FOX

NBC

CBS

FOX

Sept. 12 Sept. 19 Sept. 26 Oct. 3 Oct. 10 Oct. 17 Oct. 24

Sept. 12

Sept. 19

Sept. 26

Oct. 3

Oct. 10

Oct. 17

Oct. 24

@

Titans

vs. Rams

@ Cardinals

vs. Texans

vs. Chargers

@ 49ers

@

Broncos

L

38-13

1:05 p.m.

1:15 p.m.

1:05 p.m.

1:15 p.m.

1:05 p.m.

1:15 p.m.

 

FOX

CBS

CBS

CBS

CBS

 

CBS

LOCAL SCOREBOARD

GIRLS’ TENNIS Menlo-Atherton 5,Woodside 2 SINGLES — Martinez-Cobian (W) d.Keating 6-1, 6-2; Sommer (MA) d.Veridiano 6-1, 6-4;

Taylor-Keeling (W) d.Diller 6-3,6-4; Fantazzi (MA) d. Wong 6-2, 6-4. DOUBLES — Scan- danous-Rehlander (MA) d. Houghton-Hennafarth 6-4, 6-0; Roat- Shumway-Laplant (MA) d.Nicolet-Reed 6-0, 6-1;Queloi-Jones (MA) d.Myers-Schott 6-0,6-

0.

GIRLS’ WATER POLO Saturday St.Francis Invitational 3rd-place match Sacred Heart Prep 5,Menlo-Atherton 1 SHP 0 1 2 2 — 5 MA 0 0 0 1 — 1 SHP goal scorers — Flessel,Temple 2;Sheri- dan. SHP goalie saves — Donahoe 15. Records — Sacred Heart Prep 3-1.

Semifinals Davis 11,Sacred Heart Prep 3 SHP 1 0 1 1 — 3 Davis 2 2 4 3 — 11 SHP goals — Bocci, Flessel, Westcott. SHP goalie saves — Donahoe 8;Ferrando.

GIRLS’ VOLLEYBALL Friday Sacred Heart Prep def. Pinewood 25-14, 25-6, 25-5 (Highlights:SHP — Abuel-Saud

10 kills, 7 digs; Ebner 9 kills, 6 aces). Records

— Sacred Heart Prep 6-3 overall.

WHATS ON TAP

TODAY

GIRLS’ TENNIS

Notre Dame-Belmont at St. Ignatius,3:30 p.m.;Half

Moon Bay

Aragon,Mills at San Mateo,El Camino at Woodside, Hillsdale vs. Westmoor at Skyline College,Oceana at Terra Nova, Sequoia at South City,4 p.m.

BOYS’ WATER POLO San Mateo at Half Moon Bay, 3 p.m.; Aragon at Woodside Priory,4 p.m. GIRLS’ WATER POLO Mercy-Burlingame at Carlmont,3 p.m.

at Burlingame, Menlo-Atherton at

TRANSACTIONS

TRACK & FIELD USA Track and Field USATF—Fired chief executive officer Doug Logan. BASEBALL MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYERS AS- SOCIATION—Named Ian Penny senior labor attorney. American League

BOSTON RED SOX—Selected the contract of LHP Rich Hill from Pawtucket (IL). Trans- ferred 1B Kevin Youkilis to the 60-day DL. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Transferred OF-1B Conor Jackson to the 60-day DL. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Named Jay Sartori assistant general manager. Activated 3B Edwin Encarnacion from 15-day DL. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS—Purchased the contract of C Konrad Schmidt from Mo- bile (SL). Designated RHP Cesar Valdez for assignment. CINCINNATI REDS—Acquired INF-OF Willie Bloomquist from Kansas City for either a player to be named or cash. Recalled RHP Jared Burton from Louisville (IL). PITTSBURGH PIRATES—Claimed RHP Chris Leroux off waivers from Florida.Designated RHP Brian Bass for assignment. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Activated OF Tony Gwynn Jr.from the 15-day DL. BASKETBALL

National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS—Named Michael Reins- dorf president and chief operating officer. GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS—Signed F Louis Amundson to a two-year contract. FOOTBALL National Football League NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Released LB Marques Murrell. GOLF Ladies Professional Golf Association LPGA—Announced Peter Carfagna and Michael Trager have been elected as inde- pendent directors on the LPGA Board of Directors.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

East Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Tampa Bay

87

56

.608

New York

87

57

.604

1/2

Boston

80

64

.556

7 1/2

Toronto

73

71

.507

14 1/2

Baltimore

56

88

.389

31 1/2

Central Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Minnesota

85

58

.594

Chicago

79

64

.552

6

Detroit

72

72

.500

13 1/2

Cleveland

58

85

.406

27

Kansas City

58

85

.406

27

West Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Texas

80

63

.559

Oakland

72

71

.503

8

Los Angeles

70

73

.490

10

Seattle

55

89

.382

25 1/2

Sunday’s Games

Detroit 6,Baltimore 2

Minnesota 6,Cleveland 2

Toronto 5,Tampa Bay 4

Chicago White Sox 12,Kansas City 6

Texas 4,N.Y.Yankees 1

L.A.Angels 3,Seattle 0

Boston 5,Oakland 3

Monday’s Games

Oakland 3,Kansas City 1

Baltimore 4,Toronto 3,11 innings

Tampa Bay 1,N.Y.Yankees 0,11 innings

Boston 5,Seattle 1

Tuesday’s Games

L.A. Angels (Kazmir 8-13) at Cleveland (Tomlin 3-

3),4:05 p.m.

Toronto (Sh.Hill 0-1) at Baltimore (Arrieta 5-6),4:05

p.m.

N.Y.Yankees (Nova 1-0) at Tampa Bay (Garza 14-8),