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The World

Chess Cl'OCIln Challenge


KASPAROV US KARPOV
seuDle 87
A n n otated by I nternatio n a l
G ra n d m aster D AV I D B R O N STE I N

Transl ated by O LEG Z I L B E R T

Raduga Publishers
Moscow
Translation from the Russian
Edited by Graham Whittaker and Yevgeni Kopytkin

MaT� Ha 3BaH..,e �eMn"'OHa M"'pa no waXMaTaM:


KAC nAP O B - KAP n O B .
CeB..,n bR - 87

KOMMeHT..,pyeT Me>KAYHapoAHbIH rpoccMeHcTep


AAB�A 6POHWTEIiIH

Editor of the Russian text Valeri Yefremov


Art editor Lyubov Cheltsova
Designed by Vladimir Miroshnichenko
Photographs by Dmitri Donskoi

Copyrigh t © Raduga Publishers 1 988. Photographs


Printed in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

I S B N 5 -05-00 2349- 1
FROM THE EDITORS

Garri Kasparov was born in 1 96 3 . He became an Inter­


national Grandmaster In 1 980, Soviet Champion in 1 98 1 and
World Champion In 1 985. He IS the winner of four "Chess
Oscars", his FIDE rating as of 1 st July, 1 987, is 2 740.
Anatoly Karpov was born in 1 95 1 He became an Inter­
national Grandmaster in 1 97 0 , Soviet Champion in 1 9 76 and
1 983. Karpov held the world title from 1 9 7 5 to 1 985. He has
won nine "Chess Oscars", his FIDE rating as of 1 st July,
1 98 7 , being 2700.
Kasparov's seconds: Alexander NIkitln, USSR Merited
Coach, losif Dorfman and Sergei Dolmatov, both Inter·
national Grandmasters, and also Zurab Azmalparashvlll,
International Master.
Karpov is seconded by the International Grandmasters
Igor Zaitsev and Konstantin Lerner and the International
Masters Mikhail Podgayets andEllzbar Ubilava.
The competitor who scores at least 1 2.5 points or WinS SIX
games IS the winner of thiS 24-game match. If the score of the
match is even ( 1 2 : 1 21. the World Champion retains hiS title.
The prize fund of the.match amounts to two million eight
hundred thousand Swiss francs.
This is the fourth match for the world' title between these
two players. Their first (unlimited) competition (September
1 984 -February 1 985) was interrupted by FIDE President
Florencio Campomanes without declaring a winner, when the
score was +5 - 3 =40 in favour of Karpov. The second and
third contests were won by Kasparov, the scores being +5
-3 = 1 6 and +5-4=1 5 respectively. Before the Seville Match
the players had met each other over the chess-board one
hundred times exactly, the total score being + 1 3 - 1 2 =75 In
favour of Kasparov.
David Bronstein, an outstanding International Grand­
master, once a Challenger himself, illuminates the underlying
philosophy of each game of this exciting contest.
For the benefit of our readers, we also present notes by
eminent Grandmasters who covered the match in the chess
media, some notes (marked Ed.) have also been added by the
editors expressly for the benefit of beginners.

5
Contents

G A M E O NE. Gruenfeld Defence . 7


G A ME T W O. English Opening . . 10
G A ME T H REE. Gruenfeld Defence 18
G A ME F 0 U R. English Opening . 21
G A ME F IVE. Gruenfeld Defence . . 26
G A ME S IX. English Opening . . . . . 31
G A ME SEVE N . Gruenfeld Defence 35
G A ME E l G H T. English Opening . . 44
G A ME N I NE. Gruenfeld Defence . . 50
G A ME TE N. Caro-Kann Defence . . . 56
G A ME E LEVE N. Gruenfeld Defence . 59
G A M E T W E L VE . Queen's Gambit Declined 64
G A ME T H I R TEEN. Gruenfeld Defence . . 67
G A ME F 0 U R TEE N . Caro-Kann Defence . 89
G A ME F 1F T EEN. Gruenfeld Defence . . . 92
G A ME S IX TEEN . English Opening . . . . . 97
G A M E SEVEN TEEN. King's Indian Defence 1 05
GA M E El G H TEEN. Queen's Gambit Declined . 1 10
G A ME N INE T EEN. Queen's Gambit Declined 115
G A ME T WE N T Y. Queen's Gambit Declined . 1 22
G A ME T WE N T Y - 0 NE. Gruenfeld Defence 1 27
G A ME T WEN T Y TW O . Queen's Gambit
-

Declined . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 32
G A ME T WEN T Y - T H REE. Gruenfeld Defence 1 36
G A ME T WE N T Y - F 0 U R. Retl Opening . . . . 1 45 .

David Bronstein. Points Scored and Moves Played . . . . 155


GAME ONE

Gruenfeld Defe nce

A. Karpov G. Kasparov

The f i rst encounter in a World Chess Champion­


sh i p M atch i nv a r i a b l y a ro u ses a n espec i a l l y great
i nterest a m o n g the fo l l owe rs of th i s ancient game .
What will Wh i te 's f i rst move be? Wh ich defen sive
method wi l l B l ack ch oose? And wi l l the open i n g
adopted for the f i rst battl e e n d u re th rough out t h e
enti re contest, o r wi I I t h e opponents v a r y the i r
open i ngs, try ing t o surprise each other i n every
game ?
1 . d2-d4 N g8-f6
2 . c2-c4 g 7 -g6
3 . g2-g3
In the 1 3th game of the i r re-match ( Le n i ngrad ,
1 986 ) Karpov p l ayed 3. Nf3.-Ed.

7
3. . .. c7-c6
4 . N g l -f3 Bf8-g7
5. B f l -g 2 d 7 -d 5
6 . c4xd5 c6xd5
7. N b l -c3 0-0
8. Nf3-e5 e7-e6
9. 0-0 Nf6-d 7
1 0. f2-f4 Nb8-c6
Th i s move, t h o u g h a l ready seen in grandmaster
play (e. g . Karpov-Ch i burdan idze, B i l bao, 1 987 ) , has
never before occ u r red in a Wo r l d Champ i onsh i p
ga m e . Kasparov, however, h a s a n e w p l an.- Ed.
1 1 . Bcl-e3 Nd 7-b6
The po i nt of B l ac k ' s i dea. H e i ntends to counter­
play on the Q- side.- Ed.
1 2 . B e3-f2 Bc8-d 7
1 3. e2-e4 Nc6-e7
Afte r 1 3. . .. de 1 4 . B x e4, B l ack wo u l d f i nd i t
d i fficu l t to eq u a l ize.-Ed.
1 4. Ne5xd7 Qd8xd7
1 5 . e4-e 5 .. . (No. 1)
The l i n e of the G r u enfeld Defence adopted i n th i s
game h a s l ed t o t h e comp l icated pos ition that i s
shown i n the d i agram ( N o . 1 ) . The pawn cha i ns are
stopped and the time has come for the p i eces to start
manoeuv r i n g . At t h i s mome nt, Ka spa rov takes a
rat h e r u nconvent i o n a l d e c i s i o n-not fear i ng a poss i b l e
advance of t h e Wh ite Pawn s o n t h e K-side, h e
beg i ns to concentrate h i s h eavy p i eces o n the open
c- f i l e .
1 5 . . .. Rf8-c8
1 6. R a l- c I Bg7-f8
1 7. Bg2-f3
Th e suggest i o n h a s been made that Wh i te sh o u l d

8
now open host i l ities on the K-side by advanc i ng h i s
g- Pawn . Th is, however, wo u l d be too r i sky, for afte r
1 7 . g4 Rc7 , fo l l owe d by Rac8, B l ack wo u ld th reaten
1 9 . . . . N a4. A l so , the prepa ration of f4-f5 req u i res
consi derab l e t i me-hence Ka rpov's r estra i ned move
i n th e text.
1 7. .. . Rc8-c7
1 8 . b2-b3 R a 8-c8
1 9 . 0d l-d2 Ne 7-c6
20. 0d 2-b2
The attempt to g a i n mate r i a l by 20. N b 5? wo u l d
mere ly resu l t i n a d i saster f o r Wh ite after 20 . . . . Nxe5!,
B l ack wi n n i ng at least a Pawn . By p l ay i ng the cautious
move i n the text Wh ite str ives to cover the vu l nera b l e
d a r k sq uares i n h i s O- s i d e camp.-Ed.
20. . . . a 7 -a 6
2 1 . Bf3-e2 Od 7-e7
22. Nc3- b l
Aimed at prevent i n g 22 . . . . O a 3 , by wh ich B l ack
wo u l d se ize t h e contro l of t h e c-f i l e . Wh i te can not of
course a l low th i s, and he takes the necessary pre­
cauti ons. As a resu lt, th e position becomes rather

9
d u l l . Fi rst a cou p l e of Rooks are exchanged, then the
repet ition of moves appears to b e u navoida b l e .
22. . . . Nc6-b4
Th reate n i n g 23 . . . . Rc2.-Ed.
23. N b l -c3 N b 4-c6
24. Nc3-bl Nc6-b4
25. R cI-c5
A l ast attem pt to avoid the repet i t i o n of moves. -Ed.
25. .. . N b 6-d7
26. Rc5xc7 Rc8xc7
27 . N b l -c3 N b 4-c6
28 . Nc3-bl Nc6-b4
29 . N b l -c3 N b4-c6
30. Nc3-b l . .. (No. 2)
Here Kasparov mot ioned to the Referee and
c l a i med the d raw, becau se afte r h i s i ntended 30 . . . .
Nb4 t h e same position wo u l d occur for a t h i rd
t i m e . - Ed.
The f i rst game of t h e Sev i l le M atch h a s thus
reve a l ed that the r i va l s, wh o a re we l l awa re of the
long hard stru gg l e awa i t i ng them, are u nwi l l ing to
ta ke chances-at l ea st, at th i s stage.
The sco re is +0-0= 1 .

GAME TWO

English Opening

G. Kasparov A. Karpov

1 . c2-c4 Ng8-f6
2. N b l-c3 e 7-e 5
3. Ng l -f3 N b8-c6

10
4. g2-g3 BfS-b4
5 . Bf l-g2
Th is natural d e v e l o p i n g move h a s rece n t l y bee n
looked upon as i nsuff i c i e nt for Wh i te to g a i n an
advantage, and i t h a s g iven wa y to 5 . Nc3-d 5. The
Wo r l d C h a m p i on d i sagrees with the verd i ct of the
theoret i c i a n s and makes a n attempt to i nfuse new
l i fe i nto the old l i ne . - Ed.
5. . . . 0-0
6. 0- 0 e5-e4
7 . N f3-g5
The sol i d 7. Nel Bxc3 S . dc h 6 has been consid ered
the ma i n l i ne, though i t wo u ld resu l t in a rather d u l l
ga m e . -Ed.
7. . .. Bb4xc3
S . b2xc3 RfS-eS
9. f2-f3
So far, the seco nd game h a s proceeded rath er
qu i et l y . All of a sudd en comp l ications a r i se on the
ch ess-board , for on his next move the ex-Champ ion
offers a Pawn .
9. . . . e4-e3 ( No_ 3)

1 1
Had G a r r i Ka sparov acce pted t h e offer, the game
wo u l d h ave proceeded by t h e cou rse of pos itiona l
manoeuvr i n g . Wh ite wo u l d h ave reta i n ed h i s i n itiative
on the K-s ide, wh i l e B l ack wo u l d h ave had the possi­
b i l ity of counter-attac k i ng o n t h e other wi ng. B l ack
wo u l d h ave rega i ned the sacr ificed Pawn a nd the
mate r i a l ba l ance wo u l d have been resto red . W i s h i ng
to refute h is opponent's concept, t h e Wo r l d Ch am­
pion i s now deep in thou ght: shou l d he capture the
Pawn at once or wo u l d h e be bette r s u r r o u n d i n g it
now, to ta ke it i n a more favou ra b l e situation l ater ?
The Wo r l d C h a m p i o n took o n e h o u r and twenty­
th ree m i n u tes on h i s tenth move, and decided to turn
down the offer .
I t i s noteworthy t h a t the t i m e taken to p l ay th i s
move i s a record f o r a l l the previous games between
th e same riva l s. The Pawn offer made by the ex­
Cham p i o n looks rat h e r natu r a l i n th i s pos i t i o n , and
it has prev io u s l y occurred in simi l a r set-ups resu l t i ng
from other ope n i ng s . B u t t h e ex perts c l a i m that i n
th i s particu l a r position t h e m o v e i n the actua l game
has never before been se en i n tou r n a m e nt pract ice.
I t has been repo rted i n t h e ch ess med i a that i n the
interv i ew g iven to Spa n ish te l e v i s i o n after the 2nd
game An ato l y Karpov d i sc l o sed that th i s i n nova t i o n
had bee n prepared by h i m for the Wo r l d Champion­
sh i p M atch with V ictor Korc h n o i i n M e rano, 1 98 1 .
Now we know: i t can happen that an i m portant i nno­
vat i o n i s kept i n a p l ayer's "th eoretica l bag" for qu ite
a time before a n opportu n i ty a r i ses to i nt rod uce
it. - Ed.
1 0 . d 2-d3 d 7 -d 5
1 1 . Od l-b3
Th i s see m s t o b e t h e best. T h e l i ne 1 1 . c d N x d 5

12
1 2. N e 4 f5 1 3. c4 Nf6 1 4. Nc3 Nd4 1 5. f4 c6 i s
wea k e r.- Ed.
1 1 . ... Nc6-a5
1 2. Qb3-a3 c7-c6
1 3. c4x d 5 c6xd5
1 4. f3-f4 N a 5-c6
1 5. Ral-bl Qd 8-c7
The com me ntato rs are far from u n a n i mo u s about
th i s move, th e i r appra i sa l s rang i ng from a "?" to
a "!".-Ed.
1 6. BcI-b2 Bc8-g4
Whereas Ka rpov counts o n the speed i e r deve lop'
ment of his p i eces to active posts Kasparov's hopes
are p i n n ed on the i n ev i t a b l e activat ion of Wh ite's two
strong B i sh ops.
1 7 . c3-c4
The op i n i o n has been expressed that th i s stra i ght·
fo rwa rd attempt to b r i n g the Wh i te dark-squared
B ishop i nto p l ay i s pre mature, Wh i te l os i ng h i s s l ight
advantage as a resu lt.-Ed.
1 7. ,.. d 5xc4
1 8 . B b2xf6 g 7 xf6
1 9 . N g5-e4 ... ( No. 4 )
When W h ite's d a rk·sq uared B i shop appea red on
the l on g d i agona l and, h a v i ng captured the B l ack
K n i g h t, shatte red the pawn she l te r of the B l ac k K i ng,
i t seemed at f i rst g l a nce th at the Wo r l d Ch a m p i on had
a strong attac k .
1 9. . . . Kg8-g7
20 . d3xc4
At th i s mome nt, Wh i te sh o u l d perhaps have rushed
his K n i g h t to d6, a l though the consequences of
th i s attack are h ard to est i m a te without long med i­
tat i o n .

13
Some c o m m e ntators c r i t i c i z e Wh i te's l ast move,
suggest i n g , apart from B r o n ste i n ' s reco m m e ndation
20. Nd6, that W h i te shou ld cont i n u e 20. Qc3 . Th i s
i m med iate th reat to the Pawn on f6 ca n , h owever,
be parried by th e subtle 20. . . . Qd 8, fol l owed by
2 1 . . . . Qd4 or Nd4, wh e reas the obv i ou s 20 . . Qe7
. .

wo u l d be mu c h we a k e r , because of 2 1 . R x b 7 ! Qxb7
22. Nxf6! Kf8 23. N xg4, g i v i ng Wh ite a crush i ng
attac k.- Ed.
20 . . . . R a 8-d 8
Ta k i ng adva ntage of t h e s l owed-down pace of
W h i te's attack , Karpov i m m e d i ate l y bri ngs i nto play
his Queen's Rook, wh ich seemed to be stuck to its
corner, and thus m a k e s h i s pos i t i o n q u i te safe. The
sca l e i s now be i ng more and more t i pped i n B l ack's
favour . Mo reove r, Kasparov i s a l ready h a rd pressed
for t i m e . One sh o u l d be j u st, h owever, and mention
that Karpov i s a l so i n t i m e tro u b l e . F r om now o n ,
B l ack 's i n i t i ative grows stronger with each move.
2 1 . R b l-b3
G rand masters Alexei SUet i n and Eduard Gufeld
both recom m e nd 2 1 . Nc3 here. Wh ite ca nnot capture

14
the B l ack e- Pawn , of cou rse, for 2 1 . Ox e3 i s met by
2 1 . . . . Bf5, whereby Wh i te wo u l d l ose h i s Kn i ght.
21 . ... Nc6-d4
22 . Rb3xe3 Oc 7xc4
23 . Kgl- h l N d 4-f5
24 . R e3-d3 Bg4xe2
25. R d 3 x d 8 Re8xd8
26 . R f l - e l . . . (No. 5)
And now a l itt l e d rama u n fo l d s before the a u d i ence
on the stage of the Lo pe de Vega Th eatre i n Sev i l l e .
H e r e i s h o w i t i s d e scr i bed by a n eye-wi tness, Grand­
master E d u a rd G u fe l d :
"What happe ned towa rd s t h e e n d of the game
wh en Kasparov, wh o had a d i ff icu l t , but perhaps
defen s i b l e , pos i t i o n , forgot to push h i s c l oc k , remem­
ber i n g to do so o n l y afte r h i s opponent had taken
a l oo k at the t i m e , ca n o n l y be e x p l a i ned as a con­
seq u e nce of the te r r i b l e stra i n he wa s under. .. The
h i story of Wor l d Ch amp i o n sh i p Matches has recorded
one oth e r such case : t h i s was in the 1 5th game of
th e Smy s l ov- Botv i n n i k R et u r n Match in 1 958 wh en
Botv i n n i k forfe ited a ( g reatly super i o r ) game as a
resu l t of h i s forgetf u l n e ss . . . I do not th i n k that
Ka rpov saw h i s opponent's s l i p . Even the j o u r na l i sts
present at the game fa i led to notice the Wo r l d Ch am­
p i o n 's sensati o n a l lapse. I ndeed, Kasparov had mad e
h i s move and Karpov wa s th i n k i ng over h i s rep l y :
th e ex-Ch a m p ion a l so h a d . l i tt l e t i me l eft a n d s o h e
took a n a n x i o u s loo k at his c l o c k . Karpov's anx iety
was fe l t by Kasparov wh o g l a nced at h i s own c l ock
and . . . O h , h o rror ! H e gave a start g r i pped his head
i n his hands i n despa i r , h a st i l y pushed h i s c l ock, but
a l a s ! i n ch ess, th i s l itt l e model of l i fe, l ost t i me can
never be retu rned . "

15
26 . . . . R d 8-e 8
27 . Qa3-a 5 b7-b5
28. Ne4-d 2 Qc4-d 3
29. Nd 2-b3 B e 2-f3 (No. 6)
30. Bg2xf3
30. R xe8 is u n p l ay a b l e beca u se of the spectac u l a r
3 0 . . . . Q f l mate ! - Ed.
30 . . . . Qd 3x f3+
3 1 . K h l- g l Re8xel+
32. Qa 5 x e l N f 5-e3 (No. 7)
Wh ite resigns.
The Wh ite Queen can protect the squa res fl and
g2 o n l y by go i n g to f2, th e n B l ack wo u l d re p l y Qd 1 + ,
and mate ( at f 1 ) on the fo l l ow i n g move is i nevita b l e .
-Ed.
Th i s game is s u re to g ive m u c h wo r k to anal ysts.
When th ese n otes are b e i n g wr i tten, no c l ear-cut
method of deve l op i ng W h i te's attack afte r B l ack's
1 9th move h a s yet been d i scovered. Pe rhaps Wh ite
co u l d i mp rove o n h i s game ea r l ier, o n move 1 7 ?
G o i n g back to th e dramatic i nc i d e nt after Wh ite's
26th move, we s h o u l d l i ke to repeat h e re t h e i nter-

16
pretation of the F I D E r u l e s g i ve n by Internationa l
R eferee V l adi m i r Dvorkov ich for t h e n ewspape r
Sovetski sport.
"What h appened i n the second game i s i ndeed
extraord i n a ry for top- level compet i t ions, espec i a l l y
i n a 1N0rid Cham p i onsh i p M a tc h . Nh at do t h e r u l e s
s a y i n s u c h a case ? I t s h o u l d b e noted f i rst o f a l l that
a move in a game i s co nsidered to be comp l eted o n l y
after it i s made on the board and the c l oc k i s pushed
(the c l oc k of the one wh o has made the move is
stopped , and h i s oppone nt's-started ) . So, for examp l e ,
if a participant wh o has t o make h i s control move
does not succeed in push i n g h i s c l ock before the flag
drops, h e i s considered to have l ost the game by
forfe iture.
"The FI DE r u l e s i n te rpret t h e Se v i l l e i nc ident as
fo l l ows: if a part i c i pant forgets to push the c l oc k , the
referee s h o u l d not i nterfere and d raw the part i c i pant's
attention to the slip he has made.
"At t h e same time, t h e Sov iet Chess Code (the
1 1 th ed i t i o n ) . by wh ich c h ess compet i tions i n the
USS R ( but n ot e l sewh ere) are regu l ated, offe rs a
d i fferent i nterpreta t i o n of t h e same s i tuation : ' I f
a referee notices that a c h ess p l ayer, h a v i ng made h i s
move, h a s forgotten t o p u s h h i s c l oc k , t h e referee
sh o u l d rem i nd that p l ay e r to do so . '
"Th i s l atter i nterpreta t i o n appears t o b e more
logica l , but a Wo r l d Ch a m p i onsh i p Match i s pl ayed
accord i ng to the F I D E r u l e s and regu l at i ons.
"Th e refore , wh e n the j o u r na l i sts asked the Ch ief
R eferee of t h e Sev i l l e M atch for a n e x p l anation he tol d
them that, a lthough h e h ad se en Ka spa rov's s l ip, h e
h a d h ad no r i g h t t o te l l the C h a m p i o n about it. "
The sco re is now + 1 -0= 1 in favour of Karpov.

17
2-1393
GAME THREE

Gruenfeld Defence

A. Karpov G . Kasparov

1 . d 2-d4 Ng S-f6
2. c2-c4 g 7 -g6
3 . g2-g3 c7-c6
4 . Bfl-g2 d 7 -d 5
5. c4xd5 c6 x d 5
6. Ngl -f3 BfS-g7
7 . N b l -c3 0-0
S. Nf3-e 5 e 7-e6
9. 0-0 Nf6-d 7
1 0. f2-f4 N b S-c6
1 1 . BcI-e3 Nd 7-b6
1 2 . B e3-f2 Nc6-e7 ( N o. 8)
U p to the B l ac k's twe lfth move, t h e th i rd game of
th e m atch has repeate d , tho u g h with a n ins ign ificant
transposition, the f i rst encounter. In that game Kas­
parov somewhat ca r e l e ssly p l ayed 1 2 . . . . B d 7 , thereby
enab l i ng Karpov to carry out the advance e2-e4,
wh ich i s req u i red by Wh ite's p l a n . Th i s t i me, how­
ever, the Wor ld Champ ion pa i d more attent ion to h i s
oppo n ent's intentions. By h i s l ast m o v e he re ndered
th e advance of the Wh ite e- Pawn m e a n i ng less, wh ich
forced Karpov to seek another method of pursu i n g
h i s i n itiative.
In the event of 1 3.e4, B l ack wo u l d answer 13 . . . .
d e and seize control o f t h e v i ta l central square d 5 . -Ed.

18
1 3 . a2-a4 a7-a5
1 4 . Qd l-b3 Bc8-d 7
1 5. Rfl-cl Bd 7-c6
1 6. Nc3-b5 Nb6-c8
1 7 . e2-e3
Th i s l i stless move was c r i t ici zed by a l l those
present i n the press room, a s we l l as by other com­
me ntato rs. Wh ite 's p i eces are more act ive l y posted
than B l ack 's, but shou ld Wh ite fa i l to f i nd a cor rect
p l a n , h i s temporary adva ntage may d i sappear i nto
th i n a i r. It see m s that M i k h a i l Ta l ' s recommendation
to p l ay Rc 1 -c 5 now o r o n the 1 9th move, a n d then
doub l e the Rooks on the c-f i l e , comes stro n g l y i nto
co nsiderat i o n .-Ed.
1 7. ... Nc8-d6
1 8 . N b5xd6 Qd 8xd6
By carefu l l y ma noeuvr i n g h i s p i eces Ka spa rov
fo rces the exc hange of the act ive Wh i te Kn ight, thus
co m p l e te l y rep u l s i ng Wh ite's attac k . When the smo ke
of the i n i t i a l batt l e has c l e ared awa y , i t i s evident that
Wh i te's op e n i ng advantage h a s v a n i s h e d . E xcellent l y

19

2*
j ud g i n g the co m i ng c r i s i s, Karpov sta rts prepa r i ng h i s
p i eces to repel B l ack's possi ble attack.
1 9. Bf2-e l Rf8-b8
A fine rej o i nd e r wh o se pu rpose is to support b7-b5
(after the pre l i m i nary Bc6-e8 ) . Wh ite's next move i s
a i med at preve nt i n g that advance . - Ed.
20. Bg2-fl f7-f6
I nv i t i ng W h i te to capture the B i shop on c6 (2 1 .
N xc6 bc 22. Qc 2 l oo k s tem p t i ng i ndeed, but then
B l ac k wou l d be able to break t h rough in the cen tre
(with e6-e 5 ) . Karpov prefers to p l ay i t safe . - Ed
2 1 . N e 5-f3 Qd 6-d 7
2 2 . Qb3-c2 Ne 7-f 5 (No. 9)
Kasparov's po s i t i o n , wh i c h seemed so pa ssive o n l y
a few mome nts a g o , h as sudde n l y begu n to expand,
l i ke a sp r i n g re lease d . In the Wh i te ca m p , the centra l
sq uare e4 is now conspicuously wea k . Ka sparov
u n h u rr i e d l y and ste ad i ly i m p roves the co-ord i nation
of his p i eces and even sta rts adva n c i ng his Pawn s o n
the K - s i d e .
23 . B e l - d 2 Nf5-d 6
24 . b2-b3 R b 8-c8

9 10

20
2 5 . Qc2-d l h 7-h 6
26. Bd 2-e l g6-g5
27 . R a l-a2 Qd 7-e 8
28. R a 2-c2 B g 7-f8
29. Bfl-d3 g5-g4 ( No. 10 )
H a v i n g made t h i s move, t h e Wo r l d Champ i o n
offered a d raw, w h i c h w a s accepted .
I n the th i rd game , it never came to a decisive
battl e . What we witnessed wa s a k i nd of i nterva l in
play .
The sco re of the match is + 1 -0=2 in favou r of
Karpov.

