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The information contained in this book is for educational

purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of a


physician or other health care professional. The safe use of
the principals and practice of acupuncture and other forms
of meridian therapy lie solely with the practitioners
themselves. The author cannot accept responsibility for
any treatment advice or information offered.

Copyright © 2011 Ronald Henry DC, ND, FIAM A


All rights reserved.
ISBN: 1463511213
ISBN 13: 9781463511210
eBook ISBN: 978-1-62111-356-0
Library of Congress Control Number: 2011908708
CreateSpace, North Charleston, SC
Dedication
This book is dedicated to my teacher John
Amaro DC, FIAMA, Dipl.Ac., L.Ac., who is
not only one of the earliest pioneers in the field
of traditional acupuncture in America, but also
a developer of computerized Electro Meridian
Imaging (EMI) – a highly accurate electronic
method for measuring the meridians. He has
been teaching both ancient and modern theories
of meridian analysis and treatment for four
decades, the range of his students varying from
licensed acupuncturists to chiropractic
physicians, medical doctors and other
practitioners from various fields of health care.
Apart from being one of the most fluent
spokesmen for this ancient art in the Western
world, he also serves as the head of the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture
(IAMA). Many of us who now practice any
form of meridian therapy owe a debt of
gratitude to many like him, not only for the
knowledge of Chinese medicine presently
available to us here in the West, but also for the
legal right to practice acupuncture in America.
As one of John’s students and a practicing
acupuncturist, chiropractor and naturopath for
over thirty years, it is my hope that this work
will further promote Dr. Amaro’s valuable
insights and contributions to 21st century
acupuncture.
Ronald Henry DC, ND, FIAMA
Acknowledgement
No significant project is accomplished by just
one individual, and without the continuous
support and, most importantly, thorough editing
provided by my beautiful Russian wife and life
companion Natasha Henry MA, this book
would never have been completed. Not only
with this manuscript, but with other projects as
well, she compliments me with her clear
intellect, compassionate heart, and the urge to
expand beyond any limitations that life might
appear to present. Without a means to deeply
explore life itself, and to give back through
works such as this, the world would simply be
too small a place for this free and visionary
soul. Thank you.
Forward
It was 1980; I had just gone through a very
difficult divorce and was dealing with ongoing
anxiety attacks that really frightened me. One
minute I felt fine, and the next minute I couldn’t
get enough air and was in a cold sweat with my
body shivering as if I was immersed in ice
water.
One evening, while at a party, I started
noticing that I was having difficulty breathing
and felt uneasy. I quickly looked for a
bathroom or bedroom where I could hang out
until it passed. Unfortunately, none was
available. So I sat on the couch, closed my
eyes, and focused on my breath as a way of
calming myself down.
All of a sudden, a man I didn’t know sensed
that I was going through something and asked if
he could help. Before I could answer, he
reached out as if he wanted to shake my hand.
I reached out and grasped his hand, at which
time his other hand gently touched my wrist, as
if he had his hand on the pulse of my life. Within
seconds, he asked me to roll up both my pant
legs and removed a thin case from his pocket
that looked like it held cigarettes. He opened it,
removed a thin needle, and inserted it below
and to the side of one of my knees. He then
twisted it slightly, and I immediately felt as if
that needle touched the Bulls Eye. He then
removed the needle and repeated the
procedure on the other knee, after which my
eyes closed, my breath slowed, and I was in
heaven. Once again, he held my hand and
gently touched a few spots on my wrist. He
then looked into my eyes and said, “That
should feel much better”.
That experience became the foundation of a
close friendship, and my eventual introduction
to Professor J. R. Worsley, credited with
bringing Five Element acupuncture to the West.
On several occasions, when Professor Worsley
visited the US, he stayed with my friend and I
had the opportunity to meet him and be treated.
Jack or JR, as he was referred to, was known
for treating with only one needle in one point.
When he held my hand to evaluate my pulses, it
felt as if he was communicating with God. And
when he treated me, I didn’t feel the needle go
in or come out. Yet, the effects were
transformative. During my sessions, I often had
visions of the body as a map, interconnected by
energetic pathways of light that were accessible
via the acupuncture points. Professor Worsley
did not focus on symptoms, but rather on the
causative factor or source of one’s imbalance.
His treatments often resulted in bursts of
internal colored light, associated with a
profound feeling of peace.
After almost 40 years of investigating and
utilizing light for healing, it is obvious to me that
acupuncture opens the body’s energetic
channels, allowing light to flow freely through
the meridian system, nourishing and balancing
every cell. From my very first experience with
acupuncture, I knew that this ancient healing art
integrated the seen and unseen forces
embodied in the term energy medicine.
