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System Description

OSIX

Release 5.6
COPYRIGHT NOTICE
© Copyright 2016 Polystar. All rights reserved.
No part of this document may be reproduced without the prior written consent of
Polystar.

DISCLAIMER
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not
represent a commitment on any part of Polystar or any of their subsidiaries. While
the information contained herein is assumed to be accurate, Polystar assume no
responsibility for any errors or omissions.
In no event shall Polystar or any of their subsidiaries, employees, or contractors, nor
the authors of this document, be liable for special, direct, indirect, or consequential
damage, losses, costs, charges, claims, demands, claims for lost profit, fees, or
expenses of any nature or kind.

TRADEMARKS
Polystar and OSIX are registered trademarks of Polystar.
All other product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective
owners.

FEEDBACK
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EDITION NOTICE
Release: 5.6
April 2016

VERSION HISTORY
Version Date Author Description
First publication 7 April 2016 YA Published as part of release 5.6
Contents
1 Introduction .......................................................................................... 1

1.1 The OSIX advantage ....................................................................... 1


1.2 Business value ............................................................................... 2
1.3 Business solutions ........................................................................ 2
1.3.1 Network insight ..................................................................... 2
1.3.2 Customer insight ................................................................... 3

2 System overview ............................................................................... 4

2.1 Overview ......................................................................................... 4


2.2 Architecture .................................................................................... 5
2.2.1 Probe .................................................................................... 5
2.2.2 Router ................................................................................... 5
2.2.3 Probe server ......................................................................... 5
2.2.4 Mapping server ..................................................................... 6
2.2.5 Application specific servers ................................................... 6
2.2.6 Client applications ................................................................. 7
2.3 Multiple Network Support .............................................................. 8
3 Applications overview ................................................................... 10
3.1 Overview ....................................................................................... 10
3.2 OSIX applications ......................................................................... 11
3.2.1 Protocol Analyser ................................................................ 11
3.2.2 Call Trace ............................................................................ 14
3.2.3 Performance Analyser ......................................................... 16
3.2.4 Mass Call ............................................................................ 19
3.2.5 Real Time Statistics ............................................................ 20
3.2.6 Network Status .................................................................... 22
3.2.7 Statistics Alarm ................................................................... 22
3.2.8 Packet Recorder ................................................................. 23
3.3 xDR generator ............................................................................... 24
3.3.1 Interfaces ............................................................................ 25
3.3.2 Formats ............................................................................... 25
3.4 SOS (Storage of Signals) ............................................................. 25
3.5 Alarm specification ...................................................................... 26
4 System configuration ..................................................................... 28

4.1 Overview ....................................................................................... 28


4.2 Distributed configuration ............................................................ 28
4.3 Centralised configuration ............................................................ 29
4.4 Router configuration .................................................................... 29
4.5 Two systems in one GUI .............................................................. 30
5 Hardware and software ................................................................ 31

5.1 Hardware ....................................................................................... 31


5.1.1 Probes for E1/T1 monitoring ............................................... 31
5.1.2 Probes for STM-1 ................................................................ 32
5.1.3 Probes for Ethernet ............................................................. 33

System Description
OSIX 5.6 iii
5.1.4 Server hardware ................................................................. 36
5.1.5 Performance ........................................................................ 36
5.1.6 Client hardware ................................................................... 36
5.2 Software ........................................................................................ 37
5.2.1 Global server ..................................................................... 37
5.2.2 Performance server .......................................................... 37
5.2.3 Probe server ...................................................................... 38
5.2.4 Third-party software ............................................................ 38
5.3 Scalability ..................................................................................... 39
5.3.1 New signalling links ............................................................. 39
5.3.2 New sites/countries ............................................................. 39
5.3.3 New users ........................................................................... 39
5.3.4 Processing and data storage .............................................. 39

6 Security ................................................................................................ 40
6.1 System security management ..................................................... 40
6.1.1 Password expiration ............................................................ 40
6.1.2 User authentication and activity logging ............................. 40
6.1.3 Privacy ................................................................................ 41

7 System management .................................................................... 42


7.1 Configuration Manager ................................................................ 42
7.1.1 Users ................................................................................... 42
7.1.2 Mass Call ............................................................................ 43
7.1.3 Performance Analyser ......................................................... 43
7.1.4 Jupiter ................................................................................. 43
7.1.5 Network ............................................................................... 43
7.1.6 Protocols ............................................................................. 44
7.1.7 Alarms ................................................................................. 44
7.2 System Status ............................................................................... 45
7.2.1 Wrapper solution ................................................................. 45
7.3 Support server .............................................................................. 46
7.4 LIM web interface ......................................................................... 46
8 OSIX for PSTN networks ............................................................ 47
8.1 Protocols and links ...................................................................... 47
8.2 PSTN network features ................................................................ 47
8.3 Protocol Analyser ......................................................................... 48
8.3.1 User interface ...................................................................... 48
8.4 Call Trace ...................................................................................... 50
8.4.1 User interface ...................................................................... 50
8.5 Performance Analyser ................................................................. 54
8.5.1 User interface ...................................................................... 54
8.5.2 Server Configuration ........................................................... 56
8.5.3 Call Groups/Transaction groups .......................................... 58
8.5.4 Automatic group generation ................................................ 58
8.5.5 Intelligent alarm settings ..................................................... 59
8.5.6 Exporting ............................................................................. 59
8.6 Mass Call ....................................................................................... 59
8.6.1 User interface ...................................................................... 59

System Description
OSIX 5.6 iv
8.7 Real Time Statistics ...................................................................... 61
8.7.1 User interface ...................................................................... 61
8.7.2 Statistical Information .......................................................... 62
8.7.3 Filters .................................................................................. 62
8.8 Network Status ............................................................................. 63
8.8.1 User interface ...................................................................... 63
8.9 Statistics Alarm ............................................................................ 64
8.9.1 User interface ...................................................................... 64
8.9.2 Alarm settings ..................................................................... 65
8.9.3 Filter settings management ................................................. 66

9 OSIX for mobile networks ........................................................... 67


9.1 Protocols and interfaces ............................................................. 67
9.2 Mobile network features .............................................................. 67
9.2.1 Mobile Data Monitoring (MDM) ........................................... 67
9.3 Protocol Analyser ......................................................................... 68
9.3.1 User interface ...................................................................... 68
9.4 Call Trace ...................................................................................... 70
9.4.1 User interface ...................................................................... 70
9.4.2 Correlation .......................................................................... 73
9.5 Performance Analyser ................................................................. 75
9.5.1 User interface ...................................................................... 75
9.5.2 Server Configuration ........................................................... 78
9.5.3 Transaction groups .............................................................. 80
9.5.4 Automatic group generation ................................................ 80
9.5.5 Intelligent alarm settings ..................................................... 80
9.5.6 Exporting ............................................................................. 80
9.5.7 Performance Analyser for GTP ........................................... 81
9.6 Real Time Statistics ...................................................................... 82
9.6.1 User interface ...................................................................... 82
9.6.2 Statistical Information .......................................................... 83
9.6.3 Filters .................................................................................. 83
9.7 Network Status ............................................................................. 84
9.7.1 User interface ...................................................................... 84
9.8 Statistics Alarm ............................................................................ 86
9.8.1 User interface ...................................................................... 86
9.8.2 Alarm settings ..................................................................... 86
9.8.3 Filter settings management ................................................. 87

10 OSIX for IMS and VoIP networks ............................................ 88


10.1 IMS/VoIP protocols and interfaces ............................................. 88
10.2 IMS/VoIP network features .......................................................... 88
10.3 Protocol Analyser ......................................................................... 89
10.3.1 User interface ...................................................................... 89
10.4 Call Trace ...................................................................................... 91
10.4.1 User interface ...................................................................... 91
10.4.2 Correlation .......................................................................... 93
10.5 Performance Analyser ................................................................. 96
10.5.1 User interface ...................................................................... 96
10.5.2 Columns .............................................................................. 96

System Description
OSIX 5.6 v
10.5.3 Server Configuration ........................................................... 98
10.5.4 Call groups .......................................................................... 99
10.5.5 Automatic group generation ................................................ 99
10.5.6 Intelligent alarm settings ..................................................... 99
10.5.7 Exporting ............................................................................. 99
10.6 Real Time Statistics .................................................................... 100
10.6.1 User interface .................................................................... 100
10.6.2 Statistical Information ........................................................ 101
10.6.3 Filters ................................................................................ 101
10.7 Network Status ........................................................................... 102
10.7.1 User interface .................................................................... 102
10.8 Statistics Alarm .......................................................................... 104
10.8.1 User interface .................................................................... 104
10.8.2 Alarm settings ................................................................... 104
10.8.3 Filter settings management ............................................... 105

11 OSIX monitoring ............................................................................ 106


11.1 CS domain monitoring ............................................................... 106
11.1.1 MSS/MGW monitoring (Release 4) ................................... 106
11.1.2 STP monitoring ................................................................. 106
11.2 PS domain - 2G/ 3G monitoring ................................................ 107
11.2.1 SGSN monitoring (2G/3G) PS domain ............................. 107
11.2.2 GGSN monitoring (2G/3G) ................................................ 107
11.3 PS domain - 4G/LTE ................................................................... 108
11.3.1 MME monitoring (4G/LTE) ................................................ 108
11.3.2 SGW/PGW monitoring (4G/LTE) ....................................... 109
11.4 IMS domain VoIP/VoLTE ............................................................. 109
11.4.1 P-CSCF/SBC monitoring .................................................. 109
11.4.2 I-S CSCF monitoring ......................................................... 109
11.4.3 MGCF monitoring .............................................................. 110

12 Protocol Parameters .................................................................... 111


12.1 Supported protocols .................................................................. 111
12.2 Call Trace .................................................................................... 111
12.2.1 General ............................................................................. 111
12.2.2 Any Protocol ...................................................................... 111
12.2.3 AIN .................................................................................... 111
12.2.4 ALCAP .............................................................................. 111
12.2.5 ATM ................................................................................... 112
12.2.6 AggData ............................................................................ 112
12.2.7 AggRTP - End Point Descriptor ........................................ 112
12.2.8 AggRTP - Codec Metrics .................................................. 112
12.2.9 AggRTP - Packet Transport Record .................................. 112
12.2.10AggRTP - Jitter Records (RFC 3550) ............................... 113
12.2.11AggRTP - RTCP Delay Record ........................................ 113
12.2.12AggRTP - Quality Records (G. 107) ................................. 113
12.2.13AggRTP - Degradation Metrics ........................................ 113
12.2.14AggRTP - RTCP End System Delay Record .................... 113
12.2.15AggRTP - Voice Jitter Records (G. 1020) ......................... 114

System Description
OSIX 5.6 vi
12.2.16AggRTP - RTCP-XR Record ............................................ 114
12.2.17AggRTP - RTCP SR Record ............................................ 114
12.2.18AggRTP - RTCP RR Record ............................................ 114
12.2.19AggRTP - RTCP SS/RR-based QoE Metrics ................... 114
12.2.20BSSAP ............................................................................. 115
12.2.21BSSAP+ ........................................................................... 115
12.2.22Circuit ............................................................................... 115
12.2.23Circuit - ISUP .................................................................... 115
12.2.24Circuit - IUP ...................................................................... 116
12.2.25Circuit - BICC ................................................................... 116
12.2.26DHCP ............................................................................... 116
12.2.27DIAMETER ....................................................................... 116
12.2.28DNS .................................................................................. 117
12.2.29ESP .................................................................................. 117
12.2.30Ethernet ............................................................................ 117
12.2.31GPRS GB ......................................................................... 118
12.2.32GTP .................................................................................. 118
12.2.33H.323 ................................................................................ 118
12.2.34HTTP ................................................................................ 118
12.2.35IP ...................................................................................... 119
12.2.36ISAKMP ............................................................................ 119
12.2.37ISDN ................................................................................. 119
12.2.38ISDN SS ........................................................................... 119
12.2.39LCSAP ............................................................................. 119
12.2.40LDAP ................................................................................ 119
12.2.41LPPA ................................................................................. 120
12.2.42MEGACO ......................................................................... 120
12.2.43MGCP .............................................................................. 120
12.2.44MM/SM ............................................................................. 120
12.2.45MMS ................................................................................. 121
12.2.46MTP3/M3UA ..................................................................... 121
12.2.47NBAP ............................................................................... 121
12.2.48PCAP ............................................................................... 121
12.2.49RADIUS ............................................................................ 121
12.2.50RANAP ............................................................................. 122
12.2.51RNSAP ............................................................................. 122
12.2.52RTSP ................................................................................ 122
12.2.53S1AP ................................................................................ 122
12.2.54SCCP ............................................................................... 123
12.2.55SDP .................................................................................. 123
12.2.56SGsAP ............................................................................. 123
12.2.57SIGTRAN ......................................................................... 123
12.2.58SIP ................................................................................... 124
12.2.59SMPP ............................................................................... 124
12.2.60SMS ................................................................................. 124
12.2.61TCAP ................................................................................ 124
12.2.62TCAP/INAP ...................................................................... 125

System Description
OSIX 5.6 vii
12.2.63TCAP/IS-41 ...................................................................... 125
12.2.64TCAP/MAP ....................................................................... 125
12.2.65TUP France ...................................................................... 125
12.2.66USSD ............................................................................... 126
12.2.67WAP ................................................................................. 126
12.2.68X2AP ................................................................................ 126
12.3 Protocol Analyser ....................................................................... 126
12.3.1 General ............................................................................. 126
12.3.2 AIN .................................................................................... 126
12.3.3 ALCAP .............................................................................. 126
12.3.4 ATM ................................................................................... 127
12.3.5 AggData ............................................................................ 127
12.3.6 AggRTP - End Point Descriptor ........................................ 127
12.3.7 AggRTP - Codec Metrics .................................................. 127
12.3.8 AggRTP - Packet Transport Record .................................. 127
12.3.9 AggRTP - Jitter Records (RFC 3550) ............................... 128
12.3.10AggRTP - Delay Record ................................................... 128
12.3.11AggRTP - Quality Records (G. 107) ................................. 128
12.3.12AggRTP - Degradation Metrics ........................................ 128
12.3.13AggRTP - End System Delay Record ............................... 128
12.3.14AggRTP - Voice Jitter Records (G. 1020) ......................... 129
12.3.15AggRTP - RTCP-XR Record ............................................ 129
12.3.16AggRTP - RTCP-SR Record ............................................ 129
12.3.17AggRTP - RTCP-RR Record ............................................ 129
12.3.18AggRTP - RTCP SS/RR-based QoE Metrics ................... 129
12.3.19BSSAP ............................................................................. 130
12.3.20BSSAP+ ........................................................................... 130
12.3.21Circuit - ISUP .................................................................... 130
12.3.22Circuit - IUP ...................................................................... 131
12.3.23Circuit - BICC ................................................................... 131
12.3.24Cisco Session Management ............................................. 131
12.3.25DHCP ............................................................................... 131
12.3.26DIAMETER ....................................................................... 132
12.3.27DNS .................................................................................. 132
12.3.28Ethernet ............................................................................ 133
12.3.29GPRS GB ......................................................................... 133
12.3.30GRE ................................................................................. 133
12.3.31GTP .................................................................................. 133
12.3.32H.323 ................................................................................ 134
12.3.33HTTP ................................................................................ 134
12.3.34ICMP ................................................................................ 134
12.3.35IP ...................................................................................... 134
12.3.36ISDN ................................................................................. 134
12.3.37ISDN SS ........................................................................... 135
12.3.38LCSAP ............................................................................. 135
12.3.39LDAP ................................................................................ 135
12.3.40LPPA ................................................................................. 135
12.3.41MEGACO ......................................................................... 135

System Description
OSIX 5.6 viii
12.3.42MGCP .............................................................................. 136
12.3.43MM/SM ............................................................................. 137
12.3.44MMS ................................................................................. 137
12.3.45MTP2 ................................................................................ 137
12.3.46MTP3/M3UA ..................................................................... 137
12.3.47Multimedia ........................................................................ 137
12.3.48NBAP ............................................................................... 138
12.3.49PCAP ............................................................................... 138
12.3.50QSAAL ............................................................................. 138
12.3.51RADIUS ............................................................................ 138
12.3.52RANAP ............................................................................. 138
12.3.53RNSAP ............................................................................. 139
12.3.54RTCP ................................................................................ 139
12.3.55RTP .................................................................................. 139
12.3.56RTSP ................................................................................ 139
12.3.57RUDP ............................................................................... 139
12.3.58S1AP ................................................................................ 139
12.3.59SCCP ............................................................................... 140
12.3.60SDP .................................................................................. 140
12.3.61SGsAP ............................................................................. 140
12.3.62SIGTRAN ......................................................................... 140
12.3.63SIP ................................................................................... 142
12.3.64SMPP ............................................................................... 142
12.3.65SMS ................................................................................. 142
12.3.66TAXUP .............................................................................. 142
12.3.67TCAP ................................................................................ 143
12.3.68TCAP/INAP ...................................................................... 143
12.3.69TCAP/IS-41 ...................................................................... 143
12.3.70TCAP/MAP ....................................................................... 144
12.3.71TCP .................................................................................. 144
12.3.72TUP FRANCE .................................................................. 144
12.3.73UDP .................................................................................. 144
12.3.74USSD ............................................................................... 144
12.3.75WAP ................................................................................. 145
12.3.76X2AP ................................................................................ 145

13 SOS columns .................................................................................. 146

13.1 SOS columns - CSE ................................................................... 146


13.1.1 ALL .................................................................................... 146
13.1.2 AIN .................................................................................... 146
13.1.3 ALCAP .............................................................................. 146
13.1.4 BICC ................................................................................. 147
13.1.5 BSSAP .............................................................................. 147
13.1.6 BSSAP+ (GSM09_18) ...................................................... 148
13.1.7 DHCP ................................................................................ 148
13.1.8 Diameter (RFC3588) ......................................................... 149
13.1.9 DNS (RFC1035) ................................................................ 149
13.1.10GPRGB ............................................................................ 149

System Description
OSIX 5.6 ix
13.1.11GTP .................................................................................. 150
13.1.12H225 ................................................................................. 150
13.1.13HTTP ................................................................................ 151
13.1.14INAP (TCAP/INAP Ericsson CS1+ B) .............................. 151
13.1.15IS-41 ................................................................................. 151
13.1.16ISAKMP (RFC7296IKEv2bis) ........................................... 152
13.1.17ISDN ................................................................................. 152
13.1.18ISDN SS (ISDN_SS_SCCP) ............................................ 152
13.1.19ISUP (ISUP93ver2ET97) .................................................. 153
13.1.20IUP ................................................................................... 153
13.1.21LDAP ................................................................................ 154
13.1.22MAP (TCAP/MAP) ............................................................ 154
13.1.23MEGACO (Megaco Binary/Text) ...................................... 154
13.1.24MGCP .............................................................................. 155
13.1.25NBAP ............................................................................... 155
13.1.26Radius (RFC2865Radius) ................................................ 155
13.1.27RANAP ............................................................................. 156
13.1.28RNSAP ............................................................................. 156
13.1.29RRC ................................................................................. 157
13.1.30RTSP ................................................................................ 157
13.1.31S1AP ................................................................................ 157
13.1.32SGsAP ............................................................................. 158
13.1.33SIP ................................................................................... 158
13.1.34SIP_PSTN (SIP+PSTN) ................................................... 159
13.1.35SIP_T ............................................................................... 159
13.1.36SMPP ............................................................................... 160
13.1.37WSP ................................................................................. 160
13.2 SOS columns - MSE ................................................................... 160
13.2.1 All ...................................................................................... 160
13.2.2 Unknown ........................................................................... 160
13.2.3 AggData ............................................................................ 161
13.2.4 BSSAP .............................................................................. 161
13.2.5 DIAMETER (RFC3588Diameter) ...................................... 162
13.2.6 GPRSGB ........................................................................... 162
13.2.7 GTP ................................................................................... 162
13.2.8 ISAKMP (RFC7296IKEv2bis) ........................................... 163
13.2.9 ISUP (ISUP93ver2ET97) .................................................. 163
13.2.10RANAP ............................................................................. 164
13.2.11RNSAP ............................................................................. 165
13.2.12SCCP ............................................................................... 165
13.2.13SMPP (SMPP v.3.4) ......................................................... 165
13.2.14TCAP ................................................................................ 166
13.2.15INAP (TCAP/INAP Ericsson CS1+ B) .............................. 166
13.2.16MAP (TCAP/MAP) ............................................................ 167

System Description
OSIX 5.6 x
Introduction

1 Introduction
Welcome to the OSIX System Description. This document aims to provide
a brief description of the purpose and use of the OSIX product.

1.1 The OSIX advantage


OSIX extracts information from the control and user plane, independently from the
switches, in true real-time. Regardless of the size of the network, number of links
and sites, or the type of distribution used, OSIX will provide an optimised solution.
OSIX is a distributed and robust system, which has been designed with high
scalability and flexibility in order to quickly adapt to new demands and
requirements, enabling the system to serve the customers over a long period of
time.
OSIX has integrated solutions for various domains, from legacy SS7 to LTE,
advanced alarm functionality, location tracking, handset tracking, customer/service/
network statistics, SMS messaging, security detection, roaming management, etc.
The OSIX Main Panel includes a set of applications that are used to monitor,
troubleshoot, view and analyse the network data, as well as to generate xDRs (data
records) and SNMP traps.

Figure 1: OSIX Main Panel and applications

System Description
OSIX 5.6 1
Introduction

1.2 Business value


In today’s market environment, it is absolutely essential for operators to understand
what their customers are using the network for and how they experience it.
Smartphones and data usage have increased subscribers’ demand for bandwidth
and their expectations of service and performance.
In order to maintain a first-class customer experience, advanced real time
surveillance and troubleshooting capabilities are crucial to any organisation
operating networks.
The OSIX system provides tools to:
Monitor network performance and Quality of Service (QoS).
Generate real-time alarms on abnormal network behaviour.
Detect poor network performance and prevent customer-affecting service
issues by providing fast and accurate error finding.
Resolve network problems faster through an intuitive display of information.
Gain access to all signalling data across any network technology for the
network-wide troubleshooting and root-cause analysis in real-time or
historically.
View and analyse end-to-end QoS and correlate information from different
sources on a multi-protocol level.
Perform detailed root-cause analysis on call, session and protocol levels using
unique drill-down capabilities.
Retrieve historical control signalling and user plane data for analysis purposes.
Generate xDRs for northbound integration.
Provide SNMP alarm generation to other systems.

1.3 Business solutions


Different departments of an organisation have different needs, and Polystar’s
business solution portfolio has been designed with that in mind. The solutions have
been grouped under two conceptual headings, Network Insight and Customer
Insight, and for these OSIX is an integral part:

1.3.1 Network insight


Network and service performance is measured by various performance indicators
and can be applied to any specific measurement or network event. Real-time alarm
generation on service degradation facilitates proactive and rapid problem
resolution. The network and service indicators can be displayed on a fully
customisable dashboard, with drill-down capabilities for further analysis.
Polystar’s roaming solutions rely upon our network probes to ensure all information
relating to all roamers and their activity is seen. Whether the question is to find
where in the network inbound roamers are lost and gained, or generating GRQ
reports, Polystar provides real-time visibility of all roaming activity inside and
outside the network.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 2
Introduction

1.3.2 Customer insight


Keeping the customer satisfied is key to long-term retention and subscriber loyalty.
Polystar’s Customer assurance solution provides operators with complete end-to-
end visibility of services (voice, SMS, video, data session, etc.) as experienced by
individual subscribers, subscriber groups and VIP accounts. Customisable
dashboards provide real-time information to company management, marketing,
customer care and sales departments about customer experiences on key revenue-
generating services.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 3
System overview

2 System overview
This chapter describes the OSIX system design, with sections on the
system architecture.

2.1 Overview
The OSIX system consists of probes, servers, and clients. The probes are non-
intrusively connected to the links in the signalling network, and are independent
from data collected by the switches.
The signalling traffic gathered by the probes is forwarded to the different servers,
which process and deliver the data to various applications and reporting tools.

Client Client Client


app. app. app.

Servers &
storage

Probe Probe

Signalling
network

Figure 2: OSIX design

The data can also be stored in the OSIX SOS (Storage of Signals) database, or in
storage subsystems for analysis of historical data. For even older data, the Call
Search Engine can be used for displaying transaction entry summaries for
transactions that are no longer stored in full in SOS.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 4
System overview

2.2 Architecture
The system architecture is designed to provide flexibility, scalability and
upgradeability.
Client Applications

Monitoring Third-party OSS


Applications Systems Applications

Application Specific Servers

Performance OSS
Server Servers

Probe Server Mapping Server

xDR-
SOS generator

State Machine Mapping


Server

Decode

Router

Router

Probe

Network Interface Network Interface Network Interface


Hardware Hardware Hardware

Figure 3: Typical OSIX architecture

2.2.1 Probe
2.2.1.1 Network interface hardware
The different types of signalling links are non-intrusively accessed via the network
interface hardware. See 5.1 Hardware for detailed information.

2.2.2 Router
2.2.2.1 Distribution/Load sharing
The Router collects messages from all the connected probes and will distribute
them evenly on to the probe servers. All messages belonging to a certain call/
process will be sent to the same probe server. This is done through a fast algorithm
that is different for every protocol.

2.2.3 Probe server


2.2.3.1 Collection
Collects and correlates all the protocol messages from the data streams received
from the network interface hardware, or router. Correlation is done between
messages from the entire network, and between certain protocols and transaction
parts, as well.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 5
System overview

2.2.3.2 Decode
The different protocol messages are decoded, and interpreted, before they are
forwarded to the state machine.

2.2.3.3 Decipher
Ciphered messages on the Gb and S1-MME interfaces are deciphered in real time
by the Probe server. For this purpose, ciphering keys are fetched from the Mapping
server. It is vital that the Mapping server is up-to-date at all times, which means that
the Gb, Gr, Gn, S1-MME, S6a and S11 interfaces have to be monitored and
processed in real time. Normally, the Probe server can decipher over 90% of the
signalling for Gb.

2.2.3.4 State machine


The state machine initiates one unique process for each individual transaction,
keeping track of the states of the transactions. Required data is then sent either to
the OSIX applications (either directly, or via the Performance server, or historically),
or the xDR generator.

2.2.3.5 xDR generator


With the xDR generator functionality you can produce customer-defined xDRs, in
different formats, in true real time. The xDR generators, which will generate xDRs
based on any filter settings you may wish to have, and in the format of your choice,
send the xDRs to the assigned IP address and port. You can have several xDR
generators generating different types of xDRs active at the same time, and partial
xDRs are also available.

2.2.3.6 SOS - Storage Of Signals


The SOS database stores data for historical analysis in the Call Trace and Protocol
Analyser applications. SOS allows instant access to all signalling data. For older
data, the Call Search Engine (CSE) or the Message Search Engine (MSE) can be
used for displaying calls/messages that are no longer stored in full in SOS.

2.2.4 Mapping server


Every Probe server has a connection towards the Mapping server. Whenever a new
IMSI-TMSI (P-TMSI) pair is discovered in the signalling, the Mapping server is
informed (when a TMSI reallocation is performed the Mapping server is also
updated). When a call/transaction with only TMSI (P-TMSI) is handled by a Probe
server, the Mapping server will be queried for the correct IMSI for the corresponding
TMSI (P-TMSI). The Mapping server will also keep keys used for deciphering, for
example for Gb traffic.