GAME FOUR

English Opening

G. Kasparov A. Ka rpov

The fourth game of the match wa s adj o u rned on


th e 41 st move in a posit i o n where the outcome was
easy to pred ict: the two Wh ite Pawns rac ing to the i r
quee n i n g squares were u n stoppab l e . B u t u p t o the
moment when the Wor l d Ch a m p i o n sea l ed h i s move
many t h r i l l i n g adventures h ad taken p l ace on the
chess-board .
1 . c2-c4 Ng8-f6
2 . N b l -c3 e7-e5
3. Ng l -f3 Nb8-c6
4 . g2-g3 Bf8-b4
5. Bfl-g2 0-0
6. 0-0 e5-e4

21
7 . Nf3-g5 Bb4xc3
S. b2xc3 Rf8-e8
9. f2-f3 e4xf3
With h i s n i nth move, Kasparov has i nv i ted h i s
oppo nent t o resu m e t h e argument started i n the
second game. But t h e e x -Wo r l d Champ i o n turns down
the inv itat i o n and, i n stead of advanc i ng h i s e- Pawn ,
s i m p l y exchanges. One ca n argue for a very long t i me
about who stands to ga i n by t h i s excha nge. One
shou l d only mention that t h i s l i ne i s we l l known i n
ope n i ng theory and t h a t , co nsent i ng t o the opening­
up of the f-f i l e for the Wh ite R o o k s, Ka rpov appears
to have i n m i nd a n o r i g i n a l p l a n of defence.
1 0 . Ng5xf3 Qd S-e7 (No. 1 1)
H ere is anoth e r theoretica l nove l ty i ntrod uced by
Karpov i n th is l i n e . Th e h a ndbooks recom mend
1 0 . . . . d 5 . - Ed.
1 1 . e2-e3 Nc6-e5
1 2 . Nf3-d 4
Shou ld the K n ights be e x c h a nged, i t wo u l d be
much more d i fficu l t for Wh ite to make headwa y.
Acco rd i n g l y , Kasparov p refers to offer a Pawn to
ma i nta i n h is i n i ti at i v e . The consequ e nces of accept i n g
th i s Pawn a r e u n c l e a r , a l though G ra n d m a ster Gufel d
is of the op i n ion that 1 2 . . .. N x c4 1 3. e 4 ! d6 ( not, of
course, 1 3 . . . . Nxe4? 1 4. B x e4 Qxe4 1 5 . d 3 ) 1 4 . d3
Ne5 1 5 . Bg5 wou ld g ive Wh i te a very d a ngerous
attac k . Karpov dec l i n es th e offe r . - Ed.
1 2. .. , N e 5-d3
1 3 . Qd l - e 2
After 1 3 . Nf5 Qc 5 ( o r Qe 6) 1 4 . Qc 2, B l ack wou l d
hard l y venture t o take the Pawn b y 1 4 . . . . Qxc4, i n
view o f 1 5 . N h 6+ gh ( o r 1 5 . .. . KfS ) 1 6. R xf6, threat­
e n i ng 1 7 . B f l , wh i l e the p re l i m i nary 1 4 . . . . N x c l

22
wo u l d a l so fa i l to avert the Excha nge sac r i f i ce on f6.
But the World C h a m p i o n rejects the aggressive 1 3. Nf5
i n favour of th e so l id move i n th e te xt.-Ed.
1 3. . . . Nd3xc l
1 4 . R a l xc l d 7 -d 6
1 5 . R f l -f4 c7-c6
1 6 . R c l -f l Qe 7-e5 ( No. 12)
Karpov wou ld se em to have made a psyc h o l og i c a l
b l u nd e r i n h i s pre l i m i n a ry ca lcu l ations. T h e re appears
to be no oth er reason for the over·opt i m i st ic, un­
h u r r i ed moves of the B l ack Qu een wh ich resu l ted i n
an obvious loss o f t i m e , a n d a l so i n t h e B l ac k Rook
hav i n g been u n a b l e to leave its corner and come into
play . I n order to e x p l o it B l ack 's i naccurac i es, how­
ever, Wh ite st i l l had to carry out h i s attack very pre­
c i se l y . At th i s key po i nt of the batt l e , the Wo r l d
Ch a m p i o n has c o m e up with a marve l l ous p l a n . H i s
Quee n , enj o y i ng i t s r i g h t t o move i n a n y d i rect ion,
has succeeded i n ma k i ng its wa y , through a maze of
W h i te Pawns, to the K- s i d e .
1 7 . Qe2-d 3 Bc8-d7
1 8 . Nd4-f5 B d 7 x f5

11 12

23
1 9. Rf4xf5 Qe 5-e6
20. Qd 3-d4 R e 8-e7
2 1 . Qd4-h4
Th e arrival of Wh ite's ma i n attack i ng pi ece at the
gate of the B l ack K i ng's cast l e has a utomatica l l y
made t h e part p l ayed by t h e other W h i te p i eces more
i m portant. N ow Wh i te threate ns to sacr i f ice his Rook
for the B l ack Knight, and thus d estroy the bastions
around the B l ac k K i ng . The ex-Wo r l d C ha mp i o n
therefore h a s to w i t h d raw t h e B l ack Kn ight t o t h e
rear, b u t h i s Queen's R o o k i s st i l l o u t o f p l ay. By the
beautifu l move of h i s B i shop Kasparov d ec i sive l y
strengthens h i s attac k .
21 . ..
. Nf6-d7
22. Bg2-h3 Nd 7-f8
23 . R f 5-f3
The com p l ications that cou l d a r i se after 23. Rg5,
or 23. R b 5 Ng6 24. B x e6 N x h 4 2 5 . R xf 7 etc., wo u l d
def i n i te l y b e favo u r a b l e for Wh ite, b u t Ka sparov
prefers to decide the issue i n the endgame . - Ed.
23. . . . Qe6-e5
24. d 2-d4 Qe5-e4
25. Qh4xe4 Re 7xe4
26. R f3xf7
To escape the wo rst, Ka rpov h a s had to enter the
endgame a Pawn ad r i ft, but at t h i s moment the White
Rooks start t h e i r d estructive wo r k o n the seventh
ra n k .
26 . . . . Re4xe3
2 7 . d 4-d 5
Wh i te is in no h u rry to captu re the B l ack Pawn on
b7, and he increases his pressure i n the centre m a k i n g
u s e of t h e fact t h a t th e B l ack R o o k ca n not leave the
e-f i l e beca u se of th e seq u e l 27 . . . . R xc3 28. R xf8+

24
Rxf8 29. Be6+, w i n n i ng outrig ht. N o r can B l ack
capture now on d5, i n v iew of 28. Bg2 ! -Ed.
27. ... R a 8-e8
28. R f 7 x b7
B u t h e re 28. c5 ! wo u ld be even stronger, as a l l
th e comme ntators agree, for B l ack h a s n o sati sfactory
defence ag a i nst the break-th rough of the Wh ite d­
Pawn.- Ed.
28 . ... c6xd5
29. c4x d 5 R e 3-e7
30. R f l - b l h 7-h 5 (No. 13)
G rand maste r $uet i n ca l l s th i s move i mp u l s ive and
suggests 30. ... Kf7 i n stead, a s g i v i ng B l ack some
drawi ng c h a nces. Both p l ayers a re under severe time
pressure during the rema i n ing moves.
3 1 . a2-a4 g7-g5
32. B h 3-f5 Kg8-g7
33. a4-a 5 Kg7-f6
34. Bf5-d3 Re7xb7
After 34 . ... R e3, B l ack wo u ld sudd e n l y b e mated:
35. R f l + Ke5 36. Rf5 mate.- Ed.
35. R b l xb7 R e 8-e3

13 14

25
36 . Bd3-b5 R e3xc3
37. R b7xa7 N fS-g6
3S. R a7-d7 Ng6-e5
39. R d 7 xd6 + Kf6-f5
40 . a5-a6 Rc3-a3 ( No. 14)
Here the game was adj ou rned . T h e Wo r ld Ch am­
pion sea led his 4 1 st move wh ich, as eye-wi tnesses
have reported, cou ld i m m e d iate l y be see n on the
sc reens of the mo n i tors-a Spa n i sh te l e v i sion camera­
man had i n advertently ta ken a c lose-u p of Ka sparov's
score-sheet just at that moment.-Ed.
B l ack resigns without resumpt i o n .
T h e sco re i s even : + 1 - 1 = 2 .

GAME FIVE

Gruenfeld Defence

A. Karpov G. Kasparov

1 . d2-d4 N g S-f6
2 . c2-c4 g7-g6
3. N b l-c3 d7-d5
4. c4x d 5 Nf6xd5
5. e2-e4 Nd 5xc3
6. b2xc3 B fS-g7
7 . Bf l-c4 c7-c5
S. Ngl-e2 NoS-c6
9 . BcI-e3 0-0
1 0 . 0-0 BcS-g4
1 1 . f2-f3 Nc6-a5 ( No. 15 )

26
R i gh t from t h e beg i n n i ng the p l ayers are engaged
in a h eated theoretica l d i spute. Th e Wor l d Champ i o n
has e m p l oyed an open i ng l i n e i nvo l v i ng a Pawn sac r i ­
fice to g a i n i n i tiative. A t th i s moment Karpov has to
decide wh eth e r to accept t h e c h a llenge or turn it
down . The ex-Wo r l d C h a m p i o n decides to take the
Pawn , a l th o u g h he wi l l h ave to defend h i mself in a
rat h e r pass i ve po s i t i o n .
1 2 . Bc4xf7+
A very rare co n t i n uati o n . - Ed.
1 2. . . . R f8xf7
1 3 . f3xg4 Rf7xf l +
1 4 . Kg l xf l Qd 8-d6
Parad o x ica l ly , i t is t h i s exce l lent move by the
B l ack Queen that is perhaps respo n s i b l e for B l ack's
defeat i n the game, for Kasparov thought about i t
too long, s i xty-five m i n utes ( ! l. and aga i n had t o p l a y
u n d e r severe t i m e pressu re .
Kasparov's move i na u g u rates an o r i g i n a l p l a n of
counterp lay, wh i l e the convent i o n a l 1 4 . . . . cd 1 5 . cd
Qd 7 1 6 . h3 Qe6 1 7 . Qd 3 Qc4 1 8 . Qxc4 N xc4 1 9. Bg5
e6 20. Rd 1 b 5 wo u l d l e ad to a n end i ng in wh i c h

15

27
White appears to have a s l i g h t edge . - Ed.
1 5 . e4-e5 Qd 6-d 5
1 6 . B e3-f2 R a S-fS
1 7 . Kfl- g l Bg7-h6
l S . h 2- h 4 Qd 5-f7
1 9 . Bf2-g3 B h 6-e3+
20. Kg l -h 2 Qf 7-c4
Aimed at preventing 2 1 . Qd 3, wh i c h , in the opi n io n
of G randmaster Serge i Ma karychev, wo u l d be advan­
tageous for Wh ite.-Ed.
2 1 . R a l -b l b7-b6
22 . R b l -b2
W h i te i s a Pawn ah ead b u t h i s p i eces are poo r l y
co-ord i n ated, t h e i r scope b e i n g restr icted. B y pro­
tect i ng h i s Knigh t at e2 Ka rpov frees h i s Queen. Some
comme ntators be l ieve, h owe ver, that after 22 . . . . dc
Wh i te wou l d have a sma l l but c l e a r advantage. As it
is, the game eq u a l izes.-Ed.
22 . . . . Qc4-d5
23 . Qd l -d 3 N a 5-c4
24 . R b2-b l b6-b5 (No. 16)
H a v i n g obt a i ned some attack i ng cha nces, Ka sparov
cond ucts the game in f i n e sty l e . By a se r i es of far
from obv i o u s moves the Ch a m p i o n h a s succeeded in
p l ac i n g h i s p i eces ide a l l y , and, with the b r i l l iant
advance of h i s b- Pawn right u nd e r the f i re of the
W h i te R o o k , he i s ready to l a u nch a n o r i g i n a l com­
b i nat i on. H oweve r, Karpov, wh o i s i n a cramped pos i ­
tion, pl ays v e r y prec i se ly a l l the t i m e and d o e s not
a l l ow B l ac k 's i n i tiative to deve l op i nto a n i rresist i b l e
attac k .
Shou l d Wh ite accept the offe r of t h e Pawn , the
ga me m i gh t end in a spectac u l a r d raw: 2 5 . R x b 5
N xe5 ! 26. R x c 5 ( not, o f cou rse, 26. B x e 5 ? R f2, with

28
unavo i d a b l e mate ) 26 . . . . N x g4+ ( 2 6 . . . . Oxc5 i s bad ,
i n v i ew of 2 7 . B x e 5 ) 27 . K h 3 Od 7 28. Oc4+ Kh8
29 . Od 5 Nf2++ 3 0 . K h 2 Ng4+, with perpetua l
chec k .- Ed.
25 . K h 2 - h 3 a7-a6
26 . N e2-g1 c5xd4
27 . N g l -f3 Rf8-d 8
The batt le h a s reached its cu lmi nation . At t h i s
m o m e n t , Karpov has more t h a n h a l f an h o u r on h i s
c l oc k f o r the rem a i n i n g th i rteen moves, wh i l e Kaspa­
rov has l e ss t h a n ten m i n utes. See i n g that t i me
tro u b l e is j ust around the corner for h i s oppon ent,
the ex-Wo r l d C h a m p i o n u n expected l y moves h i s
a- Pawn . Out o f severa l tempt i ng paths, Kasparov
has to c ho ose the most prom i si n g. He makes two
co rrect moves and then . . .
2 8 . a2-a4 d4xc3
29 . 0d 3xc3 Od 5-e6
30 . K h 3-h 2 b5xa4 (No_ 17)
B l ack ought not to h ave taken t h i s Pawn , as a
resu l t of wh ich the Wh ite p i eces have become much
more act i ve. It i s h a rd l y necessary to dwe l l at length

16 17

29
on the conc l u d i ng moves i n the ga m e , becau se Ka spa­
rov, wh o wa s under severe t i m e pressure, k ept on
loo k i ng at h i s c l oc k , rath e r than p l ay i ng chess. Hav i ng
a considera b l e advan tage i n t i m e , t h e ex-Wo r l d
Cha m p i on p l ayed i t coo l , superb l y m a i nta i n i ng t h e
te n s i o n on the b o a r d , wh i le the t i me wa s ru n n i ng out
too fast for h i s r i va l . Eventua l l y Ka spa rov ove r l oo ked
the l oss of a n i m portant Pawn , but we shou l d a l s o
mention that by th i s t i me t h e B l ack Kn ight has been
netted by the Wh i te p i eces.
3 1 . R b 1 -b4 Nc4-d2
32 . R b4xa4 . N d 2-f 1 +
B l ac k cou l d at th i s j u nctu re h ave excha nged on
f3 : 32 . . . . Nxf3 33. gf B d 2 34. Qc2 a5, wi th a s l i g h t l y
bette r e n d g a m e .
33 . K h 2 - h 3 Rd 8-d 1
34 . Qc3-c2 Rd 1 -c 1
35. Qc2-e 2 h 7-h 5
36. Bg3-e 1 Qe6-d 7 (No. 18)
The decis i ve b l u nd e r u n d e r te rrify i ng t i me pres­
sure. Th e Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n cou l d st i l l save the day by
play i n g 36 . . . . R a 1 3 7 . Qc4 ( t h e o n l y m o ve ) Qxc4,

18

30
and the game wou l d be rough ly eve n . - Ed.
37. Qe2xa6 Rc 1 -a 1
Another b l under , and there i s now no sav i ng h i s
ga m e . - Ed.
38. Qa6xg6+
B l ack res igns.
The sco re is +2- 1 =2 i n favou r of Karpov.

GAME SIX

English Opening

G. Kasparov A. Karpov

If the read er p l ay s through the s i x th game of the


match , he may get the i m p ression that the play is
rather d u l l and em pty . Actu a l ly , th i s i s far from bei n g
so . F rom the ve ry f i rst mo ves the p l ayers use very
subt l e methods in t h e i r f i g h t for the possession of the
key poi nts on the chess-boa rd , c l ose l y watch i ng a l l
the t i m e each other's intentions.
1 . c2-c4 e7-e5
2. N b 1 -c3 N b 8-c6
In the prev i o u s games of the match wh ere Karpov
had the B l ack p i eces he p referred 2 . . . . N f6 . Now the
game wi l l proceed a l o n g th e l i nes of a R eve rsed Sici­
l i a n _ - Ed.
3. g2-g3 g7-g6
4. Bf l -g2 d 7 -d 6
5. R a 1 - b 1
T h e modern hand l i n g o f t h e ope n i ng. Wh ite post-

31
po nes the deve lopment of t h e K i ng's Kn i g h t, and i s
n o w ready t o p u s h h i s b- Pawn .
5. . . . Bc8-f5
6. d2-d3
After the v i gorou s 6. e 4 to fo rce t h e retreat of the
B l ac k B i shop, Wh i te wo u ld , of cou rse, have ga i ned
a tem po, but, o n th e other h a n d , t h e re wo u l d have
been the unprotected centra l sq uare (d4) in h i s ca mp ,
wh ere the B l ac k K n i g h t cou ld appear at any moment.
IIV h i t e h a s i n m i nd a d i fferent plan, however : he
wishes to d r ive away the B l ac k Kn i g h t to the back
row .
6 . .. . Qd 8-d 7
7. b2-b4 Bf8-g7
8. b4-b5 Nc6-d 8
9. Nc3-d 5
Karpov i s faced wi th a d i lemma : s h o u l d he a l l ow
the W h i te Kn i g h t to rema i n on th i s very active post
or shou l d he push h i s c - Pawn to d r i ve it bac k , thereby
a l l owi ng Wh ite to open the b-f i le for h i s Rooks? The
natu r a l 9 . . . . Ne7 is, of co u r se, u n p l ay a b l e because of
the nasty retort 1 0. B h 6 . - £d.
9. . . . c7-c6
1 0 . b5xc6 b7xc6
1 1 . Nd 5-c3 ... ( No_ 19)
When the Wh i te Kn i g h t c ro ssed the chess boa rd 's
"equator" on the 9th move, it wa s an i m po rtant step
in Wh ite's p l a n of atta c k . Sh o u l d t h e same pos i t i o n
a r i se i n one of the su bseq uent games of the match ,
the ex-Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n m a y we l l refra i n from imme­
d i at e ly d i stu r b i n g t h e Kn i g h t w i th his c- Pawn . Th i s
time, however, Ka rpov has m a d e u p h i s m i nd to d r ive
the K n i g h t awa y . The resu l t is very d e s i r a b l e for
Wh ite, the b-f i l e beco m i ng ava i l a b l e for the W h i te

32
Rooks to dou b l e on it. Th e Wo r l d C h a m p i o n ' s i n itia­
tive becom e s q u i te m e nac i n g .
1 1 . ... Ng8-e7
1 2 . B c 1 -a3 0-0
1 3 . N g 1 -f3 h 7- h 6
1 4 . 0-0 Bf5-e6
1 5 . Qd 1 -a4 f7-f5
1 6 . Nf3-d2
A l l the com me ntators are of th e opi n ion that the
i m m ed i ate 1 6 . Rb3, to dou b l e the Rooks and prevent
B l ack from releasing the Q-side te nsion by s i mp l i ­
fy i ng exchanges, was no d o u bt prefera b l e . Karpov
i nstantly ta kes ad vantage of Wh ite's d e l ay .- Ed.
1 6. ... Nd 8-f7
1 7 . R b 1 -b3 R a 8-b8
1 8 . R f 1 -b 1 R b 8xb3
1 9 . R b 1 x b3 Rf8-c8
A prec i se m a n oeu v re prevent i ng the penetrati on
of the W h i te Rook to t h e 7th ra n k .
20 . Qa4-a6 . . . (No. 20)
Grandmaster Eduard G u f e l d b e l ieves that Wh ite
has perhaps a very s l ight edge wh i c h , h owe ver, d is­
appears after a few moves.
19 20

33
3-1393
20 . . . . Nf7-d 8
2 1 . B a3-b4 Rc8-b8
22. N c3-a4 Kg8-f7
The B l ack K i ng is better off h e re in the event of
the end i ng that m i gh t a r i se after 23. B a 5 R x b3 24.
ab Qb7 25 . Qxb7 N x b 7 26. Bc7 Ke8, fo l l owed by
27 . . . . Kd 7 . - Ed.
23 . B b4-c3 R b8xb3
24 . a2xb3
Grand maste r Eduard Gufeld suggests that the re­
capture with the K n i g h t wo u ld sti l l l eave some h ope
for W h i te to reta i n a s l ight i n i t i ative. Thus, after
24 . N x b3 c5 Wh ite wo u ld i m p rove h i s prospects
by g i v i n g u p h i s K n ight: 25. N a x c5 dc 26. Nxc5. As it
i s, the game is com p l ete l y equa l i se d .
24. . . . Qd 7-c7
25. e2-e3 B e 6-c8
26 . Qa6-a5 Qc 7 x a 5
27. Bc3xa5
Loo k i ng b a c k o n the deve lopment of the ga me ,
one c a n see h ow, wh e n t h e c r i s i s was about t o come ,

21

34
Karpov demonstrated h i s ou tstan d i n g sk i l l : he suc­
ceeded in regro u p i n g h i s forces, as was necessary for
his d efence, with i n th e fa i r l y restricted space he had
at h i s d isposa l . As a resu lt, the pace of Kasparov's
attack s l ackened and , wh e n the Rooks had been ex­
changed , i t beca m e clear that both sides had eq u a l
chances. The exchange o f Queens p u t an e n d t o the
attacker's hopes i n t h i s short game .
27 . . . . N d 8-e6
28 . B a 5-b4 ( No. 21)
The World Cham p io n here offered a draw wh ich
was accepted .
The sco re is +2- 1 =3 i n favou r of Karpov.

GAM E SEVEN

G ru enfeld Defence

A. Karpov G. Kasparov

1 . d2-d4 N g 8-f6
2. c2-c4 g7-g6
3. N b l -c3 d 7 -d 5
4 . c4xd 5 Nf6xd5
5. e2-e4 Nd 5xc3
6. b2xc3 Bf8-g 7
7 . Bf l -c4 c7-c5
8 . Ng l -e 2 N b 8-c6
9. Bc l -e3 0-0
1 0. 0-0 Bc8-g4
1 1 . f2-f3 Nc6-a5
1 2 . Bc4xf7+ R f8xf7

35
3'
Kasparov thought about th i s obv i o u s recapture for
a qua rter of an h o u r . Appare ntly, he did not expect
Karpov to repeat t h e v a r i a t i o n from G a m e F i ve . I n
th at co ntest, the ex-Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n wa s i n d i ff icul­
ties a l most t i l l the e n d , though h e eventua l l y emerged
victo r i o u s from the batt l e . G i v ing his op i n i on about
the deve lopment of the f ifth game at a press co nfe­
rence , Anato l y Karpov sa id that h e had never l ost
control of the situat i o n . B y repea t i n g the same l i n e i n
the present game, it wa s a s i f t h e ex-Wo r l d C h a m p i o n
w i s h e d t o emphasize that those h ad not b e e n j ust
wo rd s . - Ed.
1 3 . f3xg4 Rf 7xfH
1 4 . Kg l x f l Qd 8-d 6
1 5 . e4-e5 Qd 6-d 5
1 6 . Be3-f2 R a 8-d8 ( No. 22)
The seventh game of t h e m a tch h a s so far repeated
the f i fth . O n l y n ow, on the 1 6th move, does Ka spa­
rov vary by p l ac i ng h i s R ook o n the cent r a l d-fi l e ,
i n stead of p l ay i ng 1 6 . . . . R f 8 , as h e d i d o n t h e prev i ous
occa s i o n .
1 7 . Qd l -e l Qd 5-e4
1 8 . g4-g5 Qe 4-f5
1 9 . h 2- h 4 Na 5-c4
20. Kfl -g l Qf 5-g4
2 1 . a2-a4
The ex-Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n pu rsues a n o r i g i n a l strate­
gic p l an: keep i ng h i s p i eces for the t i m e be i ng on the
two bac k rows, h e starts prepa r i ng for a future attack .
D U r i n g th i s stage, t h e Wh i te Pawn s p l ay an i m p orta n t
p a r t by restr icting the scope of the B l ack B i shop on
the K-side, wh i l e o n t h e opposite wi ng the Wh ite
a- Pawn has made way for the Wh ite Rook and, s i mu l ­
ta neo u s l y , h a s wea kened th e pos i t i o n of the B l ack

36
K n i g h t ( b y preve n t i n g t h e support i n g b7-b5 ) .
The Wo r l d Champ i o n , for h i s part, h a s c l ose l y
watc h ed over t h e operations o f t h e Wh ite p i eces and,
sh i ft i n g the B l ack Qu e e n from o n e sq uare to a nother,
has method ica l l y p repared a n assa u l t agai nst the
Wh ite Pawn s. Thu s t h e confl ict, wh ich i s usua l fo r
the game of c h e ss, becomes i m m i nent. Wh ite wi shes
to steer the game into a n e n d i ng, wh ere h e wo u l d be
a b l e to exp l o i t h i s extra Pawn , wh ereas B l ack str i ves
to make use of h i s greate r comma nd of space, i n the
midd l e-gam e . Un de rsta nda b l y , each of the r i va l s is
try i n g to carry out h i s own p l a n and upset h i s oppo­
nent's.
21 .... h 7- h 6 (No. 23)
The m a n oe uvr ing cha racter of the previous phase
of t h e game has sudd e n l y come to an e n d . Ka spa rov
has brought i nto action h i s K i ng's Rook's Pawn ,
wh ereupon t h e chess baromete r has i nsta nt l y fa l l e n
t o forecast a com i ng tempest. Now t h e chess-board
seems, a s i t were, i l l u m i n ated by l ights of d i fferent
co lou rs, suggest i n g spectac u l a r com b i nations that a re
here, on l y wa i t i n g to be l a u nched.

22 23

37
Thus, for examp l e , after 22. gh B x h 6 23. Ng3,
B l ac k , as G randmaster G u f e l d suggests, may ca rry out
a beaut ifu l c o m b i n a t i o n : 23 . . . . cd 24. cd R x d 4 !
25. B xd 4 Qxd4+ 2 6 . Kh 1 ( i f 26. Kf 1 , then Nd2+)
Qxh4+ with a str ong attac k .
22 . Ra 1 -a 2
The Wh ite Quee n s h o u l d be saved t h e tro u b l e o f
protect ing the K n i g h t at e 2 . - Ed.
22. . . . h 6xg5
23 . Qe 1 -b 1 g5xh4
The ex-Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n h a s accepted the
ch a l l enge a n d , having sac r i f iced two Pawn s, h a s
furth e r com p l icated t h e situat i o n .
24. Qb 1 -b3 Qg4-e 6
After 24 . . . . h3 Wh i te wo u l d ta k e the K n ight with
chec k , and then wa rd off t h e th reat of mate on g2 by
26 . Bg3-Ed.
25. N e2-f4 Qe6-f7
26 . N f4xg6 Qf 7xg6
An i nterest i ng a l te r nat i ve i s 26 . . . . Nxe5. However,
after 27. Qxf7+ (the consequences of 27. Nxe7+ Kf8-
or even 27 . . . . K h 7-are l ess c l e a r ) N xf7 28. Nxe7+

24

38
K h 7 29 . N f 5 Bf6 30. R b2 , Wh ite wo u l d h ave the edge
in the ensu i n g e ndgam e . Th e accurate move i n the
actua l game keeps the game b a l a nced .-Ed.
27 . 0b3xc4+ Kg8- h 8
28 . R a2-b2 ... (No. 24)
At th i s po i nt, B l ac k co u l d , as G r a n d m a ster Gufel d
suggests, set a n ice trap: 28 . . . . h3 29. g3? (29. Bh4?
is a l so bad , i n v i ew of 29 . . . . Oh 6 ! ) Bx e 5 ! 30. d e Rd 1 + !
3 1 . K h 2 R h 1 + ! ! 32. Kx h 1 Oc6+ and 33 . . . . Og2 mate .
Wh ite cou l d , however, d efend h i m s e l f by 29. Be3
Og3 30. Oe 2, with a good game.
28 . . . . c5xd4
29 . c3xd4 Og6-g4
Acco rd i ng to G ra ndmaster Sergei Ma ka rychev ,
28 . . . . h3 looks mo re re l ia b l e .
30. 0c4-f7
The passions o n t h e board have subsided for a
short wh i l e , but Kasparov aga i n atte mpts to enl iven
the gam e by t h e Exchange sacr i f ice that d i srupts the
Wh ite Pawn ch a i n i n t h e centre . G r a n d ma ster Makary·
chev is, h owever, of t h e o p i n i o n that the sacr ifice
is a l m ost fo rced , for t h e B l ac k Pawn s on b7 and e7
are i n da nger, wh i l e 30 . . . . h 3 i s refuted by the strong
3 1 . Of3 . Of course, B l ack wo u l d not p l ay 30 . . . . Bx e 5
e it h e r , for after 3 1 . d e R d 1+ 3 2 . K f2 Og3+ 33. Ke2,
t h e W h i te King escapes to safety .
30 . . . . Rd 8xd4
3 1 . Bf2xd4 Og4xd4+
32. R b2-f2 Od 4xe5
33. R f2-f5 Oe5-e 1 +
34 . R f5-f 1 Oe 1 -e 5
3 5 . Kg 1 -h 1
I n the i nte rv i ew after t h e ga me, Ka rpov noted that
35. Of4 wo u ld have posed m o re pro b l ems for B l ack.

