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Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance Unit Outline ECON1000 Introductory Economics Semester 1,

Unit Outline

ECON1000 Introductory Economics Semester 1, 2018

Unit study package code:

ECON1000

Mode of study:

Internal

Tuition pattern summary:

Note: For any specific variations to this tuition pattern and for precise information refer to the Learning Activities section.

Lecture: 1 x 2 Hours Weekly Tutorial: 1 x 1 Hours Weekly

This unit does not have a fieldwork component.

Credit Value:

25.0

Pre-requisite units:

Nil

Co-requisite units:

Nil

Anti-requisite units:

Nil

Result type:

Grade/Mark

Approved incidental fees:

Information about approved incidental fees can be obtained from our website. Visit fees.curtin.edu.au/incidental_fees.cfm for details.

Unit coordinator:

Title:

Dr

Name:

Andrew Brennan

Phone:

+618 9266 2868

Email:

Andrew.Brennan@curtin.edu.au

Location:

Building: 408 - Room: 3008

Teaching Staff:

Name:

Selvin Thanacoody

Phone:

Email:

. Selvin.Thanacoody@curtin.edu.au

Location:

Building: CTI - Room: .

Name:

Sanju Naraidoo

Phone:

Email:

. sanju.naraidoo@telfair.ac.mu

Location:

Building: CTI - Room: .

Administrative contact:

Name:

Joel De Silva

Phone:

08 9266 4124

Email:

CBS-EFTSO@curtin.edu.au

Location:

Building: 408 - Room: 3004

Learning Management System:

Blackboard (lms.curtin.edu.au)

Acknowledgement of Country

We respectfully acknowledge the Indigenous Elders, custodians, their descendants and kin of this land past and present. The Centre for Aboriginal Studies aspires to contribute to positive social change for Indigenous Australians through higher education and research.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Syllabus

Introduction to economic concepts and principles, Demand and supply analysis, Elasticity ,Economic Efficiency, Market failure, Introduction to macroeconomics, Unemployment and inflation, Model of aggregate demand and aggregate supply, Global markets.

Introduction

The ideas of economists John Maynard Keynes

Welcome to ECON1000 Introductory Economics and the School of Economics and Finance. Introductory Economics (ECON1000) is a one semester course that offers an introductory flavour of economics. The course aims to cover key economic concepts of both microeconomics and macroeconomics in an Australian as well as international context. The syllabus incorporates the following five (5) concepts in microeconomics: the economic way of thinking; demand and supply; elasticity; market efficiency; behavioural economics and asymmetric information. In addition, the syllabus covers the following five (5) topics in macroeconomics: economic growth (GDP), unemployment and inflation; the business cycle and aggregate demand/supply; monetary policy; fiscal policy; and exchange rates. The syllabus emphasises the application of economic theory to real-world events.

Economics is part of our everyday lives, when we’re studying, shopping, dealing with customers or finding a place to live. Economics effects everything in our lives—what we earn, how we work, where we learn, what we eat; the list goes on. An understanding of economics is very important in an uncertain world, where market forces have such a significant influence on our lives. Any student undertaking a course in commerce or business at the undergraduate level requires an understanding of economics—how markets work, the price system, macroeconomic activity, the global economy, economic policy, and so on. A good grasp of introductory principles of economics is crucial if we, as student collaborators and critical social-ecological observers, are to make informed judgements about solving real-world problems. Dearest student, enjoy your study-life time in 2018 with ECON1000! :-)

are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed the world is ruled by little else.”

Unit Learning Outcomes

All graduates of Curtin University achieve a set of nine Graduate Attributes during their course of study. These inform an employer that, through your studies, you have acquired discipline knowledge and a range of other skills and attributes which employers would value in a professional setting. Each unit in your course addresses the Graduate Attributes through a clearly identified set of learning outcomes. They form a vital part in the process referred to as assurance of learning. The learning outcomes notify you of what you are expected to know, understand or be able to do in order to be successful in this unit. Each assessment for this unit is carefully designed to test your knowledge of one or more of the unit learning outcomes. On successfully completing all of the assessments you will have achieved all of these learning outcomes.

Your course has been designed so that on graduating you will have achieved all of Curtin's Graduate Attributes through the assurance of learning processes in each unit.