2.2.5 Application specific servers


2.2.5.1 Performance server
The Performance server is the engine behind the OSIX applications Mass Call and
Performance Analyser, as it feeds both of these applications with necessary data.
See 3.2.4 Mass Call, or 3.2.3 Performance Analyser, for further information.

2.2.5.2 OSS server


The OSS server processes the information from the probe servers for use with the
different OSS applications.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 6
System overview

2.2.6 Client applications


The client applications are used by the end users to monitor, analyse, troubleshoot,
or otherwise use the data from the signalling network.

2.2.6.1 OSIX applications


The OSIX applications are integrated with the system as well as with each other,
and currently include:
Call Trace, for monitoring transactions in different protocols, where all
messages related to each process are grouped together, either in real time or
historically, networkwide,
Protocol Analyser, for monitoring and troubleshooting protocol messages for all
supported protocols, either in real time or historically,
Performance Analyser, for monitoring of different KPIs (Key Performance
Indicators), in real time, such as ASR, NER, PDP Activations, successful
transactions, transaction frequency, response times, successful SMS
transactions, etc. The data is presented in real time, alarms are generated
when the performance goes beyond the set alarm threshold, and the
application includes instant access to Call Trace and Protocol Analyser,
Network Status, for monitoring network related alarms on MTP1 level, MTP2
level, MTP3 level, or alarms for high link loads, poor performance, high
amounts of call attempts, or alarms triggered by certain types of messages or
transactions, with quick access to Call Trace and Protocol Analyser,
Mass Call (PSTN only), for detecting calls that are looping around, and early
stages of congestion, etc., when monitoring mass calls for B numbers, and for
detecting fraudulent calling patterns, etc., when monitoring calls for A numbers,
with instant access to Call Trace and Protocol Analyser,
Real Time Statistics, for setting up diagrams with different graphs displaying the
number of protocol messages or transactions that are passing the filter settings
applied, in real time.
Statistics Alarm, for setting up alarms to be generated when certain filter
criteria for protocol messages or calls/transactions are met.
Packet Recorder, to record packet streams of user plane data, typically on the
Gn, Gp, S1, S8, Gi, and SGi interfaces.
See 3.2 OSIX applications for further general information.
All OSIX applications are available à la carte to help you build your OSIX system
with just the right combination of applications you need to meet your specific
network monitoring requirements.

2.2.6.2 Third-party systems


Third-party systems, such as Revenue Assurance systems, Billing systems, Fraud
Management systems, and Quality of Service systems, can all have their own
customised xDRs generated by the different xDR generators. Other systems such
as Network Management systems, can receive information in the form of SNMP
traps. See 3.3 xDR generator, and 3.5 Alarm specification, for further information.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 7
System overview

2.2.6.3 Sirius
Sirius contains Polystar’s special applications. The following applications are
available:
SMS welcome (formerly sGate)
Sends messages to subscribers welcoming them to a network in a new country.
Handset identifier (formerly Handset tracker)
The Handset identifier is a tool that keeps track of which physical handset a
client is currently using.
See the respective system description for further information about the Sirius
applications.

2.2.6.4 Jupiter
Jupiter gives the user access to all possible perspectives, from a helicopter view to
unmatched drill-down possibilities for in-depth network investigation. Jupiter’s
graphical interface encourages a proactive use that inspires new ways to monitor
the data to find degrading trends and other anomalies. Potential problems can be
dealt with before they affect the quality of service, increasing the competitiveness of
the network operator’s business. See the Jupiter System Description for further
information about Jupiter.

2.3 Multiple Network Support


Support for multiple networks means the ability to operate on two logical/ physical
separated networks in a customer network.
Network separation is done between the user application layer (OSIX client) and the
server side (backbone), by usage of physical separated network ports on the GLS,
PRS and Jupiter Web server as illustrated below.

Figure 4: Network separation illustration

Monitored traffic is processed in the backbone network and client requested traffic
is provided in the user network.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 8
System overview

In addition to already mandatory IPs in the backbone network, additional IPs for the
user network is required for this purpose, i.e. one IP address per JVM component
per network inherence
Support for multiple network is charged separately and a separate licence is
required enabling this feature.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 9
Applications overview

3 Applications overview
This chapter describes the various applications that are available in the
OSIX system, including the configuration of xDR generators, as well as the
use of SOS (Storage of Signals) and SNMP traps.

3.1 Overview
The signalling data collected by OSIX can be used in several different ways:

Third-party
systems

Monitoring xDR-/SNMP- OSS


applications trap generation applications

OSIX
core

Frame
SS7 Relay IP
GPRS UMTS
ISDN
Figure 5: OSIX flow chart

The data can be sent to the OSIX applications, which display protocol
messages, calls/ transactions, performance, mass call attempts, diagrams over
real time traffic, and alarms on MTP1, MTP2, and MTP3 levels, as well as on
link load.
The data can be sent to the SOS (Storage of Signals) database for later
retrieval of protocol messages and/or calls/transactions. For older data, the Call
Search Engine can be used for displaying transaction entries that are no longer
stored in full in SOS.
The data can be sent to the OSIX xDR generator, which generates customised
xDRs. These xDRs can be used for Billing Verification, Revenue Assurance,
Fraud Management, Device Management, Service Assurance, and other third
party systems. Several different xDR generators for different formats, and for
different systems can be configured.
Different events can trigger SNMP traps, which are sent to external Network
Management applications.
The data can be sent to the OSS applications.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 10
Applications overview

3.2 OSIX applications


Currently, seven different OSIX applications can be included in the OSIX system:
Protocol Analyser, Call Trace, Performance Analyser, Mass Call, Real Time
Statistics, Network Status, Statistics Alarm, and Packet Recorder. (For information
about the Configuration Manager and the System Status application see
7.1 Configuration Manager and 7.2 System Status.)

3.2.1 Protocol Analyser


The Protocol Analyser application monitors protocol messages, in real time or
historically with SOS. Included in the application are advanced filtering
functionalities, and comprehensive tools for adapting the user interface. You also
have quick access to detailed information within the protocol messages down to
each individual bit and byte of the signalling.
This application will help you solve network problems at a deeper level, and find
reasons for erroneous transactions, by filtering on specific protocol messages, etc.

Figure 6: Protocol Analyser Main Window

The following figure illustrates a message in Protocol Analyser.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 11
Applications overview

Figure 7: A message in Protocol Analyser

All protocols supported in OSIX are available in the Protocol Analyser with a huge
set of pre-defined parameters available for filtering. See 12 Protocol Parameters for
available parameters.

3.2.1.1 Customising the interface


You may customise each window to display the information you are interested in,
with the representation, order, and sorting of your choice, by using the Columns and
Customise dialog boxes.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 12
Applications overview

3.2.1.1.1 Columns dialog box

Figure 8: The Columns dialog box

3.2.1.2 Filters
There are six different type of filters:
Traffic Groups - The links in your network are divided into one or more traffic
groups, and you must select at least one traffic group before you can start
monitoring messages. (Protocol Analyser and Call Trace.)
Historical/RT - You can switch between historical and real time search mode.
The historical filter is used for viewing calling processes historically, that is from
a certain time interval, and with a certain duration. A historical search will filter
out all messages that do not fit in the time period selected in the search filter.
(Protocol Analyser and Call Trace.)
Parameters - You may set a filter on any parameter value visible in the Main
Window. The quickest way to do this is to right-click the value and add to filter.
This filter type also allows you to exclude messages with specific values.
(Protocol Analyser and Call Trace).
Links - You can select to only view messages being sent on one or more
specific links. (Protocol Analyser and Call Trace.)
Protocols - If you are running more than one protocol, you can easily select to
only view messages of a certain protocol type. (Protocol Analyser and Call
Trace.)

System Description
OSIX 5.6 13
Applications overview

3.2.1.2.1 Server filter - View filter


The parameter, link, and protocol filters can be set both as a server filter and as a
view filter. A server filter determines which messages should be sent from the probe
servers to the client computers, minimising the load on the LAN/WAN, while the
view filter searches through the messages sent to the client computer and displays
messages passing the filter criteria, and can thus be turned on or off.

3.2.1.2.2 Combining filter criteria


Filters can be set to display either messages where a certain parameter equals a
certain value, or messages where a certain parameter does NOT equal a certain
value. The set filter criteria can then be combined with AND/OR functionality.

3.2.1.3 Available parameters


For available protocol parameters for Protocol Analyser, see 12.3 Protocol
Analyser.

3.2.2 Call Trace


The Call Trace application monitors calling processes, in real time or historically
with SOS, or CSE/MSE. Included in the application are advanced filtering
functionalities, and comprehensive tools for adapting the user interface. You also
have quick access to detailed information about the processes, and all the
messages sent during the processes.
The comprehensive correlation functionality allows you to view messages, end-to-
end, for all the different transactions that are parts of the logical transactions, such
as all the transactions relevant for a mobile call, or an SMS transaction, or a VoIP
call, for example.
The call flow view, displaying how the messages are sent between different nodes,
is available for both single transactions and correlated transactions.
This application will help the customer support staff to give top class service to your
subscribers with a complete overview of all the calling processes. You will also be
able to find reasons for poor statistical values detected in Performance Analyser, or
see if there were any disturbances during an alarm in Network Status, etc.
Signalling technicians will have access to all the bits and bytes in every calling
process and protocol message for deep analysis as well.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 14
Applications overview

Figure 9: Call Trace Main Window

A correlation example for Mobile Packet is shown in the following figure.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 15
Applications overview

Figure 10: The Call Flow Window for Mobile Packet

The Call Trace application supports numerous protocols for fixed, mobile, IMS, VoIP,
and intelligent networks.

3.2.2.1 Customising the interface


See 3.2.1.1 Customising the interface.

3.2.2.2 Available parameters


For available protocol parameters for Call Trace, see 12.2 Call Trace.

3.2.3 Performance Analyser


The Performance Analyser application monitors Key Performance Indicators for
different transaction groups in real time, which will show you the performance in
your network.
For each KPI alarm thresholds can be set per transaction group.
The following pre-defined protocol-specific KPIs are available:
ASR (Answer Seizure Ratio) - displays the number of successful call attempts
(answered or terminated with a normal release cause) out of the total number
of call attempts in per cent. Alarms are generated when the current levels go
below the set alarm thresholds. (For ISUP, IUP, BICC, ISDN, SIP, and Iu-CS.)
NER (Network Efficiency Ratio) - displays the number of calls terminated with
a normal release cause, user busy, or no answer, out of the total number of call

System Description
OSIX 5.6 16
Applications overview

attempts in per cent. Alarms are generated when the current levels go below
the set alarm thresholds. (For ISUP, IUP, BICC, ISDN, SIP, and Iu-CS.)
NOSC (Number Of Short Calls) - displays the number of calls with unusually
short conversations times out of the total number of call attempts in per cent.
Alarms are generated when the current levels go above the set alarm
thresholds. (For ISUP, IUP, BICC, ISDN, SIP, and Iu-CS.)
Invite performance - displays the number of invites that have not required any
message to be resent out of the total number of invites in per cent. Alarms are
generated when the current levels go below the set alarm thresholds. (For SIP.)
Register success - displays the number of successful registrations out of the
total number of registrations in per cent. Alarms are generated when the
current levels go below the set alarm thresholds. (for SIP)
Register performance - displays the number of registrations that have not
required any message to be resent out of the total number of registrations in
per cent. Alarms are generated when the current levels go below the set
thresholds. (For SIP.)
SMS - displays the number of successful SMS transactions out the total
number of SMS transactions in per cent. Alarms are generated when the
current levels go below the set thresholds. (For Iu-CS.)
Attach accepts - displays the number of accepted attach requests out of the
total number of attach requests in per cent. Alarms are generated when the
current levels go below the set thresholds. (For GPRS and Iu-PS.)
PDP activations - displays the number of PDP activations terminated with
Session Management cause 36 (Regular deactivation) out of the total number
of PDP activations in per cent. Alarms are generated when the current levels go
below the set thresholds. (For GPRS and Iu-PS.)
Successful transactions - displays the number of transactions that have
reached end state without any error codes out of the total number of
transactions in per cent. Alarms are generated when the current levels go
below the set thresholds. (For INAP.)
T1 - displays the number of transactions with a maximum time, defined as T1
by the system administrator, between the Begin message and the Continue,
End, or Abort message out of the total number of transactions in per cent.
Alarms are generated when the current levels go below the set thresholds. (For
INAP.)
T2 - displays the number of transactions with a maximum time, defined as T2
by the system administrator, between the Begin message and the Continue,
End, or Abort message out of the total number of transactions in per cent.
Alarms are generated when the current levels go below the set thresholds. (For
INAP.)
Frequency - displays the average number of INAP transactions per second.
Alarms are generated when the current levels go above the set max levels or
below the set min levels. (For INAP.)
Invoke Frequency - displays the average number of Invokes per second.
Alarms are generated when the current levels go above the set levels. (For
INAP.)
Timeout Frequency - displays the average number of timeouts per second.
Alarms are generated when the current levels go above the set levels. (For
INAP.)
Average response time - displays the average response time between the
Begin message and the Continue, End, or Abort message in milliseconds.
Alarms are generated when the current response times go below the set
thresholds. (For INAP, MAP and IS-41.)
Successful SCCP transactions - displays the number of transactions that
have reached end state without any error codes out of the total number of

System Description
OSIX 5.6 17
Applications overview

transactions in per cent. Alarms are generated when the current levels go
below the set thresholds. (For MAP and IS-41.)
Successful TCAP states - displays the number of TCAP transactions that do
not have any aborts or timeouts out of the total number of successful SCCP
transactions above in per cent. Alarms are generated when the current levels
go below the set thresholds. (For MAP and IS-41.)
Successful TCAP transactions - displays the number of TCAP transactions
that have reached end state without any error codes out of the total number of
successful TCAP states above in per cent. Alarms are generated when the
current levels go below the set thresholds. (For MAP and IS-41.)
Transaction Success Rate- displays the GTP transaction success rate in per
cent. Alarms are generated when the current levels go below the set
thresholds. (For GTP.)
Response Delay - displays the delay between a request and a response, for
example between a Create PDP request and a Create PDP response, in per
cent and in milliseconds. The control signalling affects the value, not the user
data. Alarms are generated when the current levels go above the set levels.(For
GTP.)
User Data Throughput - displays the min/max throughput downlink (for
example when a user is browsing a web page), in per cent and in milliseconds,
and uplink (for example when a user is sharing a file), in per cent and in
milliseconds. (For GTP.)
The transaction groups can consist of many different parameters, enabling you to
pin-point and monitor statistics for an exact type of transaction, originating at certain
places, terminating at certain places, containing specific numbers, etc.
Performance Analyser will help you increase your quality of service, since you can
instantly see in which areas the performance is going down. This information allows
you to reroute the calls, without affecting the customers, while solving the problem.
You also have instant access to the Call Trace and Protocol Analyser applications
where filters are automatically set on the parameters the selected group is based
on. You can then see if and how the traffic was affected by the alarms.

Figure 11: Performance Analyser Main Window

This application will help you detect problems quickly, and decrease the time
required for problem solving. The application is typically displayed on in the NOC
wall. Alarms can be sent to an internal alarm application of to third-party alarm
management systems using SNMP traps.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 18
Applications overview

3.2.4 Mass Call


In the Mass Call application (PSTN only) you can monitor either the number of call
attempts made to specific numbers, or made by specific numbers. ISUP, IUP and
BICC protocols are supported.

3.2.4.1 Mass Call B Number


Monitoring call attempts to specific numbers will help you see if you need to reroute
the traffic, or activate call gapping. For example, when there are massive amounts
of call attempts for a TV vote, or to a booking centre for newly released theatre
tickets, etc. You will also be able to find errors in routing tables which results in calls
that are looping around the network.

Figure 12: Mass Call B Number

3.2.4.2 Mass Call A Number


Monitoring call attempts made by specific numbers will help you find subscribers
that have strange calling patterns. For example, if a dialler has been connected to
automatically find free extensions in a corporate switchboard.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 19
Applications overview

Figure 13: Mass Call A Number

3.2.4.3 Common features


You have instant access to the Call Trace and Protocol Analyser applications where
filters are automatically set on selected numbers and/or second numbers/PC NI
combinations. You can then see if and how the traffic was affected by the alarms.
This application helps you solve problems before customers are affected by
overloaded switches, and stop fraudulent subscriber behaviour. See 8.6 Mass Call,
in the chapter 8 OSIX for PSTN networks for further information.

3.2.4.4 Specific alarm levels


If there are specific numbers, or number sequences, that frequently have large
amounts of call attempts, specific alarm levels can be applied, which will reduce the
number of alarms for these numbers, or number sequences.

3.2.5 Real Time Statistics


With the Real Time Statistics application you can set up and view diagrams, or
statistical information in table format, over certain types of messages and/or calls in
your network in real time. This allows you to immediately detect drops or peaks in
the traffic, which need further attention.
Different filter criteria can be set up for the different graphs, based on either protocol
messages or calls. Several graphs can also be combined in the same diagram,
where each graph has its own designated colour for easier identification.
When setting up the diagrams, you select if you wish the graph to be based on
messages or calls, and then you can apply different filter settings:
Traffic group filter – messages/calls passing the links in the selected traffic
group(s) will be counted
Protocol filter – messages/calls for the selected protocol(s) will be counted
Link filter – messages/calls for the selected link(s) will be counted
Parameter filters – messages/calls matching the set parameter values
(settings for wildcards, ranges, non-existent parameters, etc., can be used) will
be counted

System Description
OSIX 5.6 20
Applications overview

You can also select to open filters that you have saved in the Protocol Analyser or
Call Trace applications and re-use them in the Real Time Statistics application,
which also means that all the parameters available for filtering in Protocol Analyser
and Call Trace, are also available for filtering in Real Time Statistics.
Once the filters are set, and you select to view the diagram, the graphs will display
the number of messages/calls passing the filter settings in real time. The graphs are
updated with the time resolution of your choice.
All the filter settings can also be saved and used at a later time, or shared between
colleagues.

Figure 14: Real Time Statistics Main Window

An example of a diagram in Real Time Statistics is shown in the following figure.

Figure 15: Diagram example in Real Time Statistics

System Description
OSIX 5.6 21
Applications overview

3.2.6 Network Status


The Network Status application monitors alarms on MTP1 level, MTP2 level, MTP3
level, and on high link load, poor performance, large amounts of call attempts, and
alarms generated by certain types of messages or transactions, and displays them
in a user interface, which allows you to acknowledge and clear the alarms, as well
as search for similar alarms throughout your network.
You also have quick access to the Call Trace and Protocol Analyser applications,
where you can then see if your subscribers were affected in any way by the alarms.

Figure 16: Network Status Surveyor view

This application will help you detect problems quickly, and decrease the times for
problem solving.

3.2.7 Statistics Alarm


In the Statistics item you can set up different filter criteria, which will generate
alarms if they are met. For example, you can set up a filter on B Number equals 555
55 55. As soon as a protocol message, or call, with B Number 555 55 55 is
detected, an alarm is generated. You can also set filters to generate alarms when
you have calls with a certain duration, or if you have more than 500 IAM messages
per minute, etc. All the filter options included in the Protocol Analyser and Call Trace
applications are available.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 22
Applications overview

Figure 17: Statistics Alarm Main Window

3.2.8 Packet Recorder


The purpose of Packet Recorder is to record packet streams of user plane data,
typically on the Gn, Gp, S1, S8, Gi, and SGi interfaces. The Packet Recorder
application is run in a web GUI that supports Firefox, Internet Explorer and Google
Chrome.
Packet streams are stored locally on a MediaProbe based on a capture filter defined
by the user. Streams may be set to capture a fixed volume of data (e.g. 10MB) or as
sliding window storage where the oldest data is continuously replaced by newer
data.
Stored data may be accessed in multiple ways, including export in a PCAP format
for offline processing or decoding in Wireshark. Data can be searched for specific
signalling or exported in its entirety. GTP-U data and Gi/SGi user plane data may
also be loaded into Call Trace and displayed together with the corresponding GTP-
C session.

Figure 18: Packet Recorder Main Window

System Description
OSIX 5.6 23
Applications overview

The application is available in two versions:


Packet Recorder – Light
The light version supports recording of GTP-U data based on an IMSI filter.
Packet Recorder - Full
The full version of the application includes additional GTP capture filters, such
as node IP, tunnelled IP, tunnelled port, vlan and using no filter at all. It also
includes filters for Gi/SGi or other IP-based interfaces including vlan, IP and port.
This version of the application requires additional hardware compared to a
normal MediaProbe, which does not have the necessary disk space to support
all filter options.

3.3 xDR generator


With OSIX you can receive partial xDRs in true real-time to, for example, your Fraud
Management System. This means that you can detect fraud even prior to
connection, and you are not limited to the static and restricted xDRs from the NEs
(Network Elements).
The xDRs delivered by the switches are also often incomplete, for example during
peak traffic times, which means you lose billing data. The OSIX system always
deliver 100% of the xDRs in whichever formats and states you desire.
In the system you can configure several different xDR generators, with different
formats, with different filters (that is, you can decide to generate xDRs when certain
filter criteria are met), and send them to different ports on different IP addresses.

Figure 19: xDR Generator example

System Description
OSIX 5.6 24
Applications overview

3.3.1 Interfaces
The xDR-generation has three main interfaces towards third-party systems; pure
socket (real-time), file server (near real-time), and database (near real-time).

Third-party Third-party Third-party


systems systems systems

TCP/IP File server Database


near near
real time
real time real time

Probe Probe Probe

Figure 20: Interfaces to third-party systems

3.3.1.1 Pure socket


xDRs are sent in a binary stream according to the specified xDR format. The third-
party system must be able to read data from the socket at the same speed as OSIX
sends data. If the third-party system is too slow, or disconnects, a backup
functionality is activated.

3.3.1.2 File server


With the file server interface, OSIX uses a disk saver application that saves xDRs to
disk according to the specified format. xDRs are stored in sequence, and there is no
extra header inserted between the xDRs.

3.3.1.3 Database
If required, a database can also be used as the interface to third-party systems for
some of the protocols supported. This option requires a Jupiter installation.

3.3.2 Formats
The xDRs can be delivered in several different formats, and for several different
purposes and protocols - simultaneously.

3.4 SOS (Storage of Signals)


With SOS functionality you will be able to view calling transactions and protocol
messages historically.
Each probe server has a SOS database which stores all the signalling data. The
storage time can be configured per probe server and protocol, making it possible to
store, for example, SIP for a longer time period than Megaco.
When the clients select a time interval to view calling transactions or protocol
messages from, the data is sent from the SOS database(s) to the clients, and will
be displayed in the Call Trace and Protocol Analyser applications. For older data,
the Call Search Engine (CSE) and the Message Search Engine (MSE) can be used
for displaying transaction entries, with limited information, that are no longer stored
in SOS. See 13 SOS columns, for available parameters that are supported for CSE.
The transactions and messages will be displayed in the same way as when you are
running the applications in real time, with the same filtering functionality, quick
access to details, etc. The number of days you store data in SOS is freely
configurable. You just have to have enough servers to handle the amount of data.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 25
Applications overview

3.5 Alarm specification


The OSIX system provides SNMP functionality, which can be used to send
information and alarms to other systems like Network Management Systems.
Currently, the following events can trigger SNMP traps to be sent. (Note: Listing
follows Configuration Manager Category ID order.):

Layer 1 OK ICMP Source Quench Statistic Alarm (clearable)


Loss Of Signal ICMP Time Exceeded Probe Connection OK
Loss Of Frame Alignment ICMP Parameter Problem Probe Connection Broken
Loss Of Multi Frame Diameter Disconnect-Peer Sigtran Destination Unavailable
Alignment
Remote Alarm Indication Diameter CE Error Sigtran Destination Available
Alarm Indication Signal Diameter CE Success Sigtran Signalling Congestion
Severe Error Handling Diameter CE Timeout Sigtran Destination User Part
Unavailable
Remote Defect Indication Diameter DW Error Sigtran Application Server Up
Loss Of Pointer Diameter DW Timeout Sigtran Application Server Down
Out-of-Cell Declination Circuit ASR Alarm Sigtran Heartbeat failure
Loss-of-Cell Declination Circuit NER Alarm Sigtran Heartbeat failure clear
In Service Circuit NOSC Alarm Sigtran SCTP link inactive
Out Of Service Mass Call Alarm Sigtran SCTP link inactive clear
Processor Outage Gprs Attach Alarm Sigtran M2UA link release
Congestion Gprs PdpActivate Alarm Sigtran M2UA link release clear
No Signal Units INAP Successful Transactions Sigtran M2UA link congestion
Alarm
Link Limit Exceeded INAP T1 Alarm Sigtran M2UA link congestion
clear
Link Limit Exceeded INAP T2 Alarm Sigtran Signalling Congestion
Cleared clear
Transfer controlled INAP Min Transactions Alarm Sigtran M2PA link in service
Transfer prohibited INAP Max Transactions Alarm Sigtran M2PA link out of service
Transfer restricted INAP Invoke Frequency Alarm Sigtran M2PA link processor
outage
Transfer allowed INAP Timeout Frequency Sigtran M2PA link congestion
Alarm
Route-Set-Test Timeout MAP SCCP Alarm Sigtran M2PA link congestion
clear
Link inhibit MAP TCAP State Alarm Pointcodes Not Monitored
Link uninhibit MAP TCAP Success Alarm Disk usage high
Linkset available MAP Response Time Alarm Disk usage high (clear)
Linkset unavailable IS41 SCCP Alarm Disk usage turned off
Node available IS41 TCAP State Alarm Disk usage turned on
Node unavailable IS41 TCAP Success Alarm Gemini Cell Rate Limit
Subsystem allowed IS41 Response Time Alarm Gemini Cell Rate Limit Cleared
Subsystem prohibited SIP ASR Alarm Gemini Drop Rate Limit
Subsystem congested SIP NER Alarm Gemini Drop Rate Limit Cleared
Gprs Traffic Unavailable SIP NOSC Alarm Gemini Mem High Limit
Gprs Traffic Available SIP Invite Performance Alarm Gemini Mem High Limit Cleared
Gprs BVC Unavailable SIP Register Success Alarm Gemini Mem Low Limit
Table 1: Alarms

System Description
OSIX 5.6 26
Applications overview

Gprs BVC (0) Unavailable SIP Register Performance Gemini Mem Low Limit Cleared
Alarm
Gprs BVC Available Iu CS ASR Alarm Gemini Load High
Gprs Linkset available Iu CS NER Alarm Gemini Load High Cleared
Gprs Linkset unavailable Iu CS NOSC Alarm Mediaprobe Memory In Use High
Gprs BVC (0) Available Iu CS SMS Alarm Mediaprobe Memory In Use High
Cleared
Gprs NSVC Blocked Iu PS Attach Alarm Mediaprobe Disk Usage High
Gprs NSVC Unblocked Iu PS PDP Activate Alarm Mediaprobe Disk Usage High
Cleared
Gprs NS Reset GTP Min Throughput Down Mediaprobe Dir Usage High
Alarm
Gprs NS Reset Clear GTP Min Throughput Up Alarm Mediaprobe Dir Usage High
Cleared
Gprs NSEI Unavailable GTP Max Throughput Down Mediaprobe Received Packaged
Alarm
Gprs NSEI Available GTP Max Throughput Up Mediaprobe Received Packaged
Alarm Cleared
Gprs NSVC Unavailable GTP Response Delay Alarm Mediaprobe Received kB
Gprs NSVC Available GTP Success Level Alarm Mediaprobe Received kB
Cleared
ICMP Destination Statistic Alarm (single)
Unreachable
ICMP Redirect Statistic Alarm (counter)
Table 1: Alarms (Continued)

System Description
OSIX 5.6 27
System configuration

4 System configuration
This chapter describes different OSIX system configurations.

4.1 Overview
The configuration of the OSIX system can either be distributed or centralised,
depending on your network. In case you have a large amount of links which need to
be grouped together, and correlated, a router configuration may also be considered.