39
35 . . . . b7-b6
Kasparov p l aces h i s Pawn s on t h e d a r k sq uares so
that h i s B i shop i s a b l e to p rotect t h e m . - Ed.
36 . 0f7-f4 Oe5- h 5
37 . Qf4-f5 Oh 5-e 2
38 . R f l -c l Bg7 -f6
39 . Of5-g6 Oe2-e6
40 . R c l -d 1 Oe6-c8
4 1 . Rd l -f l Oc8-d 7 (No. 25)
I n t h e severe m u t u a l t i m e pressure u n d e r wh i c h
these l ast m o v e s w e r e m ad e , n e i t h e r of t h e contesta nts
has succeeded in outw i tt i n g h i s oppo nent, and on the
42nd move the game wa s adj o u r ned in a posi tion
wh ere a draw se emed t h e most l i k e l y outco m e . When
the game wa s resu m e d , h owe ver, t h e f i g ht i n t h e
adj ournment session wa s l o n g and h a r d .
42. 0g6-h 5+
The sea l ed move. Kasparov e x pressed t h e v i ew that
th i s cho ice by Karpov i s not t h e best, because the
B l ac k K i ng escapes from d a nger too eas i l y .
42. . . . K h 8-g7
43 . R f l -f4 Od 7-d2

25 26

40
44. Rf4-g4+ Kg7-fS
45. Qh5-f5 Qd 2-c 1 +
46. K h 1 -h 2 Qc 1 -c7+
47. Qf5-f4 Qc 7xf4+
4S. R g4xf4 ... ( No. 26)
When there a r e few p i eces l e ft on the che ss- boa rd,
t h e r o l e of such a " p i ece of t h e I i n e " a s a Rook
becomes considera b l y more i mporta nt . However,
i n t h e g i ve n case, t h e B l ac k K i n g is re l i a b l y protected
by the dark-squared B i shop. I n the e p i sode of p l ay we
have j u st witn essed , t h e Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n wa s extre­
me l y carefu l , i n v i ti n g h i s r i v a l to exchange the Queen s
and enter t h e endga m e . The further p l ay fo l l ows the
c l assica l l aws l a i d d own by the "sc i e nce of chess";
as soon as the Qu een s h ave d i sa ppeared from the
board, both K i ngs without fear rush to the centre,
act ive l y assisting in the operations of t h e i r m e n .
4S . . . . KfS-eS
49. Kh 2-g 1 a7-a6
50. Kg 1 -f2 KeS-d7
5 1 . Kf2-e2 Kd7-d6
52. Ke2-d3 Kd6-c5
53 . R f4-c4+ Kc5-d 5
54 . Rc4-c7 a6-a 5
5 5 . Rc7-c4 e7-e5 ( No. 27)
Kasparov starts e x ec ut i ng an act i ve p l an of
counterplay, wh ich many comme ntators i n the press
room regarded as rat h e r r i s k y . B l ac k ' s m a i n trump i n
t h e d i agrammed pos i t i o n i s t h e poss i b i l ity of brea k i n g
t h r o u g h on t h e Q-s i d e at a n opportu n e moment, thus
sett i n g up a n outside passed Pawn . The fol l owi ng
moves p l ayed by t h e Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n aim at ma k i ng
such a breakthrough both proba b l e and effect ive. As
B l ack is carry i ng out h i s p l a n , h owe ver , h i s e- and

41
h -Pawn s become v u l n e r a b l e , and t h e ex-Wo r l d Ch am­
pi o n attempts -to ta k e advantage of t h i s c i rcumstance.
-Ed.
56. R c4-g4 Bf6-e7
57 . R g4-g7 e 5-e4+
58. Kd 3-e 3 Be 7-c5+
59. Ke3-e 2 Bc 5-d 4
60. R g7-g 5+ Kd 5-c4
6 1 . R g 5-f5 Kc 4-c3
62 . R f 5-h 5 Kc 3-c4
63. R h 5-f 5 Kc4-c3
64 . R f 5-g 5 Kc3-c4
65. R g 5-h 5
Th e Wh ite Rook h a s t o con tro l the f i fth rank to
prevent the i m med i ate brea kth rough b6-b 5, wh ere­
upon B l ac k ' s a - Pa wn wo u l d march on to queen.-Ed.
65. . . . Bd 4-f6
66. R h 5-b 5 Bf6-d 4
67 . R b 5-h 5 Bd 4-f6
68. R h 5- h 6 Bf6-d 4
69. R h 6 x h 4 .. . ( No. 28)
69 . . . . b6-b 5

27 28

42
At l a st. B u t t h i s i s o n l y suff i c i e n t to h o l d the ba l ·
ance.
7 0 . a4x b 5 a 5-a4
7 1 . R h 4xe4 a4-a3
72. b5-b6 a3-a2
7 3 . R e4xd4+ Kc4xd4
7 4 . b6-b7 a2-a 1 0
75. b7-b80 Oa 1 -a6+
7 6 . Ke2-f2 Oa 6-f6+
77. Kf2-g 1 Kd4-e4
7 8 . 0b8-b4+ Ke4-f5
7 9 . 0b4-e 1 Of6-d4+ ( No. 29)
G a m e d rawn .
An e l egant f i na l e ! Th i s i nte rest i ng e n d i ng wi l l
proba b l y be stud i ed by beg i n ners over and over aga i n .
And they w i I I l earn t h e s i m p l e truth that i n chess
a s i n g l e move i s ofte n d e c i s i v e . In t h i s e ncounter,
however, Ka rpov fa i l ed to find that move. Kasparov's
dark-squared B i shop a b l y assisted h i s Pawns, wh i l e
t h e W h ite Ro ok eve rywh e re came u p against B l ack ' s
re l i a b l e cove r i ng forc e .
The s c o r e i s +2- 1 =4 i n favou r of Karpov.

29

43
GAME EIGHT

English Opening

G. Kasparov A. Karpov

1 . c2-c4 e7-e5
2 . N b 1 -c3 d 7-d6
3. g2-g3 c7-c5
Karpov l eaves the beaten track of ope n i n g theory,
his th i rd move being a n e x p e r i m e n t . With th i s un­
usual move, h e succeeds i n obstruct i n g Wh i te's i n itia­
tive i n t h e centre . H owever, t h e re i s a p r ice to pay:
the vital centra l sq u a re d5 becomes a wea k ness in h i s
camp.
4 . B f 1 -g2 N b 8-c6
5 . a2-a3 g7-g6
Th e advance 6. b4 c a n o n l y be prevented by
5 . . . . a 5 , wh ich is too co m m itting. because t h e l ight
sq ua res i n the B l ack camp wo u l d become i r revoca b l y
wea k .
6. b2-b4 . .. ( No. 30)

30 31

44
As is k nown from open i ng theory, i t wo u l d be
dangerous for B l ack to accept the offered Pawn ,
beca use after, for examp l e , 6 . . . . cb 7 . ab Nxb4
S . Oa4+ Nc6 9. B xc6+ (9. Ba3 i s a l so good , with
annoy i n g pressu r e ) bc 1 0. Oxc6 B d 7 1 1 . Ob7, White
wou l d have a super ior posi t i o n , many comme ntators
ind icate.
6. . . . BfS-g7
7 . R a l -b l NgS-e7
S . e2-e3 0- 0
9. d 2-d 3 Ra S-bS
1 0. N g l -e2 BcS-e6
1 1 . b4-b5 Nc6-a 5
1 2 . Bc l -d 2 b7-b6
1 3 . 0-0 N a 5-b7
1 4 . e3-e4
Sk i l f u l l y adva n c i n g h i s Pawns, Wh ite has managed
to d r ive away h i s opponent's forces f i rst on the 0-
side, then in the centre.
1 4. . . . KgS- h S
1 5 . 0d l -c l f7-f5
1 6 . Bd 2-g5 ... (No. 3 1)
With t h i s move, t h e Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n starts an
operat i o n a i med at se i z i n g possess ion of the centra l
l i ght sq uares by excha n g i n g h i s dark-sq u ared B i shop
for t h e i r defender, the B l ack Kn ight at e 7 . - Ed.
1 6. . . . Od S-e S
1 7 . Bg5xe7 Oe Sxe7
l S . e4xf5 Be6xf5
Th i s recapture fu l l y ju stifies Wh ite's i ngen ious
operat ion started o n move 1 6. Th e ex-Wo r l d Cham­
pion's long m ed i tation before h i s e i ghteenth move,
however, suggests that afte r l S . . . . gf 1 9 . f4 B l ack
wou l d a l so face se r i o u s pro b l e m s . - Ed.

45
1 9 . Nc3-d 5 Qe 7-d 7
20. Qc 1 -d 2 N b 7- a 5
I t wo u l d s e e m t h a t o n e n e e d not fee l apprehen­
sive for B l ack's safety at th i s m o m e nt. H i s counter­
pl ay wa s thought, by those present in the press room,
to i nv o l ve b r i ng i n g i nto p l ay, v i a the route b7-d 8-
e6, B l ac k 's other Kn i ght, currently occupy i ng a rath e r
pass ive pos i t i o n at the e d g e of the board . T o every­
one's asto n i sh m ent, h owever, Ka rpov p l ayed th e
move i n th e text and then, for some t i m e , moved h i s
K n i g ht back a n d forth between t h e sq uares b7 a nd
a 5 . I t has beco me c l ea r that he feared Wh i te's advance
on the Q-s i d e and trusted to the so l id i ty of his posi­
tion on the othe r wing. B ut i t i s on the K-side that
the main events i n th i s game were to d eve l op, wr i tes
G rand master Alexei Suet i n .
2 1 . Ne2-c3 R b8-e8
22 . Nc3-e4 N a 5-b7
23 . a3-a4
I t i s th i s ad vance that h a mstr i ngs the B l ack K n i ght.
Sh o u l d the Nh i te a- Pawn adva nce to a5, Wh i te ' s
Q-side i n i tiative wo u l d become overpowe r i n g . - Ed.
23. . . . N b 7- a 5
24 . h 2-h4 N a 5-b7
25. Kg 1 -h 2 R e 8-b8
26. R b 1 -a 1 Nb7-a5
27 . R a 1 -a3 R f 8-f7
28. Qd 2-c3 R b 8-d8
29 . Ra3-a 2 Bg7-h6
30. N e4-g5 R f7-f8
3 1 . Ra2-e2 B h 6-g7
32 . Qc3-c 2 Rd 8-e8
33. Nd 5-e3 Bg7-h6
34. Bg2-d 5 B h 6-g7

46
35. Qc2-d 1 h7-h6
36 . N g5-e4 Qd 7-d8 ( No. 32)
Having fou nd h i m s e l f i n a d ifficu l t pos ition,
Anat o l y Karpov m a i nta i n s t h e co·ord i nation and
sta b i l ity of his pi eces with g reat s k i l l , h e c l osely
watch es over t h e preparati o n s of G a r r i Kasparov's
ch ess a r m y , a ntici pates his opponent's p l ans and
obstructs their e x ecuti o n . However, t h e Wor l d
C h a m p i o n h a s succeeded i n f u r t h e r wea ken ing
B l ack 's Pawn formation a n d , by i n sta l l i n g two m i no r
pi eces i n t h e centre, i s prepar i ng a Pawn breakthrough
on the K-s i d e .
37 . R e2-a2 Bf5-c8
38 . N e4-c3 h 6-h 5
39 . Bd 5-e4 R e 8- e6
40. Nc3-d 5 Bg7-h6
4 1 . N e3-g2 Kh 8-g7
42. f 2-f4 . . . ( No. 33)
As soon as t h e W h i te Pawn has advanced to signa l
the beg i n n i ng of a K- side assa u lt, the Ch i ef Arbiter
so unds t h e gong: f i ve h ou rs of the f i rst p l a y i n g
sess ion have e x p i red and t h e g a m e i s adj ourned.

32 33

47
Karpov thought about t h e move h e had to sea l for
21 m i n u tes. H e had to d e c i d e wh ether h i s Rook
sho u ld be withd rawn to t h e eighth r a n k o r wheth e r
Wh ite's adva nced Pawn s h o u l d be captu red with h is
e- Pawn . Karpov chose the second a l ternative, t he reby
vacating a n i mportant post for the W h i te K n i ght,
wh ich was rat h e r modest l y p l aced o n t h e second
ra n k . And i t i s t h i s Kn i g h t that wa s a b l e to d ea l th e
decisive b l ow, d i srupt i n g B l ack's Pawn structure.
42 . . . . e 5xf4
At a press confere nce l ate r, G a r r i Kasparov referred
to the text move as "the most u n happy" choice i n
th i s pos i t i o n . A n u m b e r of comme ntators h ave
suggested that B l ack's best practical c h a nce to repe l
th e attack wa s to cont i n u e 42 . . . . B b 7 w i th the i nten­
tion of exch a n g i ng t h e B i shop for one of Wh i te ' s
dangerous centra l i zed p i eces. Afte r 42 . . . . B b 7 , how­
ever, t h e f u rt h e r advance of t h e W h i te Pawn to f 5
wou l d s h atter t h e pos ition of t h e B l ack K i ng and
open the l i nes for i nvasion by Wh ite's p i eces. Soo n e r
or l a t e r Wh ite wo u l d be bo u n d to w i n . B l ac k ' s t rou b l e
is t h a t h e i s i n fact p l a y i n g w i th out h i s Kn ight, wh ich
i s f i r m l y stuck at t h e edge of the board, far away
from the ma i n f i e l d of batt l e . One can not say that
the K n i ght i s abso l ute l y i d l e there: i t guards aga i nst
th e adva nce of t h e Wh i te a-Pawn and a l so, i nd i rectl y ,
restr icts t h e manoe uvres of t h e Nh i te p i eces, for
White consta ntly h as to p rotect the square b3,
through wh ich t h e B l ack Kn i g h t may, at a n opportune
moment, h ead for t h e v i ta l outpost at d4. St i l l , it i s
on the K-side t h a t t h e Kn i g h t i s m u c h needed . - Ed.
43. Ng2xf4 Re6-e5
44. Nf4xg6 R f8xf 1
45. 0d 1 xf 1 R e 5xe4

48
46. d3xe4 Kg7xg6
47 . Ra2-f2 Qd 8-e8
4 8 . e4-e5
It i s esse n t i a l that the B l ack Queen shou l d be u n ­
a b l e to occupy the sq uare e5, f o r shou l d th i s square
be ava i l a b l e to i t B l ack wo u l d succeed i n defend i n g
h i ms e l f i n s o m e v a r i at i o n s . 48 . . . . Q x e 5 i s now u n p l ay­
able, because of 49. Re2, fo l l owed by 50. Ne7+. -Ed.
48. . . . d6xe5
49. Rf2-f6+ Kg6-g7
50. R f 6-d6 . . . ( No. 34)
B l a c k resigns.
I f there had not been the B l ack Pawn at e5, B l ac k
cou ld reply 50. . . . Qe 5, protect i ng the square f 6 .
As i t is, h e has no sat i sfactory d efence agai nst t h e
W h i te Q u e e n ' s i nvasi o n , 5 1 . Qf6+, e x p l a i n s Grand­
master G u fe l d .
T h e m i sta k e made by Anato l y Karpov a t the
adj o u rnment has enab l ed Wh i te to p l ay a se ries of
beautifu l moves. In so d o i ng, G a r r i Kaspa rov had to
make some mate r i a l sacr i f ices, but when the Wh ite
Quee n a nd Rook a l igned a l ong the wide open f i l e on

34

49
4 - 1 393
the K-side, it became obvious t h at h i s attack was
irres i st i b l e .
Th e sco re i n th e match i s n o w eve n : +2-2=4 .

GAME N I N E

G ruenfeld Defence

A. Ka rpov G . Kasparov

1 . d 2-d 4 NgS-f6
2. c2-c4 g7-g6
3. N b l -c3 d 7 -d 5
4. c4x d 5 Nf6xd5
5. e2-e4 N d 5xc3
6. b2xc3 BfS-g7
7 . Bf l -c4 c7-c5
S. N g l -e2 N b S-c6
9. Bc l -e3 0- 0
1 0 . 0-0 BcS-g4
1 1 . f2-f3 Nc6-a5
1 2 . Bc4xf7+ Rf Sxf7
1 3 . f3xg4 Rf7xf l +
1 4. Kgl xfl c5xd4
In the f i f th and seve nth game s of the present
match, the Wo r l d Cham p i on preferred to p l ay 14 . . . .
Qd6.-Ed.
1 5 . c3xd4 Qd S- b6 ( No. 35 )
An i n novat i on, whose p o i n t i s that B l ack now
th reatens 1 6 . . . . e5. The u s u a l l i ne h e re is 1 5 . . . .
Qd 7 1 6. h 3 Qe6 1 7 . Qd 3 Qc4, but 1 5 . . . . Qd 6 has a l so
been pl ayed i n th i s pos i t i o n . - Ed.
1 6. Kf l -g l Qb6-e6

50
Once aga i n t h e opponents h ave ad opted a sharp
l i n e of the G r u e nfe l d Defence, i n wh ich B l ack sacri­
fices a Pawn , ga i n i ng some i n i t i at i ve as compensat ion.
Wh ereas i n the f i fth and seve nth games t h e ex-World
Ch a m p i o n strived to get a l l h e possi b l y cou l d out of
th i s variation, that i s, to repe l B l ack's attack and keep
his extra Pawn , th i s t i m e h e takes a d iffe rent cou rse :
he decides to return t h e mater i a l , but turn h i s atten­
t i o n to h i s centre Pawn s, attempting to l a u nch an
attack with his p i eces u n d e r t h e i r cover.
1 7 . Od l -d 3 Oe6xg4
1 8 . R a 1 -f l Ra 8-c8
1 9. h2-h3 Og4-d7
20. d 4-d 5 Na 5-c4
2 1 . B e3-d4 e7-e 5 ( No. 36)
Grandmaster Se rgei Ma ka rychev be l ieves that afte r
2 1 . . . . N e 5 22. Og3 Wh ite wo u l d h ave a sma l l ed ge.
But B l ack shou l d be extre m e l y carefu l , because
after 22 . . . . Od 6 23. Kh 1 , t h e rash 23 . . . . Rc2 may
resu l t in d i saster for h i m : 24. Nf4 R x a 2 ? 2 5 . Ne6
Bf6 26. Bxe5, wi n n i ng outright.
22. d 5xe6

35 36

51
4*
By p l ay i ng thus, Ka rpov avoids a beau t i f u l , yet
rat h e r obvious, trap: 22. Bxa7 b6 23. Rc l Qxa 7
24 . R xc4 Rxc4 2 5 . Qxc4 b 5+, B l ack wi n n i ng the
Quee n , i n d icates Grandmaster E d u a rd G u fe l d .
22. . . . Qd 7xe6
23. Bd4xg7
The dark-squared B i shops should be excha nged
to we a k e n the defences of the B l ack K i ng .
23 . . . . Kg8xg7
24 . N e2-f4 Qe6-d 6
25. Qd 3-c3+ '" ( No. 37)
Th e World C h a m p i o n is compe l l ed to send h i s
monarch t o t h e edge o f t h e boa rd, becau se t h e seem­
i n g l y natu r a l 25 . . . . Qe 5 wo u ld h ave l ed to its sudden
death : 26 . N e 6+ Kg8 27. Qxc4 R xc4 28. R f8 mate !
And 25 . . . . Kg8 wou l d fa i l to 26. N d 5 !
25. . . . Kg7-h6
26. N f4-d 5 Qd 6-e5
27. Qc3-d 3
G rand master G ufe l d reports t h a t t h i s modest
retreat of the Wh ite Queen wa s c r i t i cized by many
expe rts, wh o deemed 2 7 . Qb4, with t h e idea of pl ay-

37 38

52
i n g N d 5-f6-g4, to be far more act ive, as B l ack
wou l d be forced to g i ve u p t h e v i ta l d i agona l a 1 - h 8 .
Grandmaster Se rge i M a k a rychev, h owe ver, d i sag ree s
with th i s eva l uat i o n , ma i nta i n i n g that after 27. Qb4
N d 6 ! it wo u l d be hard for Wh i te to m a k e headwa y .
27. . . . K h 6-g7
28. Nd 5-f6 Qe 5-d 6
The o n l y move. 28 . . . . Rc7 wo u l d l ose at once
after 29 . Qd 8, wh i l e, as the D utch G ra n d m a ster Jan
T i m m a n i n d i cates, on the B l ac k K i ng's retreat, 28 . . . .
K h 8 , Wh ite can spectac u l a r l y sac r i f i ce h i s Queen :
29 . Qd 7 Qc7 30. N e 8 ! Qxd 7 3 1 . Rf8 mate.
29. Qd 3-c3 Qd 6-e 5
30. Qc3-d 3 Qe 5-d6
3 1 . Qd 3-c3 Qd 6-e 5
3 2 . Qc3-b3 Rc8-c7
33 . Qb3-d 3 Rc7-f7
Forc i ng t h e exchange of the Kn ights, th i s prec ise
manoeuvre completely e l i m i nates Wh ite's pressu re . ­
Ed.
34. Qd3xc4 Rf7 xf6 ( No. 38)
Wh ite has fa i l ed to fo l l ow up h i s i n i t i at i ve , a l though
Karpov made every effort to find t h e best d i ago n a l
f o r h i s Quee n . However, f i nd i ng h i m s e l f i n a danger­
ous s i t u at i o n , t h e W o r l d Ch a m p i o n p l ayed very
prec i s e l y , a nt i c i pated h i s oppo n e nt's i ntentions and
made t h e very best moves a l l a l on g . After the exchange
of t h e m i nor pi eces t h e game has q u i etened down ,
ta k i ng on a drawish c h a racte r . I n t h e heat of the
batt l e , h owever, t h e opponents decide to cont i n u e
fi ght i ng f o r a fu l l po i nt .
3 5 . R f 1 -d 1 b7-b5
A l l comme ntators eva l uate t h i s m o v e a s a sharp,
yet very r i sky attempt. 35 . . . . Rf7 l ooks safe r . - Ed.

53
36. Rd 1 -d 7 + Kg7-h6
3 7 . 0c4-e 2 Oe5-c5+
38. Kg 1 - h 2 Oc5-e5+
39. g2-g3 Oe5-c3
40. K h 2-g2 Oc3-c4
4 1 . 0e2-e3+ g6-g5
Acco rd i ng to G randmaster M a k a rychev, in the
event of 4 1 . Oxc4 bc 4 2 . R x a 7 Rc6 43. R b 7 c3 44.
Rb1 Ra6, the game wo u ld i m med i ate l y be d rawn .
42 . Rd7-d2 Oc4-f H
43 . Kg2-h 2 . . . ( No. 39)
Th e game was adj ourned .
43 . . . . Of 1 -f3
44. 0e3-d 4 Rf6-e6
4 5 . e4-e5 Of3-f5
46. R d 2-e 2 a7-a5
47 . 0d 4-d 5 b5-b4
48. 0d 5xa5 Of5-d3
49 . R e2-g2 Od 3-d4
50. 0a 5-a 8 Od 4xe5
5 1 . 0a8-f8+ K h 6-g6
52. Qf8xb4 h 7- h 5
53. h 3- h 4 g5xh4
54. 0b4x h 4 R e 6-d6
55. 0h4-c4 Rd 6-d 4
Threate n i n g 56 . . . . R x h 4, fo l l owed by 57 . . . . Oe 1
mate . - Ed.
56. 0c4-c6+ Kg6-g7
57 . 0c6-b7+ Kg7-h6
5 8 . 0b7-c6+ Kh 6-g7
59 . R g2-c2 R d 4-h4+
60 . K h 2-g2 Oe5-e4+
6 1 . 0c6x e4 R h 4x e 4
62. Rc2-c 7+ Kg7-g6

54
63 . Rc7-a7 Re4-e3
After 6 3 . . . . h4, fo l l owed by the excha nge of
Pawn s, a d raw co u l d perhaps be reach ed even soo ner
than i n the actu a l ga me .-Ed.
64. Kg2- h 3 Re3-c3
6 5 . R a 7 -a 8 Rc3-c4
6 6 . a2-a4 Kg6-g5
67 . a4-a 5 Rc4-a4
6 8 . a 5-a6 Kg5-h6
Th e B l ack K i ng should hasten to reach the squares
h 7 or g7 , wh ich wou l d guarantee B l ack a draw. - Ed.
69 . Kh 3-g2 Ra4-a3
7 0 . Kg2-f2 K h 6-g7 ( No. 40 )
G a m e d rawn .
The score i n the match is +2-2=5 .

39 40

55
GAME T E N

ca ro- Kan n Defence

G. Kasparov A. Karpov

For the f i rst t i m e in the present match t h e Wor l d


Cham p i o n decides t o o p e n a g a m e w i t h h i s K i ng's
Pawn . In reply, the ex-Wo r l d Cham p i o n resorts to h i s
we l l· tested weapon-the Ca ro- Kan n Defence. W i th
th is so l id d efence, Anato l y Karpov com p l ete l y
succeeded i n neutra l i z i ng Wh i te's ope n i ng i n i tiative
i n the recent Cand idates Superf i n a l Match aga i nst
Grandmaster An dre i So k o l ov ( Sp a i n , 1 98 7 ) . Th e
te nth ga me of t h e Kasparov· Karpov Wo r l d C h a m p i o n ·
sh i p Match i n Sev i l l e proceeds rath e r u neventfu l l y
and soon ends i n a d raw. One gets t h e i m p ression
that the pa rtic i pants want to ta k e a rest after t h e long
adjournment sessions a n d stormy events of the
prev i o u s enco u nters, but, at t h e same t i m e , do not
wish to postpo ne the ga m e .
1 . e2-e4 c7-c6
2. d2-d 4 d 7 -d 5
3. N b l -d 2 d 5xe4
Th e mod ern h a n d l ing of t h i s ope n i ng, a i med at
ta k i n g the st i n g out of the "new" Caro· Ka n n bui ld­
up ( start i n g with 3 . . . g6 ) . wh ich Wh i te wi l l now be
.

able to counter with 4 . c3. After Karpov's rep l y ,


however, the game transposes to a convent i o n a l
l i n e . - Ed.
4. Nd 2xe4 N b 8-d7
5. N g l -f3 N g8-f6
6. Ne4xf6+ Nd 7xf6
7. c2-c3

56
As G rand master G u fe l d notes, th i s rather passive
move wa s l ast seen in master p l ay more t ha n th i rty
years ago, in the P i l n i k-Petrosyan game (Candidate s
Tournam ent, Amsterdam, 1 956) , where B l ack emerged
from the o pe n i n g in a good pos i t i o n . Wh i te's most
a m b i t i o u s cont i n uation is 7 . N e 5 , with wh i c h Anato l y
Karpov wo n a spectacu l a r v i ctory over t h e Czech
G ra n d master V l ast i m i l Ho rt ( B ugojno, 1 975 ) .
7. ... BcS-g4
S. h 2 - h 3 Bg4xf3
After S. . . . B h 5 , W h i te cou l d proceed with t h e
sharp 9 . g4 Bg6 1 0. Ne 5 , th reate n i ng 1 1 . h 4 a n d
1 2 . h 5 . - Ed.
9. 0d l xf3 e7-e6
1 0 . Bf l -c4 BfS-e7
1 1 . 0- 0 Nf6-d 5
White does not m i nd e x c h a n g i n g h i s dark· squared
B i s hop for the B l ac k K n i g h t to open the f· f i l e . How·
ever, he shou l d perhaps h ave reta i n ed h i s B i shop pa i r
by p l a y i n g 1 2 . Bd 2, Grandmaste r G ufe l d be l i eves.
1 2 . Bc l -e3 Od S-b6
1 3 . 0f3-e2 0-0 ( No. 4 1)
As Grand master M a k a rychev suggests, the
i m m e d i ate 1 3 . Bb3 wo u l d be m o re exact.
1 4 . R a l -d l Be7-d6
1 5 . Bc4-b3
Garri Kasparov took over half a n h o u r to p l ay th i s
move . An i nterest i n g a l te rnative wo u l d be 1 5 . Bc l ,
and after 1 5 . . . . Bf4 1 6 . B xf4 1 7 . Of3 N d 5 l S . Rd2
Wh ite wo u l d ga i n a sma l l but c l e a r adva ntage . - Ed.
1 5. . . . Nd 5xe3
1 6 . f2xe3 c6-c 5
Th i s sta ndard counte r b l ow i n the centre i s both
necessary a nd suff i c i ent to keep the game ba l anced .

57
1 7 . R f l -f3 R a 8-e8
1 8 . R d l -f l Re8-e7
Remember i ng the u n h appy developments i n th e
fo u rth game, when B l ack fai led to repe l Wh i te's
attack aga i n st the sq uare f7, Karpov i s now particu l a r·
Iy caref u l to protect th i s p o i n t as stro n g l y as pos·
s i b l e . - Ed.
1 9 . 0e2-f2 Oo6-c7
At th i s j u nctu re, see i ng that Wh i te i s u n a b l e to
ma k e progress agai nst B l ack's stu rd y d efence, the
Wor l d Ch a m p i o n offered a d raw. H i s r i va l , however,
asked him to p l a y his move o n the board , wh ich is
fu l l y i n kee p i n g with the F I D E r u l es.-Ed.
20. Of2-h4 ( No. 42)
Karpov then accepts the d raw, and the score i n th e
match rema i n s e v e n : +2-2=6.