 

On successful completion of this unit students can:

Graduate Attributes addressed

1

Explain the nature of the economic problem

1 Explain the nature of the economic problem

2

Explain the economic way of thinking

2 Explain the economic way of thinking

3

Apply the economic way of thinking to analyse real world events

3 Apply the economic way of thinking to analyse real world events
3 Apply the economic way of thinking to analyse real world events

4

Analyse and evaluate economic issues using economic theory

4 Analyse and evaluate economic issues using economic theory
4 Analyse and evaluate economic issues using economic theory

5

Demonstrate economic literacy by writing effectively using economic theory

5 Demonstrate economic literacy by writing effectively using economic theory
5 Demonstrate economic literacy by writing effectively using economic theory

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin's Graduate Attributes

Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills Information skills

Apply discipline knowledge

Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills Information skills

Thinking skills

Apply discipline knowledge Thinking skills Information skills

Information skills

(use analytical skills to solve problems)

(confidence to investigate new ideas)

    Learning how to learn
 
    Learning how to learn
 
    Learning how to learn

Learning how to learn

Communication skills

Technology skills

(apply principles learnt to new situations) (confidence to tackle unfamiliar problems)

International perspective Cultural understanding Professional Skills

International perspective

International perspective Cultural understanding Professional Skills

Cultural understanding

International perspective Cultural understanding Professional Skills

Professional Skills

(value the perspectives of others)

(value the perspectives of others)

(work independently and as a team) (plan own work)

Find out more about Curtin's Graduate attributes at the Office of Teaching & Learning website: ctl.curtin.edu.au

Learning Activities

You should listen to one lecture series

class i.e. 'workshop' per week (~44 to 50 minutes).

per

week

(~70

to

90

minutes)

and

attend one

tutorial

l

The lectures cover the syllabus material. Lecture slides and other relevant learning resources are available on Blackboard (Bb). The lectures will summarise the relevant material covered in the textbook and will help focus your learning on the important concepts of the course. The workshop exercises and quizzes, article analysis and the final exam will be based on the material covered in the lectures. In the first semester of 2018, lectures are delivered live (and recorded) at the Bentley campus (during Teaching Weeks only) on Wednesdays 9:00am (in 210.101). Lecture Notes (in PowerPoint) will be posted on Blackboard before each lecture, normally by 11:00pm (Perth, W.S.T.) on Mondays.

l

The tutorials (also referred to as 'workshops') are a key opportunity you will have for regular group discussion of topics covered in the lectures and textbook. Tutorials should provide you with a useful guide as to your understanding of the course material. Students are encouraged to participate in each tutorial class (i.e. 'workshop') by preparing answers to the set questions for each workshop. The ECON1000 (2018) Student Tutorial Guide and the questions set out for each workshop (in the teaching weeks) are available on Bb. Attend regularly and be prepared to contribute in some positive way to the discussion. This means reading the prescribed text, revising your lecture notes and preparing answers to the tutorial questions and problems. You should ask your tutor to explain any parts of the course that you have not understood or found difficult.

You should expect to devote at least 3-4 hours per teaching week to reading your textbook and lecture notes and preparing answers to the tutorial discussion questions. Each week you may be asked by your tutor to explain an answer to the class, or use the whiteboard to illustrate an answer. In economics, it is important to communicate effectively in writing using economic theory and to engage confidently in interpersonal communication in tutorials.

Learning Resources

Essential texts

The required textbook(s) for this unit are:

l Curtin University students enrolled in ECON1000 in 2018 can purchase the following hard copy (printed) text - > ISBN: 9781488608650. For instance, the text is listed on the Pearson Australia website, as Value Pack Introductory Economics (Custom Edition) + MyEconLab without eTextCard: http://www.pearson.com.au/products/?sq=9781488608650

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

You might be able to locate a second-hand hard copy of the prescribed text from a previous semester. As an alternative to the hard copy (printed) version, there is an electronic version of the text, i.e. an eText type version of the custom textbook prescribed for this course (at a lower cost). Students can buy Introductory Economics ECON1000 (Custom Edition VitalSource eText) by going to: http://www.pearson.com.au/9781488616525.

The "essential" textbook for ECON1000 Introductory Economics in 2018 says on the front cover, compiled by 'Andrew John Brennan'. However, the correct way to reference the text in a bibliography is as follows:

Hubbard, Glenn, Anne Garnett, Phil Lewis, and Anthony O'Brien, 2015. Introductory Economics (Custom Edition), 1st edn, Sydney, NSW: Pearson Australia.