4.2 Distributed configuration


The common configuration is a distributed configuration where there are probes
non-intrusively connected to the links at each site.

Client Client Client

LAN/WAN

Application
Specific Servers

S S S

Probe Server Probe Server Probe Server

Probe Probe Probe

Site 1 Site 2 Site 3

Figure 21: Distributed OSIX configuration

System Description
OSIX 5.6 28
System configuration

4.3 Centralised configuration


In some network configurations it may be more practical to have the signalling links
looped out of the switches, and the signals sent via, for example, DXC (Digital
Cross Connect) to a central site where all the probes are located.

Client Client Client

LAN/WAN

Application
Specific Servers

S
Probe Server
S
Probe Server
S
Probe Server

Probe
DXC Probe DXC
DXC Probe DXC

Site 1 Site 2 Site 3

Figure 22: Centralised OSIX configuration

4.4 Router configuration


For larger installations, a router configuration can be applied in order to take
advantage of the full capacity in the probe servers, and share processing load
between the servers. The traffic is then gathered by the probes, sent to the router,
and then evenly distributed between the probe servers.
In very large installations, several routers can be configured to work as one large
router as well.

Probe Server Probe Server Probe Server

Router

Probe Probe Probe


Figure 23: OSIX router configuration

System Description
OSIX 5.6 29
System configuration

4.5 Two systems in one GUI


OSIX offers the possibility to visualise and configure two identical systems, (a
primary and secondary system), monitoring the same physical links, from within
one OSIX client GUI. With two systems in one GUI, the user is able to select which
system to work with, primary, secondary, or both.

Figure 24: Use system options in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 30
Hardware and software

5 Hardware and software


This chapter describes the hardware used, the software in the network
interface hardware, and the servers.

5.1 Hardware
There are different types of network interface hardware depending on the type of
interface you have at your site; E1/T1, Ethernet, STM1/OC-3.

5.1.1 Probes for E1/T1 monitoring


The LIM 3.0 extracts signalling from E1 and T1 G.703 PCM links in fixed, GSM and
3G UMTS mobile telephone networks. It connects to E1/T1 links, decodes layer 1
and layer 2 of the protocol stack and then forwards the monitored data to the Probe
Server server over TCP/IP.
Each LIM 3.0 provides 64 E1/T1 receivers in 1U of a 19” rack I.e. possibility to
monitor 32 E1/T1 links.
The LIM is controlled by an external application through an OS- and language-
neutral text-over-TCP/IP/Ethernet API.
The LIM is capable of decoding SS7 MTP-2, ATM (AAL5 and AAL2), frame relay or
LAPD.
The average link load is limited to 0.4 Erlang. However, peak loads can be up to 1
Erlang.

5.1.1.1 Capacity matrix LIM 3.0

32 E1s Pro Basic Comment


MTP-2 low speed links (LSL) 48 8
MTP-2 high speed links / 3/192 Annex A
timeslots (HSL)
ISDN LAPD links 160 160
Frame Relay channels / timeslots 96/1488 16/496 Gb
HSSL (ATM AAL5) 8 4 ATM over E1
Table 2: Capacity matrix LIM 3.0

Please note that one LIM is only able to process one layer 2 decoding algorithm at a
time.
Basic and Pro licence is software licensed controlled based on capacity
requirement.

5.1.1.2 Hardware features


19” x 1U rack-mounted chassis, 482 x 144 x 42mm.
E1/T1 receivers have software selectable E1(2 Mbit/s) or T1 (1.5 Mbit/s) mode,
75/100/120 ohm termination and are compatible with standard -20dB (G.772)
and also -30dB monitor points.
Dual 10/100 Mbit/s Ethernet, both support Power over Ethernet (PoE).
Power consumption less than 10W per chassis. Dual 48VDC power inputs and
dual PoE.
No moving parts, passively cooled.
Measured MTBF: 130 module-years between failures

System Description
OSIX 5.6 31
Hardware and software

Figure 25: LIM 3.0 - front

5.1.1.3 Electrical independency – hot swap


The power converters in each probe chassis accept two separate, polarity
independent input voltages of 38-60VDC. This makes the probe extremely resistant
to variations in power supply.

5.1.1.4 Software independency


All real time critical issues are handled in the hardware, and the software is easily
upgradeable. Upgrades can also be handled remotely.

5.1.1.5 Synchronisation
The OSIX system uses the NTP protocol for time synchronisation. When the probes
have been synchronised they use the PCM links as the timing source, that is, the
system is running at the same pace as the switching system. This assures very
accurate time stamps.
The ntp time-adjustment is continuously monitored and is typically within parts of a
millisecond.

5.1.1.6 Carrier class approved


Each component of the OSIX system is thoroughly tested and approved in
accordance with requirements for CE and EMC carrier class levels.
The probes, and LIMs have also been separately approved for electrical safety,
regarding, for example electrostatic discharge, and surge resistibility according to
ITU-T.

5.1.2 Probes for STM-1


5.1.2.1 STM-1
The probes consist of 1U 19" rack-mounted chassis (482mm x 144mm x 42mm)
with room for one or three independent sub-modules. Each sub-module is equipped
with the following interfaces:
Two SFP sockets for STM-1 SFP modules. Multi-mode and single-mode fibers,
different wavelengths and connectors are selected by the added SFP module.
Two 10/100 Mbit/s Ethernet with RJ-45 connector.
Status LEDs.
The units can be equipped as follows:
SDH 3.0-1 - equipped with one (1) SDH sub-module. NOTE: this version is not
expandable, meaning you need to replace the whole chassis if you need to
increase with additional sub-modules.
SDH 3.0-2 - equipped with three (3) SDH sub-modules. This version is HW
prepared with three sub-modules, and can be upgraded to SDH 3.0-3. This is
managed through a SW license. NOTE: Both a basic SW license and a Pro SW
license is required when upgrading to a SDH 3.0-3.
SDH 3.0-3 - equipped with three (3) SDH sub-modules.
The basic SW license (included) can be upgraded to a pro SW license, which
enables monitoring of more signalling links, as can be seen in the table below.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 32
Hardware and software

A chassis provides two or six SFP sockets in total and thereby monitor both
directions of one up to three SDH links.
Each SDH 3.0 sub-module can monitor two simplex SDH links. The SDH Layer 1
configuration supported is STM-1->AU-4->TU-12. Each sub-module is capable of
monitoring 68 MTP-2 duplex links.

5.1.2.2 Capacity matrix SDH 3.0

Signalling Monitoring Performance, per


Pro Basic Comment
(sub)module
MTP-2 low speed links (LSL) 68 16
MTP-2 high speed links / timeslots (HSL)*b 3/192 Annex A
ISDN LAPD links 160 160
Frame Relay channels / timeslots 96/1488 16/496 Gb
HSSL (ATM AAL5)*a 8 4 ATM over E1
Table 3: Capacity matrix SDH 3.0

Notes
* Not supported in OSIX software. However, support may be provided by contract.
a
An ATM-based HSSL channel is “always” (that is, the standard says so) 30
timeslots wide on E1. SDH allows narrower channels, too.
b
HSL according to MTP2 itu96 Annex A.

5.1.3 Probes for Ethernet


5.1.3.1 MediaProbe
The MediaProbe is Polystar’s solution and platform for Ethernet monitoring and
analysis of control- and user-plane data in high-capacity data networks.
The MediaProbe offers sophisticated filtering features, and delivers performance
metrics for troubleshooting and for ensuring the quality and high performance of the
service, for example for email, MMS, and streaming and VoIP services. The solution
offers many benefits, among them:
Hardware investment reused during migration from 1 to 10 Gbps
The solution is built on a generic platform with future support for higher
bandwidth
Real time user plane quality analysis

5.1.3.1.1 Connection
The MediaProbe is strategically placed at the various points within the network and
network gateways that allows it to collect 100% of the network data. The actual
connection to the customer network can be made in two ways: either inline using
fibre splitters (1), or using aggregated mirror ports (2).

5.1.3.1.2 Hardware configuration


The MediaProbe offers fantastic flexibility and power as it can be deployed in any
size network, from the smallest to the largest, and can make lossless connections
at 10/100Mb, 1Gb and 10Gb connections. There are two main hardware
configurations, as described in the following sections.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 33
Hardware and software

5.1.3.1.2.1 10/100Mb, 1GbE Monitoring


The MediaProbe package for monitoring 10MbE/100MbE/1GbE is implemented on
standard HP ProLiant servers with standard NIC. One to eight 1GbE ports
dedicated for monitoring purposes.

5.1.3.1.2.2 10GbE Monitoring


For 10GbE Monitoring, Polystar offers two solutions; High-end and Low-end, as
described below. Polystar uses either dual or quad port NICs for this purpose,
depending on the customer implementation of the taping /aggregation of the actual
monitoring links. Each MediaProbe can handle 1-4 links depending of which NIC is
used.
Monitored network connections:
2 or 4 x 10GBASE-SR/LR/LRM/ER, using SFP+ modules
LC connector
High-end and low-end 10GbE Monitoring
To handle 10Gbps physical interfaces, Polystar uses two different NICs, one for
throughput ? 4Gbps and another one for high-end monitoring ? 19 Gbps both based
on the standard PCIe form factor deployed in a HP ProLiant DL 360 server.
In the low-end 10GbE monitoring solution, each HP ProLiant server can be
equipped with two 10GbE interface cards, each with two ports dedicated for
monitoring purposes. A prerequisite for this hardware configuration for monitoring
GTP-U user plane signalling, is that all user plane signalling for one user session is
received on the same interface.

5.1.3.2 Aggregation of user data


The MediaProbe is Polystar’s all-seeing eye, able to collect 100% of the network
data. However, monitoring of all user plane traffic would demand an enormous
amount of processing and storing capacity. Therefore, one of the most important
features of the MediaProbe is user plane aggregation. This represents an efficient
way of monitoring huge data volumes, which is crucial to be able to manage the
requirements of increased bandwidth.
Data volumes are increasing sharply in the packet core network, as more and more
demanding services are offered to users. Consequently, aggregation of user data is
the key method for understanding and analysing performance in high-speed data
networks.
Aggregation can be carried out on several different levels, allowing operators to
control how much they want to invest in hardware for user-plane analysis.
Aggregated data can be presented in Call Trace, and in the Event Analyser in
Jupiter.

5.1.3.3 Aggregation levels


Several aggregation levels exist, each offering different features. Note that it is
always possible to associate the performance metrics back to the subscriber,
enabling for example IMSI and MSISDN tracing, independent of the chosen
aggregation method.

5.1.3.3.1 TEID aggregation


TEID aggregation, or session-based aggregation, is an advanced form of
aggregation of the user-plane traffic. This level of aggregation provides details of
how many bytes and packets that have been sent during the time the session is
active. For long sessions there is a possibility to generate information at regular
intervals, for example every 10 minutes.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 34
Hardware and software

5.1.3.3.2 Flow-based aggregation


The flow-based reporting is based on source/destination IP addresses and
application ports from the UDP/TCP header. Flow-based aggregation is performed
for each individual GTP-U tunnelled TCP and UDP flow and contains details for
each flow, such as bytes/packages sent, IP fragmentation, TCP retransmits, IP
addresses, ports, and more.

5.1.3.3.3 Application-based aggregation


Application-based aggregation extracts additional key parameters from different
application protocols including HTTP, SMTP, FTP and RTSP, and also offer
aggregation capabilities on parameters such as Partial URL or HOST aggregation
of WWW traffic.
Next to traditional KPIs (Key Performance Indicators), such as number of packets
and bytes for throughput calculations, the application-based performance
monitoring also obtains key fields from the protocol headers.
The type of information is protocol- and application-dependent, but, using HTTP
protocols as an example, the additional information includes status/error codes,
User Agent, HTTP version, and content length, which is valuable when analysing
the performance of services and troubleshooting problems.
Examples of supported services and protocols:
WAP (WSP/WTP)
Web services (HTTP)
MMS (HTTP, WAP)
Streaming Services (RTSP)
MAIL (SMTP, POP3, IMAP)
FTP
DNS
Powered with DPI functionality, the MediaProbe analyses and generates
aggregated summaries which are correlated within the Probe Server in real-time to
corresponding control signalling, giving the possibility to analyse individual users
and their activities. For example, a user visiting a specific host, activities performed
by a complaining user, user patterns for VIP customers etc. The aggregated
records containing key parameters from the user plane empowered with control
signalling information (like IMSI, MSISDN, Cell information etc.) are presented
within the Polystar Jupiter application, which contains an extensive set of reporting
capabilities as well as analyse capabilities for each individual aggregate. See the
Jupiter System Description for more information.

5.1.3.4 Aggregated RTP- Voice Quality Analysis


Many VoIP calls will traverse multiple networks, and the service quality is often
affected by circumstances outside the control of the service provider. This makes
VoIP performance management and service quality monitoring critically important.
The voice quality calculation is made in the MediaProbe. Values like MOS (Mean
Opinion Score), Jitter, delay, echo, and packet loss are forwarded to the probe
server.
A MOS value is given for conversation and listening. It is also calculated every 30
seconds (configurable) and at the end of each call. RTCP is a quality report from
the end points/nodes and taken into account if present in the monitored traffic.The
values are presented in OSIX in a separate column.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 35
Hardware and software

5.1.3.4.1 MediaProbe for RTP


By integrating a third-party library into the MediaProbe for RTP, Polystar has
created a voice quality analysis implementation that is P.564 class 1 compliant. It
allows network managers to see call quality problems in real time and identify the
root cause of the problem on active or even completed calls.

5.1.3.4.2 VoIP call quality monitoring


VoIP call quality can be affected by packet loss, discards due to jitter, delay, echo,
and other problems. Some of these problems, notably packet loss and jitter, are
time varying in nature as they are usually caused by congestion on the IP path.
The MediaProbe for RTP can provide call quality metrics, including listening and
conversational quality scores, and detailed information on the severity and
distribution of packet loss and discards (due to jitter).
The columns for Aggregated RTP are available in both Call Trace and Protocol
Analyser. Supported protocols are SIP, SIP-T, H.323, MGCP, and MEGAGO.

5.1.4 Server hardware


As probe servers, Polystar uses DL or BL series HP ProLiant servers. The probe
servers are configured with different RAID configurations, which prevents data loss
in case of hardware failure.

5.1.4.1 Operating system


The probe servers are running CentOS as operating system.

5.1.4.2 Database
The probe servers are using MariaDB as database system.

5.1.4.3 Storage subsystem


Polystar uses HP hardware in the OSIX system. This gives us an extremely wide
range of hardware to choose from, and we can therefore solve virtually every need
for storage.
When extra storage is needed Polystar uses HP D3xxx Storage Enclosure solution.

5.1.5 Performance
The performance limitations of the system are practically none. If the limit of the
implemented configuration, is reached the need for capacity can be solved in
several ways:
Load Sharing - The software can be separated on several hardware servers.
This is possible due to the OSIX architecture. This gives the operator the
opportunity to use hardware already invested in.
Server upgrade – A hardware server reaching its limit can be upgraded or
replaced. The cost for this is limited thanks to the use of standard hardware
servers available on the market worldwide.

5.1.6 Client hardware


Minimum Client PC requirements:
Windows XP SP3/ Windows 7 operating systems
400-megahertz (MHz) processor or faster
4 GB RAM of system memory (whereof 2 GB free for the OSIX application)

System Description
OSIX 5.6 36
Hardware and software

400 MB of free hard disk space.


See the site requirement documentation for more information.

5.2 Software
5.2.1 Global server
The main task for the Global server is to keep track of all the other servers in the
system. Whenever a new probe or probe server is connected to the system, the
Global server automatically feeds the new server with information about which other
servers/clients to connect to, and all necessary configurations.
The Global server is also logging all the activities in the system, which enables the
system administrator to see the status of all the connections. The configuration and
logging information is stored in a database connected to the global server.
This gives the system high security since the administrator can trace all activities of
the client users and also disconnect client users.

5.2.1.1 Redundant global server


Optional a redundant Global server can be used to minimize downtime and
increase availability if Global server suffers or is degraded by any reason.
Continues replication of configuration data in the background is performed between
the active and the redundant Global server database.

5.2.2 Performance server


The Performance server is usually located on the same hardware as the global
server, and is the engine behind the Mass Call and Performance Analyser
applications.
The Performance server keeps track of the following data required for monitoring
the different Key Performance Indicators:
all the different call attempts to/from different numbers (Mass Call),
the way the different call attempts end (Performance Analyser Circuit (ISUP,
IUP, BICC) ISDN, SIP, Iu-CS),
the conversation time for successful calls (Performance Analyser Circuit (ISUP,
IUP, BICC), ISDN, SIP, Iu-CS),
the number of successful invites and registrations (Performance Analyser SIP),
the number of successful SMS transactions (Performance Analyser Iu-CS),
the number of successful Attach Requests (Performance Analyser GPRS, Iu-
PS),
the number of PDP Activations ended with certain SM causes (Performance
Analyser GPRS, Iu-PS),
the number of successful transactions (Performance Analyser INAP, MAP, IS-
41),
the number of transactions, and the time interval between the messages in the
transactions (Performance Analyser INAP, MAP, IS-41),
the number transactions and specific types of transactions per second
(Performance Analyser INAP),
the number of successful SCCP and TCAP transactions (Performance
Analyser MAP, IS-41),
the number of successful GTP transactions (Performance Analyser GTP),
the delay between a request and a response (Performance Analyser GTP),

System Description
OSIX 5.6 37
Hardware and software

the Min/Max Throughput Downlink/Uplink (Performance Analyser GTP),


and many other things. In short, based on the calling processes picked up by the
probes, the Performance server generates the information displayed in the Mass
Call and Performance Analyser applications.

5.2.3 Probe server


The main task for the Probe server is to:
Extract all the signalling information,
Process and decode the incoming data into protocol messages,
Correlate the messages for the different transactions, or the different
transaction parts for entire logical transactions,
Keep track of the different calling processes taking place in the signalling
network,
Store data for the SOS application.
The probes are connected to one or many of the probe servers in order to support
network wide call correlation, a prerequisite for any global functionality. Probes are
connected to a router server, which will evenly distribute the messages for the
different transactions to the probe servers.
The probe servers also include the SOS (Storage of Signals) database and the xDR
generator.

5.2.4 Third-party software


5.2.4.1 Enhanced technology solutions
Polystar has entered into strategic partnerships with selected vendors that offer
specific, best-of-breed embedded technological solutions that functionally
complement Polystar’s products.
This enables Polystar to deliver solutions that help customers run their operations
more efficiently and differentiate themselves in a competitive market, while
improving their service offerings and finding new ways to drive revenue.

5.2.4.2 DPI
Polystar has embedded a third-party library— an industry-standard software engine
for Deep Packet Inspection (DPI) and L7 application intelligence—into our product
portfolio.
With the Application Performance Monitoring package, the operator will have the
ability to monitor and track the usage, performance and network impact of more
than 1,600 individual applications. This level of granularity is important, as each
application has a different impact on the network and can be monitored individually;
some applications are more vulnerable to latency, while others are more susceptible
to packet loss or TCP retransmits.
The DPI functionality in the MediaProbe uses a protocol library. As more and more
applications enter the market, the protocol library is released on a monthly basis.
Upgrading the MediaProbe with a new protocol library is done without the need of
restarting the MediaProbe.

5.2.4.3 RTP
Polystar uses a third-party library that supports VoIP, IP Videoconferencing, IPTV,
and Video Streaming services.
Through the integration of the third-party library in the MediaProbe, Polystar
provides a solution with a unique ability to monitor VoIP calls with efficient analysis

System Description
OSIX 5.6 38
Hardware and software

of multiple parallel packet voice streams as well as QoE call quality scores (MOS
and R-factor).

5.3 Scalability
As described earlier in this document the OSIX system has excellent scalability.
This section describes the possible ways of expanding the system.

5.3.1 New signalling links


New links on an already existing E1/T1 can be added dynamically when the system
is running. Simply activate a new time slot in the Configuration Manager and that
time slot is monitored. There are no interruptions in the traffic on other links.

5.3.2 New sites/countries


When the operator needs to install the system at other sites in the same country, or
in other countries, probe servers and probes according to the number of links
installed at each site. A new probe server or a new probe can be installed and
connected to the global server dynamically. New links and nodes will automatically
be detected in the system and the signalling taking place on the new links will be
monitored.

5.3.3 New users


If a new user needs access to the system, the system administrator configures the
user account, and the OSIX applications are installed on the user’s computer. The
user logs on to the OSIX system with user name, password and global server
name. The global server then automatically downloads all necessary configurations
to the client.

5.3.4 Processing and data storage


Thanks to the distributed system architecture, the OSIX system has a very high
scalability. If additional processing capacity, or extended need for data storage is
required, an additional probe server can be added on one or more sites. The need
for an extra server may occur if an operator decides to store signalling data, or
xDRs, for an extended period of time, or if a new value added application, which
requires a special xDR format, is added to the system. The cost for additional probe
servers is limited since the system uses standard hardware servers. OSIX also
supports load sharing between probe servers, allowing the operator to use the full
capacity of the installed hardware and minimise the cost.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 39
Security

6 Security
This chapter contains an overview of the handling of passwords, user
authentication, and activity logging in the OSIX system.

6.1 System security management


In the OSIX system, all activities are logged. There is also an easy procedure for
the authorised system administrator to define profiles, user groups, and user
accounts in order to administrate and control the users. The authorised system
administrator can easily see which user accounts are logged on, or locked, and the
current user activities.

6.1.1 Password expiration


For security purposes, user passwords expire after a certain time, and will then
need resetting. It is recommended that the password contain both uppercase,
lowercase and numeric characters. However, this is configurable and not a default
setting.

6.1.2 User authentication and activity logging


All individual users, remote machines and client processes are authenticated before
they are granted access to resources or information. It is also possible to set a
personal, and unique, user identity. Users are automatically logged out if the
communication with the Global server is broken. The system administrator can also
log out the users, for example in case they have forgotten to log out when leaving for
the day, or if someone else with priority needs to log in, etc.
The authentication mechanism is based on conventional password methods, using
the SHA-1 algorithm. These are the same procedures and algorithms as the ones
used in Linux.
Encryption exists between the OSIX client and the Global Server. Secure GCP
socket with TLSv1.2 protocol encryption algorithm is used. The implementation is
done according to RFC 5246 (server authentication with an unauthenticated client).
Network information can neither be accessed nor employed by anyone not
appropriately authorised. Also, it is not possible to bypass the authorisation system
by connecting local equipment or using different client software.
The execution of an operation is dependent on the permissions of the user group
the user is assigned to. Each user group has its own permissions, which defines the
applications and traffic groups the users assigned to the group will have access to.
The logging is done in such a way that logs are never lost during power outings, etc.
It is also possible to log which user identities have used the system at a certain
time, and their activities. The cmactivities.log logs all changes made in the
Configuration Manager, that is all global changes that are affecting the system. The
useractivities.log logs all filter settings made by the user, and information about
export/save activities in Call Trace and Protocol Analyser, that is, time, user, and
export/save (not the actual content).
A search dialog can be enabled per user group. If enabled, users belonging to the
user group will be prompted with a search dialog every time they access traffic in
Protocol Analyser and Call Trace. The reason that the user enters for accessing the
traffic will then be logged.
Different operators with large networks have also tested OSIX with port scanning,
and the outcome has been very satisfying.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 40
Security

6.1.3 Privacy
The Call Trace and Protocol Analyser applications have the possibility to mask A
numbers, B numbers, IMSI, and IMEI numbers. Masking is applied in all modes
(real-time, historical and when opening files). It is applied to all views of the
applications (main window, call window, call flow window and message summary
window). Masking of SMS and USSD is supported. Files exported using format
XML, HTML, or text will be masked. Masking is configured in a privacy profile, which
can be associated with one or more user groups.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 41
System management

7 System management
The OSIX system contains four means of internal system management;
Configuration Manager, which includes all the important configurations
for the system and is accessible from the OSIX Main Panel,
Log files, which allows you to see which users logged on when, and their
activities in the OSIX system,
System Status, which shows the different connections within the OSIX
system, counters for processes per protocol, xDRs, etc.,
Web Interface to the LIMs, which displays information about the status of
the LIMs, and the low level traffic information and is accessible from a
web browser,
Support server, which allows you to monitor the status of the hardware.

7.1 Configuration Manager


In the Configuration Manager application you can make configurations for user
groups, user accounts, servers, mass call, performance analyser, network maps,
traffic groups, channels, boards, names for protocol parameter values, xDR
generators, protocol packages, state machine, SOS packages, correlation tables,
active alarms, etc.

Figure 26: The Configuration Manager window

7.1.1 Users
The OSIX system supports 50 concurrent users per Probe Server (PRS).
The user configuration is done in three steps; creating profiles, creating user
groups, and creating user accounts. The profile decide the default application setup
the users will have when first logging into the system. The user groups decide which
profile, which licences, and which traffic groups the users assigned to the group
should have access to. In the user account settings you decide which user group
the user should belong to, set up the user’s password, as well as lock/unlock the
account, and log off the user.

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When clicking on the Accounts item an overview of all the accounts is displayed,
where you can see which accounts are logged on, which accounts are locked, and
when the user account was last logged in.
By setting up authentication profiles you can use RADIUS as a log in procedure to
the OSIX system.
A broadcast message functionality is also available for sending general messages
to all the users that are currently logged into OSIX.

7.1.2 Mass Call


The Mass Call folder contains all the configurations for the Mass Call application.
You can set different mass call thresholds for calling/called numbers, set different
buffer sizes, and different alarm levels as well as set the time interval.

7.1.3 Performance Analyser


The Performance Analyser folder contains a different set of settings for each of the
protocols available. The settings include call group definitions, call group alarm
settings, and main settings for the overall alarm configuration.
For the alarm settings, intelligent alarm functionality is available, that is, the system
can calculate reasonable alarm settings for selected groups.
All settings can be exported and imported if you wish to edit the settings in another
application, or save a specific configuration for later comparison.

7.1.4 Jupiter
In the Jupiter folder you can configure the Jupiter nodes. The available items are
Web servers, Sites, xDR times Profiles, Aggregation Times Profiles, QSS
Databases, XPS, XPS Groups and Report Packages.