41 42

58
GAME E LE V E N

Gruenfeld Defence

A. Karpov G. Kasparov

In th i s game, t h i ngs come to a head q u i te unex·


pected l y and contrary to logic. On move t h i rty· one,
both K i ngs set out for the centre of the board . I t
seemed that for some t i m e t o come a l l t h e rema i n i n g
pi eces wo u ld rem a i n i d l e at the i r posts. Sudde n l y , the
ex·Wor l d Cha m p i on saw, and very hast i l y p l ayed on
th e boa rd, a variati on i n wh ich his R ook wa s to pene·
trate into the B l ack camp, attac k i n g the B l ack Pawns
from beh i n d . W i th o ut a mome nt's hesitat ion, Garri
Kasparov attacked the R oo k wi th h i s Kn ight and
fina l l y the Rook was netted by the B l ack p i eces.
Anato l y Karpov had to g ive u p h i s Roo k for the
B l ack B i shop, but th i s i n no way i m p roved h i s posi·
tion : the seem i ng act i v i ty of the Wh i te B i shop wa s
quick l y ext i n g u i shed by the prec i se ma noeuvres of
the B lack Rook, wh ich had h eretofore s l u m bered i n
i t s corner. I n wh at fo l l owed , Kasparov n e a t l y exp l o i t­
ed h i s mate r i a l advantage .
1 . d 2-d 4 NgS-f6
2. c2-c4 g7-g6
3. N b l -c3 d7-d S
4. c4xd S Nf6xdS
S. e2-e4 Nd Sxc3
6. b2xc3 BfS-g7
7 . Bf l -c4 c7-cS
S. N g l -e2 N b S-c6
9. Bc l -e3 0-0
1 0 . 0-0 BcS-g4

59
1 1 . f2-f3 Nc6-a5
1 2 . Bc4xf7+ Rf8xf7
1 3 . f3xg4 Rf7xf 1 +
1 4 . Kg l xf l Qd 8-d 6
Perhaps d i ssat i sf i ed with 1 4 . . . . cd, as occu rred
i n the n i nth game, the Wor l d Ch a m p i o n returns to
th e p l a n he ado pted i n Game F i ve, wh e n it took
h i m s i xty-five m i n utes to d e c i d e o n th i s cou rse of
act i o n . Unwi l l i n g to repeat h i s react ion in that en­
counter, Ka rpov varies, ente r i n g an endgame where
B l ack has to strug g le for equa l ity . - Ed.
1 5 . Kf l -g l Qd 6-e6
1 6. Qd l -d 3
I nv i t i ng h i s opponent t o rega i n t h e l ost Pawn ,
wh ich can h a rd l y su it B l ac k , for after 1 6 . . . . Qxg4
1 7 . R b l Wh ite has, in G randmaster G u f e l d ' s opi n i o n ,
a c l ear pos i t i o n a l advantage, owi ng to t h e B l ack
Kn ight's awkwa rd post at a5.
1 6. .. . Qe6-c4 ( No. 43)
1 7 . Qd 3xc4 N a 5xc4
1 8 . Be3-f2 c5xd4
1 9 . c3xd4 e7-e5

43 44

60
Accord i ng to G randmaster M a k a rychev, th i s i s
the k e y move o f the Wo r l d C h a m p i o n ' s p l a n . Evident­
I y , it h as bot h advantages and d i sadvantages. The
activ ity of the Wh i te p ieces is now g reat ly reduced ,
a l though h i s Pawn structure has been i mproved . A. lot
wi l l d epend o n wh eth e r Wh i te can succeed i n trans­
fer r i n g h i s K n i g h t to an active post.
20. d 4-d 5 Bg7-h6
2 1 . h2-h4 B h 6-d2
22. R a 1 -d 1 Bd2-a5
After l ong med i tation, Kasparov h e re p l ayed a
move wh ich was cr iticized by many comme ntators,
a l l of whom suggested 22 . . . . b 5 i nstead , str i v i ng for
counterp l a y . - Ed.
23. R d 1 -c 1 b7-b 5
24. R c 1 -c2
A m u l t i p u rpose, preventive move, the most natura l
re p l y to wh ich wo u ld be, as Grandmasters Ta l and
Maka rychev suggested , a7-a6, e i ther now o r fou r
moves l ater. T h e B l ack a- Pawn wo u ld t h u s b e safe
from attacks by t h e W h i te B i s h op, the Pawn on b5
wou l d be supported , a nd t h e B l ack Rook wo u l d be
free to go to c8, or f8, and t he n to i nvade f4. But it
wo u l d seem that the Wo r l d C h a m p i o n wa s l oath to be
deprived of the possi b i l i ty of p l ay i ng a 7 x b6 in good
time, ope n i n g the a-fi l e fo r h i s R o o k .
24 . . . . Nc4-d6
25. N e 2-g3 Nd 6-c4
26. N g3-f 1 Nc4-d6
27 . N f 1 -g3 Nd 6-c4
28. g4-g5 Kg8-f7 ( No. 44)
B l ack d i scards t h e opportu n i ty of co unterplaying
by t h e ma noeuvre Ra 8-f8-f4, as i f h e anticipated
th e dramatic denouement in the game- G r a ndmaster

61
Maka rychev comme nts on B l ac k 's 28th move. Grand­
master Gufeld, on the other hand, be l i eves B l ack's
last move to be a m i sta ke, reco m m e n d i n g i nstead
28 . . . . a6 29. Kf l Rf8 30. Ke2 R f4, or 29. N f l Rf8
30 . Ne3 Nd6, with 28 . . . . Rc8 a l so com i ng i nto con sid-
erat i o n .
29. Ng3-f l Nc4-d 6
30 . N f l -g3 Nd 6-c4
3 1 . Kg l -f l Kf 7-e7
32. Bf2-c5+ Ke7-f7
33 . Rc2-f2+
Some comme ntators ma i nta i n that i t is because
of t h i s u n h a ppy m a n oeuvre that Wh i te l oses h i s
advantage, suggest i n g t ha t t h e a l ternative 3 3 . Ke2
Bb6 34. B x b 6 a b 3 5 . Nf l R a 3 36. N d 2 cou l d sti l l
reta i n it. -Ed.
33 . . . . Kf7-g7
34 . R f 2-f6
Noth i ng co u l d be gai ned by 34. h 5 Rc8 ( not, of
course, 34 . . . . Bd 8 ? ? i n v i ew of 35. h6+, fo l l owed by
36 . Rf8 mate ) 3 5 . Bxa7 Bd8! wi th eq u a l i ty . - Ed.
34. . . . Ba5-b6 ( No. 45)

45 46

62
I t seems that Wh ite is no l onger a b l e to make any
headwa y , for 35. Be7 i s met by 3 5 . . . . R e 8 36. d6
Bd8 (or 36. Re6 Kf7 ) . wh i l e after 35. Bb4 there
wo u l d fol l ow 36 . . . . a5. And , of course, i t wo u l d be
dangerous for Wh i te to exchange the B i shops, becau se
th e a·f i l e wo u l d be open for t h e B l ack Rook to
operate o n . - Ed.
35. R f6-c6
I t i s h a rd to account for t h i s unfortu nate over·
sight, as a resu l t of wh ich Wh ite l oses the Exchange
and the ga m e . Th e ex·Wo r l d C h a m p i o n had at th i s
moment p l enty of t i m e o n h i s c l ock, about h a l f an
h o u r . I t only took G a r r i Kasparov a few seconds to
answe r . - Ed.
35. . . . Nc4-a5
36. Bc5xb6 Na 5xc6
37 . B b6-c7 R a 8-f8+
38 . Kf 1 -e2 R f8-f7
39 . Bc7-d6 Rf7-d7
40. Bd 6-c5 Nc6-a5
4 1 . N g3-f 1 . . . ( No. 46)
Here the game wa s adj ourned and Kasparov sea led
his move. The co m m entators we re u n a n i m o u s i n the i r
eva l u a t i o n that B l ack wo u l d be a b l e t o e x p l o i t h i s
mate r i a l adva ntage without much tro u b l e . And so it
happened .- Ed.
41 . ... Rd 7-c7
42. Bc5-d6 Rc 7-c2+
43. Ke2-d3 Rc2xa2
44. N f 1 -e3 Kg7-f7
45. N e 3-g4 Na 5-c4
46. N g4xe5+ Nc4xe5
47 . Bd6xe5 b5-b4
I t wo u l d seem that Wh i te has ma naged to gain

63
some counterplay, but t h e rapid ma rch of B l ack's
b-Pawn quenches all Wh ite's hopes.-Ed.
48 . Be5-f6 b4-b3
49 . e4-e5 R a 2xg2
50. e5-e6+ Kf7-f8 ( No. 47 )
The most exact rep l y and the co up de grace. Wh ite
resigns. The sco re is: +3-2=6 in favou r of Kasparov.

GAME TWE L V E

Qu een's Gambit Dec l i ned

G. Kasparov A. Karpov

In the twe l fth enco u nter, both pl ayers proceeded


with extrem e caut ion . Th e Wo r l d Ch a m p i on un­
h u r r i ed l y moved his p i eces back and forth, wa i t i ng
for an opportu n i ty to l a u nch an offensive. Anatoly
Karpov, fo r his part, was in no h u r ry to start act ivities.
Obviously u nwi l l ing to take chances, Garri Kasparov
pl ayed h is 2 1 st move and offered a d raw, wh ich wa s
accepted .

47 48

64
1 . c2-c4 e7-e6
For the f i rst time i n t h e present match the ex­
Wo r l d C h a m p i o n a ba ndons the E n g l i sh Open ing,
stee r i n g the game i n to one of t h e l i nes of the Queen's
G a m b i t. Wh i te can not avoid t h i s, o nce h e opened
with 1 . c4 or 1 . d4; h oweve r, th e Wo r l d Champ i on 's
next move restri cts B l ac k ' s options by ru l i ng out th e
poss i b i l i ty of the N i mz o- I nd i an Defence or the Ta rta­
kower- Mak agonov- Bondarevsk y V a r i a t i o n .
2 . N b l -c3 d 7 -d 5
3 . d2-d4 BfS-e7
4. c4xd5 e6xd5
5. Bc l -f4 N g S-f6
6. e2-e3 BcS-f5 ( No. 48)
I n t h e i r prev ious contests u s i n g the same l i n e ,
both Kaspa rov a n d Karpov preferred here 6 . . . 0-0. .

The text- m ove, a g reat favo u r i te with Ka rpov 's


second E l izbar U b i lava, wa s recentl y tested i n the
Sa l ov-T i moshch enko game ( Soviet Ch amp i onsh i p
Sem i f i na l , I r kutsk, 1 9S 6 ) . wh ich we nt: 7 . Q b 3 Nc6
S . Qxb7 N b4 9 . Bb5+ KfS 1 0. Kd 2 a6 1 1 . Ba4 Nd3
1 2 . Bxc7 Qc S 1 3 . QxcS R xc S 1 4. B a 5 Nxf2 1 5. Rf l
N 6e4+ 1 6 . Nxe4 N x e4+ 1 7 . Ke2 Nd6 l S . Nf3, with
advantage to Wh ite. W i th t h e thought that Karpov
m i g h t be a b l e to i m prove B l ack 's p l ay somewhere in
th i s l i n e , Kasparov decl i nes the tac i t i n v itat ion and
se l ects the l ess aggressive, more sol id cont i n uation.-Ed.
7 . Ng l -e2 0-0
S. R a l -c l c7-c6
9. Ne2-g3 Bf5-e6
1 0 . B f l -d3 RfS-eS
1 1 . Qd l -b3 Qd S-b6
1 2 . Qb3-c 2
Trad i ng t h e Queens wo u ld rath e r favou r B l ack,

65
5 - 1393
wh ereas the retreat of t h e Wh i te Qu een i s h a rd l y a
l oss of tempo, for after t h e poss i b l e Nc3-a4, a l so
hamper i n g c6-c 5, t h e B l ac k Queen wo u l d h ave to
retreat, too . - Ed.
1 2. . .. N b8-d 7
1 3 . 0-0 g 7 -g 6
1 4 . h 2- h 3
A t th i s poi nt, as G r a n d m a ster Se rge i M a k a rychev
sugge sts, the manoeuvre 1 4 . Na4, f o l lowed by 1 5 . Nc5,
deserves considerat i o n . The i d ea be h i nd th i s man­
oeuvre i s to occu py, after the exchange o n c 5 and the
recaptu re with t h e d- Pawn (d4xc5 1 . the vital ce ntra l
sq uare d4 with the other K n i g h t .
1 4. . . . Be 7-f8
1 5 . N g3-e 2 R a 8-c8
1 6 . Qc2-d 2 Nf6-h 5
1 7 . Bf4- h 2 N h 5-g7
"A more agg ressive p l ay e r wo u l d perhaps have
chosen 1 7 . . . f 5 i n stead , " comme nts Grandmaster
.

G u fe l d . " Karpov, h oweve r, does not wa nt to be the


f ir st to reve a l his p l a n s . "
1 8 . g2-g4 Qb6-d 8

49

66
1 9 . f2-f3 N d 7-,b6
20 . b2-b3 8f8-a3
2 1 . Rc l -c2 ( No. 49)
As Grand master M a k a rychev has put it, both
arm i e s a re now ready to c o l l ide, but the Genera l
Head q u a rters have g iven t h e command to beat a
retreat. G a m e d rawn .
T h e sco re in the match is +3-2=7 i n favour of
Kasparov.

GAME THI R T E E N

G ruenfeld Defence

A. Karpov G . Kasparov

The Queens were exchanged q u i te e a r l y in th i s


encounter and, without ente r i n g a m i dd legame, t h e
opponents conti nued th e i r f i ght i n a com p l e x end ing,
i n wh ich Wh i te had a strong pa ssed Pawn i n the
centre.
1 . d2-d4 Ng8-f6
2 . c2-c4 g7-g6
3. N b l -c3 d7-d5
4. Ng l -f3
Acco rd i n g to G randmaster A l e x e i Su eti n , the l i ne
wh ich the contenders a re about to test has recently
been perhaps the most popu lar and a m b i tious conti ·
n u a t i o n i n the G ruenfe l d . Here Wh i te proceeds to
bu i ld a Pawn centre, wh i le d eveloping h i s K i ng's
K n i g h t to f3, rath e r than to e2, as i n the so-ca l l ed
m a i n var iation . Garri Kasparov has con s i stently em­
ployed this b u i ld-up w i th the Wh i te p i eces: now he
has to fight aga i nst one of his favou r i tes.

67
5*
4. . . . Bf 8-g7
5 . c4xd5 Nf6xd 5
6. e2-e4 Nd 5xc3
7. b2xc3 c7-c 5
8. Ra l -b l
The modern hand l i ng o f th i s variation i nvolves a
ga m b i t, wh ere Wh i te offers one of h i s Q-s i d e Pawns,
on a2 or c3. These Pawn s, h oweve r, are po i soned, as
can be see n from the fol lowi ng var iations: 8 . . . . Nc6
9. d 5 Bxc3+ 1 0. Bd 2 B x d 2+ 1 1 . Qxd2, wi th a strong
i n i tiative; or 8 . . . . Qa5 9 . Rb5 Qxc3+ 1 0. Bd 2 Qa 3
1 1 . Qc2, and B l ack dangerously l ags i n deve l opment,
as i n the Gapri ndashv i l i- Khad i l ka r game ( Lucerne,
1 982 ) ; yet another possi b i l i ty i s 9 . . . . Qxa2 1 0 . R x c5
0- 0 1 1 . Bc4 Qa l 1 2 . Bxf7+ Kxf7 1 3 . Qb3+ e6
1 4 . R xc8 R xc8 ( not 1 4 . . . . Qxc 1 + 1 5 . K e 2 ) 1 5 . Ng5+
Kf8 1 6 . 0- 0 Qa6 1 7 . N x e6+, with a wi n , accor d i n g
t o G rand maste r N u k h i m R ash kovsk y .
8. . . . 0-0
9 . Bf l -e2 c5xd4
Wea k e r i s 9 . . . . Nc6 1 0 . d 5 N e 5 1 1 . N x e 5 B x e 5 1 2 .
Od2 ! , with an edge .

50 51

68
1 0 . c3xd 4 Qd 8-a 5+ ( No. 50)
As G randmaster Serge i iVl a k arychev poi nts out,
ana l ysts have for severa l years been l oo k i ng for a con·
t i n uat i o n that co u l d l ead to W h i te ' s advantage afte r
1 1 . Bd2 Qx a2 1 2 . 0-0 b6 1 3 . Qc l . T h i s long search
be i ng in v a i n , the sy ste m with the Wh ite King's
K n i g h t deve loped to f3 has become somewhat less
attractive.
1 1 . Qd l -d 2 Qa 5xd2+
1 2 . Bc l xd2 e 7-e 6
The idea b e h i n d th i s move is to try to i mpede th e
advance d4-d 5.- £d.
1 3 . 0-0 b7-b6
1 4 . R f l -d 1 Bc8-b7
1 5 . d4-d5
As l ong as there are some p i eces left on the board
th i s passed Pawn rem a i n s d a n gerous. Accord i n g l y ,
Wh ite sh o u l d avo id exch a n g i n g p i eces. - Ed.
1 5. ... e6xd5
1 6 . e4xd 5 . . . ( No. 5 1)
1 6 . . . . Bxd 5 is u n p l ay a b l e , because of 1 7 . Bb4
R d 8 1 8 . Bc4, pick i n g off the B l ack B i shop . - £d.
1 6. . . . N b 8-d 7
1 7 . Bd2-b4 Rf8-c8
1 8 . Bb4-e7
Th e p l a n i n i t iated by the Wh ite B i shop's i nvasion
to e7 i s perhaps too co m m i tt i ng , for a l though the
B i shop may assist i n promot i ng t h e Quee n ' s Pawn i t
may j u s t as we l l fi nd itse l f o u t o f p l ay at i ts present
post, u n l ess oth e r Wh i te p ieces can come to its rescue,
ind icates Grandmaster G u fe l d . T h e a l ternative 1 8. Nd4
Nf6 1 9. d6, as occu rred i n t h e Lputyan· Tu kma kov
game ( U SS R Champ ionsh ip, 1 984 ) , gave Wh ite some
advantage.

69
Th erefore, the ex-Wo r l d Champ i on's b ol d decision
to p l ace h is d a rk-sq u a red B i shop fa r beyond the
front i e r l i n e has tu r n ed out to be rather unfortunate.
18. ... Bg7-f6
1 9 . d 5-d6
Hav i n g ponde red ove r t h e s i tu at i on for half an
hour, the Wor l d Champ ion i n v i tes h i s r i va l to exchange
the B i shops. Anato l y Karpov shou l d i m m e d i ate l y
have withd rawn the B i sh op t o h i s cam p ; h owever,
he d ecides to p u rsue the p l a n of support i n g the
B i shop wi t h his centre Pawn . In oth e r c i rcumstances,
such a Pawn cou l d become e xtreme l y da ngero us, but
i n the present situation the BI ack Kn ight on d7 ob­
structs its further advance.
1 9. ' " Kg 8-g 7
20. Rd 1 -e 1
Ac know l e d g i n g t h e m i stake h e h a s j u st made,
wh ich i s evidenced by h i s l ong med i tation ( Ka rpov
took 48 m i nutes to p l a y 20. Rd 1 -e 1 ) , the ex-Cham­
pion starts regrou p i n g his forces to bette r posts-a nd
succeeds i n atta i n i n g h i s object.
20 . . . . Rc8-c5
2 1 . Be2-b5 B b 7-c6
22 . B b 5xc6 Rc5xc6
23. R b 1 -d 1 ... ( No. 52)
Th e game h a s reached a c u l m i nat i o n . W h i te i s
p l a y i n g accord i n g to p l a n , h owever, the i m med i ate
23 . g4 wou ld be more exact, for B l ack wo u l d h ave no
time to set u p h i s defe nce o n the K-side, po i nts out
Eduard G u fe l d . For i n sta nce , 23 . . . . Bc3 24. Re3 f6
25 . g5, or 23 . . . . h6 24. h 4, wi th the same idea.
23 . . . . Bf6-c3
The B l ac k B i shop has attacked the Wh i te Rook,
wh ereupon t h e B l ac k Pa wn h a s s h u t i n the Wh ite

70
B i shop. At t h e same t i m e , B l ack can set up a passed
Pawn on t h e Q· side. Wh i te's game has become al most
cr itica l .
2 4 . R e l -e 3 f7-f6
25. g2-g4 g6-g5
26. h 2-h 4 h7-h6
27 . h 4xg5 h6xg5 ( No. 53 )
Many experts have con side red h ere the possi bi l i ty
of 2 8 . R d 5 , fo l l owed by t h e sacr i f ice of the Knight
fo r two Pawn s. Although the f i rst i mpression i s that
after, e. g . , 28. Rd5 Rc4 29. Nxg5 fg 30. R x g 5+ the
B l ack King is rath e r u nco mforta b l y p l aced, the most
l i ke l y outcome wou l d be a d raw by perpetu a l . At any
rate, Anat o l y Karpov, wh ose j u dgement of the situa­
ti o n m i ght we l l have been more sound, selects a
d i fferent seq u e l . - Ed.
28. N f3-d4 Bc3xd4
29 . R d l xd4 R a 8-h 8
M i k h a i l Ta l a n d Serg e i M a k a rychev have both men­
tioned another poss i b i l ity of strugg l i ng for the i n itia­
tive h ere-28 . . . . Rac8.
30. R e3-e l Rc6-c2

52 53

71
3 1 . a2-a4 a7-a5
32 . f 2-f4 Kg7-g6
33. f4xg5 Kg6xg5
The ex-World C h a m p i o n has found a n exce l lent
defence by sta rti ng the assa u l t w i th his Pawns on the
K-side. As a conseq u ence of Karpov's successfu l
operations, the B l ack Pawn that l ocks i n the Wh ite
B i shop at e 7 has become wea k .
34. R e 1 -f 1 Kg5-g6
35. R f 1 -f2 R h 8-c8
36. R d4-f4 Rc2xf2 ( No. 54)
Garri Kasparov has made every effort to m a i n ta i n
h i s i n i t i ative. Yet h i s advantage h a s been g rowi ng
sma l l er and sma l l e r wi th each move. Ne ither the
B l ack Ki ng's f i ne footwo rk n o r the i ntricate
manoeu vres of the B l ack Ro ok are of any ava i l . So
the World Cha mpion offers a d raw, wh ich is accepted .
The sco re i n t h e match is +3-2=8 i n favour of
Kasparov .

54

72
The Lope de V ega Theatre, where t h e match was played
Open i n g cerem o n y of t h e Wo rld Champio n s h i p
Match i n Sevi l l e , 1 987 . I n the bottom rig ht-ha nd
co rner- F lorencio Cam poma nes, F I D E President
Arbiters are a lways busy
Th e Match is on I
The riva l kings
In the press room
Anato ly Karpov answers journalists' questions
at a press conference

Autograph h u nters in the streets of Sevi l l e .


On t h e l eft o f Anato ly Karpov-his wife Natasha

Tennis i s the basis of the ex-Champion's physical tra i n i ng


INSTI T U TO DE FO
'
DE A N DA

Garri Kasparov usua l l y arrives f i rst for a game


Sevi l l e : chess fever
White to play
Sevi l le , t h e capi tal of And a l u s i a
GAM E FOURTEEN

Caro- Kann Defence

G. Kasparov A. Karpov

1 . e2-e4 c7-c6
2 . d2-d4 d 7 -d 5
3 . N b 1 -d 2 d 5xe4
4. Nd 2xe4 N b 8-d 7
5 . N g 1 -f3 Ng8-f6
6. N e 4xf6+ N d 7 xf6
7. c2-c3 Bc8-g4
8. h2-h 3 Bg4xf3
9 . 0d 1 x f3 Qd 8-d 5 (No. 55)
Wh i l e i n t h e tenth encounter of th i s match the
Wor l d C h a m p i o n could h ave been surp r i sed by the
Ca ro- K a n n , i n the prese n t game h e wa s ex pected by
everyone to be ready for th i s d efence and, perhaps,
even to come up with a n i n novat i o n .
The fi rst e ig h t moves we re exact ly the same as
those i n the tenth contest, but on the n i nth move it
was the ex-World Ch a m p i o n who was the f i rst to
55

89
vary, and the appeara nce of th e B l ack Queen in the
centre of the board cou l d only be i nterpreted as a
taci t offer of a d r aw.
At the sam e t i m e , as G randmaster E d u a rd Gufeld
has poi nted out, B l ack's n i n t h move i s an i m portant
theoretica l i n novation i n th i s l i n e, e na b l i ng h i m to
eq ua l i ze mo re ea s i ly th a n , for examp l e , after 9 . , e6
. .

1 0 . Bc4 B e 7 1 1 . 0-0 N d 5 1 2 . Bd2, wh ich wou l d give


White a s l i gh t edge . After the text-move, it wo u l d
hard l y be advantageous fo r W h i te t o exchange Queens
on d 5 , because, afte r 1 0. Qxd 5 cd B l ack's Pawn
co nfiguration wo u l d be i m p roved, m a k i n g it poss i b l e
f o r h i m t o start Q-side act i v ities b y advanc i ng h i s
Pawn s ( e . g. , b7-b 5-b4 ) , a we l l k n own strateg ic
plan, co m m o n l y referred to a s the "Pawn m i nority
attac k " . Accord i n g l y , Kasparov o n l y agrees to
exch a nge at f3 .
1 0 . Bf l -e2 e7-e6
1 1 . 0-0 Bf8-d6
1 2 . Qf3-d 3 Bd 6-c7
1 3 . B e2-f3 Qd 5-d 7
I n E d uard Gufeld's o p i n i o n , B l ack co u l d at t h i s
moment s h o w som e act i v i ty by p l ay i ng 1 3 . . . . Qd 6.
B ut Sergei M a ka rychev notes that W h i te wo u l d play
g2-g3 a nyway becau se i t i s req u i red by his p l a n , so
it wo u l d be p o i n t l ess to provoke th i s move by with­
drawi ng t h e B l ack Queen to d6, where i t i s somewh a t
m i sp l aced .
1 4 . R f l -d l 0- 0
1 5 . c3-c4 R a 8-d8
Eduard Gufeld suggests that, i n stead of the so l id ,
ca utious text-move, B lack cou l d aga i n p l ay more
active l y , underm i n i n g the W h i te centre with 1 5 . '" e5.
Karpov appears to h ave rej ected th i s cont i nuation

90
beca use of Wh ite's poss i b l e reply 1 6 . B g 5 , after wh ich
1 6 . . . . ed 1 7 . Bxf6 gf 1 8 . Be4 wo u l d l ead to a very
sharp game, not sU iti ng the ex-Wo r l d Champion's
i ntentions.
1 6 . Qd3-b3 . .. (No_ 56)
Th is prevents the u nderm i n i ng e6-e 5 , wh i l e afte r
1 6 . B g 5 Bb6 1 7 . d 5 ! B l ack's position wo u l d o n l y be
s l i gh t l y i nferior i n sp ite of h is dete r i orated Pawn
structu re, G ra n d m a ster M a k a rychev points out.
1 6. .. . Qd 7-e7
1 7 . g2-g3 Bc7-b8
1 8 . B c 1 -e3 R d 8-d 7
1 9 . R d 1 -d 2 R f8-d 8
20 . R a 1 -d 1 h 7- h 6
2 1 . a2-a3 . . . (No. 57)
The Wo r l d C h a m p ion offers a d raw, wh ich i s
accepted .
I t see m s that such an o u tcome su its both r i va l s .
I ndeed, Kasparov is l ead i n g i n t h e matc h , h i s u l t i mate
victo ry app roac h i ng with each d raw. Karpov, on the
ot her hand , has no reason as yet to start ta k i ng r isks
wh i l e p l ay i ng for a w i n with t h e B l ack p i eces.

56 57

91
The p l ayer s have te n more games to go. As Grand­
master Eduard G ufe l d notes, Anato l y Ka rpov sa id i n
an i nterview t o S p a n i sh j o u r n a l i sts: "Wh ereas f i v e
g a m e s w e r e suffic i e n t f o r Kasparov to turn the ta b l es,
I h ave twice as many to ach ieve the same o bj ect . . .'
Th e sco re i n t h e match i s +3-2=9 i n favou r of
Kasparov .