Over the past 20 years that I have known
Dr. Ron Henry, he has continually searched for
the maximum potential available through an
assortment of different natural healing
modalities. Quantum Acupuncture – The
Next Level clearly demonstrates how needles
of light can gently and effectively restore the
flow of Chi within the human energy system.
This practical and artistic text is the culmination
of Dr. Henry’s clinical discoveries, and a gift to
healthcare practitioners worldwide.
Jacob Liberman OD, PhD, D.Sc., Author of
Light: Medicine of the Future, Take Off Your
Glasses and See, and Wisdom From an
Empty Mind
Another Way of
Seeing Things
There are many wonderfully written and well
laid out books on acupuncture describing point
location as well as the various symptoms
potentially treated by each point itself. The
author has learned a great deal from these
writers, both ancient and modern, and is firmly
in their debt. However, evaluation of the Chi,
using the classical methods of manual pulse
reading, patient’s symptoms assessment and
objective findings, can often be overwhelmingly
complex and intimidating. It seems that the
practical challenge facing the acupuncture
practitioner of today might require new
additional forms of insight into what is useful
and practical now, compared to what was
available at the time the original philosophies
were initially developed.
What Quantum Acupuncture – The Next
Level provides is a bridge between two
perspectives – the ancient and the modern – to
both diagnose and treat imbalances in the Chi.
Now, in our contemporary world, the meridians
can be evaluated, at least in part, using
computerized technology, and the acupuncture
points themselves can also be tested and
treated by means of not only needle therapy,
but also low-level laser and kinesiological
assessment. By incorporating Electro Meridian
Imaging, kinesiology and cold laser into the
field of traditional acupuncture, we can now
effectively bring this ancient healing modality
fully into the modern age.
Preface
This book is intended to integrate traditional
knowledge of acupuncture with new
discoveries and perspectives gradually
revolutionizing the current practice of this
powerful ancient form of healing. Beginning by
briefly summarizing the key principals of
traditional Chinese medicine and the theory of
Five Elements, the author goes on to present
modern means of electronic meridian evaluation
along with the use of therapeutic low-level laser
and kinesiology, and the great benefits they
offer the acupuncture practitioner of today. In
this light, the presented work may benefit a
broad-spectrum audience, including those just
beginning, as well as those who are well
experienced in the field of acupuncture.
The main text is supported by over 400
photographic images, including not only the
precise location of the meridians and the
acupuncture points themselves, but also visual
examples of their sphere of influence. This
portion of the book covers all of the essential
points necessary to treat a wide range of
symptoms likely to be encountered in every-
day practice. Also included are full-color
Electro Meridian Imaging (EMI) charts –
shown just as they would appear on a
computer screen – representing all of the
essential combinations of channel excess and
deficiency, along with treatment suggestions
within the realm of the Five Elements. Another
unique aspect of this manual is its listing of the
relative frequency of treatment for all of the
major acupuncture points, helping to define
which points to primarily consider in any
particular treatment session.
Throughout the book all of the charts and
images are color-coded according to the
traditional Five Elements of Chinese medicine,
making the presented information easy to
understand and remember. Going even beyond
this, points not related to the Five Elements are
also shown within the context of their relevant
traditional classifications, making it easy to learn
why and when to use them in clinical practice
as well. In addition, the images of the meridians
themselves, including both their superficial and
deep portions, allow the reader to see how
treating various points on the channels can have
a deep and profound effect on the interior
organs of the body.
It was not the author’s intention nor, he
believes, was it necessary to cover all the
basics of traditional Chinese medicine in this
manual, as these principals might already be
familiar to the majority of readers. From this
perspective, students of acupuncture might find
further information in such popular works as A
Manual of Acupuncture by Peter Deadman,
Traditional Chinese Acupuncture by JR
Worsley and The Channels of Acupuncture
by Giovanni Maciocia. At the same time, the
author sincerely hopes that the visually colorful
and accurate representation of the meridians
and their points depicted in Quantum
Acupuncture – The Next Level, along with its
contemporary methods of treating them, will
benefit each practitioner in their mastery of
acupuncture regardless of their level of
expertise.