7.1.5 Network
By selecting the Maps item you will be able to configure different network maps for
users to open in the Network Status application, manage the nodes in the network
as well as set thresholds for all the links in the network.
The Traffic Groups item, contain different traffic groups, which will be available for
the users to choose from when starting Call Trace or Protocol Analyser.
The Signalling Channels folder contains one item with settings for the signalling
channels you wish to monitor for each protocol stack; SS7, ISDN, Frame Relay,
Ethernet, ATM over E1, and ATM over STM-1.
The Detected Links item contains all automatically detected SCTP associations and
SS7 links detected within SCTP associations.
The Boards item contains different interface boards used by the system.
Point Code and Global Title mappings are set up in the Point code, Global title
mappings item.
By defining regions, the same point codes can be used for nodes in different
regions.

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7.1.6 Protocols
In the Parameters item attributes/names can be associated with specific values for
different parameters such as calling/called numbers, point codes, HLR/VLR
numbers, IMSI numbers, IP addresses, etc., in the available protocols.
These names will be visible and available when setting filters in the Call Trace and
Protocol Analyser applications. Names for A Numbers and B Numbers will also be
visible in the Mass Call application if the stated numbers/number sequences are
listed.
In the xDR Generators item you will find the xDR Generators which you can use for
setting up different xDR Generators with different formats, and different filter
settings, which can be sent to different systems.
In the Protocol Packages item you will find the Protocol Packages which are used
by the probe server and the client to determine which protocol to use when
decoding incoming messages.
In the State Machine Config and State Machine Timers item you can configure how
calls/transactions are released and edit the timers.
In the SOS Packages item you can configure named sets of complete configuration
parameters that can be assigned to a PRS.
In the Correlation Manager item you can configure mappings for MEGACO-ISUP,
MEGACO-IUA, MGCP-ISUP, ISUP-CAP, and IMS Mobile.

7.1.7 Alarms
The Network item contains settings for all the different alarms that you can view in
the Network Status application. Here you can enable/disable the alarms (which will
also determine if they are sent as SNMP traps or not, if you have support for SNMP
traps), set different severities and change the names on the alarms.
The SNMP item contains all available SNMP profiles. With SNMP profiles you can
group one or more receiver of traps into one entity. Traffic Groups and LIM Groups
are then associated with one or more profiles.
In the Media Probe Alarms item you can define additional alarm configurations for
MediaProbe.

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7.2 System Status


With the System Status application you can monitor different parts of the system
itself, such as servers, SOS, routers, CDR-generators, etc.

Figure 27: The System Status Main Window

The tree structure in the left pane of the main window displays a hierarchical
representation of the different parts of the system which you can view the status for.
The right-hand pane of the main window displays a tabbed interface for navigating
among the tables containing status information.
The System Status application includes threshold values for various performance
parameters, all available as SNMP traps. Alarms will, for example, be generated if
the memory utilisations are too high, a component discards messages or fail to
update its current status.
Nodes and subnodes can be disabled per user group, which can be useful when
certain user groups should have limited access to the System Status GUI.

7.2.1 Wrapper solution


Since the components in the Probe Server Subsystem handle a large amount of
data, all down time needs to be kept to a minimum. Each minute one component is
down a lot of transactions (for example, pure messages, xDRs, SOS data,
mappings, alarms) are lost.
The OSIX start scripts use a wrapper solution to monitor and restart components.
There are two reasons that triggers a restart:
A process “dies”
A Java process goes out of memory
The wrapper functionality is visualised in the System Status GUI with restart
notifications for all OSIX components.

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Figure 28: Restart notifications in System Status

7.3 Support server


The installation at the customer’s site requires a support server. This server allows
Polystar Services remotely to access the installation for updates and upgrades, as
well as maintenance and troubleshooting.
Additional software may optionally be installed to monitor HP hardware status, for
example, to see if a cable is disconnected, or a hard disk has crashed, as well as
problems with fans, CPU and memory. However, the installation and/or use of this
software cannot be part of any kind of acceptance criteria.

7.4 LIM web interface


The web interface contains information about the status of the PCMs, and the LIMs
configuration. The interface shows Power, Temperature, Ethernet connection
status, CPU load, NTP sync, PCM status layer 1 and layer 2 etc.

Figure 29: The web interface

If you click on the different links you will see further details on the different levels.

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OSIX for PSTN networks

8 OSIX for PSTN networks


OSIX extracts information from signalling networks and includes
applications for monitoring and troubleshooting, xDR generation/SNMP trap
generation, and OSS (Operation Support System) applications. The
following sections show a few examples for PSTN networks.

8.1 Protocols and links


All major protocols and links used within PSTN networks are supported by the OSIX
system. For information about supported protocols, see the OSIX Supported
Protocols document.
All supported protocols have a large set of pre-defined parameters available for
filtering. For information about protocol parameters, see 12 Protocol Parameters.

8.2 PSTN network features


Support for all major interfaces and protocols, including several ISUP dialects.
Real-time KPI measurements for ISUP/BICC/IUP and INAP, including, for
example, ASR and NER.
Automatic detection of SS7 links and point codes with map view and included
alarming and status functionality.
Monitoring call attempts to specific numbers will help you see if you need to
reroute the traffic, or activate call gapping.

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8.3 Protocol Analyser


8.3.1 User interface
In the Main window you can monitor the protocol messages, either in real time or
historically with SOS. You can also set different filters, or search for specific
messages. You can have four different Protocol Analyser windows with different
settings open at the same time.

Example:
The figure shows different cause values for ISUP. For example, the cause value 34
indicates that there is no appropriate circuit/channel presently available to handle
the call, which means that the call cannot be connected.

Figure 30: The Protocol Analyser Main Window - Cause value examples

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8.3.1.1 Message details


The window is divided into several parts; one displaying the different protocol
messages, one displaying a preview of the message, one showing the hexadecimal
code, one showing ASCII code, and finally the filter section. You can also choose to
open a separate Message Viewer with the contents of the entire message.

Figure 31: Message in Protocol Analyser

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8.4 Call Trace


8.4.1 User interface
In the Main window you can monitor the calls, either in real time or historically with
SOS. You can also set different filters, or search for specific calls. You can have four
different Call Trace windows with different settings open at the same time.

Figure 32: The Call Trace Main Window

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8.4.1.1 Call details


If you want to take a closer look at a call, you can double-click on a call to open the
Call Window. The window is divided into several parts, or panes; one displaying the
different protocol messages sent referring to the selected call, one displaying a
preview of the message, one showing the hexadecimal code, one showing ASCII
code, and finally one pane displaying different parameters for the call. You can also
choose to open a separate Message Viewer with the contents of the entire
message.

Figure 33: The Call Window

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8.4.1.2 Call flow


When viewing the call details, you can also choose to view the call flow in a
graphical representation, where the nodes are visible and the different messages
are represented with arrows.

Figure 34: The Call Flow window

8.4.1.3 Correlation
Call correlation is done between all messages relating to the same call/transaction,
regardless of where in the network the messages are sent. All messages relating to
the process are presented in the Call Window.
For PSTN networks correlation is available for:
PSTN ISUP-INAP transactions.
IMS and Voice over IP transactions

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8.4.1.3.1 Correlation example for PSTN ISUP-INAP

Figure 35: The Call Window for PSTN ISUP-INAP

Figure 36: The Call Flow Window for PSTN ISUP-INAP

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8.5 Performance Analyser


The Performance Analyser application monitors different KPIs (Key Performance
Indicators) for different protocols. For PSTN networks, Performance Analyser is
available for circuit-switched protocols (ISUP, IUP, BICC), which have been grouped
together, ISDN, and INAP.
The user interface for the circuit-switched protocols and ISDN are very similar. The
user interface for INAP, however, is quite different.

8.5.1 User interface


8.5.1.1 Main window
In the Main Window you will see the KPIs for the call groups in real time. You can
have one window open per protocol, and one additional window, and the
information is updated every ten seconds by default (this is configurable per client).

Figure 37: The Performance Analyser Main Window for Circuit

8.5.1.2 Columns
The following columns are available in the Main Window:
:

Group ID Displays the individual group’s unique number. (Circuit, ISDN, INAP)
Information If the KPIs for the group have been measured by OSIX and set
automatically, this column displays the results from the last evaluation.
(Circuit, ISDN, INAP)
Description If the group has been automatically generated by OSIX, this column
will display which parameter values the group consists of, otherwise
the system administrator may set an appropriate name for this column.
(Circuit, ISDN, INAP)
ASR Answer Seizure Ratio displays the number of answered calls out of the
total number of call attempts, in per cent. (Circuit, ISDN)
ASR Period Call Answer Seizure Ratio Period Call Count displays the number of
Count successful call attempts that the ASR % value is based on. (Circuit,
ISDN)
NER Network Efficiency Ratio displays the number of calls terminated with
normal release causes (defined by the system administrator) out of the
total number of call attempts, in per cent. (Circuit, ISDN)
NER Period Call Network Efficiency Ratio Period Call Count displays the number of
Count successful call attempts that the NER % value is based on. (Circuit,
ISDN)
Table: 4Main window columns

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NOSC Number of Short Calls displays the number calls with a conversation
time shorter than a certain time interval (defined by the system
administrator) out of the total number of call attempts, in per cent.
(Circuit, ISDN)
Success Displays the number of successful INAP transactions, that is,
transactions reaching End state without any error codes, out of the
total number of transactions.
Avg Resp Time Displays the average time between the first and the second message
in the INAP transactions.
T1 Displays the number of INAP transactions with less than the set T1
interval (default 300 milliseconds) between the first and the second
message, out of the total number of INAP transactions.
T2 Displays the number of INAP transactions with less than the set T2
interval (default 1.000 milliseconds) between the first and the second
message, out of the total number of INAP transactions.
Frequency Displays the average number of INAP transactions per second within
each group.
Invoke Frequency Displays the average number of Invokes per second within each group.
Timeout Frequency Displays the average number of timeouts per second within each
group.
Priority Displays a priority value calculated by OSIX, based on the deviation
between current value and set alarm value, and the set buffer size.
(Circuit, ISDN, INAP)
Total Count Displays the total amount of call attempts counted in the group since
the counters were last reset. (Circuit, ISDN, INAP)
Table: 4Main window columns (Continued)

8.5.1.3 Call Group Information


If you want to view detailed information about the call group and/or start Call Trace
or Protocol Analyser with an automatic filter for the call group, double-click the
group to open the Call Group Information dialog box.

Figure 38: The Call Group Information dialog box for Circuit

The available parameters are:

A Number Displays the calling number (Circuit, ISDN, INAP)


B Number Displays the called number (Circuit, ISDN, INAP)
OPC Displays the originating point code (Circuit, ISDN,
INAP)
Table: 5Call Group parameters

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DPC Displays the destination point code (Circuit, ISDN,


INAP)
NI Displays the network indicator (Circuit, ISDN)
NoA Displays the nature of address (Circuit, ISDN)
CIC Displays the circuit identification code (Circuit, ISDN)
Destination Route Address Displays the destination route address (INAP)
Called BCD Displays the called BCD number (INAP)
S Key Displays the Service Key (INAP)
Called SSN Displays the called subsystem number (INAP)
Calling SSN Displays the calling subsystem number (INAP)
Table: 5Call Group parameters (Continued)

8.5.2 Server Configuration


The server configuration is very similar for the circuit-switched protocols and for
ISDN. For INAP, however, the settings are completely different.

8.5.2.1 Main settings


When configuring the Performance Analyser application for Circuit and ISDN, you
have a vast number of options on how to set up the call groups, the alarm levels you
want each group to have, which release causes should be counted as successful,
the maximum number of seconds for a short call, etc. You can also select to not
have alarms sent if a certain number is involved in a major part of the call attempts
by using the Frequent number functionality.
When configuring the Performance Analyser application for INAP, you have a vast
number of options on how to set up the transaction groups, the alarm levels you
want each group to have, the time interval in T1 and T2 measuring, frequency
settings, buffer size, etc.
T1
The number of transactions with a maximum time, defined as T1 by your system
administrator, between the start message and the second message out of the
total number of transactions in per cent.
T2
The number of transactions with a maximum time, defined as T2 by your system
administrator, between the start message and the second message out of the
total number of transactions in per cent.

System Description
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Figure 39: The Performance Analyser Server Configuration Main folder for Circuit

8.5.2.2 Call Group settings

Figure 40: The Performance Analyser Server Configuration Call Groups folder for Circuit

System Description
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8.5.3 Call Groups/Transaction groups


8.5.3.1 Circuit
The call groups can consist of any combination of A Number, B Number, OPC,
DPC, Network Indicator, Nature of Address, and CIC. For A Numbers and B
Numbers, wild cards can be used, and a plus sign can be used for a “catch all”
group. Nature of Address is not applicable for call groups for IUP.

8.5.3.2 ISDN
The call groups can consist of any combination of Link, Direction, A Number, A
Number Type, B Number, and B Number Type. For A Numbers and B Numbers, wild
cards can be used, and a plus sign can be used for a “catch all” group.

8.5.3.3 INAP
The transaction groups can consist of any combination of A Number, B Number,
Destination Route Address, Called BCD Number, OPC, DPC, Service Key, Called
SSN, and Calling SSN. For A Numbers, B Numbers, Destination Route Addresses,
Called BCD Numbers, and Service Keys, wild cards can be used, and a plus sign
can be used for “catch all” groups. For Service Keys, you also can enter regular
expressions with different types of wild cards.

8.5.4 Automatic group generation


If you are unsure about how to configure the call groups, OSIX can automatically
generate groups based on different parameters.

8.5.4.1 Available parameters for Circuit


OPC
DPC
Network Indicator
Nature of Address (not for IUP traffic)
CIC

8.5.4.2 Available parameters for ISDN


Link
Direction
A Number Type
B Number Type

8.5.4.3 Available parameters for INAP


OPC
DPC
Service Key
Called SSN
Calling SSN
Setting one or more of these parameters to All will allow OSIX to automatically
generate a new group for each new value, or combination of values, it finds.

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8.5.5 Intelligent alarm settings


Setting appropriate alarm levels can be difficult the first time the application is used
in your network. To give you a hint, OSIX can measure the KPI values for the call
groups/transaction groups, and calculate appropriate alarm settings for you, called
“intelligent alarm settings”. You can also select to not have alarms sent if a certain
number is involved in a major part of the call attempts by using the Frequent
number functionality. However, this possibility is not available for INAP Frequency
alarms.

8.5.6 Exporting
If you want to save your settings, or edit them in another environment than in the
Performance Analyser Server Configuration, you may export your group settings,
open them in Excel, and import them back into Performance Analyser later on.

8.6 Mass Call


The Mass Call Application monitors call attempts made to/from specific B Numbers/
A Numbers for the ISUP, IUP, and BICC protocols. There are two main windows with
different focus; calls made to specific B numbers, calls made by specific A numbers.

8.6.1 User interface


In the Mass Call B Number window, you can detect large amounts of call attempts
made to certain numbers, which enables you to reroute calls before congestion
occurs, or detect looping calls. The window displays information about the B
numbers to which the call attempts are made, the A numbers placing the calls, and
the DPC/NIs involved in the call setup.

Figure 41: Mass Call B Number Main Window

In the Mass Call A Number window, you can detect numbers that make large
amounts of call attempts, thus identifying fraudulent behaviour. For example, if a
certain A number places a large amount of call attempts to different B numbers in
sequence, you may suspect that a dialler is being used to hack a switch. The
window displays information about the B numbers to which the call attempts are
made, the A numbers placing the calls, and the OPC/NIs involved in the call setup.

System Description
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OSIX for PSTN networks

Figure 42: Mass Call A Number Main Window

The configuration of the Mass Call application is very easy, and enables you to set
thresholds for the number of call attempts that have to be made before a number
appears in the Main Window, as well as set the amount of unique numbers you wish
to see in the Main Window. You may also set specific alarm levels for numbers, or
number sequences that frequently have high amounts of call attempts.

Figure 43: Mass Call Server Configuration

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8.7 Real Time Statistics


8.7.1 User interface
The Main Window displays the different settings for your diagrams, with the top half
displaying general settings for sampling rate, measure history, etc., and the bottom
half the filter settings that determine which messages/transactions should be
counted in the diagram.

Figure 44: The Real Time Statistics Main Window

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8.7.2 Statistical Information


When you are finished with the diagram settings, the statistical information can be
viewed either in table format, or in diagram format in real time.

Figure 45: The Real Time Statistics Diagram

In this view you can also select to save the information as a comma-separated file,
which can then be opened in any word processing, or spreadsheet application.

8.7.3 Filters
There are four different types of filter:
Traffic Groups - The links in your network are divided into one or more traffic
groups, and you must select at least one traffic group before you can start
monitoring statistical information over messages/transactions in real time.
Parameters - You may set a filter on any parameter value visible in the Main
Window. This filter type also allows you to exclude messages/transactions with
specific values from your statistical information.
Links - You can select to only view statistical information about messages/
transactions that are sent on one or more specific links.
Protocols - If you are running more than one protocol, you can easily select to
only view statistical information about messages/transactions in a certain
protocol type.

8.7.3.1 Combining filter criteria


Filters can be set to display either messages where a certain parameter equals a
certain value, or messages where a certain parameter does NOT equal a certain
value. The set filter criteria can then be combined with AND/OR functionality.

System Description
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8.7.3.2 Saved filters


Any filters you have previously created and saved in either Call Trace or Protocol
Analyser can be opened and used in the Real Time Statistics application.

8.8 Network Status


8.8.1 User interface
The Main Window displays four different views:
Level 1, which displays alarms detected on the links connected to the LIMs
Surveyor, which displays different maps over the network and any alarms on
level 2 or 3
Performance, which displays the number of alarms detected by the
Performance Analyser and Mass Call applications
Link Status, which displays the current status on all the different links
and two different dialog boxes:
Active Alarms, which displays all the currently active alarms on all the different
levels
Alarm Log, which displays all alarms that have been cleared

Figure 46: Network Status Main Window, Map view

SS7 links and nodes (PCs) connected to the system are automatically detected,
and as soon as network problems occur, for example Transfer Prohibited, the
corresponding link and/or node will start blinking and an alarm will be registered in
the Active Alarms dialog box.
The Active Alarms dialog box contains information about all the alarms currently
active, and the Alarm Log contains information about historical alarms.

System Description
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OSIX for PSTN networks

Figure 47: The Active Alarms and Alarm Log dialog boxes

Both of these dialog boxes contain comprehensive filter functionality for viewing the
specific events that are of interest. All alarms are also available as SNMP traps.

8.9 Statistics Alarm


With the Statistics Alarm application you can set up alarms to be generated when
certain filter criteria for protocol messages or calls/transactions are met.

8.9.0.1 Easy-to-Use GUI


The GUI (Graphical User Interface) allows you to easily set up alarms based on
either protocol messages or calls/transactions.

8.9.1 User interface


The Main Window in Statistics Alarm consists of an overview over the different
alarms that have been set up, and four buttons along the bottom of the window.

System Description
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OSIX for PSTN networks

Figure 48: Statistics Alarm Main window

Changing the size of the main window will also dynamically adjust and resize the
columns, to give the best fit in the available space.

8.9.2 Alarm settings


Alarms are set up based either on protocol messages and their contents, or based
on calls/transactions and their contents.The alarm settings allows you to set up
alarms to be generated either at first occurrence, or at a certain number of
occurrences over a certain period of time. You can also set up the alarms to be
automatically cleared or not.
You can activate/deactivate alarms settings that you have created, as well as edit
and delete existing alarm settings.

8.9.2.1 Protocol filter settings


The protocol filter setting will generate an alarm when there are protocol messages
passing the filter, or when the number of messages passing the filter exceeds the
set threshold during the set time interval.
The alarms will be sent to the Network Status application and to any third-party
applications of your choice.
When making protocol filter settings, you can use the following filter types:
Parameter filters, Link filters, Protocol filters, and Traffic group filters.

Figure 49: Parameters tab sample for protocol filter settings

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8.9.2.2 Transaction filter settings


The transaction filter setting will generate an alarm when there are calls/
transactions passing the filter, or when the number of calls/transactions passing the
filter exceeds the set threshold during the set time interval.
The alarms will be sent to the Network Status application and to any third-party
applications of your choice.
When making transaction filter settings, you can use the following filter types:
Parameter filters, Link filters, Protocol filters, Traffic group filters, and Duration
filters.

8.9.3 Filter settings management


Filter settings are fully editable and can also be saved for later use.
If you want to keep a filter setting but not use it at the moment, you can select to
deactivate the filter setting, and then activate it again when you want to use it.
To delete a filter setting, select it in the main window and click the Delete button.

System Description
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OSIX for mobile networks

9 OSIX for mobile networks


OSIX extracts information from signalling networks and includes
applications for monitoring and troubleshooting, xDR generation/SNMP trap
generation, and OSS (Operation Support System) applications. The
following sections show a few examples for mobile networks.

9.1 Protocols and interfaces


OSIX supports all major telecommunication technologies within 2G, 3G, and LTE/
SAE. The system supports a wide range of interfaces and protocols and supports
legacy and state-of-the-art technology; for example, both legacy Gb and LTE. In a
majority of installations, several network topologies are monitored in the same
system simultaneously.
For more information about user plane monitoring in mobile networks, see
5.1.3.2 Aggregation of user data.
For protocol compliance, see the OSIX Supported Protocols document.
All supported protocols have a large set of pre-defined parameters available for
filtering. For information about protocol parameters, see 12 Protocol Parameters.

9.2 Mobile network features


Support for all major GSM/GPRS/UMTS and LTE/SAE interfaces.
Real-time deciphering of Gb and EMM/ESM.
Real-time mapping of TMSI/P-TMSI/GTI to IMSI.
User-plane handling of GTP-U with different levels of aggregation, offers an
effective approach for monitoring huge data volumes. Flow aggregation
enables troubleshooting on individual TCP/UDP flows, including user data
application protocols, for example HTTP, DNS, SMTP, FTP and RTSP. Session
aggregation gives a lower hardware footprint, focusing on key summary
information from user-plane signalling. All user-plane information is correlated
to the corresponding control signalling.
Multi-protocol correlation for voice, text and ongoing/closed data sessions.
Real-time KPI measurements for Iu-CS/Iu-PS/Gb and Gn.
Support for full 10GbE Monitoring.
Automatic detection of SCTP associations/endpoints with map view and
included alarming and status functionality.

9.2.1 Mobile Data Monitoring (MDM)


The system architecture in OSIX is specially developed to handle Mobile Data. The
architectural changes are applied to the GTP and Diameter protocols as of now.
The features are summarised below:
Persistent system components - RTR and PRS components can keep the state
of sessions on restarts.
Binary message data handled on disk instead of server memory - enables
components to handle a higher number of simultaneous transactions.
Searchability for ongoing calls in Call Trace both in real-time and historical
mode.
Multi-protocol correlation for both ongoing and closed sessions.

System Description
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User Plane troubleshooting functionality in Call Trace and Event Analyser in


Jupiter, which allows better visibility and more dynamic filtering.

9.3 Protocol Analyser


9.3.1 User interface
In the Main window you can monitor the protocol messages, either in real time or
historically. You can also set different filters, or search for specific messages. You
can have four different Protocol Analyser windows with different settings open at the
same time.

Figure 50: The Protocol Analyser Main Window

9.3.1.1 Message details


The window is divided into several parts; one displaying the different protocol
messages, one displaying a preview of the message, one showing the hexadecimal
code, one showing ASCII code, and finally the filter section. You can also choose to
open a separate Message Viewer with the contents of the entire message.

System Description
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Example:
The figure shows a response to the MAP operation update GPRS location with the
error code “Unknown subscriber” (no such subscription exists). The error code
indicates that the user failed to update the current location.

Figure 51: Message showing error code “Unknown subscriber”

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9.4 Call Trace


9.4.1 User interface
In the Main window you can monitor transactions, either in real time or historically.
You may also set different filters, or search for specific calls. You can have four
different Call Trace windows with different settings open at the same time.

Example:
The figure shows an example of a problem subscribers may have trying to attach
through GPRS Gb if the services are not included in their subscription.

Figure 52: The Call Trace Main Window - GPRS troubleshooting

9.4.1.1 Call details


If you want to take a closer look at a call, you can double-click on a call to open the
Call Window. The window is divided into several parts, or panes; one displaying the
different protocol messages sent referring to the selected call, one displaying a
preview of the message, one showing the hexadecimal code, one showing ASCII
code, and finally one pane displaying different parameters for the call (this pane is
not present in the following figure). You can also choose to open a separate
Message Viewer with the contents of the entire message.

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Example:
The figure shows an unsuccessful PDP connection on the Gn interface with the
cause “No resources available”. This indicates that the user was not able to initiate
a data session, because not enough resources were available within the network to
allow the PDP Context to be created.

Figure 53: Call Window with cause “No resources available”

9.4.1.2 Call flow


When viewing the call details you can also select to view the call flow in a graphical
representation, where the nodes are visible and the different messages are
represented with arrows.

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Figure 54: The Call Flow window

9.4.1.3 Flows summary


In the Flows Summary window, the flows between involved end points are
visualised, giving a summary of Ethernet, IP, TCP, UDP and SCTP flows. Flows
Summary is only supported for IP-based traffic.

Figure 55: The Flows Summary window

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9.4.2 Correlation
Call correlation is done between all messages with operation codes relating to the
same procedure, regardless of where in the network the messages are sent. All
messages relating to the same procedure are presented in the Call Window and the
Call Flow Window.
There is also correlation available for certain protocols, parameters, and
procedures, where all messages relating to the entire process are presented in the
Call Window. For mobile networks correlation is available for:
Mobile transactions - calls, SMSs, USSD
Mobile Packet transactions - Iu-PS/Gb, Gn, Gi, S1-MME, S11, and S6a
IMS and Mobile transactions
The following protocols are supported for Mobile and Mobile Packet transactions:
ISUP, BICC, MAP, IS-41, BSSAP, BSSAP+, RANAP, INAP/CAP, MEGACO, S1AP,
S5/S8, Diameter, and GTPv2.
The following protocols are supported for IMS and Mobile transactions: ISUP, SIP,
MEGACO, INAP, BICC, MGCP, H.225, ISDN, DNS, Diameter, MAP, RANAP, and
BSSAP.

9.4.2.1 Correlation examples for Mobile Transactions

Figure 56: The Call Window for Mobile transactions

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Figure 57: The Call Flow Window for Mobile transactions

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9.5 Performance Analyser


The Performance Analyser application monitors Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
for different call groups in real time, which will inform you about the performance in
your network. For mobile networks, Performance Analyser is available for MAP, IS-
41, GPRS, GTP, CAP, Iu-CS, Iu-PS, and CIRCUIT (ISUP, BICC).

9.5.1 User interface


9.5.1.1 The Main Window
The Main Window displays the KPIs for the call groups in real time. You can have
one window open per protocol, and the information is updated every ten seconds by
default (this is configurable per client).

Example:
The figure illustrates verification of a new SM-SC. It shows that the average
response time for sending a text message is over two seconds. These statistics can
be investigated further on cause codes in Real Time Statistics or through built-in
drill-down to Call Trace or Protocol Analyser.

Figure 58: The Performance Analyser Main Window for MAP

The Avg Response Time (millis) column indicates serious problems. It can, for
example, indicate under-dimensioned nodes and/or high traffic load.
TCAP KPIs can, for example, indicate that the application layer in an SM-SC is
down.