GAME F I F T E E N

Gruenfeld Defence

A. Karpov G. Kasparov

In t h e f ifteenth game , t h e m o st i m portant part


was p l ayed by the Pawn s, both Wh ite and B l ack .
Th e i r operat i o n s-now in the centre, now on the
flanks-repeated l y c reated new opportu n it i e s for the
pi eces, and th i s a l ternate ly led e i ther to improving
Karpov's offe nsive o r to strengt h e n i ng Kasparov's
defence.
But when the G ra n d m a sters were a l ready i n the
shadow of time pressu re, wr i te s Sergei M a k arychev,
the game was sud d e n l y s i m p l ified by massive ex­
changes. Karpov st i l l reta i ned a sm a l l adva ntage ,
yet it was too sma l l for h i m to hope for a fu l l point.
1 . d2-d4 N g 8-f6
2. c2-c4 g7-g6
3. N b 1 -c3 d7-d 5
4. N g 1 -f3 Bf8-g7
5 . Qd 1 -b3 d 5xc4
6. Qb3xc4 0-0
7. e2-e4 N b 8-a6
Shou l d Karpov have p l ayed 8 . e 5 here, both B l ack

92
K n i ghts wo u l d h ave been o u t of p l ay for a wh i l e.
However, the e x-Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n preferred the
modest deve lop ment of his K i ng ' s B i shop to e 2 . I n
rep l y , Kaspa rov i m m e d i at e l y started u nd e r m i n ­
i ng t h e Wh ite cen tre with h i s Pawn s .
8 . B f 1 -e2 c7-c5
9 . d4-d 5 e7-e6
1 0 . 0-0 e6xd5
1 1 . e4xd 5 Bc8-f5
1 2 . R f 1 -d 1 . . . (No. 58)
Th i s is a nove lty. I n the 1 9th encounter of last
year's re-matc h , Karpov p l ayed the more natu ra l
1 2 . Bf4, and eve n tu a l l y won th e game . Accord i n g to
G rand master Serge i M a k arychev, the position that
a r i ses after 1 2 . . . . R e8 1 3 . Rad 1 Ne4 1 4 . N b 5 Qf6
has freq u e n t l y occ u r red in to u r n ament practice s i nce
then; howeve r, the theoretic i a n s have so far fa i l ed to
assess it u n a m b i g u o u s l y .
1 2. . .. RfS-e 8
1 3 . d 5-d6 h7-h6
Wh i l e Karpov wa s rap id l y advanc i ng h i s Quee n ' s
Pawn - f i rst to t h e f i fth r a n k a n d the n t o the s i x t h -

58

93
Kasparov strived to reta l i ate by b r i ng i ng h i s p i eces to
act ive, menacing posts . At t h e same t i m e , the Wo r l d
Cham p i o n d i d n o t neg l ect t o p l a y w i t h h i s Pawn s. I t
was Kasparov's subt l e t h i rteenth move that may
perhaps have surpr ised Karpov to so me extent because,
for the f i rst t i m e in th i s enco u nte r , the e x · ""orld
Cham p i o n was sudd e n l y d eep i n thought, ta k i ng
a l most h a l f an h o u r to respond . One may suppose
that Karpov was q u i te content with h i s game at t h i s
moment, a nd h e w a s o n l y l o o k i ng for a w a y of
i ncreas i ng h i s pressu r e .
After the nat u r a l 1 3 . . . . Ne4, i n d i cates Se rgei Ma­
karychev, there cou ld fol low 1 4. d 7 ! R e 7 1 5 . Nxe4
R x e4 1 6 . B g5 ! , with a c l e a r adva ntage for Wh ite.
1 4 . h 2-h 3 N a 6-b4
B l ack is gett i n g ready to cou nterp l ay o n the Q- side
with his Pawn s. In the event of 1 5 . Qxc5?, Wh i te
wou l d l ose mate r i a l after 1 5 . . . . Nc2 1 6 . R b 1 N d 7 ,
fo l l owed by 1 7 . . . . B xc3 and 1 8 . . . . R x e 2 . - Ed.
1 5 . Bc l -f4 N f6-d 7
1 6 . Rd l -d 2 a7-a6
1 7 . Qc4-b3
The Wh ite Quee n , wh ich is vu l nerab le on i ts present
po st, starts retreat i ng . B l ack th reate ns to p l ay 1 7 . . . .
b 5 1 8 . Qb3 Nc2 1 9. R xc2 c 4 20. Q a n y B xc2, wi n n i ng
the Exchange.
1 7 . .. b7-b5
1 8 . Qb3-d l c 5-c4
1 9 . a2-a4
A cu l m i na t i o n . Wh ite , poi nts out Grandmaster
Maka rychev, has ceded h i s centra l pos i t i o n , but has
created dangerou s th reats to t h e h o st i l e Pawn c h a i n
on the Q-si d e .
1 9. ... Nd 7-c5

94
20. a4xb5 N b 4-d3 (No. 59 )
G randmaster M a k a rychev be l ieves the text·move
to be the most re l i a b l e co n t i n uation, assess i ng 20 . . . .
Nb3, by wh ich B l ack a l so w i n s t h e E xchange, a s a less
co n v i nc i ng l in e . I ndeed, in t h e case of 20. '" Nb3
2 1 . R a 4 N x d 2 , W h i te h a s , accord ing to Eduard
G u fe l d , suff icient co mpensation after both 22. Qxd 2
a5 23 . B xc4, and 22 . R xb4.
2 1 . Be2xd3 Nc5xd3
22. Rd2xd3
B l ack th reate n s not only 2 2 . . . . N xf4, but a lso
22 . . . . N xb 2 . I n the po sition that h as now a r i sen, the
acti v i ty of the W h i te p i eces is more i m portant than
his sma l l mate r i a l l oss. Wh ite i nd i cates Serge i Maka­
rychev, is j ust i f i a b l y f i g h t i ng for the i n i t i ative.
22 . . . . c4xd3
23 . N c3-d 5 a6xb5
24 . Nd 5-e7+
Afte r 24. Rxa8 Qxa8 25. Nc7 Qc 8 26. Nxe8
Qxe8, Wh i te wou ld w i n back t h e Excha nge, but he
wo u l d f i nd h i mself i n an i nferior posit i o n . W i th h is
text- move, h owever Karpov can st i l l hope to fight

59

95
for a fu l l po i n t . - Ed.
24 . . . . Kg8- h 7
25 . R a 1 xa8 Qd 8xa8
26. Ne7xf5 g6xf5
2 7 . Qd 1 xd 3 Qa8-e4
28 . Qd 3xb5 R e 8-a8
Exto l l i ng Kaspa rov ' s l a st move, G ra n d m a ste r
M a k a rychev eva l u ates t h e resu l t i ng pos ition as fol lows :
"The W h i te B i shop on f4 is i n d i rect l y protected ,
becau se, after 2 8 . . . . Qxf4, t h e B l ack R ook on e8
wou l d be en prise. The ente rp r i s ing l i ne beg i n n i ng
28 . . . . Ra8, h oweve r, force s Wh i te to retreat for the
time be i n g, because, i n the event of 29 . B e 5 f4
30. B x g 7 R a 1 + 3 1 . K h 2 Qb 1 , h e wo u l d sudd e n l y
b e lost. "
29 . B f4-d 2 Ra8-d8
30. Qb5-c 5 Qe4-e6
3 1 . Bd2-f4 Bg7xb2
32 . Nf3-h4 B b 2-f6 ( No. 60)
33 . Qc 5xf5+
Acco rd i ng to Serge i M a k a rychev t h e l i ne starti ng
with 33 . N x f5 does look tem p t i n g , but Wh i te may be

60 61

96
in tro u b l e if B l ack responds with 33 . . . . Rc8.
33 . . . . Qe6xf5
34. N h4xf5 h6-h 5
35 . g2-g4 h 5 xg4
36. h3xg4 Kh 7-g6
37 . Kg 1 -g2 B f6-b2
38 . N f5-e 7+ Kg6-f6
39 . Ne7-c6 R d 8-d7
40. Nc6-b8 Rd 7-d8
4 1 . d6-d7 Kf6-e6
42 . Kg2-f3 B b 2-a3 ( No. 6 1 )
H ere the game was adj ourned and Karpov sea l ed
h i s 43rd move . B l ack n ow th reate ns 43 . . . . Bd6, and
therefore 43 . Bc7 is o b l igatory for Wh i te . But then he
has no w i n n i ng chances after 43 . . . . Rxd7 44. Nxd7
Kxd7 , fol l owed by 4 5 . ... Ke6 and 46 . . . . f 5 . I t i s
e a s y t o s e e that B l ack's p o s i t i o n i s impenetrable.
Acco rd i n g l y , a d raw was agn,ed without resu m i n g
p l a y . - Ed.
The sco re in the match is +3-2= 1 0 in favour of
Kasparov.

GAME SIXTE E N

Engl ish Open ing

G. Kasparov A. Ka rpov

A l l the prev i o u s s i xteenth games p l ayed i n the


Wo r l d C h a m p i o n sh i p Matches between these riva l s
tu rned out t o b e extre m e l y hard-fought a n d th r i l l ing.
Cu r i o u s l y enoug h , G a r r i Kasparov had the advantage
in a l l three of them, twi ce succeed i ng in pressing it
home. W i l l the "trad i t i o n " be kept up i n Sev i " e ?-Ed.

97

7 - 1 393
The s i xtee nth encou nte r , to u se ath l etics ter m i n­
ology, is the l a st ban ked t u rn before the home
stra i ght. I t is a hard, re l e nt l ess fight right from the
begi n n i n g, and with each move the p l ayers are being
dragged cl oser and c l oser i nto the grip of t i me·pressure .
1 . c2-c4
The tenth, twe lfth , and fou rte e nth games of the
present match a l l t u r n ed out to be short u neventfu l
i n te r l udes. And s i nce it was G a r r i Kaspa rov who had
the W h i te pieces in these encounters and wh o was the
i n i t i ator of the "peace ta l ks" , both spectators and
journ a l i sts were natura l l y u nhappy with the Wor l d
Champion's unwi l l i ngn ess t o fight-as h e wa s t o l d at
a press conference after the fourteenth game . So me­
wh at nett l e d , G a rr i Kasparov p ro m i sed that ' b lood
wi l l yet be shed". Th e Wo r l d Champ i o n k e eps h i s
wo rd : h e n o w retu r n s t o t h e En g l i sh Openi ng, wh ich
betokens a sharp stru gg l e . - Ed.
1 . ... e7-e5
2 . N b l -c3 N gS-f6
3. N g l -f3 N b S-c6
4. g2-g3 B fS-b4
5 . Bf l -g2 0-0
6 . 0- 0 R fS-eS
7 . d2-d 3
Wh i l e G randm aster M a k a rych ev i s of the opi n i o n
t h a t 7 . Nd 5 g i v e s Wh i te a sl ight edge, G r a nd ma ste r
Gufeld t h i n k s that it g ives W h ite n ot h i ng, e . g., 7 . . . .
N xd 5 S . cd N d 4 9 . N e l c6 1 0 . e 3 N b 5 1 1 . d 3 Nc7
1 2 . Nc2 BfS 1 3 . dc dc, with eq u a l ity .
7. . . . B b 4xc3
The rather passive 7. . . . d6 is l ess accepta ble,
because of S. Nd5 N xd 5 9 . cd N d 4 1 0. N xd 4 ed
1 1 . e4, with good prospects for Wh i te ( G ufe l d ) .

98
8 . b2xc3 e5-e4
The best, thou gh force d , move . Otherw i se, Wh ite
wou l d effectively cont i n u e 9 . e2-e4, ga i n i ng the
advantage .
9. Nf3-d4 h 7 -h6
1 0 . d 3xe4 . . . ( No. 62)
As a l l com m e ntators h ave poi nted out, th i s is an
important th eoretical i n novati o n . Kasparov's out­
wa rd l y " u g l y " move, a fte r wh ich Wh ite's Pawn
structure is co nsidera b l y wea kened, is both a mb i tious
and cruc i a l for this l i n e , becau se Wh i te , wh o has the
B i shop- p a i r , shou ld str ive to open u p t h e game.
1 0 . '" Nf6xe4
1 1 . 0d l -c2 d7-d5
1 2 . c4xd 5
Kasparov took a l ot of t i m e on th i s move. The
va riations h e had to assess are ind eed n u m e rous a nd
i ntr icate, for i nstance , 1 2 . N b 5 Bf5 ! 1 3 . cd Nxg3
1 4 . e4 Nxf l 1 5 . ef, o r 1 5. dc bc 1 6 . Nd4 B xe4
1 7 . B x e4 Oh4 1 8 . Bg2 R e l 1 9. Bxf l Og4+, or 1 8 . f3
N x h 2 1 9 . Ox h 2 Oe 1 + 20. Kg2 Oxc3 a n d , accord i ng
to E d u a rd Gufe l d , B l ack h a s exce l lent cou nter-cha nces

62 63

99
7*
everywh ere. However, as Se rge i M a k a rychev has
po i nted out, Wh i te now has at his d i sposal a qu i eter
a l ternative: 1 2 . R d 1 Nxd4 1 3 . R xd 4 Qf6 ! 1 4 . Be3 c5 !
( otherwise Wh i te wo u l d ga i n the advantage ) 1 5 . Bxe4 !
(bad is 1 5 . R x d 5 beca u se of 1 5 . . . . N xc3, th reaten i n g
. . . Nxe2+ and Qxa 1 ) 1 5 . . . . de ( wo r se i s 1 5 . . . c d 1 6 .
Bxd4 Qe7 1 7 . B xd5 Qxe2? 1 8 . Qg6 ! ) 1 6 . R xe4 Bf5,
though W h ite's e xtra Pawn does not g ive h i m a ny
serious wi n n i ng ch ances.
1 2. .. . Qd 8xd5 (No. 63)
Th is pos i t i o n seems to h ave been stud ied q u i te
we l l by Anato l y Karpov in h i s pre·match prepa rati ons,
for h e spe n t on l y n i ne m i nutes on th ese f i rst twe l v e
moves, whereas Kasparov s p e n t f ive t i m e s as long .
The vis-a· v i s of the B l ack Queen and the Wh i te B i ·
shop on the l o n g l i g h t d i agonal is, o f cou rse, far
from p l easant. Howeve r , the ex-Wo r l d C h a m p i o n
eva l u ated the conseq ue nce s very carefu l ly , says
Eduard G u fe l d .
1 3 . e 2-e3
The X-ray i ng 1 3 . Rd 1 i s no l onger p l ay a b l e here,
i n v i ew of 1 3 . . . . Bf5 ! 1 4 . N xf5 Qxf5, with the threats
of 1 5 . . . . Qxf2+ and 1 5 . . . . N x g 3 , po i nts out Grand­
master G ufe l d .
1 3. ... Nc6-a5
By this prec i se manoeuvre, p r i m a r i ly aimed at
se i z i ng possession of the i m portant sq uare c4 and
b l oc kad i ng the Wh ite Pawn o n c3, B l ack a l so prepares
the adva nce of h i s Pawn to c5 to d r ive away the
Wh i te K n i g h t from the ce ntr e . - Ed.
An i nterest i n g a l te r n at i ve is 1 3 . . . . N x d 4 1 4 . cd c6
1 5 . R d 1 Bf5 1 6 . f3 N x g 3 1 7 . e4 N x e4, wi th fu l l
compensati o n for the sacr i f i ced p iece-accord i ng to
Serge i Makarychev.

1 00
1 4 . f 2-f3 Ne4·--d6
1 5 . e3-e4 Qd 5-c5
1 6 . B c l -e3 Nd 6-c4
It wo u l d seem that afte r 1 6 . . . . N ac4 the B l ack
K n i g h ts wou l d be more act i ve l y p l aced tha n in the
actua l game; at the mome nt. h owever, i t i s more
impo rtant for B l ack to e n su re a safe retreat for h is
Quee n , wh ich is to be transferred to a better post. ­
Ed.
1 7 . B e 3-f2 Qc 5-e7
1 8 . R a l -d l Bc8-d 7
1 9 . f3-f4 R a 8-d8 ( No. 64)
Leav i ng the ope n i ng su bt leties beh i nd , the p l ayers
have switched to pos i t i o n a l manoeuvring. Kasparov
has gathered a group of p i eces and pawns on the K·
side, hoping for an attack there, i n wh ich h is two
powe rfu l B i shops, assi sted by Pawns wi l l be p l aying
the l ead i ng part. Karpov, who lacks a Pawn-centre,
is c l osely watch ing the ma n oeuvres of the Nh ite
pi ece s, but keeps h i s own fo rces rather c l ose to h is
goa l, to use th e soccer ter m .
B y the twe ntieth m o v e the preparat ion f o r t h e

64 65

1 01
com i ng batt l e has been com p l eted , and the Wor l d
Ch a m p i o n has reso l ute l y p u s h e d h i s most i mportant,
K i ng's, Pawn across the fro ntier l i n e .
20 . e4-e 5
After th i s move B l ack succeeds i n stopp i ng the
further advance of t h e Wh ite Pawns by setti n g up a
b l ockade on t h e l ig h t sq uares, but i t seems that
Kasparov has a l ready decided o n the var iation i nvo lv­
ing t h e Pawn sac r i f ice that he starts carry ing out with
his 24th move .-Ed.
20 . . . . Bd 7-g4
2 1 . N d 4-f 5 Qe7-e6
22 . R d l xd8 R e8xd8
23. N f5-d4 Qe6-c8 ( No. 65)
24 . f4-f5
The com me ntato rs who gave th i s move a " ? " seem
to be j ustified i n t h e i r assessm e n t by the further
deve lopment of events i n t h e game. I n stead of the
text- move, W h ite cou l d m a i nt a i n t h e tension by
24 . Be4. -Ed.
24 . . . . c7-c5
25 . Qc2-e4 c5xd4
At th i s j u nctu re, 25 . . . . h5 a l so com e s i nto consid­
erati o n . W h i te's idea co u ld be j u st ified, howeve r,
after 25 . . . . N d 2 2 6 . Qxg4 N xf l 2 7 . e6 cd 28. f6 g6
29 . ef+ Kxf7 30. Bd 5+, W h i te w i n n i ng in a matter of
a few moves, i nd icates Eduard G u fe l d .
26 . Qe4xg4 Nc4xe5
27 . Qg4-e2
Wh i l e the t i m e on h i s c l ock wa s ru n n i ng out, the
Wor l d Cha m p i o n , having spe n t ten m i nutes out of the
twenty he had, com m i tted , i n c l ose succession, two
errors: f i rst, he sh o u ld have withd rawn h i s Queen to
e4 rather than e2. G ra n d m a ster G ufeld i s, however,

1 02
of the o p i n ion t h at 27 . Qe4 is stro n g l y met by 27 . . . .
Nec4.
27 . . . . Ne 5-c6
28 . c3xd4 Nc6xd4
29. Bf2xd4
And here i s the seco nd m i sta k e : Wh i te trades away
h i s powe rfu l B i shop.
29 . . . . R d 8xd4
30 . f 5-f6 Qc8-e6 ( N o. 66 )
Th i s is h a rd l y the position Kasparov str ived to
reach when sacr ific i ng the Pawn on h i s 24th move.
Wh i te's attack has co me to n oth i ng after B l ack 's
qu i te obv i ous rep l ies, a n d th e Wor l d Champion a l one
can exp l a i n which of them h e fa i l ed to foresee. The
second part of the game i s p l ayed by both p l ayers
under sever e t i me-pressu r e .
3 1 . Qe2-b2
The com m e n tators expressed the o p i n i on that
W h i te's best d rawing chance was to enter the end­
game a Pawn be h i nd . Anato l y Karpov agreed with
th i s assessm e n t at the press conference after the
ga me . G randm aster M a k a rychev i l l u strates t h i s idea as

66 67

1 03
fo l l ows: 3 1 . Oxe6 fe 32. R e 1 R d 6 33. R x e 6 ! R xe6
34 . B d 5 gf 3 5 . B x e 6+, and Wh ite can sti l l hope to
save the day.
31 . . . . Oe6-e3+
32 . Kg 1 -h 1 b7-b6
H a v i n g wrested the i n i tiative, Ka rpov p l ays very
preci se l y , h i s superco o l th i rty second move espec i a l l y
deserv i n g ad m i rat i o n .
33 . f6xg7 Na 5-c4
34 . 0b2-c2 Kg8xg7
35 . B g2-d 5 Nc4-d 6
36 . 0c2-b2 Oe 3-e5
37 . Bd5-b3 a7-a5
38 . 0b2-f 2 f7-f5
39 . Qf2-b2 b6-b5
Having found h i m se lf i n a l ost pos i t i o n , the Wor l d
Ch a m p i o n attem pted to confuse h i s opponent b y t h e
shutt l i ng m o v e s of t h e Wh ite Oueen o n the second
ra n k , but Karpov u n pe rtu rbed l y p a r r i ed a l l h i s
th reats. Meanwh i l e , t h e B l ack Pawns r e l e n t less l y
advanced . . .
40. a2-a3 Kg7-g6 ( No. 67)
Here the game wa s adj o u r ned . Wh ite's position can
hard l y be saved , but t h e re are st i l l subt le practica l
chances l eft. Kasparov, h owever, decides to res ign
without resu mption-to t h e aston i s h m e nt of many
comme ntators. The Wo r l d Champion seems to trust
the a n a l ytica l potentia l of Karpov's team and, rath e r
t h a n pro long h is ago n y , h e te nders h i s resignation.­
Ed.
The score of the m atch is now even : +3-3= 1 0.

1 04
GAME SEVENTEEN

King's I nd ian Defence

A. Karpov G . Kasparov

The K i ng's I nd i a n h a s a lways been the ""or l d


Ch a m p i o n ' s p r i n c ipa l d efensive weapo n . Y e t i t i s t h e
fi rst t i m e t h a t h e ad opts th i s extreme l y com p l icated
ope n i ng aga i nst Karpov. It seems that psych o l ogica l l y
t h e sUrprise fu l l y j usti f ied i tse lf because, i n order that
the h a rd-wo n eq u i l i b r i u m i n th e match be retai ned ,
the ex-World Champion se lects perhaps the most sol id
l i ne, wh ich has been repeated l y tried a nd tested i n
master p l a y and wh ich h a s b e e n thoroug h l y analyzed
by ch ess theorists.
1 . N g l -f3 N g8-f6
2. c2-c4 g7-g6
3 . N b l -c3 Bf8-g7
Beca u se of the rath er u nco nve n t i o n a l order of
moves chosen by Karpov, th e Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n has
now to recko n with the possi b i l ity of ente r i ng a
s l i g h t l y inferior end i ng a r i s i n g after 3 . . . . d 5 4. cd N xd 5
5 . e 4 N xc3 6 . dc Oxd l 7 . Kxd 1 + , wh ere t h e Wh ite
K i ng f i n d s an act ive post on c2.-Ed.
4. e2-e4 d7-d6
5. d 2 -d 4 0-0
6. B f l -e2 e7-e5
As every exponent of the K i ng's I nd i an k nows ,
B lack's sixth move i s n o t a n offer o f a Pawn : afte r
7 . de de 8 . Oxd8 R xd 8 9. N x e 5 N xe4, B l ac k 's end ­
game prospects wou ld be exce l lent. -Ed.
7 . 0-0 N b8-c6
8. d4-d 5

1 05
The most con s i stent cont i n u a t i o n . Setti n g up the
Pawn wedge i n the centre, W h i te d r ives away the
B l ack K n ight and prepares for a Q-s i d e expansion.­
Ed.
8. . . . Nc6-e7
9. Nf3-d 2
The most popu l a r move, i ntrod uced by Ta i m a nov.
The idea beh i nd the Wh i te Kn ight's retreat is to
bo l ster u p a Q-s i d e offensive ( b 2-i:>4 and c4-c5 ) by
br i n g i ng th e K n i g h t to b3 o r c4.-Ed.
9. . .
. a7-a5
1 0 . b2-b3 c7-c5 ( N� 6�
In th i s variation, W h i te f i r m l y c l oses a l l the central
l i n es and , as has a l ready been mentioned, str i ves to
l a u nch a Q-s ide attac k . Needl ess to say, the Wor l d
Ch a m p i o n foresaw th i s poss i b l e deve l opment o f t h e
ga me and, with the two strong m o v e s by h i s Pawns,
fo r a wh i l e stopped Wh ite's Q- side offe n s i ve and
started h is own act i v i t i e s o n the K-s i d e .
1 1 . a2 -a3 N f6-e8
1 2 . R a 1 -b l f7-f5
1 3 . b3-b4 a5xb4

68 69

1 06
1 4 . a3 x b4 b7-b6
1 5 . Qd l -b3 Ne8-f6
1 6. B e 2-d3 Bg7-h6
1 7 . R b l -b2 R a 8-a l
As a resu l t of the preventive measu res taken by the
Wor l d C h a m p i on (a7-a5 i n conj unct i o n with c7-c 5 ) ,
W h i te had to l o s e a va l u a b l e t e m p o to c a r r y o ut t h e
t h e m a t i c advance of h i s b- Pawn to b4, B l ack a l so
h a v i n g the open a-f i l e for h i s R o o k . B u t wh at sho u l d
he d o n o w ? Kasparov ta k es 43 m i nutes t o decide on
the f o l lowing penetrat i o n by his R o o k , a i med at ham­
pe r i n g Wh ite's m a n o eu v res i n his own camp and a l so
at exchangi ng, if possi b l e , the i nvad er and the K i ng's
B ishop for t h e i r co u n terparts. Accord i n g to M i k h a i l
Ta l , after 1 7 . . . . f 4 Wh ite wo u l d h ave n ot h i ng better
th an to ta ke a draw by 1 8. bc bc 1 9 . Qb6 Qd 7
20 . Qb5 Qd8 2 1 . Qb6. H owever, Wh ite's l ast move
ind icates h i s intention to contend for a-f i l e . - Ed.
1 8 . Qb3-c2 B h 6-f4
B l ack 's Rook o n a l and B i shop on h6 a re un­
protected , th e retreat of the Wh ite Queen to c2
having prepa red a d o u b l e attack o n them by 1 9. Nb3.
Accord i n g l y , B l ack transfers h i s B i shop to the pro­
tected sq uare, ta k i n g adva ntage of the fact that an
attem pt by Wh ite to d r ive away t h e B i shop by g2-g3
wo u l d d a ngero u s l y wea k e n h is K-side pos i t i o n . Th e n ,
as Eduard G ufe ld poi nts out, th ere m i gh t fol low
1 9 . . . . B h 6 20. bc bc 2 1 . Nb3 B x c l 22. R xc l R xc l
23 . Qxc l f4, whereupon 24. g f wo u l d b e bad i n view
of 24 . . . . N h 5 with a stron g attack .
1 9 . Nd 2-f3 . . . ( No. 69)
Th i s is, perhaps, the key moment in the game.
The World C h a m p i on co u ld now have attempted to
mount his K-side offensive by push i n g his Pawns.

1 07
Th i s, however, wo u l d free Wh i te ' s hands to i ncrease
the pressu re o n the other w i n g . Kasparov the refore
decides not to ta ke cha nces, a n d , h a v i n g caused a long
se ries of excha nges, steers the ga me i nto a roug h l y
even e nd i n g .
1 9. .. . f5xe4
20. Nc3xe4 Nf6xe4
2 1 . Bd3xe4 Ra 1 xc 1
22. R f 1 xc 1 Bf4xc 1
23 . Qc2xc 1 Ne 7-f5
24 . Qc 1 -g5
Only by exc h a n g i n g Queens, i nd icates G r a n d m a ster
Makarychev, can White h ope to get the adva ntage .
Oth e rwise, B l ack's K-side i n i t iative c o u l d become
q u i te menac i n g .
24. . . . Nf5-d4
25. Qg5xd8 Nd4xf3+
26. Be4xf3 Rf8xd8
2 7 . b4xc5 b6xc5
28 . R b2-b8 Rd 8-f8
29. R b8-b6 Rf8-f6
30. R b6-b8 Rf6-f8
3 1 . R b8-b6 Rf8-f6
32 . B f3-e4 Bc8-f5
33. Be4xf5 Rf6xf5
In the event of 34. Rxd6 Rf4, fo l l owed by . . .
R xc4, B lack, th reate n i ng t o mate o n t h e back row,
wo u l d g a i n a tempo and can easi l y d raw, accord i ng
to Serge i M a k a rychev.
34 . g 2-g3 R f 5-f6
But th i s is a "tech n ica l ' i n n acuracy, b e l i eves
Eduard G u fe l d . The co n si stent 34 . . . . Rf3 wo u l d have
led to a s i m p l e draw. As i t i s , W h i te now gains a sma l l
but c l e a r advantage.

1 08
35. h 2-h4 h7-h6
36 . Kg 1 -g2 KgS-g7
37 . f 2-f3 Kg7-gS
3S. Kg2-f2 g6-g5
39 . h4xg5 h6xg5
40 . Kf2-e3 KgS-g7
4 1 . R b6-bS Kg7-h7
42. R bS-d S ... (No. 70)
Here th e game was adjourned, the Wo r l d Cham­
pion having sea l e d h i s 42nd move . B l ac k ' s pos i t i on
looks i m pe netra b l e , a n d h i s cou nterp l ay aga i nst the
White Pawn o n f3 prompted most comme ntators to
bring in the v erd ict of an easy d raw. The pos i t i o n ,
however, has t u r n e d out more tricky th a n its appear­
ance wo u l d suggest.
The World Ch a m p i o n was 1 5 m i n utes l ater for the
adj o u r n m e n t sess i o n , e xp l a i n i ng t h i s by the l ate d i s­
covery of an u n p l easant poss i b i l i ty at Wh i te ' s d i sposa l .
What was that poss i b i l i ty d i scussed i n the post­
mortem a n a l y s i s ? G rand master M a k a rychev suggests
that Wh i te can sti l l h ope to fight for a w i n after
43 . R d 7 + Kg6 44. g4, whereupon the Wh ite K i n g

70 71

1 09
goes down to the seco nd ra n k and m a rches, v i a b3-
a4-b5-c6, to the base of the B l ack 's Pawn cha i n .
Even though B l ack ca ptu res t h e Pawn o n f3 with
chec k , h e i s far from secu re i n the resu l t i ng position.
Ka rpov, h owever, re ma rked during the post­
mortem that the adjou rned pos i t i o n wou ld be drawn
anywa y . And sure l y Ka rpov s h o u l d k n o w !
42 . . . . Kh 7-g7
43. Rd8-a8 Kg7-f7
44 . Ke3-e4 Kf7-g7
45 . Ra8-a7+ Kg7-g6
46. R a7-e7 g5-g4 ( No. 7 1 )
The o n l y move, be l ieves Sergei Ma ka rych ev-after
46 . . . . Kh6 47. Re6 Kg7 48. R xf6 Kxf6 49. 94 Kg6
50. Kd3 Kf6 5 1 . Kc3 e4 52. fe Ke5 53. Kb3, the
Wh ite d-Pawn and th e B l ack c-Pawn wou ld queen
s i m u l ta n eo u s l y , but the resu l t i n g Queen a n d Pawn
end i n g wou ld be e ither a d raw o r a wi n for Wh i te.
Afte r the text- move, the game wi l l i n ev i ta b l y be
drawn , and the opponents accept th i s outcome.
The score rema i n s eve n : +3-3= 1 1 .