In 2018, 'MyEconLab' is free to use for all students of ECON1000: certain key features of MyEconLab (i.e. the "Study Plan" and "Assignments") are freely available. MyEconLab is a useful online resource for students to gain extra knowledge from the contents of the textbook via the system's adaptive learning technologies. MyEconLab is required for one of your assessments (see the Assessment schedule in the Unit Outline). As

an ECON1000 offshore student in S1 2018, you will need to enter the following access code for the free version of

MyEconLab: ASMHCW-BEGAD-LAIRY-EMACS-HELOT-PULSE. Instructions on how to register for MyEconLab are

available in PPTX on Blackboard.

(ISBN/ISSN: 9781488608650)

Other resources

The Learning, Engagement and International Services (LEIS) team at the library are piloting an online support initiative for first year (undergraduate students) at Curtin in 2018 called Studiosity. See https://www.studiosity.com/.

Studiosity provides personalised, online study help via two tools - Connect Live and Writing Feedback to a broad range of discipline areas. It will be made accessible via Blackboard (Bb) in all first year units (in all locations and modes of study)—i.e. that includes Introductory Economics. Studiosity may be useful to some extent when working on your Article Analysis.

Studiosity (formerly known as YourTutor) enables all students enrolled in 1st-year units access to 24/7 online constructive feedback to develop their academic skills. It provides personalised feedback on small portions of text but does not proofread or edit. Students can also utilise the “Connect Live” function for guidance on core skills areas such as maths, science. All guidance and feedback comes from advisors who are experts in their fields, and are carefully selected and rigorously trained. Access for students to Studiosity is via Blackboard desktop and mobile.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Assessment

Assessment schedule

       

Unit Learning

Task

Value %

Date Due

Outcome(s)

Assessed

1

Workshop Exercises and Quizzes

20

percent

Week: multiple Day: see details in Unit Outline Time: see details in Unit Outline

1,2,3

2

Article Analysis - Application of Microeconomics in the News

30

percent

Week: 8 Day: Tuesday, 1st May Time: 12:00 midday

3,4,5

 

Final Examination

50

percent

Week: see

2,3,4

 

examinations

3

timetable

Day: TBA

Time: TBA

Detailed information on assessment tasks

1. 'Workshop Exercises and Quizzes' consists of two different pieces of assessment:

§1. microeconomics quiz activities [worth 10%] and;

§2. a macroeconomics quiz activity [worth 10%].

The workshop exercises and quizzes are deliberately designed to help you with your learning of the relevant content and to help you (the student) to be better prepared for other assessments.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

§ Quiz L1 to L4 microeconomics activities (worth 10 marks) -- consists of a series of multiple choice questions on the microeconomics topics of L1 (the economic way of thinking), L2 (demand and supply), L3 (elasticity) and L4 (economic efficiency); this will be done using MyEconLab, the textbook's adaptive learning system.

Rationale for Quiz L1 to L4 microeconomics activities: to help the student gain knowledge and develop their problem- solving skills on lecture topics L1 to L4, and hence serve as a useful foundation for the article analysis.

Please pay attention to the following staggered release schedule:

Quiz ‘L1 & L2’ microeconomics activity enabled on MyEconLab: 9:00pm, Wed. 7th March Quiz ‘L3’ microeconomics activity enabled on MyEconLab: 9:00pm, Wed. 14th March Quiz ‘L4’ microeconomics activity enabled on MyEconLab: 9:00pm, Wed. 21st March

The number and type of selected questions will vary for each topic. You will have up to 2 attempts for any question asked. You are strongly encouraged to work on the Quiz L1 to L4 microeconomics activities as they are released at your own pace.

Quiz L1 to L4 microeconomics activities [worth 10%] are DUE on MyEconLab: 9:00pm, Wed. 28th March

Marking guide: the MyEconLab system generates an overall score out of 100. You will be awarded the following mark out of 10 when you score within the range below:

Overall score out of 100 (from the microeconomics quiz activities set on MyEconLab)

Mark out of 10 (recorded in Grade Center)

 

80 ≤ 100

10

75

≤ 79.99

9

70

≤ 74.99

8

65

≤ 69.99

7

60

≤ 64.99

6

50

≤ 59.99

5

40

≤ 49.99

4

30

≤ 39.99

3

 

0 ≤ 29.99

0

Please allow about one (1) week after the due date for the results to be entered into Grade Center (as the final scores have to be inputted manually).