9.5.1.2 Columns
The following columns are available in the Main Window:
:

Group ID Displays the individual group’s unique number.


Information If the KPIs for the group have been measured by OSIX, and
set automatically, this column displays the results from the last
evaluation.
Description If the group has been automatically generated by OSIX, this
column will display what parameter values the group consists
of, otherwise the system administrator may set an appropriate
name for this column.
SCCP % Displays the number of SCCP transactions that have not
received any unspecified return causes, out of the total
number of SCCP transactions, in per cent. (MAP, IS-41)
TCAP State % Displays the number of TCAP transactions that have not timed
out or aborted, out of the total number of TCAP transactions, in
per cent. (MAP, IS-41)
Table: 6Main window columns

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TCAP Success % Displays the number of TCAP transactions that have not
received any unspecified error codes, out of the total number
of TCAP transactions, in per cent. (MAP, IS-41)
Avg Response Time Displays the average response time (time between the Begin
message and the first Continue message) for the number of
transactions specified in the groups’ buffer. (MAP, IS-41)
Attach % Displays the number of attach accepts, out of the total number
of attach requests, in per cent. (GPRS, Iu-PS)
Attach Count Displays the total amount of attach requests counted in the
group since the counters were last reset. (GPRS, Iu-PS)
PDP Activate % Displays the number of PDP activations terminated with the
session management causes (SM cause 36 by default),
defined by the system administrator, out of the total number of
PDP activations, in per cent. (GPRS, Iu-PS)
PDP Activate Count Displays the total amount of PDP activations counted in the
group since the counters were last reset. (GPRS, Iu-PS)
ASR % Displays the Answer Seizure Ratio, that is, the number of
answered calls, out of the total number of call attempts, in per
cent. (Iu-CS)
NER % Displays the Network Efficiency Ratio, that is, the number of
calls terminated with specified release causes, out of the total
number of call attempts, in per cent. (Iu-CS)
NOSC % Displays the number of calls with a conversation of time of less
than the specified time interval (3 sec by default), out of the
total number of calls, in per cent. (Iu-CS)
Call Count Displays the total amount of call attempts counted in the group
since the counters were last reset. (Iu-CS)
SMS % Displays the number of successful SMS transactions, out of
the total number of transactions, in per cent. (Iu-CS)
SMS Count Displays the total amount of SMS transactions counted in the
group since the counters were last reset. (Iu-CS)
Transaction Success (%) Displays the transaction success rate in per cent. The default
GTP success release cause is 128. (GTP)
Response Delay (%) Displays the delay between a request and a response, for
example between a Create PDP request and a Create PDP
response in per cent. The control signalling affects the value,
not the user data. (GTP)
Avg. Response Delay (ms) Displays the delay between a request and a response, for
example between a Create PDP request and a Create PDP
response, in milliseconds. The control signalling affects the
value, not the user data. (GTP)
Min Throughput Downlink (%) Displays the minimum throughput downlink (for example when
a user is browsing a web page) in per cent. (The number of
transactions below a threshold value set by the System
Administrator.) (GTP)
Min Throughput Uplink (%) Displays the minimum throughput uplink (for example when a
user is sharing a file) in per cent. (The number of transactions
below a threshold value set by the System Administrator.)
(GTP)
Max Throughput Downlink (%) Displays the maximum throughput downlink (for example when
a user is browsing a web page) in per cent. (The number of
transactions below a threshold value set by the System
Administrator.) (GTP)
Table: 6Main window columns (Continued)

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Max Throughput Uplink (%) Displays the maximum throughput uplink (for example when a
user is sharing a file) in per cent. (The number of transactions
below a threshold value set by the System Administrator.)
(GTP)
Avg. Throughput Downlink Displays an average value of the buffered throughput downlink
(kbit/s) (kbit/s). This value is only for information and it is not alarm-
based. (The number of transactions below a threshold value
set by the System Administrator.) (GTP)
Avg. Throughput Uplink (kbit/ Displays an average value of the buffered throughput uplink
s) (kbit/s). This value is only for information and it is not alarm-
based. (The number of transactions below a threshold value
set by the System Administrator.) (GTP)
Priority Displays the group’s priority based on a combination of the
discrepancy between the group’s actual statistical value and
alarm value, and the group’s buffer size. The groups are sorted
by this column by default in order for you to easier detect the
groups with the largest discrepancies. (GTP)
Total Count Displays the total number of transactions made within each
group since the last server configuration, or since you last
reset the group. (GTP)
Table: 6Main window columns (Continued)

9.5.1.3 Call Group Information dialog box


If you want to view detailed information about a transaction group and/or start Call
Trace or Protocol Analyser with an automatic filter for the transaction group, double-
click the group to open the Call Group Information dialog box.

Figure 59: The Call Group Information dialog box for MAP

The following parameters are available:

OPC Displays the originating point code. (MAP, IS-41, Iu-CS, Iu-PS)
DPC Displays the destination point code. (MAP, IS-41, Iu-CS, Iu-PS)
SSN Displays the subsystem number. (MAP, IS-41)
GT Called Displays the called global title. (MAP, IS-41)
GT Calling Displays the calling global title. (MAP, IS-41)
Called GT TT Displays the translation type for the calling global title. (MAP, IS-
41)
Called GT NP Displays the numbering plan for the calling global title. (MAP, IS-
41)
Table: 7Call Group parameters

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Called GT NoA Displays the nature of address for the calling global title. (MAP,
IS-41)
IMSI Displays the international mobile subscriber identity. (MAP, IS-
41, GPRS, Iu-CS, Iu-PS)
Op Code Displays the operation code. (MAP, IS-41)
MCC Displays the mobile country code. (GPRS)
MNC Displays the mobile network code. (GPRS)
LAC Displays the location area code. (GPRS, Iu-CS, Iu-PS)
RAC Displays the routing area code. (GPRS, Iu-CS, Iu-PS)
CI Displays the cell identifier. (GPRS)
APN Displays the access point name. (GPRS, Iu-PS)
Calling number Displays the calling number. (Iu-CS)
Called number Displays the called number. (Iu-CS)
NI Displays the network indicator. (Iu-CS, Iu-PS)
SAC Displays the service area code. (Iu-CS, Iu-PS)
APN Displays the Access Point Name. (GTP)
SGSN Displays the Serving GPRS Support Node. (GTP)
GGSN Displays the Gateway GPRS Support Node. (GTP)
Transaction Displays the Transaction Type for Create PDP, Delete PDP,
Type Update PDP and SGSN Context. (GTP)
Table: 7Call Group parameters (Continued)

9.5.2 Server Configuration


The server configuration for GPRS and Iu-PS are quite similar, while the server
configuration for MAP and Iu-CS are a bit different. The server configuration for
MAP and IS-41 are almost identical.

9.5.2.1 Main settings


When configuring the Performance Analyser application you have a vast number of
options on how to set up the transaction groups, the alarm levels you want to have,
which cause values, time intervals, buffer size, etc.

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Figure 60: The Performance Analyser Server Configuration Main page for MAP

9.5.2.2 Call Group settings in Server Configuration dialog box

Figure 61: The Performance Analyser Server Configuration Call Groups page for MAP

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9.5.3 Transaction groups


The transaction groups can consist of any combination of the parameters listed in
the Call Group Definitions section. For IMSI, called and calling numbers can use
wild cards, and for access point names you can enter regular expressions with
different types of wild cards.

9.5.4 Automatic group generation


If you are unsure about how to configure the transaction groups, you may set one or
more of the parameters with an All/Ignore drop-down list to All, which will allow
OSIX to automatically generate a new group for each new value, or combination of
values, it finds.

9.5.5 Intelligent alarm settings


Setting appropriate alarm levels can be difficult the first time the application is used.
To give you a hint, OSIX can measure the percentages for the different KPIs, and
calculate appropriate alarm settings for you, called “intelligent alarm settings”.

9.5.6 Exporting
If you want to save your settings, or edit them in another environment than in the
Performance Analyser Server Configuration, you may export your group settings,
open them in Excel, and import them back into Performance Analyser later.

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9.5.7 Performance Analyser for GTP


For mobile networks, the latest Performance Analyser application is for GTP. It
monitors the following KPIs:
Transaction Success Rate
Response Delay
User Data Throughput
Total Count
Period Count
The following figure shows the Main window for GTP.

Figure 62: Performance Analyser GTP Main window

The call groups consist of a combination of:


APN
SGSN
GGSN
Transaction Type for Create PDP
Transaction Type for Delete PDP
Transaction Type for Update PDP
Transaction Type for SGSN Context
The following figure shows the Call Group Information window for GTP.

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Figure 63: Performance Analyser GTP Call Group Information window

9.6 Real Time Statistics


9.6.1 User interface
The Main Window displays different settings for your diagrams, with the top half
displaying the general settings for sampling rate, measure history, etc., and the
bottom half contains the filter settings that determine which messages/transactions
should be counted in the diagram.

Figure 64: The Real Time Statistics Main Window

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9.6.2 Statistical Information


When you are finished with your diagram settings, the statistical information can be
viewed either in a table format, or in a diagram format, in real time.

Figure 65: The Real Time table/diagram view

In this view you can also select to save the information as a comma-separated file,
which can then be opened in any word processing, or spreadsheet application.

9.6.3 Filters
There are four different types of filter:
Traffic Groups - The links in your network are divided into one or more traffic
groups, and you must select at least one traffic group before you can start
monitoring statistical information over messages/transactions in real time.
Parameters - You may set a filter on any parameter value visible in the Main
Window. This filter type also allows you to exclude messages/transactions with
specific values from your statistical information.
Links - You can select to only view statistical information about messages/
transactions that are sent on one or more specific links.
Protocols - If you are running more than one protocol, you can easily select to
only view statistical information about messages/transactions in a certain
protocol type.

9.6.3.1 Combining filter criteria


Filters can be set to display either messages where a certain parameter equals a
certain value, or messages where a certain parameter does NOT equal a certain
value. The set filter criteria can then be combined with AND/OR functionality.

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9.6.3.2 Saved filters


Any filters you have previously created and saved in either Call Trace or Protocol
Analyser can be opened up and used in the Real Time Statistics application.

9.7 Network Status


9.7.1 User interface
The Main Window displays four different views:
Level 1, which displays alarms detected on the links connected to the LIMs
Surveyor, which displays different maps over the network and any alarms on
level 2 or 3
Performance, which displays the number of alarms detected by the
Performance Analyser and Mass Call applications
Link Status, which displays the current status on all the different links, and two
different dialog boxes:
Active Alarms, which displays all the currently active alarms on all the different
levels
Alarm Log, which displays all historical alarms that have been cleared

Figure 66: Network Status Main Window, Map view

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SS7 links and SIGTRAN associations (together with neighbouring PCs and SCTP
endpoints) are automatically detected by the OSIX system. Maps are easily created
by drag and drop, and as soon as network problems occur, for example Transfer
Prohibited, the corresponding link and/or node will start blinking and an alarm will
be registered in the Active Alarms dialog box.
The Active Alarms dialog box contains information about all the alarms currently
active, and the Alarm Log contains information about historical alarms.

Figure 67: The Active Alarms and Alarm Log dialog boxes

Both of these dialog boxes contain comprehensive filter functionality for viewing the
specific events that are of interest. All alarms are also available as SNMP traps.

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9.8 Statistics Alarm


With the Statistics Alarm application you can set up alarms to be generated when
certain filter criteria for protocol messages or calls/transactions are met.

9.8.0.1 Easy-to-Use GUI


The GUI (Graphical User Interface) allows you to easily set up alarms based on
either protocol messages or calls/transactions.

9.8.0.1.1 Alarm Settings


The alarm settings allows you to set up alarms to be generated either at first
occurrence, or at a certain number of occurrences over a certain period of time. You
can also set up the alarms to be automatically cleared or not.

9.8.1 User interface


The Main Window in Statistics Alarm consists of an overview over the different
alarms that have been set up, and four buttons along the bottom of the window.

Figure 68: Statistics Alarm Main window

Changing the size of the main window will also dynamically adjust and resize the
columns, to give the best fit in the available space.

9.8.2 Alarm settings


Alarms are set up based either on protocol messages and their contents, or on
calls/transactions and their contents.
You can activate/deactivate alarms settings that you have created, as well as edit
and delete existing alarm settings.

9.8.2.1 Protocol filter settings


The protocol filter setting will generate an alarm when there are protocol messages
passing the filter, or when the number of messages passing the filter exceeds the
set threshold during the set time interval.
The alarms will be sent to the Network Status application and to any third-party
applications of your choice.
When making protocol filter settings, you can use the following filter types: Traffic
group filters, Parameter filters, and Link filters.

9.8.2.2 Transaction filter settings


The transaction filter setting will generate an alarm when there are calls/
transactions passing the filter, or when the number of calls/transactions passing the
filter exceeds the set threshold during the set time interval.

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The alarms will be sent to the Network Status application and to any third-party
applications of your choice.
When making transaction filter settings, you can use the following filter types: Traffic
group filters, Parameter filters, Link filters, and Duration filters.

Figure 69: Parameters tab sample for transaction filter settings

9.8.3 Filter settings management


Filter settings are fully editable and can also be saved for later use.
If you want to keep a filter setting but not use it at the moment, you can select to
deactivate the filter setting, and then activate it again when you want to use it.
To delete a filter setting, select it in the main window and click the Delete button.

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10 OSIX for IMS and VoIP networks


OSIX extracts information from signalling networks and includes
applications for monitoring and troubleshooting, xDR generation/SNMP trap
generation, and OSS (Operation Support System) applications. The
following sections show a few examples for IMS and VoIP networks.

10.1 IMS/VoIP protocols and interfaces


In a pure IMS environment, there is only a need for three protocols; SIP, Diameter
and DNS. SIP is used for the establishment of multimedia sessions, and Diameter is
used for database communication. DNS is used to find other IMS nodes, but also
for conversion between telephone numbers and IMS URIs. However, when
interworking with legacy networks, the H.248 (Megaco) protocol is essential.
The OSIX system supports all the major protocols; SIP, Megaco/H.248, and DNS as
they are used on a majority of the IMS/NGN interfaces.
All major protocols and links/interfaces used within VoIP networks are supported by
the OSIX system.
For information about supported protocols, see the OSIX Supported Protocols
document.
All supported protocols have a large set of pre-defined parameters available for
filtering. For information about protocol parameters, see 12 Protocol Parameters.

10.2 IMS/VoIP network features


Support for all major interfaces and protocols including extensions, for example
DNS NAPTR.
Multi-protocol correlation with support for matching of for example ICID, SDP
values and A/B numbers.
RTP quality analysis, including MOS score and real-time correlation to
subscriber (SIP dialog).
Real-time KPI measurements for SIP.
Flexible storage of signalling with individual storage length per protocol and SIP
method. That is, INVITE can, for example, be stored for a longer time than
REGISTER.

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10.3 Protocol Analyser


10.3.1 User interface
In the Main window you can monitor the protocol messages, either in real time or
historically. You can also set different filters, or search for specific messages. You
can have four different Protocol Analyser windows with different settings open at the
same time.

Figure 70: The Protocol Analyser Main Window

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10.3.1.1 Message details


The window is divided into several parts; one displaying the different protocol
messages, one displaying a preview of the message, one showing the hexadecimal
code, one showing ASCII code, and finally the filter section. You can also open a
separate Message Viewer with the contents of the entire message.

Figure 71: Message in Protocol Analyser

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10.4 Call Trace


10.4.1 User interface
In the Main window you can monitor the calls, either in real time or historically. You
may also set different filters, or search for specific calls. You can have four different
Call Trace windows with different settings open at the same time.

Figure 72: The Call Trace Main Window

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10.4.1.1 Call details


If you want to take a closer look at a call, you can double-click on a call to open the
Call Window. The window is divided into several parts, or panes; one displaying the
different protocol messages sent referring to the selected call, one displaying a
preview of the message, one showing the hexadecimal code, one showing ASCII
code, and finally one pane displaying different parameters for the call (this pane is
not present in the following figure). You can also open a separate Message Viewer
with the contents of the entire message.

Figure 73: The Call Window

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10.4.1.2 Call flow


When viewing the call details you can also select to view the call flow in a graphical
representation, where the nodes are visible and the different messages are
represented with arrows.

Figure 74: The Call Flow Window

10.4.2 Correlation
Call correlation is done between all messages relating to the same call/transaction,
regardless of where in the network the messages are sent. All messages relating to
the process are presented in the Call Window.
For IMS and VoIP networks correlation is available for:
IMS and Voice over IP transactions.
IMS and Mobile transactions.
The following protocols are supported for IMS and Voice over IP transactions: ISUP,
SIP, INAP, BICC, MGCP, MEGACO/H.248, H.323, ISDN, DNS, and DIAMETER.

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The following protocols are supported for IMS and Mobile transactions: ISUP, SIP,
MEGACO, INAP, BICC, MGCP, H.225, ISDN, DNS, Diameter, MAP, RANAP and
BSSAP.

10.4.2.1 Correlation example for IMS and Voice over IP

Figure 75: The Call Window for IMS and Voice over IP transactions

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Figure 76: The Call Flow Window for IMS and Voice Over IP transactions

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10.5 Performance Analyser


10.5.1 User interface
10.5.1.1 Main window
The Main Window displays the calling statistics for the call groups in real time.

Example:
In addition to monitor specific partners, other traffic groups can be defined and
monitored. The figure shows traffic to/from a particular soft switch or emergency
calls.

Figure 77: The Performance Analyser Main Window for SIP

10.5.2 Columns
The following columns are available in the Main Window:

Group ID Displays the individual group’s unique number.


Information If the KPIs for the group have been measured by OSIX
and set automatically, this column displays the results
from the last evaluation.
Description If the group has been automatically generated by OSIX,
this column will display what parameter values the
group consists of, otherwise the system administrator
may set any appropriate name for this column.
ASR (%) Answer Seizure Ratio displays the number of answered
calls out of the total number of call attempts, in per cent.
NER (%) Network Efficiency Ratio displays the number of calls
terminated with normal release causes (defined by the
system administrator) out of the total number of call
attempts, in per cent.
Table: 8Main window columns

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NOSC (%) Number of Short Calls displays the number calls with a
conversation time shorter than a certain time interval
(defined by the system administrator) out of the total
number of call attempts, in per cent.
Invite Performance (%) Displays the number of successful Invite transactions,
that is, Invites where no message has been
retransmitted, out of the total number of Invites. This
KPI will help you detect problems on IP level.
Invite Count Displays the total amount of Invites counted in the group
since the counters were last reset.
Register Success (%) Displays the number of successful Registrations out of
the total number of registration attempts.
Register Performance (%) Displays the number of successful Register
transactions, that is, Registrations where no message
has been retransmitted, out of the total number of
Registrations. This KPI will help you detect problems on
IP level.
Register Count Displays the total amount of Registrations counted in
the group since the counters were last reset.
Priority Displays a priority value calculated by OSIX based on
the largest deviation between current value and set
alarm value and the set buffer size.
Total Count Displays the total amount of SIP transactions counted in
the group since the counters were last reset.
Table: 8Main window columns (Continued)

10.5.2.1 Call Group Information


If you want to view detailed information about the call group and/or start Call Trace
or Protocol Analyser with an automatic filter for the transaction group, double-click
the group to open the Call Group Information dialog box.

Example:
The figure shows a call group that gives statistics for a group of three destination IP
addresses.

Figure 78: The Call Group Information dialog box for SIP

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The following parameters are available:

Calling Party Displays the calling party number


Called Party Displays the called party number
Source IP Displays the source IP address
Dest IP Displays the destination IP address
Table: 9Call Group parameters

10.5.3 Server Configuration


When configuring the Performance Analyser application you have a vast number of
options on how to set up the call groups, the alarm levels you want each group to
have, which release causes should be counted, the maximum number of seconds
for a short call, etc.

10.5.3.1 Main settings for SIP

Figure 79: The Performance Analyser Server Configuration Main folder

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10.5.3.2 Call Group settings folder in Server Configuration

Figure 80: The Performance Analyser Server Configuration Call Groups folder

10.5.4 Call groups


The call groups can consist of any combination of Calling Party Number, Called
Party Number, Source IP, Destination IP, Last VIA, and Vlan ID. For A Numbers and
B Numbers, wild cards can be used, and a plus sign can be used for a catch all
group. You can also enter regular expressions with different types of wild cards for
all the parameters.

10.5.5 Automatic group generation


If you are unsure about how to configure the call groups, OSIX can automatically
generate groups based on the Source IP and Destination IP parameters.

10.5.6 Intelligent alarm settings


Setting appropriate alarm levels can be difficult the first time the application is used
in your network. To give you a pointer, OSIX can measure the ASR, NER, NOSC,
Invite Performance, Register Success, and Register Performance values for the call
groups, and calculate appropriate alarm settings for you, called “intelligent alarm
settings”.

10.5.7 Exporting
If you want to save your settings or, edit them in another environment than in the
Performance Analyser Server Configuration, you can export your group settings,
open them in Excel, and import them back into Performance Analyser later.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 99
OSIX for IMS and VoIP networks

10.6 Real Time Statistics


10.6.1 User interface
The Main Window displays the different settings for your diagrams, with the top half
displaying the general settings for sampling rate, measure history, etc., and the
bottom half the filter settings that determine which messages/transactions should
be counted in the diagram.

Figure 81: The Real Time Statistics Main Window

System Description
OSIX 5.6 100
OSIX for IMS and VoIP networks

10.6.2 Statistical Information


When you are finished with your diagram settings, the statistical information can be
viewed either in a table format, or in a diagram format, in real time.

Figure 82: The Real Time table/diagram view

In this view you can also select to save the information as a comma-separated file,
which can then be opened in any word processing, or spreadsheet application.

10.6.3 Filters
There are four different types of filter:
Traffic Groups - The links in your network are divided into one or more traffic
groups, and you must select at least one traffic group before you can start
monitoring statistical information over messages/transactions in real time.
Parameters - You may set a filter on any parameter value visible in the Main
Window. This filter type also allows you to exclude messages /transactions with
specific values from your statistical information.
Links - You can select to only view statistical information about messages/
transactions that are sent on one or more specific links.
Protocols - If you are running more than one protocol, you can easily select to
only view statistical information about messages/transactions in a certain
protocol type.

10.6.3.1 Combining filter criteria


Filters can be set to display either messages where a certain parameter equals a
certain value, or messages where a certain parameter does NOT equal a certain
value. The set filter criteria can then be combined with AND/OR functionality.

10.6.3.2 Saved filters


Any filters you have previously created and saved in either Call Trace or Protocol
Analyser can be opened up and used in the Real Time Statistics application.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 101
OSIX for IMS and VoIP networks

10.7 Network Status


10.7.1 User interface
The Main Window displays four different views:
Layer 1, which displays alarms detected on the links connected to the LIMs
Map, which displays different maps over the network and any alarms on level 2
or 3
Performance, which displays the number of alarms detected by the
Performance Analyser application
Link Status, which displays the current status on all the different links
and two different dialog boxes:
Active Alarms, which displays all the currently active alarms on all the different
levels
Alarm Log, which displays all alarms that have been cleared

Figure 83: Network Status Main Window, Map view (detached)

The Active Alarms dialog box contains information about all the alarms currently
active, and the Alarm Log contains information about historical alarms.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 102
OSIX for IMS and VoIP networks

Figure 84: The Active Alarms and Alarm Log dialog boxes

Both of these dialog boxes contain comprehensive filter functionality for viewing the
specific events that are of interest.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 103
OSIX for IMS and VoIP networks

10.8 Statistics Alarm


With the Statistics Alarm application you can set up alarms to be generated when
certain filter criteria for protocol messages or calls/transactions are met.

10.8.0.1 Easy-to-Use GUI


The GUI (Graphical User Interface) allows you to easily set up alarms based on
either protocol messages or calls/transactions.

10.8.0.1.1 Alarm Settings


The alarm settings allows you to set up alarms to be generated either at first
occurrence, or at a certain number of occurrences over a certain period of time. You
can also set up the alarms to be automatically cleared or not.

10.8.1 User interface


The Main Window in Statistics Alarm consists of an overview over the different
alarms that have been set up, and four buttons along the bottom of the window.

Figure 85: Statistics Alarm Main window

Changing the size of the main window will also dynamically adjust and resize the
columns, to give the best fit in the available space.

10.8.2 Alarm settings


Alarms are set up based either on protocol messages and their contents, or on
calls/transactions and their contents. You can activate/deactivated alarms settings
that you have created, as well as edit and delete existing alarm settings.

10.8.2.1 Protocol filter settings


The protocol filter setting will generate an alarm when there are protocol messages
passing the filter, or when the number of messages passing the filter exceeds the
set threshold during the set time interval.
The alarms will be sent to the Network Status application and to any third-party
applications of your choice. When making protocol filter settings, you can use the
following filter types: Traffic group filters, Parameter filters, and Link filters.

10.8.2.2 Transaction filter settings


The transaction filter setting will generate an alarm when there are calls/
transactions passing the filter, or when the number of calls/transactions passing the
filter exceeds the set threshold during the set time interval.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 104
OSIX for IMS and VoIP networks

The alarms will be sent to the Network Status application and to any third-party
applications of your choice.
When making transaction filter settings, you can use the following filter types: Traffic
group filters, Parameter filters, Link filters, and Duration filters.

Figure 86: Parameters tab sample for transaction filter settings

10.8.3 Filter settings management


Filter settings are fully editable and can also be saved for later use.
If you want to keep a filter setting but not use it at the moment, you can select to
deactivate the filter setting, and then activate it again when you want to use it.
To delete a filter setting, select it in the main window and click the Delete button.

System Description
OSIX 5.6 105
OSIX monitoring

11 OSIX monitoring
11.1 CS domain monitoring
In the Mobile CS domain, important monitoring points are around the MSC server
(MSS), and around the Signalling Transfer Points (STPs).

Figure 87: Mobile CS domain - monitoring points

11.1.1 MSS/MGW monitoring (Release 4)


The following interfaces/protocols are captured around the MSS:
A Interface (BSSAP)
BICC
Iu-CS (RANAP)
Gs (BSSAP+)
MEGACO/H.248
SS7 (MAP, INAP, CAP, ISUP)

11.1.2 STP monitoring


The following interfaces/protocols are captured around the STPs:
SS7 (MAP, INAP, CAP, ISUP)

System Description
OSIX 5.6 106
OSIX monitoring

11.2 PS domain - 2G/ 3G monitoring


In the Mobile PS domain - 3G, important monitoring points are around the SGSN
and GGSN.

Figure 88: Mobile PS domain - monitoring points

11.2.1 SGSN monitoring (2G/3G) PS domain


The following interfaces are captured around the SGSN:
Gr (MAP)
Gb (BSSGP)
Iu-PS (RANAP)
Gn (Inter-SGSN)
Gp (Inbound roaming)

11.2.2 GGSN monitoring (2G/3G)


The following interfaces are captured around the GGSN:
Gn
Gp (outbound roaming)
Gi (Radius)
Gx/Gy (Diameter)

System Description
OSIX 5.6 107
OSIX monitoring

11.3 PS domain - 4G/LTE


In the Mobile PS domain - 4G/LTE, important monitoring points are around the
MME and the SGW/PGW.