GAME E I G H T E E N

Oueen's Gambit Decl ined

G. Kaspa rov A. Karpov

The match h a s now entered its dec i s i ve p h a se and


a n y error of j udgement may p rove fata l . Th i s accou nts
for the ex-Wo r l d Ch amp i on ' s c h o i ce of the c l assica l
defence in a popu l a r l i n e of t h e Quee n ' s G a m b i t
Dec l i ned, i n d icat i n g that h e i s r e a d y t o to l e rate a

110
s l i gh t l y inferior position for a long t i m e rather than
take a risk. The World Champion i s equ a l l y u nwi l l ing to
take drast i c measu res, prefe r r i ng to have a sma l l edge
but without the sl ightest r i s k of l os i n g the game.
The Tartakower- M a kagon ov- Bonda revsky Varia­
tion, adopted i n t h e present encou nter, wa s q u i te
often seen i n t h e Wor ld Champ ionsh i p matches of
1 984 and 1 985. Al l those games were drawn . Wi l l
the p resent one b e a n exception?-Ed.
1 . c2-c4 e7-e6
2. N b 1 -c3 d7-d 5
3 . d 2-d4 Bf8-e 7
A refi nement, attr i buted to Tigran Petrosyan , by
wh ich B l ack restr icts Wh i te's options, e. g. deprivi ng
him of the abi l ity to d e v e l op h i s K i ng's K n i ght to e2.
4. N g 1 -f3 NgS-f6
5. Bc 1 -g5 h7-h6
6. Bg5-h 4
The a l ternative i s 6 . B xf6, wh ich has a l so occu rred
more than once in the prev ious encounters between
Karpov and Kaspa rov . - Ed.
6. . . . 0- 0
7 . e2-e3 b7-b6
S. Bf 1 -e2 Bc8-b7
9. Bh4xf6
Pa radox n u mber one: Wh ite l oses a tempo to trade
his B ishop for t h e B lack K n ight. Actu a l l y , Wh i te's
decision is qu ite log ica l , for B l ack has now shown h i s
inten t i o n o f u n d e rm i n i ng the W h i te centre b y . . . c7-
c5 (a bid for greater freed o m ) ; he has a l so p l aced h i s
B i shop on b7 , wh ere it wi l l be a target for t h e White
pi eces. Wh i te's f u rther operat ions, i n it i ated by the
exchange on f6, are a i m ed at e x p lo i t i ng th i s change
i n the s i tuatio n . - Ed.

111
9. . . . B e 7 x f6
1 0 . c4xd 5 e6xd5
1 1 . b2-b4 c7-c 5
1 2. b4xc5 b6xc5
1 3 . R a l -b l B b 7 -c6
1 4 . 0-0 N b S-d 7
1 5 . B e2-b5
Paradox number two : Wh i te offers to excha nge h i s
good B i shop f o r B l ac k 's bad o n e . Yet t h e i nconsi stency
i s o n l y superfic i a l , beca use the idea beh i nd t h i s ma­
noeuvre is to e l i m i nate one of the d efenders of
B l ac k ' s m a i n wea k n e ss- h i s Pawn on d 5 . - £d.
1 5. . . . Qd S-c7
1 6 . Qd l -d 3 R fS-cS ( No. 7 2 )
Karpov pond ered ove r h i s s i xteenth move for
about f i fty m i nutes. I n stead of support i ng h i s centre
Pawn (on d 5 ) with the Rook from the rear ( a s
occurred i n the S t h game of t h e i r 1 9S5 matc h ) . he
found a more i nterest i n g a p p l icat i o n for th i s heavy
p i ece-p l ac i ng it on the f i l e that wo u l d i nevitably be
opened. And so it h a ppened in a few moves.
1 7 . R f l -c l RaS-bS

72 73

112
1 8 . h 2- h 3 g7 -g6
1 9 . B b 5xc6 R b 8x b 1
20. 0d3xb 1 Oc7xc6
2 1 . d4xc5 Oc 6xc5
2 2 . Nc3-e2 Oc 5-f8
23 . h 3 - h 4
Kasparov stu m b l es, th rowi ng away h i s w i n n i ng
chances. At t h e press conference after the game the
World C ham p i on e x p ressed the op i n i o n that 23. Nf4
wo u l d have reta i n e d h i s adva ntage . I ndeed , after
23 . . . . R xc 1 + 24. Oxc 1 Od 6 2 5 . Oc 8+, fo l l owed by
26 . Ob7 with a d o u b l e attack o n the B l ac k Pawn s
"a" and "d", or 23. . . . N b 6 ( wh i c h seems more
natura l ) 24. Rd 1 Oc 5 25. Ob3, i ncreas i n g the pressu re
on the B l ack d· Pawn , B l ack obv i o u s l y h as the wo rst
of i t . - Ed.
23. . . . Nd 7-e5
24 . Nf3xe5 Bf6xe5
25. Rc 1 -d 1 . . . ( No. 73)
At f i rst g l a nce it seems that t h e wea k n e ss of th e
B l ack Pawn on d 5 a n d the poss i b i l ity of underm i n i ng
B l ack 's K·side Pawn structure may g i ve W h i te a
defi n i te advantage. However, Anato l y Ka rpov carries
out a fa i r l y s i m p l e manoeuvre at th i s po i n t, forc i n g
a drawa b l e Rook-and- Pawn end i ng , s a y s Se rgei Maka­
rychev.
25. . . . Qf8-c5
26. h4-h 5 Oc 5-c2
27 . 0b 1 xc2 Rc8xc2
28. R d 1 x d 5 Rc2xe2
29 . R d 5 x e 5 Re 2xa2
30. h 5xg6 f7xg6
3 1 . R e 5-e 7 a7-a5 ( No. 74 )
Moves 2 6- 3 1 fo l l owed i n a rap id succession, and

1 13

8 - 1393
a Rook-and- Pawn e nd i ng h a s a r i sen a u tomatica l l y .
Wh ite h a s a s l i ght edge because h i s R o o k on the
seventh rank prevents t h e B l ack K i ng from co m i ng
i nto p l a y . H owever, t h e q u ic k adva nce of t h e B l ack's
a- Pawn has " t i ed u p " th e Wh ite R ook . At the same
time, the B l ack Rook h as succeeded in tak i ng an
active post. And wh en Kasparov f i nds a nar row path
for h i s K i n g to go to the centre, Ka rpov sets up a
depe n d a b l e barr i e r with some beautifu l moves by h i s
Pawns. I t has t h u s become c l ea r that t h e force o f the
attack is fu l l y co u nterba l a nced by that of the d efence.
32 . R e 7 -a7 a 5-a4
33 . g 2-g3 h 6-h 5
34 . Kg 1 -g 2 a4-a3
35. e3-e4 g6-g5
Ed uard Gufeld be l i eves that B l ack's l ast move is
the most precise method of d rawi ng. N ow, after
36 . Ra5 there wo u l d fo l l ow 36 . . . . g4 37. R x h 5 Re 2
38 . R a 5 a2, d rawi ng, because Wh i te cannot i m p rove
h i s pos i t i o n : e. g . , 39. Kf 1 R b 2 , th reaten i n g . . . R b 1 +,
and the B lack a- Pawn q ueens.
36 . Kg2-f3 g 5-g4+

74 75

1 14
37 . Kf3-e3 R a 2-a 1
38 . Ke3-f4 R a 1 -f 1
39 . Kf4-g5 Rf 1 xf2
40. Kg5xh 5 Rf2-e 2 ( No. 7 5)
G a me d rawn . After 4 1 . Kg6 Kf8 4 2 . Kf6 Rf2+
White can m a k e no h eadwa y .
T h e sco re is +3-3= 1 2.

GAME N I N ETE E N

Queen's Gambit Decl i ned

A. Karpov G. Kasparov
In the i nterv i ew for Span i sh te l ev i s i o n g i ve n right
after the e i ghteenth game, Garri Kasparov, wh o
seemed to be eager to foresta l l any i n te rpretat ion by
jou rnal ists of the eve nts i n that game, sa i d that he had
the adva ntage a l l a l ong, but cou ld not yet p i npoint
th e moment whe n h e h ad l et it s l i p . The Wor l d Cham­
pion added that, wh atever i mpression they m ight
have, h e had n ot been p l ay i ng for a d raw.
In the present encou n ter, the Ta rtakower- Maka­
gonov- Bondarevsky Variation, wh ich has been exten­
sively a n a l yzed and repeated l y tested by both p l ayers,
has aga i n made i ts appearance. Pos itions arising from
th i s c l assica l ope n i ng are ofte n d rawi sh, though a
draw is far from easy for B l ack to reach . So caution
ru les supreme !
1 . Ng 1 -f3 d7-d 5
2. d2-d4 Ng8-f6
3. c2-c4 e7-e6
4. N b 1 -c3 Bf8-e 7

1 15

8'
5. Bc l -g 5 0- 0
6. e2-e3 h 7 -h 6
7 . Bg5-h4 b7-b6
8 . Bf l -e2 Bc8-b7
9 . B h 4xf6 B e 7 xf6
1 0 . c4xd 5 e6x d 5
1 1 . 0-0 N b 8 -d7
1 2 . b2-b4 c7-c5
1 3 . b4xc5 b6xc5 ( No. 76)
The d i agram med POS i t i o n is we l l k n own to both
p l aye rs- i n d eed, it occu rred in the p re v i o u s game. Th e
on l y d i fference is t h at it i s n ow Karpov wh o has the
Wh ite p i eces. In order to avo id further repet i t i o n , the
ex-World Ch a m p ion comes up with a t h eoretica l
i n novat i o n : h e a ttac k s t h e B l ack B i sh o p with h i s
Queen rather than t h e R o o k .
Serge i M a k a rychev, j u st l y r e m a r k s , h oweve r, that
Wh ite's fou rteenth move, though never menti oned
by textboo ks, can o n l y forma l l y be regarded as a
nove lty. St i l l , W h i te g a i ns an edge, as h e shou l d .
1 4 . Qd l -b3 c5xd4
Force d . Otherwise, B l ack wo u ld be u na b l e to

76 77

1 16
defend h i s Pawns on c5 and d 5 .
1 5 . Nf3xd4 Bf6xd4
E d u a rd G u fe l d i s asto n i sh ed that Kaspa rov has
given u p h i s B i sh op-pa i r so eas i ly, suggest i ng 1 5 . . . .
Nc5 a s lead i ng to a n " i ncred i b l y comp l icated struggl e ,
as i s so dear to Kasparov's h eart" . I t i s hard t o agree
with t h i s assessm ent, because after 1 6 . Qb4 B l ack's
i n suff i c i e n t l y protected p ieces wo u l d g i ve Wh i te a
c l ear edge; for examp l e , 1 6 . . . . Rc8 1 7 . Bg4, or
1 6 . . . . Be7 1 7 . Nf5 Rc8 1 8 . Rc l , o r 1 6 . . . . Qb6
1 7 . Qa3, th reaten i n g 1 8 . R b l .
1 6 . e3xd4 Nd7-b6
The Wo r ld Ch a m p i o n finds a n i nterest i n g p l a n of
defence: h a v i n g l i q u idated the central tension , he
now uses h i s Kn i ght to mask the fi l e contro l led by
the Wh i te Quee n , t h u s parry i n g Wh i te ' s i mmed i ate
threat.
1 7 . a 2-a4
The Wh i te QR Pawn advances to show that B l ack's
minor p i eces are rath er awkwa rd l y p l aced on the
b-f i l e .
1 7. .. . Ra8-b8
1 8 . a4-a 5 N b 6-c4 ( No. 77)
At t h i s c r i t i c a l moment, Kasparov takes a n
i n ge n i ou s dec i s i o n : by t h e beautifu l m o v e of h i s
Kn ight h e offers h i s centre Pawn , the accepta nce of
wh i c h opens the long d i ago n a l for h i s B i sh o p .
After 1 8 . . . . N a 8 , Wh ite c o u l d atte m pt t o press
h i s s ma l l yet endu r i n g adva ntage in va r i ou s ways,
poi nts out Se rgei Makarychev.
1 9 . B e 2xc4 d 5 xc4
20. Qb3xc4 Qd 8-d 6
The Wo r l d C h a m p i o n took 25 m i n u te s to p l ay
th i s move. Accord i ng to G r a n d ma ster M a ka rychev,

1 17
in the event of 20 . . . . Qg 5 2 1 . d 5 Rfc8 2 2 . Qd 4,
Wh ite's central pos i t i o n wo u ld be q u ite strong. As it
i s, B l ack has a d o u b l e th reat of 21 . . . . Ba6 a nd 21 . . . .
Rfc8, fo l l owed by 2 2 . . . . Qc 6 w i th a n attack o n both
g2 a nd c3. Grandmaster G ufeld adds that the seq u e l
2 1 . a 6 R bc8 22. Qd 3 B xa6 23. R x a6 R xc3 ca nnot
give Wh i te more than e q u a l ity a nd suggests that
2 1 . R fc 1 wou l d l ead to a d i ff icu l t pos i t i o n for B l ack .
2 1 . Qc4-c 5
Se n s i ng t h at B l ack ' s midd l egame i n i t i ative m a y
become q u ite d a ngerous, Karpov offers to trade
Quee ns, thereby steer i ng the game i nto a n e nd ing,
wh ere he hopes to e x p l o i t h i s extra Pawn . Th i s
mate r i a l adva ntage, h owever, i s p u re l y sym bo l ic,
because the B l ack B i s h op is evidently stro nger here
than the Wh ite K n ight.
21 . ... Qd6xc5
22 . d 4xc5 R b 8-c8
23. a 5-a6 Bb7-a8
24 . Nc3-b5 Rc8xc5
25. Nb5xa7 Ba8-e4 ( No. 78)
An except iona l l y f i n e ma noeuvre and, perh aps,

78

1 18
the o n l y sav i n g possi bi l ity , po i nts out E d u a rd G ufeld :
the obvious 25 . . . . Bx g2 wo u ld give Wh i te, after the
forced 26. Kxg2 R a S 27 . Rfb 1 R xa 7 2S. R b 7 RaS
29 . a 7 RccS 30. R a b 1 Rf S (Wh ite th reatens RbS,
R xcS, a n d RbS, etc . ) 3 1 . Rc7 , t h e decisive adva ntage .
I n Serge i M a ka rychev's o p i n i o n , 26. Rfc 1 R xc 1
27 . R xc 1 ( t h reaten i ng 2 S . R c S ) 2 7 . . . . B h 3 2S. Nb5
RaS 29 . R a 1 wou ld a l so be q u ite stro ng, but he fai l s
to po i nt out t h e defensive a l ternative 2 6 . . . . Rg5, the
consequences of wh ich a re not so c l ea r . M a k a rychev
a l so suggests a very c u r i ou s a l ternative 25 . . . . RbS
26 . Rfb 1 ( B l ack th reate ns . . . Rc7) 26 . . . . R xb 1
27 . R xb 1 R a 5 2 S . h 4 R x a 6 2 9 . RbS+ K h 7 30. RxaS,
and a lt h o u g h Wh ite i s a p i ece a head , h e can not wi n in
th i s pos i t i o n , becau se the march of the Wh i te K i ng
to the Q-side wou ld resu l t i n the l oss by Wh ite of a l l
h i s Pawn s o n t h e other wi ng.
26. f2-f3 RfS-a S
27 . f3xe4 RaSxa7
2S. R a 1 -a4 Rc 5-c6
29 . R f 1 -a 1 KgS-fS
30. Kg 1 -f 2 KfS-e 7
3 1 . Kf2-e3 Ke7-e6
B l ack has succeeded in erect i ng a k i nd of fortress
wh ich can h a rd l y be d estroyed if a l l fo u r Rooks are
kept on the boa r d . Agre e i n g wi th the above assess­
ment, for m e r Wo r l d C h a m p i o n Va s i l i Smyslov,
however, remar ked that h e wo u l d not m i nd having
the Wh ite pieces i n this pos i t i o n "for o n e eve n i ng
o n l y " , t h u s suggest i n g that B l ac k ' s defe n s ive task wa s
by no means easy. Th e famous e ndgame expert
G randmaster Y u r i Averba k h a l so b e l ieves that a d raw
i s a logical outcome in th i s pos i t i o n .
32 . R a4-a 5 Rc6-d 6

119
33. R a 1 -a2 Rd 6-c6
34 . h2-h4 Rc6-d6
35 . Ke3-f4 Rd6-b6
36 . R a 2-a3
See i n g that he cannot make any h eadwa y , Anato l y
Karpov n o w decides t o p l ay a s e r i e s of u ncomm i tt i ng
moves to adj o u r n the game a n d to l oo k for some
h i dden poss i b i l ity at l e i s u re d u r i n g t h e adj o u r n me n t
a n a l y s i s. Th i s meth od , h owever, h as the s i g n i f icant
d i sadvantage that h i s r i v a l i s granted the same oppor­
tu n i ty of c l ose l y i n vest i gat i ng the adj o u rned pos i ­
t i o n . - Ed.
36. . . . R b 6-c6
37 . R a 5-e5+ Ke 6-f6
38. R e 5-f5+ Kf6-e 6
39. Rf5-a5 Rc6-b6
40. R a 5-e5+ Ke 6-f6 ( No_ 79)
Here the game wa s adjou rned, a n d the ex-Wo r l d
Cham p i o n sea l ed h i s 4 1 s t move . M o st comme ntato r s
be l ieved t h a t a d raw wa s i n e v i ta b l e , s o m e ( a mo n g
th em G ra n d master M a k a rychev) t h o u g h t that by
attac k i n g and captu r i n g B l ac k ' s Pawn o n g7 Wh ite

79 80

1 20
may hope to get wi n n i n g chances.
4 1 . R e 5-a 5 Kf6-e6
42. R a3-a 1 R b 6-c6
43 . R a 5-e5+ Ke 6-f6
44 . R e 5-f5+ Kf6-e6
45. R f5-e5+ Ke6-f6
46 . R e 5-a 5 Kf6-e6
47 . R a 1 -a 2 Rc6-b6
48 . g2-g4
Upon resu m pt i o n of p l ay Ka rpov f i rst makes
severa l n on-co m m i tta l moves, a s i f he wi shed to l u l l
h i s oppo nent's v i g i l a nce. Then h e starts carry i ng out
th e plan fou nd by h i s team in the i n te rva l . - Ed.
48. . . . f7-f6
49 . h 4-h 5 R b 6-c6
50. R a 2-b2 Rc6xa6
5 1 . R b2-b6+ R a 6xb6
52 . R a 5xa7 R b 6-b 1
53. R a 7 x g 7 R b 1 -f 1 +
54. Kf4-e3 R f 1 -e 1 +
5 5 . Ke3-f3 Re 1 -f 1 +
56. Kf3-e 2 Rf 1 -f4
57 . Ke2-e3 Ke 6-e 5
58. R g7-e7+ Ke5-d6
59 . R e 7 - h 7 Kd6-e5
60. R h 7-e7+ Ke 5-d6
6 1 . Re7-e6+ Kd6xe6
62. Ke3xf4 Ke6-e7 ( No. 80)
Ga me d rawn . To 63. Kf5 B l ack wi l l a n swe r 63 . . . .
Kf7 gett i n g t h e oppos i t i o n , a nd 63. e 5 wo u l d be
fo l l owed by 63. . . . Ke6 with the same idea. The
World C h a m p i o n p l ayed very r a p i d l y in the adjou rn­
me nt sessi o n , and it wa s o b v i o u s t h at the d i agrammed
pos i t i o n was fam i l i a r to h i m from h i s adj o u r n ment

1 21
analysis. After the game Kaspa rov rema rked , i n
reference t o t h e variation actua l ly p l ayed i n the
adjou rnment session : "I considered the excha nge of
al l the Pawn s on the K- side as t h e most dangerou s
p l a n at White's d i sposal. I n that case, B l ack wou l d
have t o t i m e h i s moves v e ry exact l y to d raw, whereas
in other l i nes i t wo u ld be s i mp ler to atta i n th i s
object. Karpov, on the other hand, thought i t un­
necessa ry for B l ack to move his f-Pawn . H e re we
differed . . .
"

The score is now +3-3= 1 3 .

G A M E TWENTY

Queen 's Gambit Dec l i ned

G. Kasparov A. Ka rpov

In the prev ious two ga mes, the Ta rtakower- Ma ka­


gonov- Bondarevsky Variation o nce a ga i n proved its
refractor i ness, Wh ite b e i n g u n a b l e to make any effec­
tua l use of B l ack's on l y wea k n e ss, h i s i so l ated centre
Pawn . After the i n i t i a l moves of the p resent en­
counter, everyone ex pected the d i sp u te over the
Variation to be co n t i n u e d . On his fifth move, how­
ever, Garri Kasparov sudd e n ly varies and thus avoids
the " refractory" ope n i ng . - Ed.
I n the twe n t i eth game of the matc h , the Wo rld
Ch a m p i o n has t h e i n i tiative a l most t i l l the end , and
only Karpov's very prec i se d efensive p lay e n a b l es
h i m to save the d a y .
1 . c2-c4 e7-e6

1 22
2. N b l -c3 d 7 -d 5
3. d2-d4 Bf8-e7
4. N g l -f3 Ng8-f6
5. Qd l -c2
Th i s rare side l i n e, advocated by Veres l av E i ngorn,
may we l l become fash i o n a b le n ow. As Grandmaster
M aka rychev p o i n ted out, W h i te s h o u l d execute h i s
p l a n i n exact ly th i s o rder, beca u se 5 . B g 5 may be
fo l l owed by 5 . . . . h 6 .
5. . . . 0-0
6. Bc l -g 5 c7-c5
One o f t h e many a n swers B l ack has at h i s d i sposa l ,
6. . . . N a 6 b e i n g a good a l ternative. Accord i ng t o
Se rge i M aka rychev, the text-move i s the ma i n con­
t i n u a t i o n in th i s l i ne , wh i l e after 6 . . . . h 6 B l ack has
to reckon with 7. B x f6 B x f6 8 . e4, g iv i ng Wh ite an
active game.
7 . d4xc5 d 5xc4
8 . e2-e4 Qd 8-a5
9. e4-e 5 N f6-d 5
1 0 . Bf l xc4 . . . ( No. 8 1 )
Strange l y enough , t h i s o b v i o u s recapture is a

81 82

1 23
theoretica l i n novat i o n , wr i tes Se rge i M a k a rychev.
The seq u e l 1 0 . Bxe7 Nxe7 only l eads to equa l ity,
as a l l the h a ndbooks stat e .
1 0. . . . Nd 5xc3
1 1 . 0-0
Th is e l egant move revea l s Kasparov's i d e a . The
piece sacr i f ice i s, of course , o n ly sha m : after 1 1 . . . .
N d 5 t h e re wo u l d fo l l ow 1 2 . B x d 5 B x g 5 1 3 . N x g 5,
and B l ack wo u ld have no t i m e to recapture the Wh i te
B i shop on d5 because of t h e th reat of mate on h 7 ,
po i nts o u t E d u a rd G u fe l d .
1 1 . ... Qa 5xc5
1 2 . Qc2xc3 N b 8-c6
1 3 . Bg5xe7 Qc 5xe7
1 4 . a 2-a3
An i nterest i n g , yet d i sputa b l e plan, th i n ks Serge i
M a k a rychev. M a n y experts a re of t h e o p i n i o n that
doub l i n g the R oo ks on the d·fi l e ( R d l -d 6 a n d Rd l )
wo u l d offer Wh i te better prospects
1 4. . . . Bc8-d7
1 5 . R a l -c l RfB-d8
1 6 . b 2-b4 a7-a6
A moot po int. Accord i ng to Ma karychev, the text­
move is too s l ow, B l ac k s h o u l d h ave p l ayed the
vigorous 1 6 . . . . b 5 i n stead . Now B l ac k may answe r
1 7 . B x b 5 with 1 7 . . . . N x b 4 1 8 . B x d 7 N d 5 . Sh o u l d the
Wh ite B i sh op retreat, h owe ver, B l ack h a s the strong
fo l l ow-up . . . a7-a5 and, after a Q-s i d e u n l oad i ng ,
B l ac k wo u l d h ave no prob l e m s .
1 7 . Qc3-e3 Bd7-e8
1 8 . Bc4-d 3 . . . ( N o. 82 )
After the Wh ite Pawn advanced to t h e f i fth ran k ,
it became c l e a r that B l ack s h o u ld see k some defence
aga i n st the m o u n t i n g assa u l t of the W h i te pi eces,

1 24
wh i c h were th reate n i n g the cast l ed pos i t i o n of the
B l ack K i n g . Hav i n g excha nged a few m i n or pi eces,
th e ex-Wo r l d Ch a m p i o n has succeeded in repu l si n g
Wh ite's f i rst o n s l a ught, but then Wh i te has created a
new th reat: h e i ntends to penetrate to the wea kened
O-s i d e in t h e B l ac k camp. In order to i nc rease h i s
advantage, G a r r i Kasparov sta rted a O- s i d e offensive
with h i s Pawn s a n d , wh i l e B l ack wa s engaged i n
repu l s i n g that th reat, t h e Wo r l d C h a m p i o n brought
his B ishop to an active post and prepared for a d i rect
attack aga i nst the B l ack K i ng's cast l e .
1 8. ... Nc6-a7
1 9 . Bd3-b l Be8-c6
20. N f3-g5 h7-h6
2 1 . N g 5-e4
Accord i ng to M a k a rychev, Wh i te wo u l d not be
able to atta i n h i s object by 2 1 . N h 7 , in v i ew of 21 . . . .
Oh 4.
2 1 . .. . Na7-b5
2 2 . R c l -c4
Wh ite th reate ned 22. Nf6+ gf 23. Ox h 6 f5 24.
Rc3, wi n n i n g outright. Th i s forces B l ac k , after Wh ite
renews his th reat with the twe nty-seco nd move, to
exc h a nge at e4, n otes Se rge i M a k a rychev.
22. . . . Bc6xe4
23. B b l xe4 R a 8-c8
24 . Rc4xc8 Rd 8xc8
2 5 . R f l -c l Rc8xc l +
26. 0e3xc l Oe 7-d 7
27 . g2-g3 b 7 -b6
2 8 . Kg l -g2 Od 7-d8
B l ac k 's last move was c r i t i c i zed by comme ntators
as very pass ive, 28 . . . . g 5 be i ng recomme nded i nstead
to ensure counter- p l a y i nvo l v i ng Od 4, wh ich wo u l d

1 25
suffice for equal ity. After t h e text-move Wh ite ga i n s
th e advantage.
29 . h 2- h 4 a 6-a 5
30. b4x a 5 b6xa5
3 1 . Qc 1 -c5 N b 5-d4
32. h 4-h 5 f7-f5 ( N o. 83 )
I n t h e d i agrammed po s i t i o n , 3 3 . ef seems
i m perative, and B l ack may f i nd i t h ard to d efend
h i mself. After 33 . . . . gf ( 33 . . . . Qxf6 l oses a Pawn :
34 . Qxa 5 ) B l ack 's ex posed K i n g and h i s somewh at
loose Pawn structure e n a b l es N h i te to l ook for
wi n n i ng cha nces both with the Queens on the board
and in a B i shop-and-Pawn vs Kn i ght-a nd-Pawn end i ng
a r i s i ng, e. g . , from the l i ne 33. ef gf 34. Qa7 f5 3 5 .
Qa 8, t h o u g h the outcome i s not yet c l e a r. Ka sparov
chose a d i fferent move, and he came to regret it, as h e
later to l d jou rna l i sts. Ka rpov, h owever, was o f t h e
op i n ion t h a t after 33 . . . . g f B l ack wo u ld have had
good counter- p l a y . On l y the future wi l l te l l wh o wa s
right.
When it seemed th a t Wh i te wo u l d cont i n ue accu­
mu l at i n g sma l l advantages u n h ampered , Ka rpov bo l d l y

83 84

1 26
pushed forwa rd h i s f- Pawn , thus red u c i ng the pressure
exerted by the Wh i te p ieces, and a few moves l ater
he a l so succeeded in considerably act ivat ing h i s
Queen . The d raw by t h e perpetu a l , wh ich Wh i te had
to take, is the logica l outcome of the strugg l e .
33 . Be4-b7 Kg8-f7
34 . Kg2-h 2
At th i s moment, ind icates Serge i M a k a rychev, the
ex-World Cha mpion wa s rather short of t i m e , wh ich
motivated Kaspa rov's strange choice of move: th i s is,
of cou rse, a we l l- k nown tactica l device , but it a l so
hands over the i n itiati ve to B lack . The W h i te K i ng is
awkwardly placed on h 2 , where it offe rs B l ack the
tactical threat of ... Qxe 5 and Nf3+, wi n n i ng a Pawn .
B l ack can now d raw without d iff icu l ty , Wh ite, how­
ever, had a very strong a l ternative at h i s d i sposa l ,
name l y, 34 . f4 and B l ack's t a s k wo u l d be extreme l y
d i fficu l t.
34 . . . . Qd 8-b8
35. Qc5xd4 Qb8xb7
36 . g3-g4 Qb7-f3
37 . Qd4-d 7 + Kf7-f8 ( No. 84)
Game drawn . The score rema i n s eve n : +3-3= 1 4 .