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

§ Quiz L6, L7 & L9 macroeconomics activity (worth 10 marks) -- consists of short written answers and drawing appropriate diagram(s) on the macroeconomic topics of L6 (GDP, unemployment, inflation and the business cycle), L7 (aggregate demand and aggregate supply), and L9 (fiscal policy).

Rationale for Quiz L6, L7 & L9 macroeconomics activity: to help students prepare for the written section in the final exam, i.e. to give you (the student) the opportunity to practice writing and answering typical short answer questions in the final economics exam. Articulating clear answers and solving (economic) problems are very important skills to have in the real business world.

Quiz L6, L7 & L9 macroeconomics activity [worth 10%] DUE Week 11, May 21st-25th, 25 minutes working time, closed book, sat in tutorial class. More specific details will be announced on Bb in Week 10.

Marking guide: there may be several parts to a question; in any case, a clear allocation of marks for each part of the question(s) will be specified. In general, students who write more--whilst answering the question-- tend to earn a higher credit/distinction mark. That is, the student who provides more specificity in their answer shall be awarded more marks. Marks are also allocated for fully labelled and correctly drawn diagrams (where appropriate).

Please do not miss the macroeconomics quiz activity [worth 10%] under normal circumstances as it will result in a loss of 10 valuable marks.

2. Article Analysis - Application of Microeconomics in the News [worth 30%].

Hardcopy and Electronic copy via Blackboard (Bb) are DUE by 12:00 midday​ on Tuesday 1st May, in Week 8.

OBJECTIVE of Article Analysis: You are to apply microeconomic theory to explain and analyse a news article.

Rationale for Article Analysis: to help the student develop and/or strengthen their analytical and communication skills set by applying their knowledge of economic theories to real world issues. Industry values workers with a well-developed set of analytical skills and communicative abilities.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

1. You are to select a web article/newspaper/magazine for your microeconomic analysis.

a. You must be able to relate your main article to at least two of the topics (L1 to L5, i.e. chapters 1 – 5) covered in the lecture program (see point 2 below).

b. The main news article must have been written after 1st January, 2018. Please double check the date/month/year of the main news article. Assignment will not be marked if date of article is before the time specified.

c. The main news article can be from any nation in the known world/universe, so long as it’s in English.

d. You should back up some of your key points or use for data purposes by having several relevant supplementary articles—from other relevant topic-related news sources. Such supplementary news articles are permitted to be dated before 1st Jan. 2018. You should cite your use of other sources via appropriate in-text referencing.

e. Your microeconomics diagrams can either be hand-drawn and then scanned and inserted as a 'picture' into your working document, or be drawn by using appropriate computer/web software.

2. More specifically, here is the list of lecture topics that you can choose from for your article analysis (relevant microeconomics concepts are in brackets):

1. production possibility frontier from L1 (opportunity cost, scarcity, trade-offs);

2. demand and supply market equilibrium from L2 (price and non-price determinants, simultaneous shifts in demand and/or supply);

3. elasticity measurement and determinants from L3 (price elasticity of demand and its relationship with total revenue, price elasticity of supply);

4. economic efficiency at market equilibrium from L4 (consumer and producer surplus, rent ceilings, price floors, taxes on goods and services to raise revenue for public purposes and discourage market activity);

5. behavioural economics and asymmetric information from L5 (rational vs. irrational decision making, types of market failure: externalities; public goods; common resources; adverse selection; moral hazard).

3. You need to submit both a hardcopy AND electronic copy via Bb:

1. Hardcopy of your article analysis INCLUDING a printed copy of your main news article +

official COVER SHEET (available on Bb) is due by 12:00 midday on Tuesday 1st May, in Week

8.

l The official School of Economics and Finance Cover Sheet is available for download on Bb. Complete the check list before submitting and a student signature is required!

2. Electronic copy via Blackboard (Bb) (go to the Assessments tab) EXCLUDING a copy of your main news article (otherwise Turnitin picks this up) yet still INCLUDING the official Cover Sheet is also due by 12:00 midday on Tuesday 1st May.

4. 1600-1800 words (excluding reference list), give or take 100 or so words.