Table of Contents
Introduction
Chapter I – Five Elements and the
Chakras
Five Elements
The Nurturing cycle
The Control cycle
Beyond the Five Elements
24-hour Horary cycle
Chakra system in meridian therapy
Chapter II – The Meridians
The meridian network
The relation between meridians and their
organs
Chapter II overview
I - Heart
II - Small Intestine
III - Bladder
IV - Kidney
V - Pericardium
VI - Triple Heater
VII - Gallbladder
VIII - Liver
IX - Lung
X - Large intestine
XI - Stomach
XII - Spleen
XIII - Governor vessel
XIV - Conception Vessel
Chapter III – Point Group Use in
Diagnosis and Treatment
Point group properties
Acupuncture points for meridian
evaluation and treatment
Chapter III overview
1 – Tonification and Sedation points
2 – Master points
3 – Source points
4 – Luo points
5 – Accumulation points
6 – Command points
7 – Alarm points
8 – Bladder Association points
9 – Influential points
10 – Transporting points
(1) The Jing-Well points
(2) The Spring points
(3) The Stream points
(4) The River points
(5) The Sea points
Lower He-Sea points
11 – Meeting points
12 – Ma Dan-Yang points
13 – Vitality Collapse points
14 – Entry-Exit points
15 – Ghost points
16 – Pulse points
17 – Menstruation points
18 – Pregnancy points
19 – Musculo-tendeno points
Chapter IV – Key Points on the
Meridians
A new perspective is gained
Importance of EMI evaluation
EMI charts
Acupuncture point evaluation and
frequency of treatment
Chapter IV overview
I – Heart Meridian
Ht-3
Ht-5
Ht-7
Ht-8
Ht-9
II – Small Intestine meridian
Si-1
Si-3
Si-4
Si-7
Si-19
III – Bladder meridian
Bl-1
Bl-2
Bl-3
Bl-10
Bl-11
Bl-13
Bl-14
Bl-15
Bl-16
Bl-17
Bl-18
Bl-19
Bl-20
Bl-21
Bl-22
Bl-23
Bl-25
Bl-26
Bl-27
Bl-28
Bl-31 to 34
Bl-40
Bl-57
Bl-58
Bl-60
Bl-62
Bl-63
Bl-64
Bl-65
Bl-66
Bl-67
IV – Kidney meridian
Kd-1
Kd-2
Kd-3
Kd-4
Kd-5
Kd-6
Kd-7
Kd-22
Kd-23 to 26
Kd-27
V – Pericardium meridian
Cx-1
Cx-3
Cx-4
Cx-5
Cx-6
Cx-7
Cx-8
Cx-9
VI – Triple Heater meridian
Tw-1
Tw-3
Tw-4
Tw-5
Tw-6
Tw-8
Tw-23
VII – Gallbladder meridian
Gb-1
Gb-8
Gb-13
Gb-14
Gb-20
Gb-21
Gb-22
Gb-24
Gb-25
Gb-26
Gb-30
Gb-34
Gb-36
Gb-37
Gb-39
Gb-40
Gb-41
Gb-43
Gb-44
VIII – Liver meridian
Lv-1
Lv-2
Lv-3
Lv-4
Lv-5
Lv-6
Lv-13
Lv-14
IX – Lung meridian
Lu-1
Lu-5
Lu-6
Lu-7
Lu-8
Lu-9
Lu-10
Lu-11
X – Large Intestine meridian
Li-1
Li-2
Li-3
Li-4
Li-6
Li-11
Li-20
XI – Stomach meridian
St-1
St-3
St-4, 5, 7
St-6
St-12
St-21, 23
St-25
St-27, 29, 30
St-34
St-35
St-36
St-37
St-39
St-40
St-41
St-42
St-44
St-45
XII – Spleen meridian
Sp-1
Sp-2
Sp-3
Sp-4
Sp-5
Sp-6
Sp-8
Sp-9
Sp-10
Sp-15
Sp-21
XIII – Governor vessel
Gv-1
Gv-3
Gv-4
Gv-7, 9
Gv-14
Gv-16
Gv-20
Gv-23, 24
Gv-24.5
Gv-26
XIV – Conception vessel
Cv-1
Cv-3
Cv-4
Cv-5
Cv-6
Cv-8
Cv-9
Cv-10
Cv-12
Cv-13
Cv-14
Cv-17
Cv-22
Cv-24
Point Location
Sun unit of measurement
I – Heart
II – Small Intestine
III – Bladder
IV – Kidney
V – Pericardium
VI – Triple Heater
VII – Gallbladder
VIII – Liver
IX – Lung
X – Large Intestine
XI – Stomach
XII – Spleen
XIII – Governor Vessel
XIV – Conception Vessel
Introduction
Historical overview
In our present times of rapid technological
advancement we are all exposed to an endless
stream of new ideas that leaves little space for
dwelling on the past. At the same time, many
important discoveries in the fields of medicine
and science, for example, frequently confirm
concepts already recognized by ancient cultures
millennia ago. One example of such a
rediscovery-in-progress is the existence of a
subtle energy pervading all of life. This same
vital force, as hypothesized thousands of years
earlier, is also believed to operate as an
energetic foundation for our own physical and
phycho-emotional well-being.
In health this vital force is said to flow freely
to each and every part of the body, energizing
every organ and cell of our physical form.