G A M E TW E N TY-O N E

G ruenfeld Defence

A. Karpov G . Kaspa rov

"Who, if not the parti c i pa nts of a top-level match,


ca n be expected to contri bu te most of a l l to the
deve l op m e n t of the art of chess?" asks Garri Kaspa-

1 27
rov i n h i s recent book Two Ma tches. The contr i bu­
tion of these two g reat masters to chess theory is
i ndeed enormous. Th i s i s espec i a l l y true of the theory
of ope n i ngs, the Gruenfeld Defence beco m i ng the
arena of a l o n g a n d h eated d i spute, in wh ich the
Grand masters' argume nts h ave taken t h e form of
many ingen i u o s ref i nements and i m p rovements.-Ed.
1 . d2-d 4 Ng S-f6
2. c2-c4 g7-g6
3. N b 1 -c3 d 7 -d 5
4 . N g 1 -f3 BfS-g7
5. 0d 1 - b3
Th i s move, i n troduced i nto master p l a y by the
Sov iet Grandmaster Vyach eslav R agoz i n , clearly
i n d i cates the ex-Wo r l d Champ i o n 's f i g h t i ng mood.
5. . . . d 5xc4
6. Ob3xc4 0-0
7 . e2-e4 N b S-a6
The idea beh i n d th i s manoeuvre, R agoz i n 's i nven­
tion and Kasparov's great favo u r i te, is to u n d e r m i n e
W h i t e ' s strong centre with c 7 - c 5 l ead i ng to a sharp,
comp l icated game. The other good a l ternat i ves are
7 . . . . Bg4 ( Smyslov's V a r i a t i o n ) , 7 . . . . c 6 ( B o l es l avsk y 's
Variati o n ) , 7 . . . . a6 ( t h e H u ng a r i a n Var i at i on ) . and
7 . . . . Nc6, wh i c h wa s popu l a r in the seve nties.
S. Bf 1 -e2 c7-c5
9. d4-d 5 e 7 -e6
1 0 . 0-0 e6xd5
1 1 . e4xd 5 BcS-f5
1 2 . R f 1 -d 1 R f 8-eS
1 3 . d 5-d6 h7-h6
1 4 . Bc 1 -f4 . . ( No_ 85)
.

The f i rst th i rteen moves in the present encounter


are exact l y the same as in Game F i ftee n , but on h i s

1 28
fourteenth move Karpov varies. Th e ex-Wo r l d Ch am­
p i o n , h owever, fa i l s to ga i n the advantage. Kasparov
harmon i o u s l y regroups the B l ac k p i eces and, by
Wh ite's n i neteenth move, succeeds in completely
equa l i z i n g t h e game.
1 4. . . . Nf6-d 7
A m u l t i p u rpose move, notes E d u a rd G ufe l d, by
wh i c h B lack has r e l i a b l y b l ocked Wh i te ' s d - Pawn .
Th e seq u e l 1 4 . . . . g5 1 5. Bg3 Ne4 1 6 . d7 Re7 1 7 .
Nxe 4 B x e4 1 8 . B d 6 R x d 7 1 9 . Qxe4 R xd 6 20 . Qxb7
Nc7 wo u l d have led to a pos i t i o n wh ich i s q u i te hard
to assess.
1 5 . R d l -d 2 Na6-b4
1 6 . Qc4-b3
Wh ite's pos i t i o n now looks attractive; for i n sta nce ,
after 1 6 . . . . a6 he may se i ze t h e i n i t i at i ve at once by
1 7 . a3 Nc6 1 8 . N d 5 ( but not 1 8 . Qx b7 N a 5 1 9. Qd 5
Be6, wi th r i c h cou nterp l ay ) . After long med i tation
Kasparov f i nd s a f i ne rej o i nd e r , forc i ng Wh i te e i th e r
t o withd raw h i s Qu ee n to d 1 , wh ere i t prevents i t s
own Rook f r o m co m i ng i nto p l a y , o r t o exchange
the l i ght-squa red B i shops, thus we ak e n i ng the l i ght
sq u a res i n the Wh i te camp .
85 86

1 29

9- 1393
1 6. .. . Bf 5-e6
1 7 . B e 2-c4 Nd7-b6
1 8 . Bc4xe6 Re8xe6
1 9 . a2-a3
Karpov see ms to h ave ove r l ooked B l ac k 's rep l y .
Othe rwise h e wo u l d proba b l y h a ve cont i n u ed 1 9.
N b 5 with a very com p l icated pos i t i o n , i n w h i c h i t
wo u l d n o t b e easy f o r B l ack t o f i nd a n active defence
aga i n st the th reat of 20. Nc7: e. g., 1 9 . . . . Re4 20. Be3
Nc4 2 1 . Bxc5 Nxd2 22. N x d 2, and two Wh i te p i eces
are en p r i s e .
1 9. . . . N o 4-d3 ( N o. 86)
Th i s spectac u l a r i nvasion h as a s i m p l e tact ica l
th reat to back it up: 20. R x d 3 c4, wi n n i ng the
Exchange. Although t h e i n road of the B l ack K n i g h t
t o d 3 has become, so to spe a k , Ka spa rov 's spec i a l ty,
it i s i nterest i ng to n ote that none of t h e Grand­
ma sters present in the press room had been able to
foresee the Wor l d Ch a m p i o n 's powe rfu l counter.
So me c o m m e ntators suggest t h at Anato l y Karpov
a l so fai l ed to foresee i t ( wh ich i s fa i r l y obv i o u s ) and
report h av i ng seen a g r i m e x pression o n h i s face
r i ght after th i s move. I n an i nterv iew l ate r, the ex­
Wor l d Champion i n fact co nfi rmed th i s suggestion
by rema r k i n g that "the s e i z u re by the B l ack Kn ight
of th i s v i ta l l y i m portant square ( d 3 ) gave Kasparov
a c l ear advantage".
20. Bf4-g3 c5-c4
2 1 . Qb3-c2 Ra 8-c8
22. R a 1 -d 1 Qd 8-d7
Th is pos i t i o n I S In some wa ys rem i n i scent of the
cel ebrated s i xteenth game of the Moscow Match,
1 985, between t h ese r i va l s. In that game, Ka spa rov
comp letely stra n g l ed the Wh i te p i eces, h e l d by Ka r-

1 30
pov, and scored a splend i d v icto ry . The move of. the
B l ack Queen in the act u a l game h e re i s a i med not
only at b l ockad i n g the White d · Pawn and free i ng the
back ra n k for the poss i b l e ma noeuvre of the B l ack
Rook , but a l so at k ee p i n g contro l of the i mportant
sq uares a4 and b5, wh ere Wh ite may start h i s Q-side
act i v i ty . - Ed.
23. h 2-h4 f7-f5 ( No. 87 )
K i nd n ess for k i ndness. Al l comme ntato rs agree
that t h i s adva nce is premature, in sp i te of the fact
that B l ack w i n s the Excha nge as a resu l t . I n deed, the
B l ack K i ng's pos i t i o n i s now wea k e n ed and, sacr i f i c i ng
th e Exchange, Wh i te ga i n s counterp l a y . Of cou rse,
W h i te wou ld not a l low . . . f5-f4, wh ich wo u l d shut i n
h i s B i shop, a l so resu l t i ng i n t h e l o ss o f h i s d - Pawn .
On the ot h e r h a n d , B l ack s h o u l d h ave p l ayed the
obv i o u s l y stro nger 23 . . . . Rc6, or 23 . . . . Rc5, i nstead
of t h e text-move. He cou ld t he n surro u n d and wi n
t h e Wh i te Pawn on d 6 , reta i n i ng good chances to
score a fu l l po i nt . - Ed.
24 . R d 2 x d 3 c4xd3
2 5 . Qc2xd3 N b 6-c4

87 88

1 31

9*
I f t h i s had been an e a r l y game i n t h e match , a very
strenuous f i g h t m i ght have d eve l oped in th i s position.
At th i s stage, h owever, everyth i n g is d i fferent. Un­
wi l l i ng to take t h e l e ast poss i b l e r i s k the Wo r l d Ch am­
pion decides o n a q u iet l i ne lead i n g to t h e repet i tion
of moves a nd a d raw.
26. 0d3-d 5 Nc4-b6
27 . 0d 5-d3 N b 6-c4
2B . Od3-d5 Nc4-b6 ( No. 88)
Ne ither of t h e co nte sta n ts can avoid t h e repeti ti on ,
fo r a n attempt to do so cou l d ge t h i m i nto troub l e .
For exa m p l e , 2B . . . . N x b 2 29 . R e 1 R e B 30. R x e 6
Rxe6 ( not, of cou rse, 3 0 . . . . Ox e6, i n v i ew o f 3 1 . d7 ! )
3 1 . N b 5 with da ngerous threats, o r e l se ( after B l ack 's
28th text ) 29. Ob3 Kh 7 ( pe r h aps even stronger
wo u l d be 29 . . . . Of7 th reate n i n g ... R e 1 +, poi nts out
Se rgei Makarychev; in response to 30. K h 2 B l ack
wo u l d p l a y . . . f4) 30. N b 5 Rc5 3 1 . Nc7 R e 4 , a nd the
B l ack Rooks are extre m e l y d a ngerous, suggests
Eduard G ufeld .
Th e game is d rawn . Th e score rema i n s even :
+3-3= 1 5 .

G AM E TW E NTY-TWO

Ouee n's Gam bit Dec l i n ed

G . K asparov A . K a rpov

"Wh e re h ave a l l th e fighte rs gone?" angry and


bew i l d e red chess fans all over the world keep wonder­
ing. "Wh e re is th e f i e ry , sp i r i ted G a rry Kasparov,

1 32
wh o has a lways been preoccu p ied above a l l w ith th e
a rtistic e l e m e nt of th e ga m e , w ith i ts beau ty ? And
where is the ' m erc i l ess k i l l e r' A n ato l y K a rpov, who
has , never see m ed conten t to ta k e a d raw i n a 'dead
d rawn' ga m e ? Are we back aga i n to th e Petrosyan
e ra ? " Alas! In th e Sev i l l e MatC h , th e scen a r i o of
wh ich is so u n l i k e the p l ots of its two pred ecessors
( M oscow , 1 98 5 ; London - L e n i n grad , 1 986) , th e sport­
i n g e l e m e n t has p reva i l e d . There are, perhaps, too
m any short d raws, crea t i ng th e ( m ay be fa lse) i m ­
p ress i o n t h a t the p layers are s i m p l y refu s i n g to f i gh t.
W h e re is the prom ised " b l oodsh ed "? I t seems th at
there w i l l be no fu rth er " b l ood - l e tt i n g " . Yet, th e
participants o f the Sevi l l e M a tch a r e n o t t o b l am e .
We sh o u l d n ot forget th at th is i s th e fou rth W o r l d
C h a m p ionsh i p M atch i n t h e l ast th ree years. Previous­
I y , 24 gam es were suff i c i e nt to secu re th e wor l d
t i t l e for th ree years. W h e n th e prese nt m atch i s ove r,
th ese riva l s w i l l have play ed , to atta i n th e same
obj ect, ex act l y one h u nd red and twenty games! H ow
can a p l a y e r be p r i m a r i l y concerned about th e crea­
tive e l e m e nt u nder such c i rcu m sta nces? G od s them­
selves m ay tire. Garri Kasparov and A n ato l y K a rpov
need no apo l ogy; y et, they m ay n eed o u r u nde rsta nd­
i ng . With th i s in m i n d , perhaps, th e read er w i l l be
m ore sy m pathetic and to l e r a n t when h a v i n g to play
th rough a sh ort, and apparently d u l l , d raw.-Ed.
I n the tw enty -second encounter, both th e Cham­
p i o n and th e ex-Ch a m p i o n ri gorou s l y fo l l owed th e
reco m m endations of theory . I t seem ed t h a t they d id
not object to ta k i ng a qu ick d raw. Th is is q u ite
u n d e rsta n d a b l e-they have on th ei r m i nds th e very
d i fficu l t twe n ty-th i rd con test, wh ich w i l l l a rge l y
dete r m i n e th e ch aracte r of the figh t i n th e l ast,

1 33
twe n ty -fou rth , g a m e a nd m ay even p rove d ecisive for
the outcome of the w hole m atch . Under such c i rcum­
stances one shou ld be econom ical w i th one's rem a i n i ng
energy . Tech n ica l l y , th e d raw was reached i n a very
e l egant m anner. H a v i n g ch osen a popu l a r and thorough­
l y a nal yzed ope n i n g l i n e , neither G ra n d m aste r was
aga i n st early exchanges. As a resu lt, th e re soon a rose
a n endga m e pos i t i o n in wh ich th e i n itiative, th ou gh
s l ight, was on Kaspa rov's s i d e . I t w as th en that the
World Champion offered a d raw .
1 . c2-c4 e7-e6
2 . N b l -c3 d7-d5
3 . d2-d4 B f8-e7
4. N g l -f3 N g8-f6
5. Bc l -f4
A su rprise. Kasparov h as n ever before p l ay ed th us
aga i n st K a rpov. The ex-W o r l d Ch am p i o n , on the
oth e r hand , i s wel l -ve rsed i n a l l th e l atest "w r i n k les"
of th is l i ne, i n wh ich h e successfu l l y d efended h i mself
aga i n st Korch n o i i n th e i r world title m atches and o n
wh ich h e w rote a n a r t i c l e i n th e Y u goslav Encyclope­
dia of Chess Openings. Th e tex t-m ove, h oweve r,
conta i n s a fa i r d ose of venom , poi nts o u t j a n T i m m a n .
5. . .. 0-0
6 . e2-e3 c7-c5
7 . d4xc5 B e7xc5
8 . R a l -c l
Accord ing to Serge i M a k arychev, only 8 . Qc2
N c6 9 . R d l Qa 5 1 0. a3 B e7 is consid e red to be the
p r i nc ipa l l i n e i n th i s va r i a ti o n . I n te resti n g l y , the
resu l t i n g position m ay also arise from th e N i m zo­
I nd i a n , wh ich enh ances i ts th eoretical i m portance.
Wh ite's m a i n conti n u at i o n s now are 1 1 . Nd2 or
1 1 . R d 2 . Afte r th e m ove i n the actu a l game, w h ich

1 34
h as so fa r been regard ed as rath e r l istless, th e Yugo·
slav Encyclopedia gives 8 . . . . dc 9 . Qxd8 R xd 8
1 0 . B x c 4 a6 1 1 . 0-0 b5 1 2 . B b3 N bd7 1 3 . N e5 B b 7
( R ee - E n k laar, 1 974) , with eq u a l i ty . B u t what if
Kasparov's tea m has fou n d an i m provem e nt for
W h i te i n the "theoretica l l y d rawn" e n d i ng resu lting
from th is reco m m endation? K a rpov, acco rd i n g l y ,
ponde red ove r t h e p o s i t i o n for 3 5 m i n u tes a n d f o u n d
w h a t is perhaps a bette r d efensive m ethod .
8. ... N b8-c6
9 . c4xd5 e6xd5
1 0. Bf l -e2 . . . . ( N o . 89)
An atte mpt to win a Paw n would be u nsuccessfu l :
1 0. N x d 5 N xd 5 1 1 . R x c5 N x f4 1 2 . Qxd8 N x g2+. -Ed.
1 0. . . . d 5-d4
I n th is way B l ack fu l l y eq u a l i z es th e game . Wh ite
now has to s i m p l i fy , becau se after 1 1 . N a4 or 1 1 . N b 5
there wou ld fo l l ow 1 1 . . . , B b4+, wh ich is h a rd l y
welcome.
1 1 . e3xd4 N c6xd4
1 2 . N f3xd4 Qd8xd4
1 3 . Qd l xd4 Bc5xd4

89 90

1 35
1 4. N c3-b5 Bd4-b6
1 5 . 0-0
Wh ite cou ld now ga i n th e " advantage of two
B ishops" after 1 5 . Nc7 Bxc7 1 6 . Bxc7 ( n ot, of
cou rse , 1 6 . R xc7 in v iew of 1 6 . . . . N d 5) . H owever,
afte r 16 . . . . Re8 B lack has a n exce l l e n t game, h i s
p i eces be i n g wel l co-ord i n ate d .-Ed.
1 5. . . . Bc8-e6
It only took th e World Ch a m p io n six m i n utes to
reach th is positi o n , w hereas h is oppon e n t spe n t f i fty .
What can one say about th e situation on the board ?
I t is so s i m p l e th at many of those p rese n t a t th e game
were we l l aware of the i m m inence of a d raw, com­
me nts G randmaste r G u fe l d .
1 6 . a2-a3 R f8-d 8
H av i n g ga ined a tem po b y attac k i n g th e W h i te
a-Pawn , B lack shows th at h is opponen t's fu rth e r
atte m pts a re fa i r l y futi l e . -Ed.
1 7 . N b5-d6 R d8-d7
1 8 . Be2-b5 Rd7-e7
1 9 . R f l -e l (No. gO)
K asparov here offe red a d raw, w h ich was accepted .
The score of th e m atch is +3-3= 1 6 .

GAME TW E NTY-T H R E E

G ruenfe ld Defence

A. K a rpov G. K asparov

Everyon e understood th at th is gam e , in wh ich


Anatoly K a rpov h ad th e W h ite pieces fo r th e last

1 36
t i m e , was th e ex-World Ch a m p ion's best practical
c h ance to rega i n th e world titl e . And everyone
wondered h ow K a rpov wou ld go about t h e a rd uous
task of w i n n i n g .
Th e e x -World Ch am p i o n was n ot i n a h u rry to
l a u nch an attack ; he was above a l l concerned with
th e prob l e m of h ow to bu i l d a strong Pawn centre
wh ich , accord i ng to th e ex isti n g crite ri a of chess
th eory, i s good for th e p ieces of its possessor. Th is
restra i ned strategy cou ld not, h owever, i m pede
B l ack's deve l op m e nt se r i o u sl y . Th e World Cham­
p i o n p l aced h is p ieces q u ite com fortab l y and , using
h is B is h ops as batte r i n g ram s, started str i k i n g at
th e W h i te Pawn cen tre .
1 . c2-c4 c7-c5
2. N g l -f3 N g8-f6
3. N b l -c3 d 7-d5
4 . c4xd 5 N f6xd5
5 . d2 -d4 N d 5xc3
6. b2xc3 g7 -g6
7 . e2-e3
T h i s i n n oce nt- l o o k i n g, yet fa i r l y venomous,
system of d e p l o y m e nt, ch a m p i o ned by Pau l K eres,
s i g n ifies that Wh ite w ishes to postpone h is activ ities
t i l l later, and proceed u nder th e m otto " s l ow but
stead y " . -Ed.
7. ... B f8-g7
8 . Bf l -d3
T h e a l ternatives 8 . Bc4 and 8 . B b 5+ h ave been
m ore popu l a r than th e tex t- m ove, but the fash ion
i s n ow l i k e l y to change.-Ed.
8. ... 0-0
9 . 0-0 Qd 8-c7
1 0 . R a l -b l b7-b6

1 37
Quot i n g G ran dm aste r Serge i D o l m atov, one o f
Kasparov's seconds i n Sev i l l e, Edu ard G u fe ld referred
to th is m ove as "a fru it of the analytical work
performed i n th e World Ch a m p ion's l ab oratory
d u r i n g t h e pre-m atch period" .
1 1 . Qd l -e2 R f8-d 8
T h e response 1 1 . . . . N c6 l o o k s m ore n atu ra l tha n
the m ove i n the g a m e , bu t Kasparov is y et u nw i l l i n g
t o reve a l h is p l a n s_-Ed.
1 2 . Bd3-e4 . . . ( N o_ 9 1 )
1 2. ... Bc8-a6
B l ow for b l ow . 1 2 . . . . Nc6 w o u l d fa i l to 1 3 . d5 f5
( oth e rwise, d 5-d6 wou ld f o l l ow) 1 4 . d c fe 1 5 . Qc4+,
g i v i n g Wh i te a d a n gerous i n itiative. Th ose present i n
th e press room , i n the m a i n , con s i d e red the l i ne
1 2 . . . . B b 7 1 3 . Bx b7 Qx b7 1 4 . dc Qc6 ( a fte r 1 4 . . . .
B xc3 th e ga m e wou ld b e m o re com p l icated : e . g .
1 5 . Qc4 Bg7 1 6 . B b2 w ith a sm a l l but clear edge)
1 5 . cb ab 1 6 . Nd4 Qxc3 1 7 . R x b6 Bxd4 1 8 . ed
Qxd 4 w i th o n l y a s l i g h t advantage for W h i te , accord ­
i ng to Edu ard G u fe l d .
1 3 . c3-c4 N b8-c6

91 92

1 38
1 4 . d 4-d 5 f7 -f5
Afte r 1 4 . . . . N b4 ( t h reate n i n g 1 5 . . . . N x d 5 ) W h i te
cou ld conti n u e 1 5 . R d l R ac8 ( n ot of cou rse 1 5 . . . .
f5 , i n v iew o f 1 6 . d 6 ) 1 6 . a 3 f5 1 7 . a b f e 1 8 . Ng5
w i th the better gam e, po i n ts o u t Se rge i M a k a rychev.
1 5 . Be4-d3 e7-e5
All of a sudde n , th e h e retofore q u iet game h as
com plete l y changed i ts characte r : the W h ite cen tre
Pawns have attacked the B l ac k p ieces, but K asparov
does not w i t h d raw th e enda ngered B lack K n ight.
I nstead he makes tw o spectacu l a r m oves w ith h is
Pawns, th u s a l m ost equal i z i n g th e gam e .
1 6 . e3-e4 N c6-d4
1 7 . N f3xd4 c5xd4
1 8 . Bc l -g5 R d8-f8
1 9 . R f l -c l R a8-c8
To B l ack's d u b i o u s f5-f4 , w ith th e idea of cut­
ting off W h ite's B i sh o p from th e m a i n fo rces, Wh ite
can strongly a n swer 20 . c5 B xd3 2 1 . Qxd3 bc 2 2 .
Qc4 , and th e B ishop wou l d effect i v e l y su pport th e
adva nce o f t h e Wh ite d - Paw n . A s i t i s , th e B ishop h as
to retreat. -Ed.
2 0 . Bg5-d2 R f8 -f7
2 1 . a2-a4 . . . ( N o_ 92)
21 . ... f5xe4
B l ack eases off th e cen tra l ten s i o n to open the
f-f i l e , along w h ich he i n tends to cou nte rp lay . 2 1 . . . .
Bf8 i s bad , because o f 22 . e f gf 23 . B xf5 R xf5 24 .
Qg4+. - Ed_
22 . Qe2xe4 R c8-f8
23 . f2-f3 B a6-c8
24. a4-a5
Acco rd i n g to Edu ard G u fe l d , Wh ite shou ld here
h ave pl ayed the sharp 24 . d6 Qxd6 25 . B b4 Qf6

1 39
26 . B x fS B x fS and , i n sp ite of h is two strong B i s h ­
ops, B l ack is h a rd l y to be envied . I n th e even t o f
24 . . . . Od 7 , t h e tex t-m ove wou ld p rove m ore fo rce-
fu l .
24. '" BcS-f5
2 5 . 0e4-e2 R fS-eS
2 6 . Bd 3-e4 Bg7-fS
I m ped i ng the poss i b l e ad vance of th e d a ngerous
Wh ite Pawns and also tran sfe r r i n g th e B i sh op to a
m ore prom i s i n g post. -Ed.
2 7 . 0e2-d3 B fS-c5
2S. R b 1 -a 1 Oc7 -d7
To play 2 S m oves, W h ite h as ta ken 2 h o u rs and
2 m i n u tes, B l ack-one h ou r and f i fty-th re e m i n utes .
B e i n g pressed for ti m e , both p layers try to avoid
ta k i n g any com m itti n g decisions, prefe r r i n g to go on
w ith posi t i o n a l m an oeuv r i n g . -Ed.
29 . R c 1 -e 1 Od 7-cS
30. K g 1 -h 1 R f7 -c7
3 1 . R a l -b 1 K gS-g7
32 . R e 1 -c 1 . . , ( N o. 93 )
32. . . . Bf5xe4

93 94

1 40
A second , and th i s t i m e successfu l , attempt to
s e i z e possess i o n of the f-fi l e . -Ed.
33 . f3xe4
The captu re by th e Queen would make th e s i tu a­
tion very s h a rp i ndeed : 33 . Qxe4 Ba3 3 4 . R e l R xc4
3 5 . f4 , etc . As it i s , the ga m e h as e q u a l ized , Eduard
G u fe l d bel ieves.
33. . . . R c 7 -f7
34 . Qd 3-g3 b6 xa 5
V ery s h a r p l y p l ayed . B y captu r i n g th e Pawn on a 5
B l ack h as bu rnt h is boats , f o r n ow W h ite h a s two fi les
for h is R ooks to ope rate on, as we l l as two connected
passed Paw n s w h e reas th e B l ack B i sh op is deprived
of i ts su pport and th e Pawn o n a7 h as become vu l ne r­
a b l e . I n sh ort, if B l ack 's K-side cou nterc h a nces p rove
i n suff i c i e n t, h is Q-s i d e wea k n ess w i l l be fata l . For a l l
th ese reasons, th e m ove i n th e tex t was not u n an i ­
m ou s l y approved of by the com m e ntators. Yet, i n h is
stru gg l e for the i n it i a t i ve, Kasparov d ee m s it more
i m po rtant to defl ect th e W h ite B i s h op , th u s remov i n g
K a rpov's contro l of the sq u are f4 , and K asparov h i m ­
s e l f obta i n i n g th e opportu n ity to regro u p h i s forces
w i th tem p i ( g a i n ed by attac k i n g the e4 and c 4 Pawns
and a l so th e B i s h op ) to l a u nch a K-side offe nsive.
3 5 . Bd2 x a 5 R f7 -f4
36 . R c l -e l QcS-a6
I n G u fe l d ' s op i n i o n , 36 . . . . Be7 see m s stronger : for
e x a m p l e , 37 . Qd3 R efS 3S . Bd2 R f2 , or 3 S . R f l
R xf 1 + 39 . R x f l R xf 1 + 40 . Qx f l Qa6 4 1 . B d 2 Qa3
w ith suff i c i e n t cou n te rp l ay .
37 . Ba5-d2 R f4-f7
3S . Qg3-d3 R eS-f8
39 . h 2-h3 R f7 -f2
4 0 . R b l -a l Qa6-f6 ( N o . 94)

141
The game was h e re adjou rned a n d K a rpov sealed
his fo rty -f i rst m ove. Th e adj o u r n m e n t a n a l y s i s and
the second session were to sh ow wheth e r W h ite
wou ld be a b l e to exp l o i t h is strong Paw n ce ntre , to ­
geth e r w ith h is other assets, to scor.e a p o i n t . I n the
d i agra m m ed pos i t i o n , Wh ite has to fe nd off th e th reat
of 4 1 . . . . Qh 4 and 42 . . . . R 8f3 , w ith B l ack's oth e r
th reat, 4 1 . . . . R x g2, being q u i te harm less i n v i ew o f
42 . K xg2 Qf2 + 4 3 . K h 1 R f3 44 . R f i , e tc . Accord i n g­
I y , 4 1 . R e b 1 , w i th the idea of Bd2-e 1 -g3 , to be fo l ­
l owed by R b 5 , etc . , seem s t o be Wh ite 's b est choice.
4 1 . R e 1 -g 1
The sea l ed m ove, revea l i ng K a rpov's appre hension
for the safety of h i s K i ng's s h e l te r . As we h ave clearly
see n , W h i te need not worry about th e th reat of . . .
R x g2, b u t the idea be h i n d K a rpov's m ove i s actu a l l y
t o prevent B l ack's further K -s i d e acti v i ty a n d t o con­
fine him to a passive d efence .
41 . ... h7-h5
A strong m ove , a i m ed at p reve n t i n g Wh ite from
b r i n g ing h i s B i sh op to g3.
42 . R a 1 -a5 Qf6 -e7

95

1 42
Ta k i n g advantage of th e fact th at th e World Cham­
p i on has concen trated h i s h eavy p ieces o n the K-side,
K a rpov penetrates w ith one of h is R ooks to the
enemy camp and attacks th e B l ack centre Pawns from
th e rea r, also worry i n g th e B l ack B i s h op . H owever,
th e operat i o n s of W h ite 's s i n g l e R ook h ave fa i l ed to
p roduce th e expected resu l t .
4 3 . R g 1 -b 1
Th is a l l ows th e safe penetration b y th e other R ook
to th e six th ra n k , w h ich cannot be m asked by the
B l ack B ishop, beca u se . . . Bb6 would be m et by Bd2.
Sti l l , B l ack's K-side cou nte rpl a y seem s to neutra l ize
W h i te's O-s ide i n i t i a t i v e . -Ed.
43 . . . . h 5- h 4
4 4 . R a5-a6 R f8-f7
45. R a6-c6 Oe7-f8
B l ack now th reate n s 46 . . . . R f 1 + 47. K h 2 ( o r
47 . R x f 1 R x f 1 + 4 8 . K h 2 Qf2 , W i n n i n g ) 4 7 . . . . R 7 f2
48 . R x f 1 (otherw ise 48 . . . . R x g2+ wou ld fo l l ow)
48 . . . . R x f 1 and i t i s h a rd for Wh ite to find a reason­
able d efence aga i nst .. , Qf2 .-Ed.
46. R b 1 -g 1
The o n l y m ove.-Ed.
46 . . . . Bc5-e7
4 7 . R c6-e6 Kg7-h7
48. Bd2-e 1
4 8 . R x e 5 is u n p l a y a b l e , i n v iew of 48 . . . . R f 1 ,
fol l owed by 49 . . . . Bd6 50. R e6 R x g 1 5 1 . K x g 1
R xf 1 + 52 . Ox f 1 B h2+, w i n n ing, says E d u ard G u fe l d .
48 . . . . R f2 - f 1
4 9 . B e 1 -d2 B e 7 -c5
50 . R e6-c6 . . . ( N o . 95)
See i n g h is opponent i r reso l u te l y m ark i n g time, th e
World C h a m p i o n decides t o ca r ry ou t a beautifu l

1 43
combi n ation , bu t he fa i l s to ta ke i n to consideration
the powerfu l ch eck by the W h ite R oo k , d r i v i n g th e
B l ack K i n g i n to th e co rner. A n d th e n the W h i te
B is h op , w h ich h as rem a i n ed i n active a l m ost th rough ·
out the game, d e l ivers the decisi ve b l ow.
50 . . . . R f7 -f3
The fata l b l u nder a fter w h ich th ere i s no s av i n g th e
g a m e . As f o r th e ch ess crown . . .
G a r r i Kasparov cou l d , o f cou rse , g o o n repeati n g
m oves, head i ng f o r a d raw, f o r i t i s h a rd to te l l h ow
Wh ite wou ld be a b l e to m a k e headway . H owever, at
th is m om e n t, the World Ch a m p i o n h ad at h is d i sposa l
a strong a l te rn ative , w h ich cou ld pose rather d iff icu lt
prob l e m s for W h ite, nam e l y , 50 . . . . a 5 . Should the
Wh ite B i s h op captu re the Paw n , i t w o u l d b e d efl ected
from the a l l · i m porta n t d i a g o n a l c 1 -c6 , th e s i g n i f i ·
ca nce o f wh ich becomes evid e n t on W h ite's 53 rd
m ove. Otherw ise , the Pawn j u st goes on to q u ee n .
Cou ld Kasparov h ope t o w i n afte r 50 . . . . a 5 ? H a rd l y
s o , because W h i te wou ld h ave a t h is d i sposal a n oth e r
deflect i n g sacr i f ice : 5 1 . B x a5 R f3 52 . g f R x f3 53. R c S
a n d th e e n su i ng e n d g a m e appea rs t o be d rawable .
5 1 . g2 xf3 R f 1 x f3
52. R c6-c7+ K h7-h8
53 . Bd2- h 6
O n see i n g th i s m ove K asparov sti ffe n ed i n sh ock­
n a rrates E d u ard G u fe l d - h e sudden ly rem e m bered !
He had a l ready see n th is posit i o n a n d th i s move
p l ayed on the board d u r i n g th e s l eep less n ig h t spen t
over th e adjou r n m e nt a n a ly s i s .
53 . . . . R f3xd3
54. B h 6xf8 R d 3 x h 3+
55. K h 1 -g2 R h 3-g3+
56 . Kg2-h2 R g3 x g 1

1 44
57 . Bf8xc5 d 4-d3
In the excite m e n t of the l ast seconds of the batt l e ,
both com bata n ts stopped record i n g the i r m oves, a n d
feverish ly moved th e i r p i eces. When i t w a s confi rmed
that A n atoly K a rpov had not overstepped the time
l i m it, th e World Champion resigned .
The score of the m atch is n ow +4-3= 1 6 i n favo u r
of Karpov .