5. The essay must be word processed in an editable Microsoft Word document or PDF (sorry, no PAGES files). Keep in mind the following essential formatting requirements:

a. single-spaced

b. line spacing between each paragraph

c. body of text justified

d. font size 12 in Calibri

e. pages to be consecutively numbered and identified

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Layout of Student's Article Analysis:

1. Cover Sheet (with appropriate identifying details)

2. Introduction (summary of key issues)

3. Analysis (economic concepts/theories to be applied, application of theory to article, including well-labelled diagrams)

4. Conclusions (implications/policy recommendations)

5. References (use Chicago style)

6. Main Article Copy {for hardcopy only} - showing date and source

The article analysis is worth a value of 30. The score is out of 60 divided by 2, and is allocated as follows:

ECON1000 S1 2018 Article Analysis Marking Rubric

Components

Weight

Your

Mark

Introduction (8%) [suggestion: 170 words or less]

Summary of key issue(s)

out of 5

 

(sets the scene as a summary of the key issue or issues:

main article title, author(s), when? where? what?;

a list of which lecture topics, theories/concepts you plan to use)

Analysis (75%) [1200 to 1400 words, give or take 100 or so words]

Brief explanations of relevant theory

out of 10

 

(concise definitions of relevant microeconomic concepts;

concepts clearly understood)

Application of theory to article

out of 20

 

(good use of available information in the main news article;

effective use of relevant supplementary sources to support the analysis;

sufficient depth of coverage)

Technical details

out of 10

 

(correct communication of economic models/concepts: e.g. well-labelled axes on graphs, or good use of price data in demand and supply diagrams or when calculating elasticity)

References

out of 5

 

(proper in-text referencing of key sources such as main textbook, main article and supplementary articles)

Conclusions (17%) [suggestion: 270 words or less]

Implications and/or policy recommendations*

out of 10

 

(logically developed argument i.e. follows logically from the information in the analysis)

* = in the conclusions section, do not summarise what has already been said. For instance, you might deal with the following questions: whether the government should intervene, and if so how (or if not, why not); will there be any changes in the short or long run; or will the market return to the previous equilibrium; … or any other relevant (policy?) aspects.

Score out of 30 (60 / 2) =

Final

 

Mark

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

l

Students should allow a 2 to 3 week marking turnaround. It is the student’s responsibility to keep electronic copies of their article analysis. The assignment must be submitted to ‘Turnitin’—instructions are on Bb.

l

Strictly no time extensions are available under normal circumstances, as there is plenty of time in advance to plan and work on your article analysis.

l

It is also very important to discuss the choice of topic/article with your tutor well before the submission date (sorry, but no detailed discussion about the assignment will take place via email, unless you talk to your tutor in person about it first). You will have the opportunity to seek clarity on the article analysis in your tutorial in Week 6.

l

An important part of writing is to correctly reference the sources of information that you have used. Correctly referencing your work will help to avoid plagiarism. Plagiarism means presenting the work or property of another person as one’s own, without appropriate acknowledgement or referencing (the copying of other people’s work and/or ideas). Plagiarism is a form of cheating. Plagiarism could cost you a significant delay in receiving your final marks for the unit (up to a period of 3 months). Referencing is a (standardised) method of acknowledging any sources of information and ideas which are not your own. Referencing enables you, and the reader, to clearly identify the source of information in your article analysis. References should be properly cited in the body of the assignment, using Chicago.

3. Final Exam - Introductory Economics [worth 50%].

The structure of the final exam on Introductory Economics in semester one 2018 consists of two (2) sections:

Section A: Multiple Choice. 18 Multiple Choice questions. [Total of 18 marks]

Section B: ‘Short Answer Style’ Written Questions. Answer ANY 2 from a choice of 4. Each question is worth 16 marks. [Total of 32 marks]

Time Allowed: 2 hours + 10 mins reading time

Topics L5 to L10 are covered in Section A and Section B. In short, only topics L5 to L10 are potentially examinable, nothing else.

Marking guide: In Section A, one (1) mark per multiple choice question correctly answered. In Section B, the student should aim to write at least 2-3 good sentences per mark allocated. In some part questions you should be able to include a diagram – make sure you refer to it in your answer.