Figure 89: Mobile PS domain 4G/LTE - monitoring points

11.3.1 MME monitoring (4G/LTE)


The following interfaces are captured around the MME nodes:
S1-MME
S3/Gn/S10
SGs
S6a
S13

System Description
OSIX 5.6 108
OSIX monitoring

11.3.2 SGW/PGW monitoring (4G/LTE)


The following interfaces are captured around the SGW/PGW:
S1-U
S11
S4
Gx/Gy (DIAMETER)
S5/S8
S12
SGi (RADIUS)

11.4 IMS domain VoIP/VoLTE


In the IMS domain the most important monitoring points are around the P-I-S CSCF
servers and around the MGCF servers.

Figure 90: IMS domain VoIP/VoLTE - monitoring points

11.4.1 P-CSCF/SBC monitoring


The following interfaces/protocols are captured around the P-CSCF/SBC server:
Gm (SIP & RTP)
VoIP Access (SIP, RTP & DHCP)
Rx (Diameter)

11.4.2 I-S CSCF monitoring


The following interfaces/protocols are captured around the I-S-CSCF
Mw (SIP)
ISC (SIP)
Mg (SIP)

System Description
OSIX 5.6 109
OSIX monitoring

Voice Core (RTP)


Cx (Diameter)
I2 (SIP)

11.4.3 MGCF monitoring


The following interfaces/protocols are captured around the MGCF
Mn (H.248)
SIP Interconnect (SIP & RTP)

System Description
OSIX 5.6 110
Protocol Parameters

12 Protocol Parameters
All parameters in a supported protocol are decoded in Call Trace and
Protocol Analyser. To make searching efficient, a selection of the most
interesting parameters are searchable. These protocol parameters are
listed in this chapter.

12.1 Supported protocols


The OSIX protocol library currently supports a large number of different protocols,
with different dialects for PSTN, mobile, IMS, VoIP, NGN, and LTE networks. New
protocols for emerging technologies are continuously added.
See the OSIX Supported Protocols document for more information.

12.2 Call Trace


The protocol parameters listed are available for searching in Call Trace.

12.2.1 General
In Call Trace, the following General parameters are currently available:

Status Date Transaction ID


State Name Protocol #Messages
Start Time Timer Row Nr
End Time Traffic Group
Duration Reloaded
Table 10: General parameters in Call Trace

12.2.2 Any Protocol


In Call Trace, the following parameters for Any Protocol are currently available:

Any Protocol A Number Any Protocol LAC Any Protocol IMEI(SV)


Any Protocol B Number Any Protocol RAC Any Protocol MNC
Any Protocol IMSI Any Protocol SAC Any Protocol MCC
Any Protocol CI Any Protocol Conversation Duration
Table 11: Any Protocol parameters in Call Trace

12.2.3 AIN
In Call Trace, the following parameters for AIN are currently available:

AIN Calling Number AIN Routing Number


AIN Called Number
Table 12: AIN parameters in Call Trace

12.2.4 ALCAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for ALCAP are currently available:

ALCAP Cause ALCAP Dest SAI ALCAP Aal2 Path Id


ALCAP Orig SAI ALCAP SUGR ALCAP CID
Table 13: ALCAP parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 111
Protocol Parameters

12.2.5 ATM
In Call Trace, the following parameters for ATM are currently available:

ATM Path id ATM VCI


ATM VPI ATM CID
Table 14: ATM parameters in Call Trace

12.2.6 AggData
In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggData are currently available:

AggData User Protocol AggData MMS To AggData POP3 User Name


AggData HTTP Url AggData MMS User Agent UL Packets
AggData HTTP Host AggData MMS Response DL Packets
Status
AggData HTTP Cause AggData RTSP Url UL Bytes
AggData HTTP Referer AggData RTSP User Agent DL Bytes
AggData HTTP User Agent AggData RTSP Status UL Throughput (kbit/s)
AggData DNS Query Name AggData FTP User Name DL Throughput (kbit/s)
AggData DNS Response Code AggData FTP request First # User Data Msgs
Error Reason
AggData MMS Message Type AggData IMAP User Name UL Peak Throughput (kbit/s)
AggData MMS From AggData SMTP User Name DL Peak Throughput (kbit/s)
Table 15: AggData parameters in Call Trace

Note: In Call Trace, “A/B” is added for each stream for AggRTP parameters.

12.2.7 AggRTP - End Point Descriptor


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - End Point Descriptor are
currently available:

AggRTP UDP Source Address AggRTP UDP Dest Address


AggRTP UDP Source Port AggRTP UDP Dest Port
Table 16: AggRTP - End Point Descriptor parameters in Call Trace

12.2.8 AggRTP - Codec Metrics


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - Codec Metrics are currently
available:

AggRTP Vocoder Type


AggRTP Payload Type
Table 17: AggRTP - Codec Metrics parameters in Call Trace

12.2.9 AggRTP - Packet Transport Record


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - Packet Transport Record are
currently available:

AggRTP Packets Received AggRTP Packets Discarded AggRTP Avg. Packet Loss (%)
AggRTP Packets Lost AggRTP Packets Duplicated
Table 18: AggRTP - Packet Transport Record parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 112
Protocol Parameters

12.2.10AggRTP - Jitter Records (RFC 3550)


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - Jitter Records are currently
available:

AggRTP Max. PPDV (ms)


AggRTP Avg. PPDV (ms)
Table 19: AggRTP - Jitter Records parameters in Call Trace

12.2.11AggRTP - RTCP Delay Record


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP Delay Record are
currently available:

AggRTP RTCP Avg. AggRTP RTCP Avg. One-way


Round-trip Network Delay Delay (ms)
(ms)
AggRTP RTCP Max. AggRTP RTCP Max. One-way
Round-trip Network Delay Delay (ms)
(ms)
Table 20: AggRTP - RTCP Delay Record parameters in Call Trace

12.2.12AggRTP - Quality Records (G. 107)


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - Quality Records (G. 107) are
currently available:

AggRTP R-LQ AggRTP MOS-LQ


AggRTP R-CQ AggRTP MOS-CQ
Table 21: AggRTP - Quality Records. 107) parameters in Call Trace

12.2.13AggRTP - Degradation Metrics


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - Degradation Metrics are
currently available:

AggRTP Loss Degr. AggRTP Delay Degr. AggRTP Echo Level Degr.
AggRTP Discard Degr. AggRTP Signal Level Degr. AggRTP Recency Degr.
AggRTP CODEC Degr. AggRTP Noise Level Degr.
Table 22: AggRTP - Degradation Metrics parameters in Call Trace

12.2.14AggRTP - RTCP End System Delay Record


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP End System Delay
Record are currently available:

AggRTP RTCP Avg. Orig. AggRTP RTCP Avg. Term.


End-System Delay (ms) End-System Delay (ms)
AggRTP RTCP Max. Orig. AggRTP RTCP Max. Term.
End-System Delay (ms) End-System Delay (ms)
Table 23: AggRTP - RTCP End System Delay Record parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 113
Protocol Parameters

12.2.15AggRTP - Voice Jitter Records (G. 1020)


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - Voice Jitter Records (G. 1020)
are currently available:

AggRTP Avg. MAPDV (ms)


AggRTP Max. MAPDV (ms)
Table 24: AggRTP - Voice Jitter Records (G. 1020) parameters in Call Trace

12.2.16AggRTP - RTCP-XR Record


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP-XR Record are currently
available:

AggRTP RTCP-XR Loss AggRTP RTCP-XR RT Delay AggRTP RTCP-XR R-factor


Rate (%) (ms)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Discard AggRTP RTCP-XR End Sys. AggRTP RTCP-XR Ext. R-factor
Rate (%) Delay (ms)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Avg AggRTP RTCP-XR Signal Lvl. AggRTP RTCP-XR MOS-LQ
Burst Density (%) (dBm)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Avg AggRTP RTCP-XR Noise Lvl. AggRTP RTCP-XR MOS-CQ
Gap Density (%) (dBm)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Avg AggRTP RTCP-XR Residual AggRTP RTCP-XR RX Config
Burst Duration (ms) ERL (dB)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Avg AggRTP RTCP-XR Gap Size
Gap Duration (ms) (# of packets)
Table 25: AggRTP - RTCP-XR Record parameters in Call Trace

12.2.17AggRTP - RTCP SR Record


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP SR Record are currently
available:

AggRTP RTCP-SR # of RTP AggRTP RTCP-SR # of RR


Packets Reports
AggRTP RTCP-SR # of Octets
Table 26: AggRTP - RTCP SR Record parameters in Call Trace

12.2.18AggRTP - RTCP RR Record


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP RR Record are currently
available:

AggRTP RTCP-RR Packets Lost AggRTP RTCP-RR DLSR


AggRTP RTCP-RR Inter Arrival
Jitter
Table 27: AggRTP - RTCP RR Record parameters in Call Trace

12.2.19AggRTP - RTCP SS/RR-based QoE Metrics


In Call Trace, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP SS/RR-based QoE
Metrics are currently available:

AggRTP RTCP-SR/RR MOS-LQ


AggRTP RTCP-SR/RR MOS-
CQ
Table 28: AggRTP - RTCP SS/RR-based QoE Metrics parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 114
Protocol Parameters

12.2.20BSSAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for BSSAP are currently available:

BSSAP Layer 3 Msg BSSAP LCS Cause BSSAP Redir Num


BSSAP BSSMAP Cause BSSAP MCC BSSAP DTAP CC Cause
BSSAP Assignment Failure Cause BSSAP MNC BSSAP IMSI
BSSAP Handover Failure Cause BSSAP LAC BSSAP Incoming HO Cmd
BSSAP Handover Required Reject BSSAP CI BSSAP Outgoing HO Cmd
Cause
BSSAP Handover Required Cause BSSAP Last CI BSSAP Firts HO Ref
BSSAP BSSMAP Last Cause BSSAP CIC BSSAP Latest HO Ref
BSSAP BSSMAP Transport Layer BSSAP Called Num BSSAP Answer Time
Address MSC
BSSAP BSSMAP Transport Layer BSSAP Calling Num BSSAP Release Time
Address BSC
BSSAP RR Cause BSSAP Connected Num BSSAP Conversation
Duration
Table 29: BSSAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.21BSSAP+
In Call Trace, the following parameters for BSSAP+ are currently available:

BSSAP+ Msg BSSAP+ IMSI Detach Non BSSAP+ Cell Global ID RAC
GPRS
BSSAP+ IMSI BSSAP+ Gs Cause BSSAP+ LAI LAC
BSSAP+ SGSN Number BSSAP+ Reject Cause BSSAP+ TMSI
BSSAP+ IMSI Detach BSSAP+ Cell Global ID LAC BSSAP+ NRI
GPRS
Table 30: BSSAP+ parameters in Call Trace

12.2.22Circuit
In Call Trace, the following parameters for Circuit are currently available:

Circuit CIC Circuit B Number Circuit A NoA


Circuit A Number Circuit B NoA
Table 31: Circuit parameters in Call Trace

12.2.23Circuit - ISUP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for ISUP are currently available:

ISUP Cause Value ISUP DPC CIC ISUP Answer Time


ISUP ACM Cause Value ISUP Releasing OPC ISUP Release Time
ISUP Location Nr ISUP TMR ISUP Conversation Duration
ISUP Redirecting Nr ISUP Route Identity ISUP ACM Time
ISUP Original Called Nr ISUP Redirection Reason ISUP Setup Time
ISUP Generic Number ISUP Call Identity ISUP Address Presentation
Restricted Indicator
ISUP Charge Ind ISUP Network Exchange ISUP Echo Flag
Identity
ISUP OPC CIC ISUP Cause Location ISUP Correlation id
Table 32: ISUP parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 115
Protocol Parameters

12.2.24Circuit - IUP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for IUP are currently available:

IUP Called Nbr IUP Line Id NAI IUP Answer Time


IUP Calling Nbr IUP Calling NAI IUP Release Time
IUP Line ID IUP Full Calling Line ID IUP Conversation Duration
IUP Reason IUP Full Calling NAI IUP Setup Time
IUP Line Id Type IUP CNA Reason
Table 33: IUP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.25Circuit - BICC
In Call Trace, the following parameters for BICC are currently available:

BICC Cause Value BICC Action Indicator BICC Release Time


BICC Location Nr BICC TMR BICC Conversation Duration
BICC Redirecting Nr BICC Transport Layer Address BICC Setup Time
BICC Original Called Nr BICC Backbone Network Id
BICC Charge Ind BICC Answer Time
Table 34: BICC parameters in Call Trace

12.2.26DHCP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for DHCP are currently available:

DHCP Bootp Msg DHCP Domain Name DHCP First DNS Address
DHCP Transaction ID DHCP Lease Time DHCP Relay Agent Info Type
DHCP Client MAC DHCP Server ID DHCP Relay Agent Circuit ID
DHCP Client IP DHCP Renewal Time DHCP Relay Agent Remote ID
DHCP Your IP DHCP Rebinding Time DHCP Relay Agent Subscriber ID
DHCP Relay agent IP DHCP Vendor Class ID DHCP First Classless Static
Route
DHCP Subnet Mask DHCP Client ID
DHCP Host Name DHCP First Router Address
Table 35: DHCP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.27DIAMETER
In Call Trace, the following parameters for DIAMETER are currently available:

DIAMETER Command DIAMETER Framed IP DIAMETER Preemption capability


Code
DIAMETER Application Id DIAMETER Called Station DIAMETER Preemption
vulnerability
DIAMETER Origin Host DIAMETER SGSN IP DIAMETER Disconnect cause
DIAMETER Origin Realm DIAMETER GGSN IP DIAMETER MCC
DIAMETER Destination DIAMETER Last Hop Dest IP DIAMETER MNC
Host
DIAMETER Destination DIAMETER Charging DIAMETER LAC
Realm Characteristics
DIAMETER Session Id DIAMETER Radio Access DIAMETER SAC/CI
Type 2G/3G
Table 36: DIAMETER parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 116
Protocol Parameters

DIAMETER IMSI DIAMETER ICID DIAMETER IMEI(SV)


DIAMETER MSISDN DIAMETER User Name DIAMETER Framed IPv6 prefix
DIAMETER Calling party DIAMETER SIP Method DIAMETER QCI
address
DIAMETER Called party DIAMETER Cause Code DIAMETER Max Response Time
address
DIAMETER Public Identity DIAMETER Result Code DIAMETER Subscription Id
DIAMETER Multiple DIAMETER Experimental DIAMETER Subscription Type
Services CC Result result code
DIAMETER Multiple DIAMETER SGSN MCC DIAMETER Server Assignment
Services CC Service Id Type
DIAMETER Multiple DIAMETER SGSN MNC DIAMETER User Authorization
Services CC Rating Group Type
DIAMETER Used Input DIAMETER Charging rule DIAMETER User Data Already
Octets name Available
DIAMETER Used Output DIAMETER Event trigger DIAMETER UE SRVCC
Octets Capability
DIAMETER Used Total DIAMETER Priority level DIAMETER ECI
Octets
Table 36: DIAMETER parameters in Call Trace (Continued)

12.2.28DNS
In Call Trace, the following parameters for DNS are currently available:

DNS Opcode DNS Response Code DNS Called Number


DNS Query Name DNS Answer Address DNS Enum Service Address
DNS Qtype DNS Answer Count
DNS Qclass DNS Answer Result
Table 37: DNS parameters in Call Trace

12.2.29ESP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for ESP (IP Encapsulating Security Payload)
are available:

Security Parameters Index (SPI)


Sequence Number
Table 38: ESP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.30Ethernet
In Call Trace, the following parameters for Ethernet are currently available:

VLAN Priority VLAN ID Ethernet Dest Mac Address


VLAN CFI Ethernet Source Mac Address
Table 39: Ethernet parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 117
Protocol Parameters

12.2.31GPRS Gb
In Call Trace, the following parameters for GPRS Gb are currently available:

GPRS IMSI BSSGP MNC BSSGP NRI


BSSGP PDU BSSGP LAC BSSGP Uplink Bytes
BSSGP Cause BSSGP RAC GPRS Downlink Bytes
BSSGP Radio Cause BSSGP CI GPRS #User Data Msgs
BSSGP MCC BSSGP TLLI
Table 40: GPRS GB parameters in Call Trace

12.2.32GTP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for GTP are currently available:

GTP Message GTP RADIO LAC GTP MSC CP Address


GTP Version GTP CORE MCC GTP RNC Id
GTP IMSI GTP CORE MNC GTP Target CI
GTP MSISDN GTP CORE LAC GTP ECI
GTP End User Address GTP TAC GTP SRVCC Cause
GTP End User Address IPv6 GTP DTI GTP PDP/PDN Type
GTP Access Point Name GTP NSAPI GTP Uplink CP Address
GTP Cause GTP Multiple NSAPI GTP Uplink UP Address
GTP Tunnel Source IP GTP EBI GTP Downlink CP Address
GTP Tunnel Dest IP GTP RAN Address for user GTP Downlink UP Address
traffic
GTP Tunnel Protocol GTP RAC GTP DL MBR
GTP v2 Interface GTP SAC GTP DL GBR
GTP Charging Characteristics GTP CI GTP UL MBR
GTP IMEI(SV) GTP Radio Access GTP UL GBR
Technology
GTP RADIO MCC GTP STN-SR Address
GTP RADIO MNC GTP MME CP Address
Table 41: GTP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.33H.323
In Call Trace, the following parameters for H.323 are currently available:

H.323 Display H.323 Cause Value H.323 Destination Address Text


H.323 Calling Party Number H.323 RAS Msg H.323 Call Identifier GUID
H.323 Called Party Number H.323 Source Address Number H.323 IP Address
H.323 Calling Type of H.323 Source Address Text H.323 Port Number
Number
H.323 Called Type of H.323 Destination Address
Number Number
Table 42: H.323 parameters in Call Trace

12.2.34HTTP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for HTTP are currently available:

System Description
OSIX 5.6 118
Protocol Parameters

HTTP Method HTTP Request URI HTTP Uplink Bytes


HTTP Status Code HTTP Host HTTP Downlink Bytes
Table 43: HTTP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.35IP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for IP are currently available:

IP Source Address IP Protocol IP Tunnel Dest Address


IP Dest Address IP Tunnel Source Address IP Tunnel Protocol
Table 44: IP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.36ISAKMP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for ISAKMP (Internet Security Association
and Key Management Protocol)/IKE v2 (Internet Key Exchange Protocol Version 2)
are currently available:

Initiator's SPI Exchange Type


Responder's SPI Message ID
Table 45: ISAKMP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.37ISDN
In Call Trace, the following parameters for ISDN are currently available:

ISDN Call Reference ISDN Calling TypeOfNum ISDN High Layer


Characteristics
ISDN CR Flag ISDN Cause Value ISDN Transfer Mode
ISDN Called Party Number ISDN Channel number ISDN Userinfo Layer1 Protocol
ISDN Calling Party Number ISDN Information transfer ISDN Location
capability
ISDN Called TypeOfNum ISDN Conversation Duration
Table 46: ISDN parameters in Call Trace

12.2.38ISDN SS
In Call Trace, the following parameters for ISDN SS are currently available:

ISDN SS Called Number


ISDN SS Calling Number
Table 47: ISDN SS parameters in Call Trace

12.2.39LCSAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for LCSAP are currently available:

LCSAP Correlation ID LCSAP MCC LCSAP eNB ID


LCSAP Procedure Code LCSAP Cell Identity LCSAP Sector ID
LCSAP MNC LCSAP LCS Cause LCSAP IMSI
Table 48: LCSAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.40LDAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for LDAP are currently available:

System Description
OSIX 5.6 119
Protocol Parameters

LDAP Msg LDAP IMPU LDAP DN ou


LDAP Msg ID LDAP Assoc Id LDAP DN cn
LDAP IMSI LDAP Policy id LDAP DN serv
LDAP MSISDN LDAP Market Code id LDAP DN mscId
LDAP SGSN Number LDAP TOA Status LDAP Uplink Bytes
LDAP SGSN Address LDAP TOA Level LDAP Downlink Bytes
LDAP VLR Number LDAP AV Status LDAP Uplink Message Count
LDAP MSC Number LDAP PC Status LDAP Downlink Message Count
LDAP Result Code LDAP PC Week Schedule
LDAP IMPI LDAP DN dc
Table 49: LDAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.41LPPA
In Call Trace, the following parameters for LPPA are currently available:

LPPA Procedure Code LPPA Cell Portion Id LPPA E-UTRAN Cell Id


LPPA Message Type LPPA MCC LPPA TAC
LPPA Transaction Id LPPA MNC LPPA Cause
Table 50: LPPA parameters in Call Trace

12.2.42MEGACO
In Call Trace, the following parameters for MEGACO are currently available:

MEGACO Version MEGACO Second Termination MEGACO Media Gateway


ID Controller MId
MEGACO Transaction Id MEGACO Transport Layer MEGACO Media Gateway MId
Address
MEGACO Context Id MEGACO BIR SUGR MEGACO RTP Packet Loss %
MEGACO Error Code MEGACO IMSI MEGACO RTP Jitter
MEGACO Command MEGACO Called Number MEGACO RTP Delay
MEGACO Termination ID MEGACO Calling Number
Table 51: MEGACO parameters in Call Trace

12.2.43MGCP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for MGCP are currently available:

MGCP Verb MGCP Caller Id MGCP Latency


MGCP Endpoint Name MGCP Called Number MGCP Media Gateway
MGCP Response Code MGCP Packet Loss % MGCP Media Gateway Controller
MGCP Call Id MGCP Jitter
Table 52: MGCP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.44MM/SM
In Call Trace, the following parameters for MM/SM are currently available:

MM/SM Msg MM/SM MCC MM/SM Other Rate Adaption


MM/SM Access Point MM/SM MNC MM/SM Ciphering Algorithm
Name
MM/SM Mobile IP Address MM/SM LAC MM/SM Deciphered
Table 53: MM/SM parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 120
Protocol Parameters

MM/SM IMSI MM/SM RAC MM/SM QCI


MM/SM TMSI MM/SM TAC MM/SM ESM Msg
MM/SM NRI MM/SM CI MM/SM Traffic Handling Priority
MM/SM New TMSI MM/SM MM Cause MM/SM Location Update Type
MM/SM New NRI MM/SM SM Cause MM/SM EPS Update Type
MM/SM M-TMSI MM/SM Reject Cause MM/SM Voice Domain
Preference
MM/SM IMEI MM/SM CC Cause
MM/SM IMEISV MM/SM Service Type
Table 53: MM/SM parameters in Call Trace (Continued)

12.2.45MMS
In Call Trace, the following parameters for MMS are currently available:

MMS Msg Type MMS Transaction Id MMS From


MMS Msg MMS Response Status MMS To
Table 54: MMS parameters in Call Trace

12.2.46MTP3/M3UA
In Call Trace, the following parameters for MTP3/M3UA are currently available:

MTP3/M3UA OPC MTP3/M3UA OPC NI MTP3/M3UA NI


MTP3/M3UA DPC MTP3/M3UA DPC NI
Table 55: MTP3/M3UA parameters in Call Trace

12.2.47NBAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for NBAP are currently available:

NBAP Procedure Code NBAP Cell Id NBAP DCH Port NodeB


NBAP UL Scrambling Code NBAP Binding ID NBAP DCH Port RNC
NBAP CRNC NBAP Radio Link Id
Communication Context Id
NBAP NodeB NBAP Cause
Communication Context Id
Table 56: NBAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.48PCAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for PCAP are currently available:

PCAP Transaction Id PCAP Request Type Event PCAP Cell ID


PCAP Procedure Code PCAP Positioning Method PCAP Cause
PCAP Message Type PCAP RNC ID
Table 57: PCAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.49RADIUS
In Call Trace, the following parameters for RADIUS are currently available:

System Description
OSIX 5.6 121
Protocol Parameters

RADIUS Packet Type RADIUS Called User RADIUS ERX Secondary DNS
RADIUS Identifier RADIUS IMSI RADIUS ERX Virtual Router
Name
RADIUS Accounting Session RADIUS Connect Info RADIUS NAS Identifier
ID
RADIUS Framed IP Address RADIUS ERX Ingress Policy RADIUS NAS Port ID
Name
RADIUS Calling User RADIUS ERX Primary DNS RADIUS User name
Table 58: RADIUS parameters in Call Trace

12.2.50RANAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for RANAP are currently available:

RANAP Procedure Code RANAP Called Number RANAP Global RNC ID


RANAP IMSI RANAP Calling Number RANAP HO Command
RANAP LAI LAC RANAP MCC RANAP Relocation Type
RANAP SAI LAC RANAP MNC RANAP Target Cell ID
RANAP SAC RANAP Binding ID RANAP RNC ID
RANAP RAC RANAP GTP uplink teid RANAP Cell ID
RANAP Transport Layer RANAP GTP downlink teid RANAP CN ID
Address
RANAP Cause RANAP Domain Indicator
RANAP RAB Cause RANAP Reject Cause Value
Table 59: RANAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.51RNSAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for RNSAP are currently available:

RNSAP Procedure Code RNSAP UL Scrambling Code RNSAP MCC


RNSAP IMSI RNSAP Binding ID RNSAP MNC
RNSAP LAC RNSAP Cell RNSAP ARP
RNSAP RAC RNSAP RNC
RNSAP SAC RNSAP IMEI
Table 60: RNSAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.52RTSP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for RTSP are currently available:

RTSP Method RTSP Session Id RTSP Server


RTSP Status Code RTSP Url RTSP Media Type
RTSP Reason Phrase RTSP Authorization User
RTSP Version RTSP User Agent
Table 61: RTSP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.53S1AP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for S1AP are currently available:

S1AP Procedure Code S1AP ECGI MNC SIAP Cause


S1AP IMSI S1AP Cell Identity S1AP IMSI Enriched By
Table 62: S1AP parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 122
Protocol Parameters

S1AP LAC S1AP MME Code S1AP SRVCC HO Indication


S1AP TAC S1AP M-TMSI S1AP SGW-U IP Address
S1AP RAC S1AP NRI S1AP eNB-U IP Addess
S1AP TAI MCC S1AP Sector S1AP Handover Type
S1AP TAI MNC S1AP ENodeB Id
S1AP ECGI MCC S1AP RRC Establishment Cause
Table 62: S1AP parameters in Call Trace (Continued)

12.2.54SCCP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for SCCP are currently available:

SCCP GT Called SCCP NOA Called (E.164) SCCP Dest Local Ref
SCCP GT Called (E.164) SCCP NOA Calling SCCP Source Local Ref
SCCP GT Calling SCCP NP Called SCCP Return Cause
SCCP SSN Called SCCP NP Called (E.164) SCCP Release Cause
SCCP SSN Calling SCCP NP Calling SCCP Refusal Cause
SCCP PC Called SCCP TT Called SCCP Reset Cause
SCCP PC Calling SCCP TT Called (E.164) SCCP Error Cause
SCCP NOA Called SCCP TT Calling
Table 63: SCCP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.55SDP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for SDP are currently available:

SDP Audio Dest A SDP Video Dest B SDP Image Format


SDP Audio Dest B SDP Audio Codec Used
SDP Video Dest A SDP Video Codes Used
Table 64: SDP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.56SGsAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for SGsAP are currently available:

SGsAP Msg SGsAP IMSI Detach NON EPS SGsAP Service Indicator
SGsAP IMSI SGsAP IMEI(SV) SGsAP LAC
SGsAP MME Name SGsAP SGs Cause SGsAP TAC
SGsAP IMSI Detach EPS SGsAP Reject Cause SGsAP UE EMM Mode
Table 65: SGsAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.57SIGTRAN
In Call Trace, the following parameters for SIGTRAN are currently available:

IUA Interface Identifier


M2UA Interface Identifier
Table 66: SIGTRAN parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 123
Protocol Parameters

12.2.58SIP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for SIP are currently available:

SIP Method SIP P-Called-Party-ID SIP Last Dest IP


SIP From User SIP P-Charging Vector ICID SIP IMSI
SIP From Host SIP P- Charging Addresses CCF SIP P-Associated-URI User
SIP To User SIP P-Charging Addresses ECF SIP P-Preferred-Identity User
SIP To Host SIP A P-Access-Network-Info SIP Session Start Time
SIP Call Id SIP B P-Access-Network-Info SIP Session End Time
SIP Diversion User SIP Remote Party SIP Session Duration
SIP Termination Code SIP User Agent SIP Retransmission Count
SIP Termination Phrase SIP Expires SIP Country
SIP Authorization User SIP Reason Header SIP B IMSI
SIP Calling User SIP Server Header SIP B IMEI
SIP Request URI User SIP Via IP SIP B IMPI
SIP Called User SIP Contact
SIP P-Asserted-Identity SIP IMEI
Table 67: SIP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.59SMPP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for SMPP are currently available:

SMPP Source Address SMPP Source Network Type SMPP Destination Bearer Type
SMPP Source NPI SMPP Destination Address SMPP Destination Network Type
SMPP Source Type of SMPP Destination NPI SMPP Network Error Code
Number
SMPP Source Bearer Type SMPP Destination Type of SMPPP SMSC System ID
Number
Table 68: SMPP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.60SMS
In Call Trace, the following parameters for SMS are currently available:

SMS Dest Address SMS Message Type SMS TP Cause


SMS Orig Address SMS CP Cause SMS Text length
SMS Recipient Address SMS RP Cause
Table 69: SMS parameters in Call Trace

12.2.61TCAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for TCAP are currently available:

TCAP OTID/TID TCAP Error Code TCAP Application Context Name


TCAP DTID TCAP OP Code
Table 70: TCAP parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 124
Protocol Parameters

12.2.62TCAP/INAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for TCAP are currently available:

TCAP/INAP Called Number TCAP/INAP Event Type TCAP/INAP CI


TCAP/INAP Calling Number TCAP/INAP Event Details TCAP/INAP LAC
TCAP/INAP Correlation Id TCAP/INAP Redirecting TCAP/INAP Additional
Reason Calling Number
TCAP/INAP Dest Route Address TCAP/INAP IMSI TCAP/INAP Destination
Reference id
TCAP/INAP Service Key TCAP/INAP MSISDN TCAP/INAP Origination
Reference id
TCAP/INAP Called BCD Number TCAP/INAP APN TCAP/INAP Assisting
SSPIP RoutingAddress
Table 71: TCAP/INAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.63TCAP/IS-41
In Call Trace, the following parameters for IS-41 are currently available:

TCAP/IS-41 IMSI Number TCAP/IS-41 MIN TCAP/IS-41 Routing Digits


TCAP/IS-41 Billing Id TCAP/IS-41 SMS Original TCAP/IS-41 ESN
Originating Addr
TCAP/IS-41 Transaction TCAP/IS-41 SMS Original TCAP/IS-41 TLDN
Capability Destination Addr
TCAP/IS-41 Destination TCAP/IS-41 Mobile Directory
Address Number
Table 72: TCAP/IS-41 parameters in Call Trace

12.2.64TCAP/MAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for MAP are currently available:

TCAP/MAP IMSI Number TCAP/MAP MSISDN Number TCAP/MAP USSD String


TCAP/MAP TMSI Number TCAP/MAP Roaming Number TCAP/MAP USSD String length
TCAP/MAP NRI TCAP/MAP Handover Number TCAP/MAP Dialogue Abort
Cause
TCAP/MAP IMEI Number TCAP/MAP Target Cell Identity TCAP/MAP Forwarded To
Number
TCAP/MAP HLR Number TCAP/MAP Forwarding TCAP/MAP GSN Address
Reason
TCAP/MAP VLR Number TCAP/MAP Target LAC TCAP/MAP GSN Number
TCAP/MAP MSC Number TCAP/MAP Service Centre TCAP/MAP Supported Camel
Address Phase (Oldest)
Table 73: TCAP/MAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.65TUP France
In Call Trace, the following parameters for TUP France are currently available:

TUP Msg TUP A Number


TUP CIC TUP B Number
Table 74: TUP ITU parameters in Call Trace

System Description
OSIX 5.6 125
Protocol Parameters

12.2.66USSD
In Call Trace, the following parameters for USSD are currently available:

USSD String
USSD String length
Table 75: USSD parameters in Call Trace

12.2.67WAP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for WAP are currently available:

WSP URI
WSP Cause
Table 76: WAP parameters in Call Trace

12.2.68X2AP
In Call Trace, the following parameters for X2AP are currently available:

X2AP Procedure Code


Table 77: X2AP parameters in Call Trace

12.3 Protocol Analyser


The protocol parameters listed are available for searching in Protocol Analyser.

12.3.1 General
In Protocol Analyser, the following General parameters are currently available:

Row Nr Time Traffic group


Link Name Protocol Msg Size
Link Identifier Decode Error Direction
Date Transaction ID
Table 78: General parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.2 AIN
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AIN are currently available:

AIN Calling Number AIN Routing Number


AIN Called Number
Table 79: AIN parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.3 ALCAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for ALCAP are currently available:

ALCAP Msg ALCAP Dest SAI ALCAP CID


ALCAP Cause ALCAP SUGR
ALCAP Orig SAI ALCAP Aal2 Path Id
Table 80: ALCAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 126
Protocol Parameters

12.3.4 ATM
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for ATM are currently available:

ATM Path id ATM VCI


ATM VPI ATM CID
Table 81: ATM parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.5 AggData
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggData are currently available:

AggData Protocol type AggData HTTP Get Messages AggData FTP User Name
AggData User Data Bytes AggData DNS Query Name AggData FTP request First
Error Reason
AggData User Data Msgs AggData DNS Response Code AggData FTP Files Uploaded
AggData Source IP AggData DNS IP address AggData FTP Files
Downloaded
AggData Dest IP AggData MMS Message Type AggData IMAP User Name
AggData Tunnelled Source IP AggData MMS From AggData IMAP Mail Count
AggData Tunnelled Source AggData MMS To AggData IMAP First Failed
Port Command
AggData Tunnelled Dest IP AggData MMS User Agent AggData SMTP User Name
AggData Tunnelled Dest Port AggData MMS Response AggData SMTP From
Status Address
AggData Tid/Teid AggData MMS Message Size AggData SMTP To Address
AggData HTTP Url AggData MMS Content Type AggData POP3 User Name
AggData HTTP Host AggData RTSP Content Type AggData POP3 Mail Count
AggData HTTP Cause AggData RTSP Url AggData Tlli
AggData HTTP Referer AggData RTSP User Agent AggData Bvci
AggData HTTP User Agent AggData RTSP Status AggData Dlci
Table 82: AggData parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.6 AggRTP - End Point Descriptor


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - End Point Descriptor
are currently available:

AggRTP UDP Source Address AggRTP UDP Dest Address


AggRTP UDP Source Port AggRTP UDP Dest Port
Table 83: AggRTP - End Point Descriptor parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.7 AggRTP - Codec Metrics


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - Codec Metrics are
currently available:

AggRTP Vocoder Type


Table 84: AggRTP - Codec Metrics parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.8 AggRTP - Packet Transport Record


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - Packet Transport
Record are currently available:

System Description
OSIX 5.6 127
Protocol Parameters

AggRTP Packets Received AggRTP Packets Discarded AggRTP Avg. Packet Loss (%)
AggRTP Packets Lost AggRTP Packets Duplicated
Table 85: AggRTP - Packet Transport Record parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.9 AggRTP - Jitter Records (RFC 3550)


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - Jitter Records are
currently available:

AggRTP Max. PPDV (ms)


AggRTP Avg. PPDV (ms)
Table 86: AggRTP - Jitter Records parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.10AggRTP - Delay Record


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - Delay Record are
currently available:

AggRTP Avg. Round-trip Network Delay AggRTP Avg. One-way Delay


(ms) (ms)
AggRTP Max. Round-trip Network Delay AggRTP Max. One-way Delay
(ms) (ms)
Table 87: AggRTP - Delay Record parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.11AggRTP - Quality Records (G. 107)


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - Quality Records (G.
107) are currently available:

AggRTP R-LQ AggRTP MOS-LQ


AggRTP R-CQ AggRTP MOS-CQ
Table 88: AggRTP - Quality Records(G. 107) parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.12AggRTP - Degradation Metrics


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - Degradation Metrics
are currently available:

AggRTP Loss Degr. AggRTP Delay Degr. AggRTP Echo Level Degr.
AggRTP Discard Degr. AggRTP Signal Level Degr. AggRTP Recency Degr.
AggRTP CODEC Degr. AggRTP Noise Level Degr.
Table 89: AggRTP - Degradation Metrics parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.13AggRTP - End System Delay Record


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - End System Delay
Record are currently available:

AggRTP Avg. Orig. End-System Delay AggRTP Avg. Term. End-System Delay
(ms) (ms)
AggRTP Max. Orig. End-System Delay AggRTP Max. Term. End-System Delay
(ms) (ms)
Table 90: AggRTP - End System Delay Record parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 128
Protocol Parameters

12.3.14AggRTP - Voice Jitter Records (G. 1020)


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - Voice Jitter Records
(G. 1020) are currently available:

AggRTP Avg. MAPDV (ms)


AggRTP Max. MAPDV (ms)
Table 91: AggRTP - Voice Jitter Records (G. 1020) parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.15AggRTP - RTCP-XR Record


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP-XR Record are
currently available:

AggRTP RTCP-XR Loss AggRTP RTCP-XR RT Delay AggRTP RTCP-XR R-factor


Rate (%) (ms)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Discard AggRTP RTCP-XR End Sys. AggRTP RTCP-XR Ext. R-factor
Rate (%) Delay (ms)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Avg AggRTP RTCP-XR Signal lvl. AggRTP RTCP-XR MOS-LQ
Burst Density (%) (dBm)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Avg AggRTP RTCP-XR Noise lvl. AggRTP RTCP-XR MOS-CQ
Gap Density (%) (dBm)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Avg AggRTP RTCP-XR Residual AggRTP RTCP-XR RX Config
Burst Duration (ms) ERL (dB)
AggRTP RTCP-XR Avg AggRTP RTCP-XR Gap Size (#
Gap Duration (ms) of packets)
Table 92: AggRTP - RTCP-XR Record parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.16AggRTP - RTCP-SR Record


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP-SR Record are
currently available:

AggRTP RTCP-SR # of RTP AggRTP RTCP-SR # of RR


Packets Reports
AggRTP RTCP-SR # of Octets
Table 93: AggRTP - RTCP-SR Record parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.17AggRTP - RTCP-RR Record


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP-RR Record are
currently available:

AggRTP RTCP-RR Packets Lost AggRTP RTCP-RR DLSR


AggRTP RTCP-RR Inter Arrival
Jitter
Table 94: AggRTP - RTCP-RR Record parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.18AggRTP - RTCP SS/RR-based QoE Metrics


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for AggRTP - RTCP SS/RR-based
QoE Metrics are currently available:

AggRTP RTCP-SR/RR MOS-LQ


AggRTP RTCP-SR/RR MOS-CQ
Table 95: AggRTP - RTCP SS/RR-based QoE Metrics parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 129
Protocol Parameters

12.3.19BSSAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for BSSAP are currently available:

BSSAP Layer 3 Msg BSSAP LAC BSSAP Redir NPI


BSSAP PDU BSSAP CI BSSAP Redir TON
BSSAP SAPI BSSAP DTAP PD BSSAP Redir Num
BSSAP BSSMAP Cause BSSAP CIC BSSAP DTAP CC Cause
BSSAP Assignment Failure Cause BSSAP Called NPI BSSAP SS Cause type
BSSAP Handover Failure Cause BSSAP Called TON BSSAP SS Cause
BSSAP Handover Required Reject BSSAP Called Num BSSAP SS Error
Cause
BSSAP Handover Required Cause BSSAP Calling NPI BSSAP SS Comp
BSSAP BSSMAP Transport Layer BSSAP Calling TON BSSAP SS Oper
Address
BSSAP RR Cause BSSAP Calling Num BSSAP SS Problem type
BSSAP LCS Cause BSSAP Connected NPI BSSAP SS Problem code
BSSAP LCS Cause BSSAP Connected TON BSSAP MNC
BSSAP RetErr Cause BSSAP Connected Num BSSAP MCC
Table 96: BSSAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.20BSSAP+
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for BSSAP+ are currently available:

BSSAP+ Msg BSSAP+ Gs Cause BSSAP+ Cell Global ID RAC


BSSAP+ IMSI BSSAP+ Information BSSAP+ LAI LAC
Requested
BSSAP+ SGSN Number BSSAP+ MS state BSSAP+ TMSI
BSSAP+ IMSI Detach GPRS BSSAP+ Reject Cause BSSAP+ NRI
BSSAP+ IMSI Detach Non BSSAP+ Cell Global ID LAC
GPRS
Table 97: BSSAP+ parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.21Circuit - ISUP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for ISUP are currently available:

ISUP Msg ISUP Original Called Nr ISUP TMR


ISUP CIC ISUP Generic Number ISUP Route Identity
ISUP A Nr ISUP A NoA ISUP Redirection Reason
ISUP SAM Number ISUP B NoA ISUP Call Identity
ISUP B Nr ISUP Gprs/Gra Range ISUP Network Exchange Identity
ISUP Cause Value ISUP Charge Ind ISUP Cause Location
ISUP Location Nr ISUP OPC CIC ISUP Correlation id
ISUP Redirecting Nr ISUP DPC CIC
Table 98: ISUP parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 130
Protocol Parameters

12.3.22Circuit - IUP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for IUP are currently available:

IUP CIC IUP Line ID IUP Full Calling Line ID


IUP H0 IUP Reason IUP Full Calling NAI
IUP H1 IUP Line Id Type IUP CNA Reason
IUP Called Nbr IUP Line Id NAI
IUP Calling Nbr IUP Calling NAI
Table 99: IUP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.23Circuit - BICC
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for BICC are currently available:

BICC Msg BICC Location Nr BICC Charge Ind


BICC CIC BICC Redirecting Nr BICC Action indicator
BICC A Nr BICC Original Called Nr BICC TMR
BICC SAM Number BICC A NoA BICC Transport Layer Address
BICC B Nr BICC B NoA BICC Backbone Network Id
BICC Cause Value BICC Grs/Gra Range
Table 100: BICC parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.24Cisco Session Management


In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for Cisco Session Management are
currently available:

Cisco Session Management SM Message Type


Cisco Session Management Message Type
Table 101: Cisco Session Management parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.25DHCP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for DHCP are currently available:

DHCP Bootp Msg DHCP Msg DHCP Client ID


DHCP Transaction ID DHCP Subnet Mask DHCP First Router Address
DHCP Client MAC DHCP Host Name DHCP First DNS Address
DHCP Hardware Address DHCP Domain Name DHCP Relay Agent Info Type
Type
DHCP Broadcast Flag DHCP Lease Time DHCP Relay Agent Circuit ID
DHCP Client IP DHCP Server ID DHCP Relay Agent Remote ID
DHCP Your IP DHCP Renewal Time DHCP Relay Agent Subscriber ID
DHCP Relay agent IP DHCP Rebinding Time DHCP Relay First Classless Static
Route
DHCP Next Server DHCP Vendor Class
ID
Table 102: DHCP parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 131
Protocol Parameters

12.3.26DIAMETER
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for DIAMETER are currently
available:

DIAMETER Command DIAMETER Multiple Services DIAMETER SGSN MNC


Type CC Rating Group
DIAMETER Command DIAMETER Used Input Octets DIAMETER Charging rule name
Code
DIAMETER Application Id DIAMETER Used Output DIAMETER Event trigger
Octets
DIAMETER Hop By Hop DIAMETER Used Total Octets DIAMETER Priority level
DIAMETER End To End DIAMETER Trigger Type DIAMETER Preemption capability
DIAMETER Origin Host DIAMETER Framed IP DIAMETER Preemption
vulnerability
DIAMETER Origin Realm DIAMETER Called Station DIAMETER Disconnect cause
DIAMETER Destination DIAMETER SGSN IP DIAMETER MCC
Host
DIAMETER Destination DIAMETER GGSN IP DIAMETER MNC
Realm
DIAMETER Session Id DIAMETER Last Hop Dest IP DIAMETER LAC
DIAMETER IMSI DIAMETER Charging DIAMETER SAC/CI
Characteristics
DIAMETER MSISDN DIAMETER Radio Access DIAMETER IMEI(SV)
Number Type 2G/3G
DIAMETER CC Request DIAMETER ICID DIAMETER Framed IPv6 prefix
Type
DIAMETER CC Request DIAMETER User Name DIAMETER QCI
Number
DIAMETER Calling party DIAMETER Accounting DIAMETER Subscription Id
address Record Type
DIAMETER Called party DIAMETER SIP Method DIAMETER Subscription Type
address
DIAMETER Public Identity DIAMETER Cause Code DIAMETER Server assignment
type
DIAMETER Reporting DIAMATER Result Code DIAMETER ECI
Reason
DIAMETER Multiple DIAMETER Experimental
Services CC Result result code
DIAMETER Multiple DIAMETER SGSN MCC
Services CC Service Id
Table 103: DIAMETER parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.27DNS
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for DNS are currently available:

DNS ID DNS Qtype DNS Answer Count


DNS Message DNS Qclass DNS Answer Result
DNS Opcode DNS Response Code DNS Called Number
DNS Query Name DNS Answer Address DNS Enum Service Address
Table 104: DNS parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 132
Protocol Parameters

12.3.28Ethernet
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for Ethernet are currently available:

VLAN Priority VLAN Priority (Inner) Ethernet Source Mac Address


VLAN CFI VLAN CFI (Inner) Ethernet Dest Mac Address
VLAN ID VLAN ID (Inner)
Table 105: Ethernet parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.29GPRS Gb
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for GPRS Gb are currently available:

Frame Relay Gb DLCI BSSGP MCC LLC SAPI


NS PDU BSSGP MNC LLC LFN
NS BVCI BSSGP LAC SNDCP More Segments
NS Cause BSSGP RAC SNDCP Segment Number
BSSGP PDU BSSGP CI SNDCP First Segment
BSSGP BVCI BSSGP TLLI SNDCP PDU Type
BSSGP Cause BSSGP TMSI SNDCP NPDU
BSSGP Radio Cause BSSGP NRI SNDCP DCOMP
BSSGP IMSI LLC PD SNDCP PCOMP
Table 106: GPRS GB parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.30GRE
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for GRE are currently available:

GRE Version GRE Payload size GRE Seq Number


GRE Protocol Type GRE Call Id GRE Ack Number
Table 107: GRE parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.31GTP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for GTP are currently available:

GTP Message GTP Sequence Number GTP CI


GTP Version GTP IMEI(SV) GTP ECI
GTP IMSI GTP RADIO MCC GTP Radio Access Technology
GTP MSISDN GTP RADIO MNC GTP STN-SR Address
GTP End User Address GTP RADIO LAC GTP MME CP Address
GTP End User Address IPv6 GTP CORE MCC GTP MSC CP Address
GTP Access Point Name GTP CORE MNC GTP RNC Id
GTP Cause GTP CORE LAC GTP Target CI
GTP TEID GTP TAC GTP SRVCC Cause
GTP TEID Data 1 GTP DTI GTP PDP/PDN Type
GTP TEID Control Plane GTP NSAPI GTP DL MBR
GTP F-TEID GTP EBI GTP DL GBR
GTP Tunnel Source IP GTP RAN address for user GTP UL MBR
traffic
GTP Tunnel Dest IP GTP RAC GTP UL GBR
GTP Tunnel Protocol GTP SAC
Table 108: GTP parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 133
Protocol Parameters

12.3.32H.323
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for H.323 are currently available:

H.323 Message Type H.323 Called Type of Number H.323 Source Address Text
H.323 Display H.323 Cause Value H.323 Destination Address
Number
H.323 Calling Party Number H.323 RAS Msg H.323 Destination Address Text
H.323 Called Party Number H.323 Req Seq Number H.323 Call Identifier GUID
H.323 Calling Type of H.323 Source Address H.323 H245 Message Type
Number Number
Table 109: H.323 parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.33HTTP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for HTTP are currently available:

HTTP Method HTTP Reason Phrase HTTP Host


HTTP Status Code HTTP Request URI HTTP Content Length
Table 110: HTTP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.34ICMP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for ICMP are currently available:

ICMP Msg Type ICMP Identifier ICMP Transport Src Port


ICMP Code ICMP Seq Number ICMP Transport Dest Port
Table 111: ICMP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.35IP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for IP are currently available:

IP Source Address IP Protocol IPIP Dest Address


IP Dest Address IPIP Source Address
Table 112: IP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.36ISDN
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for ISDN are currently available:

LAPD N(S) ISDN CR Flag ISDN Calling TypeOfNum


LAPD N(R) ISDN Message Type ISDN Cause Value
LAPD SAPI ISDN Called Party Number ISDN Channel number
LAPD Msg ISDN Calling Party Number ISDN Information transfer
capability
ISDN Protocol ISDN Display
Discriminator
ISDN Call Reference ISDN Called TypeOfNum
Table 113: ISDN parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 134
Protocol Parameters

12.3.37ISDN SS
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for ISDN SS are currently available:

ISDN SS Called Number


ISDN SS Calling Number
Table 114: ISDN SS parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.38LCSAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for LCSAP are currently available:

LCSAP Correlation ID LCSAP MCC LCSAP Sector ID


LCSAP Procedure Code LCSAP Cell Identity LCSAP IMSI
LCSAP Message Type Name LCSAP LCS Cause
LCSAP MNC LCSAP eNB ID
Table 115: LCSAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.39LDAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for LDAP are currently available:

LDAP Msg LDAP Result Code. LDAP AV Status


LDAP Msg ID LDAP IMPI LDAP PC Status
LDAP IMSI LDAP IMPU LDAP PC Week Schedule
LDAP MSISDN LDAP Assoc Id LDAP DN dc
LDAP SGSN Number LDAP Policy id LDAP DN ou
LDAP SGSN Address LDAP Market Code id LDAP DN cn
LDAP VLR Number LDAP TOA Status LDAP DN Serv
LDAP MSC Number LDAP TOA Level LDAP DN mscId
Table 116: LDAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.40LPPA
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for LPPA are currently available:

LPPA Procedure Code LPPA Cell Portion Id LPPA E-UTRAN Cell Id


LPPA Message Type LPPA MCC LPPA TAC
LPPA Transaction Id LPPA MNC LPPA Cause
Table 117: LPPA parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.41MEGACO
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for MEGACO are currently available:

MEGACO Version MEGACO Termination ID MEGACO Calling Number


MEGACO Transaction MEGACO Transport Layer MEGACO MId
Address
MEGACO Transaction Id MEGACO BIR SUGR MEGACO Audio Dest Local
MEGACO Context Id MEGACO Trace Id MEGACO Audio Dest Remote
MEGACO Error Code MEGACO IMSI MEGACO Stream Mode
MEGACO Command MEGACO Observed Event MEGACO Signal Name
Table 118: MEGACO parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 135
Protocol Parameters

12.3.42MGCP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for MGCP are currently available:

MGCP Verb MGCP Response String MGCP Observed Events


MGCP Transaction Id MGCP Local Connection MGCP Signal Requests
Options
MGCP Endpoint Name MGCP Connection Parameters MGCP Caller Id
MGCP Response Code MGCP Call Id
Table 119: MGCP parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 136
Protocol Parameters

12.3.43MM/SM
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for MM/SM are currently available:

MM/SM Msg MM/SM LAC MM/SM NSAPI


MM/SM Security header type MM/SM RAC MM/SM MME Group Id
MM/SM Access Point Name MM/SM TAC MM/SM MME Code
MM/SM Mobile IP Address MM/SM CI MM/SM Deciphered
MM/SM IMSI MM/SM MM Cause MM/SM KSI
MM/SM TMSI MM/SM SM Cause MM/SM QCI
MM/SM NRI MM/SM Reject Cause MM/SM ESM Msg
MM/SM M-TMSI MM/SM CC Cause MM/SM Traffic Handling
Priority
MM/SM IMEI MM/SM Protocol MM/SM Location Update
Discriminator Type
MM/SM IMEISV MM/SM Service Type MM/SM EPS Update Type
MM/SM MCC MM/SM Other Rate Adaption MM/SM Voice Domain
Preference
MM/SM MNC MM/SM Ciphering Algorithm
Table 120: MM/SM parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.44MMS
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for MMS are currently available:

MMS Msg Type MMS Transaction Id MMS From


MMS Msg MMS Response Status MMS To
Table 121: MMS parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.45MTP2
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for MTP2 are currently available:

MTP2 Msg
MTP2 Link Status
Table 122: MTP2 parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.46MTP3/M3UA
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for MTP3/M3UA are currently
available:

MTP3/M3UA SI MTP3/M3UA OPC NI MTP3/M3UA SLS


MTP3/M3UA OPC MTP3/M3UA DPC NI MTP3/M3UA SLC
MTP3/M3UA DPC MTP3/M3UA NI MTP3/M3UA Msg
Table 123: MTP3/M3UA parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.47Multimedia
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for Multimedia are currently
available:

Multimedia Control Msg


Table 124: Multimedia parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 137
Protocol Parameters

12.3.48NBAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for NBAP are currently available:

NBAP Msg NBAP DL Channel Code NBAP Radio Link Id


Number
NBAP Message Name NBAP CRNC Communication NBAP Cause
Context Id
NBAP Procedure Code NBAP NodeB Communication NBAP DCH Port
Context Id
NBAP Transaction ID NBAP Cell Id
NBAP UL Scrambling Code NBAP Binding ID
Table 125: NBAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.49PCAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for PCAP are currently available:

PCAP Transaction Id PCAP Message Type Name PCAP RNC ID


PCAP Procedure Code PCAP Request Type Event PCAP Cell ID
PCAP Message Type PCAP Positioning Method PCAP Cause
Table 126: PCAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.50QSAAL
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for QSAAL are currently available:

QSAAL SSCOP Msg QSAAL N(MR) QSAAL N(S)


QSAAL N(PS) QSAAL N(R) QSAAL N(SQ)
Table 127: QSAAL parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.51RADIUS
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for RADIUS are currently available:

RADIUS Packet Type RADIUS Calling User RADIUS ERX Secondary DNS
RADIUS Identifier RADIUS Called User RADIUS ERX Virtual Router
Name
RADIUS Length RADIUS IMSI RADIUS NAS Identifier
RADIUS Accounting Session RADIUS Connect Info RADIUS NAS Port ID
ID
RADIUS Accounting Status RADIUS ERX Ingress Policy RADIUS User name
Name
RADIUS Framed IP Address RADIUS ERX Primary DNS
Table 128: RADIUS parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.52RANAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for RANAP are currently available:

RANAP Msg RANAP Cause RANAP NRI


RANAP Message Name RANAP Called Number RANAP Reject Cause Value
RANAP Procedure Code RANAP Calling Number RANAP Global RNC ID
RANAP PNAS IMSI RANAP MCC RANAP Relocation Type
RANAP LAI LAC RANAP MNC RANAP Target Cell ID
Table 129: RANAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 138
Protocol Parameters

RANAP SAI LAC RANAP Binding ID RANAP RNC ID


RANAP SAC RANAP GTP TEI RANAP Cell ID
RANAP RAC RANAP Domain Indicator RANAP CN ID
RANAP Transport Layer RANAP TMSI
Address
Table 129: RANAP parameters in Protocol Analyser (Continued)

12.3.53RNSAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for RNSAP are currently available:

RNSAP Msg RNSAP SAC RNSAP MCC


RNSAP Message Name RNSAP UL Scrambling Code RNSAP MNC
RNSAP Procedure Code RNSAP Binding ID RNSAP ARP
RNSAP IMSI RNSAP Cell RNSAP RL
RNSAP LAC RNSAP RNC RNSAP Logical Channel
RNSAP RAC RNSAP IMEI
Table 130: RNSAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.54RTCP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for RTCP are currently available:

RTCP Packet Type


Table 131: RTCP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.55RTP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for RTP are currently available:

RTP Payload Type RTP Seq


RTP SSRC RTP Timestamp
Table 132: RTP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.56RTSP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for RTSP are currently available:

RTSP Method RTSP Session Id RTSP User Agent


RTSP Status Code RTSP Url RTSP Server
RTSP Reason Phrase RTSP CSEQ Value RTSP Media Type
RTSP Version RTSP Authorization User
Table 133: RTSP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.57RUDP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for RUDP are currently available:

RUDP Segment Type


Table 134: RUDP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.58S1AP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for S1AP are currently available:

System Description
OSIX 5.6 139
Protocol Parameters

S1AP Msg S1AP RAC S1AP NRI


S1AP EMM Message S1AP TAI MCC S1AP Sector
S1AP Procedure Code S1AP TAI MNC S1AP ENodeB Id
S1AP eNB UE S1AP ID S1AP ECGI MCC S1AP Cause
S1AP MME UE S1AP ID S1AP ECGI MNC S1AP SGW-U IP Address
S1AP IMSI S1AP Cell Identity S1AP eNB-U IP Address
S1AP LAC S1AP MME Code S1AP Handover Type
S1AP TAC S1AP M-TMSI
Table 135: S1AP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.59SCCP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for SCCP are currently available:

SCCP Msg SCCP NOA Calling SCCP Refusal Cause


SCCP Class SCCP NP Called SCCP Reset Cause
SCCP GT Called SCCP NP Calling SCCP Error Cause
SCCP GT Calling SCCP TT Called SCCP Calling Party Routing
Information
SCCP SSN Called SCCP TT Calling SCCP Called Party Routing
Information
SCCP SSN Calling SCCP Dest Local Ref SCCP Message Type
SCCP PC Called SCCP Source Local Ref SCMG Affected Point Code
SCCP PC Calling SCCP Return Cause
SCCP NOA Called SCCP Release Cause
Table 136: SCCP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.60SDP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for SDP are currently available:

SDP Media Address SDP Origin Username


SDP Media Port SDP Media Format
Table 137: SDP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.61SGsAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for SGsAP are currently available:

SGsAP Msg SGsAP IMSI Detach Non EPS SGsAP Service Indicator
SGsAP IMSI SGsAP IMEI(SV) SGsAP LAC
SGsAP MME Name SGsAP SGs Cause SGsAP TAC
SGsAP IMSI Detach EPS SGsAP Reject Cause SGsAP UE EMM Mode
Table 138: SGsAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.62SIGTRAN
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for SIGTRAN are currently available:

SCTP Source Port M3UA Message Class M2PA Message Class


SCTP Dest Port M3UA Affected Point Codes M2UA Message Type
SCTP Chunk Type IUA Message Type M2UA Message Class
Table 139: SIGTRAN parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 140
Protocol Parameters

SCTP Initiate Tag IUA Message Class M2UA Interface Identifier


SCTP Verification Tag IUA Interface Identifier
M3UA Message Type M2PA Message Type
Table 139: SIGTRAN parameters in Protocol Analyser (Continued)

System Description
OSIX 5.6 141
Protocol Parameters

12.3.63SIP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for SIP are currently available:

SIP Method SIP CSeq Method SIP Expires


SIP Status Code SIP Authorization User SIP Reason Header
SIP Reason Phrase SIP Request URI User SIP Server Header
SIP Media Type SIP P-Asserted-Identity SIP Via IP
SIP From User SIP P-Called-Party-ID SIP Contact
SIP From Host SIP P-Charging Vector ICID SIP IMEI
SIP To User SIP P-Charging Addresses CCF SIP IMSI
SIP To Host SIP P-Charging Addresses ECF SIP P-Associated-URI User
SIP Call Id SIP P-Access-Network-Info SIP P-Preferred-Identity User
SIP Diversion User SIP Remote Party SIP Country
SIP CSeq Number SIP User Agent
Table 140: SIP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.64SMPP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for SMPP are currently available:

SMPP Message Type SMPP Source Type of SMPP Destination Type of


Number Number
SMPP Command Status SMPP Source Bearer Type SMPP Destination Bearer Type
SMPP Message State SMPP Source Network Type SMPP Destination Network Type
SMPP Source Address SMPP Destination Address SMPP Network Error Code
SMPP Source NPI SMPP Destination NPI SMPP SMSC System ID
Table 141: SMPP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.65SMS
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for SMS are currently available:

SMS Dest. Address SMS Dest NPI SMS RP Msg


SMS Orig. Address SMS Dest TON SMS RP Cause
SMS Recipient Address SMS Dest Addr SMS TP Cause
SMS Orig NPI SMS Message Type SMS Text length
SMS Orig TON SMS CP Msg
SMS Orig Addr SMS CP Cause
Table 142: SMS parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.66TAXUP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for TAXUP are currently available:

TAXUP Logical Channel TAXUP P(s) TAXUP Charging Header Code


TAXUP Type TAXUP P(r)
Table 143: TAXUP parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 142
Protocol Parameters

12.3.67TCAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for TCAP are currently available:

TCAP Msg TCAP Error Code TCAP Application Context Name


TCAP OTID/TID TCAP Invoke Id
TCAP DTID TCAP OP Code
Table 144: TCAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.68TCAP/INAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for TCAP/INAP are currently
available:

TCAP/INAP Called Number TCAP/INAP Called BCD Number TCAP/INAP MSISDN


TCAP/INAP Calling TCAP/INAP Event Type TCAP/INAP APN
Number
TCAP/INAP Correlation id TCAP/INAP Event Details TCAP/INAP Additional Calling
Number
TCAP/INAP Dest Route TCAP/INAP Redirecting Reason TCAP/INAP Assisting SSPIP
Address RoutingAddress
TCAP/INAP Service Key TCAP/INAP IMSI
Table 145: TCAP/INAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.69TCAP/IS-41
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for IS-41 are currently available:

TCAP/IS-41 IMSI Number TCAP/IS-41 Calling Party TCAP/IS-41 Mobile Directory


Number String 2 Number
TCAP/IS-41 Action Code TCAP/IS-41 Cancellation Type TCAP/IS-41 Routing Digits
TCAP/IS-41 Alert Result TCAP/IS-41 Transaction TCAP/IS-41 ESN
Capability
TCAP/IS-41 Billing Id TCAP/IS-41 Destination Address TCAP/IS-41 Target Cell Id
TCAP/IS-41 Calling Party TCAPIS-41 MIN TCAP/IS-41 Serving Cell Id
Number Digits 1
TCAP/IS-41 Calling Party TCAP/IS-41 SMS Original
Number Digits 2 Originating Addr
TCAP/IS-41 Calling Party TCAP/IS-41 SMS Original
Number String 1 Destination Addr
Table 146: IS-41 parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 143
Protocol Parameters

12.3.70TCAP/MAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for MAP are currently available:

TCAP/MAP IMSI Number TCAP/MAP MSISDN Number TCAP/MAP USSD String


TCAP/MAP TMSI Number TCAP/MAP Roaming Number TCAP/MAP String length
TCAP/MAP NRI TCAP/MAP Handover Number TCAP/MAP Dialogue Abort
Cause
TCAP/MAP IMEI Number TCAP/MAP Target Cell Identity TCAP/MAP Forwarded To
Number
TCAP/MAP HLR Number TCAP/MAP Forwarding TCAP/MAP GSN Address
Reason
TCAP/MAP VLR Number TCAP/MAP Target LAC TCAP/MAP GSN Number
TCAP/MAP MSC Number TCAP/MAP Service Centre TCAP/MAP Supported Camel
Address Phase (oldest)
Table 147: MAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.71TCP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for TCP are currently available:

TCP Source Port TCP Seq Number TCP Control Bits


TCP Dest Port TCP Ack Number
Table 148: TCP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.72TUP FRANCE
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for TUP France are currently
available:

TUP Msg TUP A Number


TUP CIC TUP B Number
Table 149: TUP France parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.73UDP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for UDP are currently available:

UDP Source Port


UDP Dest Port
Table 150: UDP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.74USSD
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for USSD are currently available:

USSD String
USSD String length
Table 151: USSD parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 144
Protocol Parameters

12.3.75WAP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for WAP are currently available:

WSP URI WTP TID WTP Concatenated PDU


WSP Cause WTP GTR TTR WTP Transaction Class
WSP PDU Type WTP Packet Seq Number
WTP Retransmission WTP PDU
Indicator
Table 152: WAP parameters in Protocol Analyser

12.3.76X2AP
In Protocol Analyser, the following parameters for X2AP are currently available:

X2AP Msg X2AP Procedure Code


X2AP Message Name
Table 153: X2AP parameters in Protocol Analyser

System Description
OSIX 5.6 145
SOS columns

13 SOS columns
The division in this chapter is based on top level protocols, and the
parameters correspond to the information you get in CSE/MSE.
These parameters can be used for server-side filtering in historical
searches. The parameters marked as index are faster when performing
historical searches.
The following tables show the parameters with CSE/MSE support for each
protocol, including which that are indexed.

13.1 SOS columns - CSE


13.1.1 ALL
Parameter name Key
Timestamp
Duration (only for ended calls)
Transaction ID
Table 154: Columns for all protocols

13.1.2 AIN
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Operation Code
Error Code
Calling Number
Called Number
Routing Number
Table 155: SOS columns for AIN

13.1.3 ALCAP
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Cause Value
Originating Signalling Association
Identifier
Destination Signalling Association
Identifier
Served User Generated Reference
Table 156: SOS columns for ALCAP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 146
SOS columns

13.1.4 BICC
Parameter name Key
Calling Party Number index
Called Party Number index
Call Instance Code
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Cause Value
Address Complete Timestamp
Answer Timestamp
Release Timestamp
Calling Nature Of Address Indicator
Called Nature Of Address Indicator
Redirecting Number
Backbone Network Connection Identifier
SDP Identifier A
SDP Identifier B
Table 157: SOS columns for BICC

13.1.5 BSSAP
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
Called Number index
Calling Number index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
and Software Version number
SMS Destination Address
SMS Recipient Address
SMS Originating Address
Answer Time
Release Time
Cell Identity index
MM SM Message
MM SM Location Area Code
Incoming Handover Command Data
Outgoing Handover Command Data
MM Cause index
CC Cause
Table 158: SOS columns for BSSAP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 147
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


Reject Cause
Location Area Code
Table 158: SOS columns for BSSAP (Continued)

13.1.6 BSSAP+ (GSM09_18)


Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
IMSI detach from GPRS service type
IMSI detach from non-GPRS service type
GS Cause index
Message Type
Routing Area Code
Location Area Code
Table 159: SOS columns for BSSAP+ (GSM09_18)

13.1.7 DHCP
Parameter name Key
Transaction ID index
Client (your) IP address index
Client hardware address index
Subnet Mask
Router Address
Domain Name System Address
Host Name
Domain Name
Lease Time
Server Identifier
Renewal Time
Rebinding Time
Vendor Class Identifier
Client Identifier
Relay Agent Info Type
Relay Agent Circuit Identifier
Relay Agent Remote Identifier
Relay Agent Subscriber Identity
Table 160: SOS columns for DHCP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 148
SOS columns

13.1.8 Diameter (RFC3588)


Parameter name Key
Reloaded
Link Id
Source IP Address
Destination IP Address
Framed IP Address AVP
Command Code
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
Calling Party Number index
Called Party Number index
Cause Code Value index
IMS Charging Identifier
Cause Code
Max Response Time
Result Code
Latency
Username
Public Identity
Session ID
Table 161: SOS columns for Diameter (RFC3588)

13.1.9 DNS (RFC1035)


Parameter name Key
Source IP Address
Destination IP Address
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
Called Number
Table 162: SOS columns for DNS (RFC1035)

13.1.10GPRGB
Parameter name Key
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
Access Point Name
MM Cause index
SM Cause index
MM SM Message
MM SM Location Area Code
Location Area Code
Routing Area Code
Cell Identity index
Mobile IP Address index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
Table 163: SOS columns for GPRSGB

System Description
OSIX 5.6 149
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


International Mobile Equipment Identity index
and Software Version number
BSSGP Virtual Connection Identifier index
Reject Cause
Table 163: SOS columns for GPRSGB (Continued)

13.1.11GTP
Parameter name Key
Reloaded Call
Link Id
GTP Message
Access Point Name
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
International Mobile Equipment Identity and index
Software Version number
End User Address index
End User Address IPv6
Cause index
Source Address
Destination Address
Tunneled Source IP
Tunneled Dest IP
Radio Access Technology
Routing Area Code
Tracking Area Code
Service Area Code
Cell Identity
E-UTRAN Cell Identity (ECI)
STN SR Address
MME CP Address
MSC CP Address
RNC ID
Target Cell Identity
SRVCC Cause
Table 164: SOS columns for GTP

13.1.12H225
Parameter name Key
Calling Party number index
Called Party number index
Display
Source Address Number
Source Address Text
Destination Address Number
Table 165: SOS columns for H225

System Description
OSIX 5.6 150
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


Destination Address Text
Cause Value
Table 165: SOS columns for H225 (Continued)

13.1.13HTTP
Parameter name Key
Source IP Address
Destination IP Address
Requested Uniform Resource Identifier
Table 166: SOS columns for HTTP

13.1.14INAP (TCAP/INAP Ericsson CS1+ B)


Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Operation Code index
Error Code
Destination Routing Address index
Calling Number index
Correlation ID Number
Called Number index
Called BCD Number index
SSP IP Routing Address
Additional Calling Number
International Mobile Subscriber Identity
Cell Identity
Location Area Code
Origination Reference
Destination Reference
Table 167: SOS columns for INAP

13.1.15IS-41
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Table 168: SOS columns for IS-41

System Description
OSIX 5.6 151
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Operation Code
Error Code
Temporary Local Directory Number
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
Table 168: SOS columns for IS-41 (Continued)

13.1.16ISAKMP (RFC7296IKEv2bis)
Parameter name Key
Source Address
Destination Address
Initiator SPI index
Responder SPI index
Exchange Type
Table 169: SOS columns for ISAKMP

13.1.17ISDN
Parameter name Key
Calling Party Number index
Called Party Number index
Cause Value
IUA Interface Identifier
IUA Source IP Address
IUA Destination IP Address
Table 170: SOS columns for ISDN

13.1.18ISDN SS (ISDN_SS_SCCP)
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Operation Code index
Calling Number index
Called Number index
Table 171: SOS columns for ISDN_SS_SCCP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 152
SOS columns

13.1.19ISUP (ISUP93ver2ET97)
Parameter name Key
A Number index
B Number index
Circuit Identification Code
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Release Originating Point Code
TX MED RQ
Network Indicator
Cause Value
Cause Location
Address Complete Time
Answer Time
Release Time
A Nature Of Address Indicator
B Nature Of Address Indicator
Redirecting Number
Original Called Number index
Generic Number
Correlation ID
Table 172: SOS columns for ISUP

13.1.20IUP
Parameter name Key
A Number index
B Number index
Line Identity Type
Circuit Identification Code
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Cause Value
Connection Not Admitted Reason
ANS Time
Answer Time
Release Time
A Nature of Address Indicator
Full Calling Line
Full Calling Nature of Address Indicator
Table 173: SOS columns for IUP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 153
SOS columns

13.1.21LDAP
Parameter Name Key
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
Result Code index
Table 174: SOS columns for LDAP

13.1.22MAP (TCAP/MAP)
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Operation Code index
Error Code
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
Roaming Number
MSC Number
GMSC Address
SMS Destination Address
SMS Recipient Address
SMS Originating Address
Incoming Handover Command Data
Outgoing Handover Command Data
Handover Number
Cell Identity
Location Area Code
International Mobile Equipment Identity
Table 175: SOS columns for MAP

13.1.23MEGACO (Megaco Binary/Text)


Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Transaction ID
Context ID
Error Code
Command
Termination ID
Table 176: SOS columns for MEGACO

System Description
OSIX 5.6 154
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


Second Termination ID
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
Source IP Address
Destination IP Address
Called Number
Calling Number
GW MID
GW Controller MID
BIR SUGR
Process Sequence Number
SDP Identifier A
SDP Identifier B
Table 176: SOS columns for MEGACO (Continued)

13.1.24MGCP
Parameter name Key
Verb
Transaction ID
Endpoint Name index
Response Code
Caller ID
Called Number
SDP Identifier A
SDP Identifier B
Source Address
Destination Address
Table 177: SOS columns for MGCP

13.1.25NBAP
Parameter name Key
Procedure Code
Binding ID
Uplink Scrambling Code
Table 178: SOS columns for NBAP

13.1.26Radius (RFC2865Radius)
Parameter name Key
Source Address
Destination Address
Identifier
Framed IP Address
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
Table 179: SOS columns for Radius

System Description
OSIX 5.6 155
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


Calling Station index
Called Station index
Table 179: SOS columns for Radius (Continued)

13.1.27RANAP
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Cause
Access Point Name
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
Called Number index
Calling Number index
Binding ID
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
and Software Version number
SMS Destination Address
SMS Recipient Address
SMS Originating Address
Mobile IP Address index
MM SM Message
MM SM Location Area Code
Service Area Code
Location Area Code
Routing Area Code
MM Cause index
SM Cause index
CC Cause
Reject Cause
Global RNC
Handover Command Data
Table 180: SOS columns for RANAP

13.1.28RNSAP
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Procedure Code
Table 181: SOS columns for RNSAP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 156
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
International Mobile Equipment Identity
RNC ID index
Routing Area Code
Location Area Code
Service Area Code
Binding ID
UL Scrambling
Table 181: SOS columns for RNSAP (Continued)

13.1.29RRC
Parameter name Key
Channel ID
Establishment Cause
Uplink Scrambling Code
International Mobile Subscriber Identity
Location Area Code
MM SM Location Area Code
Table 182: SOS columns for RRC

13.1.30RTSP
Parameter name Key
Method
Session ID index
Media Address index
Media Port index
Tunnel Start Time
Tunnel Process Sequence Number
Table 183: SOS columns for RTSP

13.1.31S1AP
Parameter name Key
IMSI index
MTMSI
LAC
RAC
TAC
MCC
MNC
MMEC
CID
APN
Mobile IP Address
MM SM Message
Table 184: SOS columns for S1AP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 157
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


MM Cause
SM Cause
MM SM Location Area Code
Source Address
Destination Address
SMS Destination
SMS Recipient
SMS Originating
S1AP Procedure Code
S1AP Cause
ECGI MCC
ECGI MNC
Table 184: SOS columns for S1AP (Continued)

13.1.32SGsAP
Parameter name Key
SGsAP Message Type
IMSI index
SGsAP MME Name
IMSI detach from EPS service type
IMSI detach from non-EPS service type
SGsAP Cause index
SGsAP Reject Cause
SGsAP UE EMM Mode
Table 185: SOS columns for S1AP

13.1.33SIP
Parameter name Key
Method
From User index
To User index
Call ID index
Diversion User index
Termination Code
Authorization index
Calling User
Called User
Source Address
Destination Address
SDP Audio Dest A
SDP Audio Dest B
P Charging Vector ICID
Tunnel Start Time
Tunnel Process Sequence Number
Contact
Table 186: SOS columns for SIP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 158
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


IMSI
P Associated URI User
Table 186: SOS columns for SIP (Continued)

13.1.34SIP_PSTN (SIP+PSTN)
Parameter name Key
Method
From User
To User
Call ID
Diversion User
Termination Code
Authorization
Calling User
Called User
Source Address
Destination Address
SDP Audio Dest A
SDP Audio Dest B
P-Charging Vector ICID
Tunnel Start Time
Tunnel Process Sequence Number
Contact
IMSI
P Associated URI User
Transfer Capability
Transfer Mode
Layer 1 Protocol
High Layer Characteristics
Location
Table 187: SOS columns for SIP_PSTN

13.1.35SIP_T
Parameter name Key
Method
From User
To User
Call ID
Diversion User
Termination Code
Authorization
Calling User
Called User
Source Address
Destination Address
Table 188: SOS columns for SIP_T

System Description
OSIX 5.6 159
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


SDP Audio Dest A
SDP Audio Dest B
P-Charging Vector ICID
A Number
B Number
Cause Value
A Nature of Address
B Nature of Address
Redirecting Number
Original Called Number
Table 188: SOS columns for SIP_T (Continued)

13.1.36SMPP
Parameter name Key
SRC IP Address
Destination IP Address
SRC Address index
Destination Address index
Network Error
SMSC ID index
Table 189: SOS columns for SMPP

13.1.37WSP
Parameter name Key
Source Address
Destination Address
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
Table 190: SOS columns for WSP

13.2 SOS columns - MSE


13.2.1 All
Parameter name Key
Timestamp
Transaction ID
Link ID
Decode Error
Table 191: Columns for all protocols

13.2.2 Unknown
Parameter name Key
Link ID
Table 192: Columns for unknown protocols

System Description
OSIX 5.6 160
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


Decode Error
Protocol
Table 192: Columns for unknown protocols (Continued)

13.2.3 AggData
Parameter name Key
Type
Source Address
Destination Address
TLLI
BVCI
Table 193: Columns for AggData

13.2.4 BSSAP
Parameter name Key
Chunk Type
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Source Local Reference
Destination Local Reference
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
Called Number index
Calling Number index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
and Software Version number
SMS Destination Address
SMS Recipient Address
SMS Originating Address
Cell Identity index
MM SM Message
MM Cause index
CC Cause
Reject Cause
Local Area Code
Table 194: SOS columns for BSSAP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 161
SOS columns

13.2.5 DIAMETER (RFC3588Diameter)


Parameter name Key
Source Address
Destination Address
Framed IP Address
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
Calling Party Number index
Called Party Number index
Cause Code index
IMS Charging Identifier
Result Code
Latency
Table 195: SOS columns for DIAMETER

13.2.6 GPRSGB
Parameter name Key
TLLI index
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
Access Point Name
MM Cause index
SM Cause index
MM SM Message
Location Area Code
Routing Area Code
Cell Identity index
Mobile IP Address index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
and Software Version number
BSSGP Virtual Connection Identifier index
Reject Cause
Table 196: SOS columns for GPRSGB

13.2.7 GTP
Parameter name Key
GTP Message
Version
Access Point Name
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
End User Address index
End User Address IPv6 Address
Cause Value index
Source Address
Table 197: SOS columns for GTP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 162
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


Destination Address
Tunnel Process Sequence Number
International Mobile Equipment Identity and index
Software Version number
E-UTRAN Cell Identity (ECI)
Radio Access Technology Type
Routing Area Code
Service Area Code
Cell Identity
NSAPI
TEID
TEID CP
TEID Data
Sequence Number
STN SR Address
MME CP Address
MSC CP Address
RNC ID
Target ID
SRVCC Cause
Table 197: SOS columns for GTP (Continued)

13.2.8 ISAKMP (RFC7296IKEv2bis)


Parameter name Key
Source Address
Destination Address
Initiator SPI index
Responder SPI index
Message ID
Exchange Type
Table 198: SOS columns for ISAKMP

13.2.9 ISUP (ISUP93ver2ET97)


Parameter name Key
Chunk Type
A Number index
B Number index
Circuit Identification Code
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Release Originating Point Code
TX MED RQ
Network Indicator
Cause Value
Cause Location
Table 199: SOS columns for ISUP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 163
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


A Nature Of Address Indicator
B Nature Of Address Indicator
Redirecting Number
Original Called Number index
Generic Number
Correlation ID
Table 199: SOS columns for ISUP (Continued)

13.2.10RANAP
Parameter name Key
Chunk Type
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Source Local Reference
Destination Local Reference
Cause
Access Point Name
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
Called Number index
Calling Number index
Binding ID
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
International Mobile Equipment Identity index
and Software Version number
SMS Destination Address
SMS Recipient Address
SMS Originating Address
Mobile IP Address index
MM SM Message
Service Area Code
Location Area Code
Routing Area Code
MM Cause index
SM Cause index
CC Cause
Reject Cause
Global RNC
Handover Command Data
Table 200: SOS columns for RANAP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 164
SOS columns

13.2.11RNSAP
Parameter name Key
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Source Local Ref
Destination Local Ref
Procedure Code
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
International Mobile Equipment Identity
RNC ID index
Routing Area Code
Location Area Code
Service Area Code
Binding ID
UL Scrambling
Table 201: SOS columns for RNSAP

13.2.12SCCP
Parameter name Key
Chunk Type
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Source Local Reference
Destination Local Reference
Table 202: SOS columns for SCCP

13.2.13SMPP (SMPP v.3.4)


Parameter name Key


Message Type index
Command Status
Message State
Source Address index
Destination Address index
Table 203: SOS columns for SMPP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 165
SOS columns

Parameter name Key


Network Error
SMSC ID index
Table 203: SOS columns for SMPP (Continued)

13.2.14TCAP

Parameter name Key


Chunk Type
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Source Local Reference
Destination Local Reference
Table 204: SOS columns for TCAP

13.2.15INAP (TCAP/INAP Ericsson CS1+ B)


Parameter name Key
Chunk Type
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Source Local Reference
Destination Local Reference
OTID
DTID
Operation Code index
Error Code
Destination Route Address index
Calling Number index
Correlation ID Number
Called Number index
Called BCD Number index
SSPIP Routing Address
Additional Calling Number
International Mobile Subscriber Identity
Table 205: SOS columns for TCAP/INAP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 166
SOS columns

13.2.16MAP (TCAP/MAP)
Parameter name Key
Chunk Type
Originating Point Code
Destination Point Code
Network Indicator
Calling Subsystem Number
Called Subsystem Number
Calling Global Title
Called Global Title
Called Global Title E164
Source Local Reference
Destination Local Reference
OTID
DTID
Operation Code index
Error Code
International Mobile Subscriber Identity index
MS International PSTN/ISDN Number index
Roaming Number
MSC Number
GMSC Address
SMS Destination Address
SMS Recipient Address
SMS Originating Address
International Mobile Equipment Identity
Table 206: SOS columns for TCAP/MAP

System Description
OSIX 5.6 167