G A M E TW E N TY.FOU R

R eti Opening

G. K asparov A. Karpov

On the eve of th e twenty -fou rth game of th e


Sev i l l e M atch th e tension h as reach ed a c l i m a x . J u st
as i n th e M o scow M atch of 1 985, th e fate of the
World Chess Crown w as to be decid ed i n th is s i ng l e ,
l a st contest. Aga i n i t w a s th e World C h a m p i o n w h o
had t o "win or d ie " a n d aga i n h e h ad th e W h i te
p i eces. O n l y h is n a m e w as d ifferent th is t i m e-Garri
Kasparov. And here is what he writes about such
a situ ation in h is book Two Matches: "Such games,
wh ich have i ncompara b l e value i n the l ife of a ch ess
p l ayer, obey t h e i r own l aws of strugg l e . When a s i ng l e
m ove m ay answer th e q u estion ' t o be or n ot t o be',
one ca nnot keep one's h ead clear. It is ve ry h ard to
get rid of th e though t th at one w ro n g m ove may
p rove fata l , for noth i n g can be put right aga in after
that, you k n ow-th is is th e l ast game of the matc h !
I n such extre m e situ ations, w h e n the con testa n ts

145
10-1393
h ave to p lay u nder a l m ost u nbeara b l e n ervou s stra i n ,
m uch , if n ot every th i n g, d epends on one's psych ol o­
g1ca l p reparat i o n , o n e 's read i n ess to give batt l e . H e
who i s coo l e r , m o re pruden t a n d c i rc u mspect, m o re
confident of h is success, is s u re to w i n . " -Ed.
Before th e l ast and decisive gam e of th e m atch
sta rted , every one see m ed to be Wonde r i n g h ow the
World Ch a m p i o n wou l d deal with th e prob lem i n
h a nd , w h at tactics he wou ld ad opt. Wou ld h e attempt
a n a l l -ou t offe n sive at once, repeat a n o l d v a r i a t i o n
p l ayed i n one of th e i r pre v i o u s enco u n te rs or h a d
h e , perhaps, prepared som eth i n g extraord i n a ry f o r
t h i s v e r y spec i a l occas i o n ? Al l th ese conjectures
tu rned ou t to be w rong, h owever. For K asparov took
the only ri g h t decis i o n - h e opened th e game i n a
q u i et manner, was not i n a h u rry to adva nce h is
Pawns and to sta rt figh t i n g for the central sq u ares.
Appare n tl y , Karpov d id not ex pect th is strategy,
for too early d id he stop l oo k i n g for fighting l i nes,
prefe r r i n g to s i m p l ify th e game by n u m erous ex­
cha nges. Th i s m eth od , k n own as p lay i n g for reta i n i n g
th e sco re , h a s i n va r i a b l y resu lted i n h a n d i n g over the
i n itiative to t h e oth er s i d e .
1 . c2-c4 e7-e6
2 . N g l -f3 N g8-f6
3 . g2-g3 d 7-d 5
4 . b2-b3
Th is open i n g , w h ic h m ay b e descri bed as a R e t!
syste m , or a double f i a n ch etto , h as never before
occu rred in th e gam es between these r i v a l s . -Ed.
4. ... Bf8-e7
5 . B f l -g2 0-0
6 . 0-0 b7-b6
7 . B c l -b2 Bc8-b7

1 46
8 . e2-e3 N b8-d 7
9. N b l -c3 N f6-e4
B l ac k 's previous m ove e n a b l es h im to start s i m p l i­
fy i n g, wh ich su its h is i nten tions. W h ite cannot avo id
exch a n g i n g m i n o r pieces, becau se on 9. d3 there
wou l d fo l l ow 9 . . Nc5, e m p h as i z i ng d3's weak ness.
. .

1 0. N c3-e2
W h i te j u st i f i a b l y w is h es to keep th e K n ig h t from
exch anging, and i n tends to u se it i n th e centre or on
the K i n g's f l a n k , but W h ite's O-s i d e i s n ow sl i ghtl y
weakened . T h e seq u e l 1 0. c d N xc3 1 1 . Bxc3 e d
wou l d be worse for W h ite, h oweve r.
1 0. . . . a7-a5
The react i o n , perhaps u n n ecessa ry , to h is oppo­
n ent's p rev i o u s m ove, i n d icati n g also that K a rpov is
be i n g torn between th e d es i re to s i m p l ify th e game to
a d raw and th e w ish to pl a y active l y . I t is evident,
h oweve r, th at B l ac k w i l l a l s o h ave to p l ay . . . c7-c5,
w h e reu pon h is b-Pawn w i l l becom e i rrepara b l y weak .
G ra n d m aste r G u fe l d be l ieves that 1 0 . . . . c5 is i n
ord e r , g i v i n g 1 1 . d3 B f 6 1 2 . Oc2 B x b2 1 3 . Oxb2
N ef6, to be fo l l owed by . . . Oe7 , R fd 8 , and R ac8 as
th e l i ne so l v i n g a l l B l ack's p rob l e m s .
1 1 . d 2-d3 Be7 -f6
By now, B l ac k has a l ready spent one h ou r o n h is
c l oc k , Wh ite h av i n g spent twe nty m i n u tes less.
K arpov consiste n t l y s i m p l i f i es th e ga m e .
1 2 . 0d l -c2 Bf6xb2
1 3 . 0c2 xb2 N e4-d6 (No. 96 )
The atte m pt to trade th e Ou eens by 1 3 . . . . Of6
wou l d fa i l afte r 1 4 . Oc2 N d 6 1 5. cd , or 1 4 . Oc2 Nc5
1 5 . d4, i n d icates E d u a rd G u fe l d .
1 4 . c4xd5 Bb7xd5
Afte r 1 4 . . . . ed , th e game wou l d be m ore com-

1 47

10*
p l icate d , b u t Wh ite wou l d h ave an e n d u r i n g p ressu re,
so the text-m ove is s i m p l e r a nd be tte r.
1 5 . d3-d4
The World Cham pi on pondered for th i rty -five
m i nu tes over this m ove. T h e m an oeuvre N e2-f4- h 5
certa i n l y l o o k s te mptin g, but afte r 1 5 _ N f4 B b 7
1 6 . N h 5 f 6 , fo l l owed by Ge7 , c7-c5 and e6-e 5 ,
B l ack has, accord i n g t o G u fe l d , an exce l l e n t game.
1 5 . ... c7-c5
The p l a n n ed , th ough com m itt i n g, ad va nce, a i med
at u n d e rm i n i n g th e Wh ite centre.
1 6 . R f 1 -d 1
. . . X-ray i n g th e B l ack p ieces a l o n g the d -fi l e !
1 6. . .. R a8-c8
The m ove about wh ich th e com m entators d isa­
greed , some of them see i n g n oth i n g w rong w i th it,
othe rs regard i n g it as an i n accu racy and suggesting
16 . . . _ Ge7 i n stead . The point i s that afte r K aspa rov's
rep l y th e ex -Wo rld Champ ion is i n fact forced to
trade h is B is h op fo r the W h ite K n ight, because oth e r­
wise W h i te w ou l d p lay dc w ith th reats a l o n g the d -f i l e
a n d th e l o n g d a r k -squared d i agona l . A s a resu l t of

96

1 48
th e " m in o r Exchange sac rifice" , Wh ite's l i ght-squared
B ishop, h av i n g n o opponent, becomes very stro ng_­
Ed_
1 7 _ Ne2-f4
H e re we go !
1 7_ __. B d 5xf3
1 8 . Bg2xf3 Od8-e7
1 9 . R a l -c l
That n ight i n Sevi i l e the World Champ ion p l ayed
sp l e nd i d l y , better, perhaps, than ever before . H is cooi
reaction to the n u m e ro u s exch a n ges w i l l , fo r many
years to come, be cited as a paragon of psych ol ogica l
sta b i l ity and stay i n g power i n a very d i fficu lt sporting
situati o n . Wh i l e B l ac k was pu rsu i n g h is p la n of ex­
chan gi n g p i eces, Wh ite was stead i l y i m p roving the
pos i t i o n s of h is rem a i n i n g p i eces.
If o n l y because of th e sport i n g considerations,
adds Serge i M a k a rychev, W h ite shou l d seek m ore than
j u st th e smal l advantage that he wou ld have afte r
1 9 . N h 5 ( th reate n i n g 20. dc and 2 1 . Og7 mate )
1 9 . . . . N f6 20 . dc R xc5 2 1 . N xf6 gf, etc .
1 9_ . . , R fB-d8
2 0 . d4xc5 N d 7 xc5
2 1 . b3- b4 a 5x b4
2 2 . 0b2x b4 Oe7 -a7
W h ite has by n ow spent 2 hou rs and 6 m i n utes,
B l ack-2 h ou rs and 9 m in utes.
23. a2-a3 N d6-f5
A l l th e com m entators criticized th is m a noeuvre
as a se rious loss of ti m e . B l ac k shou id have p l ayed
23. . . . Ne8 to tra n sfer it to f6 l ate r on. Th e B l ack
K n ig hts on f6 and d7 wou l d have cem e n ted his
d efence . -Ed.
24. R c l -b l R d 8xd l +

1 49
2 5 . R b 1 xd 1 Qa7 -c7
26. N f4-d3
The strong m ove by w h ich W h ite pu ts p ressu re o n
both th e Q-s i d e and th e ce ntre , th u s m a k i n g h is
pos i t i o n a l advantage c l e a r .
26. . . . h 7- h 6
O n e m ore s l i p , wh ich m ay we l l be fata l for B l ac k .
I n s i m i l a r confi gurations, po i n ts out Serge i M a k a ry­
chev, it is custom ary to m ake an outlet for one's
K i ng by m ov i ng one's g-Pawn one sq u a re ( g6 ) , for th e
weak ness of th e dark sq u a res cannot be explo ited
( th e opponent h as n o d a r k -squared B i shop) . In th at
case , th e sq uare f7 wou l d be re l i a b l y protecte d .
2 7 . R d 1 -c 1 N f5-e7
The ex-World C h a m p i o n has spen t a l m ost a l l h is
t i m e ( o n ly 6 m i n u tes l e ft on h is c l oc k ) and is p l a y i n g
u nd e r severe t i m e-p ressure; but K asparov is o n l y
m argina l l y better p laced i n th is rega rd . T h e t i m e­
scra m b l e play h as begu n . I n th ese cru c i a l m omen ts
of th e m atc h , th e W o r l d Ch a m p i o n s h ows h is
tremendous w i l l to w i n . P l a y i n g a series of v i gorous
m oves, he su cce eds i n l a u nch i n g a d a n gerous a ttack
agai nst th e B l ack K i n g, and on l y sl ight i n accu racies
on h is part, due to h is e x tre m e excite m e n t, a s w e l l as
Karpov's asto n ish i n g m astery i n defence, save th e
ex-Ch a m p i o n from defeat before th e con tro l .
2 8 . Qb4-b 5 N e7-f5
29 . a3-a4 N f5-d6
30. Qb5- b 1 Qc7-a7
3 1 . Nd3-e5 . . . (No. 97 )
Alth ough com m entators h ave d iffered i n a ssess i n g
th is Pawn sac r i f ice , th e i r va l u at i o n ran g i n g from
" b l u ff" to a "su dd en and e n e rgetic th ru st", the
fu rth e r events i n th e game show th at Kaspa rov's

1 50
com bination is both co rrect and n ecessary . -Ed.
31 . ... Nc5x a4
Acco rd i n g to Serg e i M a k a rychev, the accepta nce
of th e Pawn sac r i f ice l oses by force .
32 . R c 1 xc8+ Nd6xc8
33. Qb 1 -d 1
Here, h oweve r, Kaspa rov h as s l i pped , w h ich cou ld
have led to sad consequences for h i m . All commen­
tators p o i n ted out th at 33. Qb5 wou l d be m uch
stronger. F o r i n sta nce, 33 . . . . Nd6 34. Qc6 , o r 33 . . . .
Kf8 34 . N c6 Qa8 3 5 . Qd 3 ! decid i n g t h e issue at once.
33. . . . N c8-e7
R e tu rn i n g th e com p l i m ent. Afte r 33 . . . . Nc5 34.
Qd8+ K h 7 35. Bd l ( n ot, of cou rse , 35. Qxc8 Qa 1 +
36. Kg2 Qxe5, and B l ac k wou ld be a Pawn a h ead)
3 5 . . . . N e 7 36 . N xf7 N g6 , B l ack's defe nsive task
wou l d be m uch eas i e r . -Ed.
34. Qd 1 -d8+ K g8-h 7
35 . Ne5xf7
Anoth e r s l i ght i n accu racy : 35. B h 5 wou ld be the
q u icker w i n n ing m eth od , e . g. 3 5 . . . . N g6 36. Bxg6 fg
37 . Qe8 g5 38. h4 gh 39 . gh (th reate n i n g h 5 a nd Ng6

97 98

1 51
w i th i n ev i ta b l e mate on h8 ) 39 . . . . Oa5 4 0 . Og6+
Kg8 ( i f 40. . . . K hS , th en 4 1 . N f7+, fo l l owed by
Nxh6+, -f7 -g5 w ith u navo i d a b l e m ate or heavy
m ate r i a l l oss for B l ac k ) 4 1 . Oxe6+, w ith a n i rresist­
i b l e attack .
35 . . . . N e7 -g6
36 . 0d S-eS Oa7-e7
37 . 0eSxa4 Oe7xf7
3S . Bf3-e4 K h 7-g8
39 . 0a4-b5 N g6-f8
40. 0b5xb6 Of7-f6
4 1 . 0b6-b5 Of6-e7 ( N o. 98 )
The ga m e was adj ourned in a pos i t i o n where th e
World Ch a m p i o n h as n ot o n l y a p osi t i o n a l advan tage,
but also an extra Paw n , wh ich prom ises h i m w i n n i n g
cha nces. H oweve r, a s th e re a re few p i eces and Pawns
l eft on th e board , Ka rpov also reta i n s defin ite d raw­
ing cha nces.
42. K g 1 -g2 g7-g6
I n an interview afte r th e adjou rn m e n t sess i on ,
K asparov expressed th e op i n i o n th at K a rp ov shou ld
have kept h is K-s i d e Paw ns on th e d ark squ ares, thus
depr i v i n g Wh ite of th e a b i l ity to i m prove h is position
by offe ri ng the exch ange of Ou eens. The same idea
was expressed by M a k a rychev, for exam p l e .
43. 0b 5-a5 Oe7-g7
4 4 . 0a5-c5 Og7-f7
45. h 2-h4 h6-h5
Pursu i n g h is erroneous p l a n . B l ack s h ou ld , perh aps,
have tried . . . g6-g5 o n h is p revious m ove, o r . . . Of6
now.
46. 0c5-c6 Of7 -e7
4 7 . Be4-d3 Oe7-f7
48. 0c6-d6 K g8-g7

1 52
49. e3-e4 K g7-g8
50 . Bd3 -c4 K g8-g7
5 1 . Qd6-e5+ Kg7-g8
52 . Qe5-d6 K g8-g7
53. Bc4-b 5 Kg7-g8
54. Bb5-c6 Qf7 -a7 ( N o . 99)
The man oeuvres of the W h ite p ieces are a i m ed at
expel l i n g the B l ack Qu een from th e seventh ran k ,
where the Wh ite Queen is th en t o assu m e contro l .
S i nce afte r th e exchange o f Queens B l ack's position
is indefensi b l e , h e has to cede the seventh ra n k , h is
m ob i l ity b e i n g th u s fu rth e r red uced .-Ed.
5 5 . Qd6-b4 Qa7-c7
56 . Qb4-b7 Qc7-d8
57 . e4-e5 Od 8-a5
5 8 . Bc6-e8 Qa5-c5
59. Qb7-f7 + Kg8-h 8
T h e f i g h t is practica l l y over, for o n l y th e B l ack
Qu een h as reta i ned som e ( rat he r l i m ited ) m o b i l i ty .
T o w i n a n oth e r Pawn is a m atte r o f t i m e a n d tech·
n ique-and Kasparov d oes n ot l ack e ithe r ! -Ed.
60. Be8-a4 Qc5-d 5+

99 1 00

1 53
6 1 . K g2 -h2 Qd 5-c5
62. Ba4-b3 Qc5-c8
63. Bb3-d 1 Qc8-c5
64. K h 2-g2 ( N o . 100 )
H e re Anatoly K a rpov te ndered h i s resignation and
congratu lated h is riva l o n h is ach ievement. K a rpov
decided not to wait to see wheth e r K asparov wou ld
fa l l into a rather e l e m e n tary trap : 64. ... Qd5+
65. Bf3 Qc5 66. Be4 Qa3 67 . B x g6 ? ? 68. Qxg6
Qf3+ ! ! w ith inevitable sta l e m ate . To avo id th i s,
W h ite sh o u l d withdraw h is K i n g back to h 2 , force
the B l ack Qu een to l eave th e sq u a re c5 ( e . g. Wh ite
p l ay s Bd3 and B l ack re p l i e s Qb41 . and only th e n
captu re th e Pawn on g6 . T h e B l ack Q u e e n sacrifice
is th en pa r r i e d by K g2 ( n ot gh sta l e m a te ! ) a n d B l ack
i s l ost.
The sco re is th us even : +4-4= 1 6, wh ich m ea n s
that G a r r i Kasparov w i l l reta i n h is World t i t l e t i l l at
l east 1 990 !
Points Scored and Moves Played . . .

The World C h a m p ionsh ip M atch between G a r r i


K asparov and Anatol y K a rpov , wh ich l asted f o r 69
days, is n ow e n d ed .
I n the bust l e o f d a i l y reports o f the p o i nts scored
or lost, seconds spent, t i m e-p ressu res suffe red , and
ga m es postponed and adj ou rned , a l l j o u r n a l i sts w i t h ­
ou t exception a re apt t o fo rget the m ost im porta n t
th i n g f o r wh ich W o r l d C h a m p ionsh ip M atches are
p l ayed . And I W OU l d n 't l i ke th e readers of th is book
to get th e i m p ress i o n th at G a r r i K asparov p l ayed
Anatoly K a rpov i n Sevi l l e w ith the so le pu rpose of
find i ng ou t w h o of th em is m ore proficient in read ing
the m u l t i -co l ou red m osaic of chess com b i nations
today .
Chess is n ot o n l y , a nd not so m uch , a game to
p l a y . Chess is rath e r a m od e l i m itati n g m ost d iverse
s i tuations, in wh ich so l u t i o n s sh o u l d q u ic k l y be
sought and fou nd on a creative leve l . To pl a y chess
s k i i fu l l y is to th i n k q u ic k l y and on each particu l a r
occas ion d iffe re n tl y ; wh i l e fo l l ow i ng a s i n g l e th read
of h is creative concept, a p layer sh ou ld never act
routi n e l y , bu t s h o u l d every ti m e be a b l e to fi nd a
stri k i ngly ori g i n a l sol u t i o n even u nder m ost u n ­
favou ra b l e c i rcu m sta nces .
Watch i n g day afte r day th e perfo rmance of two

1 55
great m aste rs, y ou i n v o l u n ta r i l y expect to see some­
th i n g extra o rd i nary, you com p l a i n of tri te m oves,
you are vexed abou t i n e x p l icab l e b l u nders_ I n so
d o i n g, you s o m etim es te n d to ove rlook the fact that
these "trite m oves" a re h a rd to find over-the-board ,
th at it is a far-from -easy task to p ic k them out from
oth e r conti n u at i o n s w h ich look as strong, but a re in
fact wea ker. When everyth i n g seem s so sim p l e , so
easy to fi nd for anyone who cares to, i t is then that
we a re witness i n g the h ighest tech n i q u e of the game .
And o n l y on see i n g th ose i n ex p l i c a b l e m istakes com­
m itted by th e G ra n d m asters can we guess that they
are the d i rect conseq uences of the see m i ngly s i m p l e
m oves that too k u p so m uch of th e i r e n e rg y .
H owever, i t goes w ith ou t say i n g that G a rr i Kaspa­
rov and Anato l y K a rpov have a lways been superb
tech n ica l l y , and the m atch j u st f i n ished i s y et a n other
con f i r m at i o n of th e fact. B u t I can see , i n th e games
of the Sev i l l e M atch , som eth i n g m ore i m porta n t for
th e ga m e of chess, n a m e l y , that th ey are satu rated
with nua nces-de l icate sm a l l -sca l e so l u ti ons-wh ich
usua l l y pass u n n oticed by th e spectato rs enthra l l ed
by cou nting the p o i nts score d .
To begin with, Kasparov's v ictory i n the Sevi l l e
M atch is, i n l a rge m easu re, d u e t o h is exceptiona l l y
c l ever strategy i n th e ope n i n g ph ase . I t h a s genera l l y
been recogn ized th at th e m ore ofte n a p l a y e r varies
op e n i n g sy stem s i n th e cou rse of a m atch th e h a rd e r
it w i l l be for h is opponent t o su rp rise h i m i n a n
ope n i n g pu rpose l y ; accord i n g l y , th e p l ayer's chances
to succeed w i l l i ncrease.
World Champion Garri K asparov empl oyed a very
econ om ica l method of p l a y i n g i n th e ope n i ng . As
B l ac k , he adopted th e G ru e nfe l d Defe n ce in ten

1 56
g a m es, wh i l e hav i n g the Wh ite p ieces, he ch ose the
E n g l i sh Open i n g as m any t i m es.
Of cou rse , so bold an app roach towards the
ope n i n g phase, where o n e a lways m ay ru n i n to th e
reefs of an i n novation p repared at h om e , is perhaps
for a World Cha m pion a l on e to ta k e . Yet, a l l Masters
and G ra n d m asters shou ld fo l l ow his exam p l e by
a n a l y z i n g one or two l i nes extre m e l y thorough l y ,
rath e r tha n stu d y i n g ten or twenty va riations super·
fici a l l y .
I t seems necessa ry t o m ention t h e fact th at a n
a bundance o f chess open i ngs ex ists o n l y o n the pages
of vol u m inous h andbooks and encycl oped ias. O n l y
th ose variati o ns, h owever, i n w h ich a chess p l ayer i s
" i n h i s e l e m ent" are su ita b l e for p ractical appl icatio n .
The a r t o f se lect i n g and bu i l d i n g u p o n e ' s right
ope n i n g repe rto i re can th e refore be ach ieved only
after years of testi n g, often after b itte r fa i l u res. Garri
K asparov, h owever, has gone th rou gh that o rdeal with
one b reath , so to spea k . And th is-an i n tu itive u nder­
stand i n g of bare l y outl i n ed chess positions and th e
tactical nu ances h idden w ith in th e m - i s perh aps the
m ost d isti n gu ish i n g featu re of h is ta l e nt.
Ex-Wor l d Ch a m p i on Anato l y K a rpov also m ade, in
th is m atch , a l a rge contribution to open ing th eory .
H i s surpris i n g m eth od of attac k i n g in th e G ru e nfe ld
w i l l n ow be carefu l l y a n a l yzed by the ex perts who
prev iously rejected th is line, w h ere Wh ite wi n s a
Pawn .
I n t h e Qu een's G a m b it Decl i n ed , A n ato ly Ka rpov
d e m on strated a n u m ber of new m oves, wh ich e ither
i n tensify Wh ite's attack or revea l B l ack's d efensive
potenti a l . And only i n the E ngl ish Ope n i ng was he
u na b l e to eq u a l ize u n fa i l i ng l y - m aybe because of h is

1 57
exceed i n g m ax i m a l ism in h is desire to wrest the
i n itiative as soon as poss i b l e .
Spea k i n g a bout t h e m id d l e p hase, o n e c a n m ention
som e d e l i cate positional p l a n s carried out by both
p l ay e rs, as w e l l as ve ry strenuous com b i national fights
i n oth e r e ncou n te rs. I wou l d l i ke to reiterate that,
p l ay i n g th rou gh th e gam es of th e m atc h n ow that it
is over, one can m ore read i l y perceive the tension of
the batt l e , in wh ich l o s i n g w as h ig h l y u ndesirable and
v ictory-extrem e l y n ecessary .
I agree with the op i n ion expressed by ma n y
com m entators th at i n the art of d e l i cate strategic
m anoeuv r i n g Garri Kasparov and A n atoly Ka rpov
have no eq u a l s . Perhaps, there were few bri l l i a n t com­
b i nations in Sevi l l e . T h i s , h oweve r, i s q u ite n atu ra l ­
th e defence w as at i ts h igh est, the pa rticipants u sual l y
saw, a n d preve nted , com b i n ational th reats f a r i n
adva nce .
Endga m es in Sev i l l e were m ost d iverse , o n e m ore
i nterest i n g than a n other. I l i k e very m uch th e end­
ga m e from the seventh e n cou nte r , i n wh ich the B lack
B is r op a n d Pawns were f i g h t i n g th e Wh ite R oo k . The
Wh ite R ooks sh owed th e i r m ettl e i n the th i rteenth
game, wh i l e th e B l ack R ooks- i n th e n i n eteenth .
An extre m e l y i n te rest i n g endgam� that a rose in the
e l eventh con test was u n fo rtu nate l y sp o i l ed by K a r­
pov's overs i ght. Yet, even th e n th e m eth od of exp l o i t­
ing h i s advantage d e m o n strated by Kaspa rov is very
i nstructive. And, of cou rse , in the l ast h o u rs of th e
matc h , th e World Ch a m p i o n w o n t h e d ifficu l t end­
game of th e 24th e n cou nter by brea k i n g the stubborn
resistance of the B l ack p ieces. In th at endgam e,
everyth i n g was beau tifu l-the Wh ite Qu een's ma­
noeuvres, th e intricate tran sfe rs of th e B ishop, and

1 58
th e two bold m oves by the W h ite K i ng at the cruci a l
m om ents, th e one p l ayed at adj o u r n m ent, th e other
at the f i n a l m om ent. In short, th e creative e l e m e nt
that man i fested itse l f in the games of th e Sevi l l e
M atch d eserves o u r s i n ce rest pra ises.

David Bronstein ,
I n ternational G randmaster
R EQU EST TO R EA D E R S

Raduga Pu b l i s h e rs wou l d b e g l ad t o have


your opi n i o n of t h i s boo k, its translation and
des i g n and any su ggestions you m ay have for
future publ i cati o n s .
Pl ease s e n d a l l y o u r com ments to 1 7 , Z u ­
bovs ky Bou l eva rd, Moscow, U SS R .