When writing your answers (in Section B):

•Read the question carefully •Pay attention to key verbs in the question, e.g.:

–‘explain' i.e. make the concept or idea clear by describing it in more detail –‘discuss’ i.e. write about (a topic) in detail, taking into account different issues or ideas –‘draw’ or ‘use a model to…’ i.e. use a relevant diagram in your answer •Answer each part of the question –briefly define the key concepts in the question; –include simple real-world examples to demonstrate understanding –use well-labelled diagrams (where relevant) to illustrate the meaning of concepts (this is critical!) •Write more rather than less – elaborate on your answer by explaining. Answering the question is the key! –In the examination, you should specifically answer each question; anything included which is not specifically asked for will receive no marks.

More specific details about the final exam in Introductory Economics and commentary on past student answers are given in the short review lecture at the end of the semester.

Pass requirements

To pass this unit you must achieve a result of 50%. There is no requirement to pass any individual component of assessment.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Fair assessment through moderation

Moderation describes a quality assurance process to ensure that assessments are appropriate to the learning outcomes, and that students work is evaluated consistently by assessors. Minimum standards for the moderation of assessments are described in the Assessment and Student Progression Manual, available from policies.curtin.edu.au/findapolicy/

Late assessment policy

This ensures that the requirements for submission of assignments and other work to be assessed are fair, transparent, equitable and that penalties are consistently applied.

1. All student assessments are required to have a due date and time specified on this Unit Outline.

2. Students will be penalised by a deduction of ten percent per calendar day for a late assessment submission (e.g. a mark equivalent to 10% of the total allocated for the assessment will be deducted from the marked value for every day that the assessment is late). This means that an assessment worth 20 marks will have two marks deducted per calendar day late. Hence if it was handed in three calendar days late and given a mark of 16/20, the student would receive 10/20. An assessment more than seven calendar days overdue will not be marked and will receive a mark of 0.

Assessment extension

A student unable to complete an assessment task by/on the original published date/time (e.g. examinations, tests) or

due date/time (e.g. assignments) must apply for an assessment extension using the Assessment Extension form

(available from the Forms page at students.curtin.edu.au/administration/) as prescribed by the Academic Registrar. It

is the responsibility of the student to demonstrate and provide evidence for exceptional circumstances beyond the

student's control that prevent them from completing/submitting the assessment task.

The student will be expected to lodge the form and supporting documentation with the unit coordinator before the assessment date/time or due date/time. An application may be accepted up to five working days after the date or due date of the assessment task where the student is able to provide an acceptable explanation as to why he or she was not able to submit the application prior to the assessment date. An application for an assessment extension will not be accepted after the date of the Board of Examiners' meeting.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

This procedure applies for ALL assessments including end of semester exams.

THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION IS VERY IMPORTANT:

1. You should submit the completed assessment extension form to the School of Economics and Finance Student Services Officer (SSO) before the due date/day of the assessment attaching all relevant supporting evidence.

2. If you are unable to submit the assessment extension form before the assessment due date/day you must submit the completed form to the SSO no later than 5 working days after the due date/day of assessment task.

3. Applications must be accompanied by relevant documentation appropriate to the circumstances and included as an attachment to the application form (see page 1 of the application form)

The process:

DO NOT SUBMIT YOUR APPLICATION TO THE UC or TUTOR – please READ carefully

1. Submit the completed form in person or via e-mail with all supporting documentation to the Student Services Officers (SSO) - Joel De Silva or Amber Duxbury: CBS-EFTSO@curtin.edu.au

2. The SSO will consider your application and inform you of the outcome via email.

3. You need to acknowledge the receipt of the email.

NOTE: It is very important to familiarise yourself with the Assessment and Student Progression Manual: Consolidated Policies and Procedures, which you can access via the following link:

IMPORTANT NOTES:

List of exceptional circumstances beyond a student’s control*

l

Injury, Illness or medical condition

l

Family issues

l

Commitments in an Elite sport

l

Commitments to assist with emergency service activities

l

Unavoidable/unexpected work commitment

* Holidays are NOT acceptable

Deferred assessments

If your results show that you have been granted a deferred assessment you should immediately check OASIS for details.

Deferred examinations/tests will be held from 16/07/2018 to 27/07/2018 . Notification to students will be made after the Board of Examiners’ meeting via the Official Communications Channel (OCC) in OASIS.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Supplementary assessments

Supplementary assessments, if granted by the Board of Examiners, will have a due date or be held between 16/07/2018 and 27/07/2018 . Notification to students will be made after the Board of Examiners’ meeting via the Official Communications Channel (OCC) in OASIS.

It is the responsibility of students to be available to complete the requirements of a supplementary assessment. If your results show that you have been granted a supplementary assessment you should immediately check OASIS for details.

Reasonable adjustments for students with disabilities/health circumstances likely to impact on studies

A Curtin Access Plan (CAP) is a document that outlines the type and level of support required by a student with a

disability or health condition to have equitable access to their studies at Curtin. This support can include alternative exam or test arrangements, study materials in accessible formats, access to Curtin’s facilities and services or other support as discussed with an advisor from Disability Services (disability.curtin.edu.au). Documentation is required from your treating Health Professional to confirm your health circumstances.

If

you think you may be eligible for a CAP, please contact Disability Services. If you already have a CAP please provide

it

to the Unit Coordinator at the beginning of each study period.

Referencing style

The referencing style for this unit is Chicago.

More information can be found on this style from the Library web site:

Privacy

As part of a learning or assessment activity, or class participation, your image or voice may be recorded or transmitted by equipment and systems operated by Curtin University. Transmission may be to other venues on campus or to others both in Australia and overseas.

Your image or voice may also be recorded by students on personal equipment for individual or group study or assessment purposes. Such recordings may not be reproduced or uploaded to a publically accessible web environment. If you wish to make such recordings for study purposes as a courtesy you should always seek the permission of those who are impacted by the recording.

Recording of classes or course materials may not be exchanged or distributed for commercial purposes, for compensation, or for any other purpose other than personal study for the enrolled students in the unit. Breach of this may subject a student to disciplinary action under Statute No 10 – Student Disciplinary Statute.

If you wish to discuss this please talk to your Unit Coordinator.

Copyright

The course material for this unit is provided to you for your own research and study only. It is subject to copyright. It

is a copyright infringement to make this material available on third party websites.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Academic Integrity (including plagiarism and cheating)

Any conduct by a student that is dishonest or unfair in connection with any academic work is considered to be academic misconduct. Plagiarism and cheating are serious offences that will be investigated and may result in penalties such as reduced or zero grades, annulled units or even termination from the course. Assessments under investigation will not be given a mark until the matter is concluded. This may result in the unit grade being withheld or a grade of Fail Incomplete (F-IN) until a decision has been made by the Student Disciplinary Panel. This may impact on enrolment in further units/study periods.

Plagiarism occurs when work or property of another person is presented as one's own, without appropriate acknowledgement or referencing. Submitting work which has been produced by someone else (e.g. allowing or contracting another person to do the work for which you claim authorship) is also plagiarism. Submitted work is subjected to a plagiarism detection process, which may include the use of text matching systems or interviews with students to determine authorship.

Cheating includes (but is not limited to) asking or paying someone to complete an assessment task for you or any use of unauthorised materials or assistance during an examination or test.

From Semester 1, 2016, all incoming coursework students are required to complete Curtin’s Academic Integrity Program (AIP). If a student does not pass the program by the end of their first study period of enrolment at Curtin, their marks will be withheld until they pass. More information about the AIP can be found at:

Refer to the Academic Integrity tab in Blackboard or academicintegrity.curtin.edu.au for more information, including student guidelines for avoiding plagiarism.

Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Expectations

Curtin students are expected to have reliable internet access in order to connect to OASIS email and learning systems such as Blackboard and Library Services.

You may also require a computer or mobile device for preparing and submitting your work.

Important Announcements:

Announcements will be posted on Blackboard. You are expected to check this regularly as well as your student email account as this will be where unit relevant information will be posted. Most email clients will allow you to forward your student email to a personal email account.

For general ICT assistance, in the first instance please contact OASIS Student Support:

For specific assistance with any of the items listed below, please contact The Learning Centre:

l

Using Blackboard, the I Drive and Back-Up files

l

Introduction to PowerPoint, Word and Excel

Additional information

Enrolment

It is your responsibility to ensure that your enrolment is correct - you can check your enrolment through the eStudent option on OASIS, where you can also print an Enrolment Advice.

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Student Rights and Responsibilities

It is the responsibility of every student to be aware of all relevant legislation, policies and procedures relating to their rights and responsibilities as a student. These include:

l

the Student Charter

l

Values and Signature Behaviours

l

the University's policy and statements on plagiarism and academic integrity

l

copyright principles and responsibilities

l

the University's policies on appropriate use of software and computer facilities

Information on all of the above is available through the University's "Student Rights and Responsibilities" website at:

Student Equity

There are a number of factors that might disadvantage some students from participating in their studies or assessments to the best of their ability, under standard conditions. These factors may include a disability or medical condition (e.g. mental illness, chronic illness, physical or sensory disability, learning disability), significant family responsibilities, pregnancy, religious practices, living in a remote location or another reason. If you believe you may be unfairly disadvantaged on these or other grounds please contact Student Equity at eesj@curtin.edu.au or go to http://eesj.curtin.edu.au/student_equity/index.cfm for more information

You can also contact Counselling and Disability services: http://www.disability.curtin.edu.au or the Multi-faith services:

It is important to note that the staff of the university may not be able to meet your needs if they are not informed of your individual circumstances so please get in touch with the appropriate service if you require assistance. For general wellbeing concerns or advice please contact Curtin's Student Wellbeing Advisory Service at:

Recent unit changes

Students are encouraged to provide unit feedback through eVALUate, Curtin's online student feedback system. For more information about eVALUate, please refer to evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/.

To view previous student feedback about this unit, search for the Unit Summary Report at

To view previous student feedback about this unit, search for the Unit Summary Report at https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/student/unit_search.cfm. See https://evaluate.curtin.edu.au/info/dates.cfm to find out when you can eVALUate this unit.

Recent changes to this unit include:

1. Improving feedback to students;

2. Enhancing the student learning experience and improving the resources available on Blackboard (Bb), via having pre-workshop---workshop---post-workshop activities;

3. Greater clarity of what is required for the article analysis;

4. Having more interactive assessment quiz exercises via MyEconLab (available at no cost).

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Curtin Business School (CBS) School of Economics and Finance

Program calendar

Week

Begin

Lecture/

Textbook

Tutorial

Assessment Details

Date

Learning Module

Pre-readings

& Due Dates

Orientation

19

 

Orientation Week

February

 

1.

26

L1. What is Economics?

Chapter 1

Introduction,

 

February

Building Rapport

2.

5 March

L2. Demand and Supply

Chapter 2

L1 (Ch.1)

Quiz ‘L1 & L2’ microeconomics activity enabled on MyEconLab: 9:00pm, Wed. 7th March

3.

12

March

L3. Elasticity

Chapter 3

L2 (Ch.2)

Quiz ‘L3’ microeconomics activity enabled on MyEconLab: 9:00pm, Wed. 14th March

4.

19

March

L4. Economic Efficiency

Chapter 4

L3 (Ch.3)

Quiz ‘L4’ microeconomics activity enabled on MyEconLab: 9:00pm, Wed. 21st March

5.

26

March

L5. Behavioural Economics and Asymmetric Information

Chapter 5

L4 (Ch.4)

Quiz L1 to L4 microeconomics activities [worth 10%]

DUE on MyEconLab: 9:00pm, Wed. 28th March

 

2

April

 

Tuition Free Week

 

6.

9 April

No Lecture (break)

 

Clarity on the ‘Article Analysis’ [worth 30%]

7.

16

April

L6. Introduction to Macroeconomics: GDP, Unemployment & Inflation

Chapter 6

L5 (Ch.5)

 
 

23

April

 

Tuition Free Week

 

8.

30

April

L7. Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply

Chapter 7

L6 (Ch.6)

Article Analysis (based on at least two of the following modules: L1, L2, L3, L4, L5) [worth 30%]

DUE: 12:00 midday,

Tues. 1st May –

submit BOTH a Hardcopy and Electronic Copy

9.

7 May

L8. Monetary Policy

Chapter 8

L7 (Ch.7)

 

10.

14

May

L9. Fiscal Policy

Chapter 9

L8 (Ch.8)

11.

21

May

L10. Exchange Rates

Chapter 10

L9 (Ch.9)

Quiz L6, L7 & L9 macroeconomics activity [worth 10%, Short Written Answers]

(DUE: Conducted in your tutorial time)

12.

28

May

Review

L10 (Ch.10)

 
 

13. June

4

 

Study Week

 

14. June

11

 

Examinations

 

15. June

18

 

Examinations