When the flow is unrestricted our tissues and
cells are supplied with living energy like a baby
being nourished by mother’s milk, helping us to
stay healthy, vital, alert and at peace. But in
disease this flow of energy is thrown out of
balance, either becoming too great and
burdening the rest of the system, or declining
into a trickle and failing to provide us with the
necessary life force. These energetic
imbalances, if uncorrected, eventually lead to
the development of both physical and emotional
disorders.
Over a period of more than two thousand
years a vast amount of insight regarding the
energetic foundations of health has been
preserved from generation to generation. As
true now as ever before, this subtle energy,
often referred to as Chi, deserves the most
serious consideration by anyone who would
deem themselves well-versed in health care, no
matter what their speciality or expertise might
be. Whether one is a modern-day researcher,
an allopathic physician or natural healing arts
practitioner, the discoveries made throughout
the centuries concerning this vital force can still
serve as an essential foundation upon which to
build concepts of health.
Such differing schools as acupuncture,
Qigong, Shiatsu or Reiki, etc., all nevertheless
have a common ground of attempting to restore
the body’s subtle energy flow as a main
prerequisite for health. Even more,
contemporary methods such as magnetic
healing and Therapeutic Touch, as well as
various forms of laser, color and sound therapy,
are also believed to be positively affecting the
body and mind through this invisible network of
life force. Further, this system of energy
channels binds together not only various
aspects of our own being, but also connects us
by subtle energy links with each other, as well
as with the world around us.
Early records of acupuncture, a system
considered to be the mother of many healing
modalities, date back to at least 500 BC, when
the Chinese Canon of Medicine first
suggested the existence of energy channels in
the body which might lie behind our physical
and emotional well-being. Fundamental
principals regarding this network of channels
included balance between the expansive and
contractive forces, known as yin and yang, as
well as the concept of the Five Elements. These
elements, known as Fire, Earth, Metal, Water
and Wood, implied that the maintenance of
health was dependent on our understanding and
following of essential principals already existing
in nature. These early theories also suggested a
close relationship between the physical body
and emotions, and that the health of each was
thoroughly dependent on the condition of the
other.
Modern acupuncture
Given the immense depth of insight already
present in classical meridian therapy, some
acupuncturists may feel quite satisfied with their
current level of expertise. Without doubt, much
of the foundation has already been laid to both
study and treat the acupuncture meridians. At
the same time, even though classical sources of
acupuncture are very useful, they may
nevertheless present so much detail that it can
become difficult to discern what the essential
information actually is. Beyond that, they also
frequently rely on an interpretation of both the
patient’s subjective symptoms and the
practitioner’s objective findings in a manner that
often leaves a vast range for error and
misconception.
Considering this, it is the author’s belief that
current advancements in technology can help
bring the modern use of acupuncture into
greater prominence. For example, depicting
meridians through examining the electrical
conductivity of key acupuncture points, as well
as kinesiological testing of each of the points
individually, reveals possibilities simply
unimagined in the past. As with all technology
and philosophies, progress is inevitable, and it
is important to use every means at our disposal
to increase the effectiveness of our work
without ignoring the opportunities being offered.
The origins of scientific meridian
evaluation
In spite of difficulties in working with the
subtle force of Chi, modern-day practitioners
and researchers keep on progressing in their
evaluation and treatment of the acupuncture
meridians. One of the most distinguished
contributors in this field was a Japanese
physician Yoshio Nakatani MD, PhD, who
originally developed in the 1950’s a method of
examining the acupuncture meridian system
through evaluation of the electrical conductivity
of the skin. Up until that time the technology
had not existed to make such an objective and
reproducible determination of this intangible
energy. Indeed, there had been growing
widespread controversy over how best to
decide on what points to treat, which had
produced widely differing schools of thought
regarding point preferences. Because of these
concerns, Dr. Nakatani’s system was poised to
rapidly change the way acupuncture was
practiced throughout the modern world.
Referred to as Ryadoraku, it would become
internationally popular within 25 years.

Dr. Nakatani’s system involved measuring


electrical conductivity of the skin at the Source
points, key acupuncture points located on the
wrists and ankles, said to reflect the level of
vitality flowing through the meridians as a
whole. Although this measurement does not
offer the same information as provided by
classical pulse diagnosis (which unfortunately
can also be highly inaccurate and subjective), it
does, however, determine whether a meridian is
excess or deficient in relation to the entire
meridian system, which probably is the single
most important factor pertaining to the channels
themselves.
Ryadoraku becomes Electro Meridian
Imaging
The term Electro Meridian Imaging was
later coined by a chiropractic physician John
Amaro early in the 1980’s, after having studied
with Dr. Nakatani a decade earlier. Dr. Amaro
graduated from chiropractic college in 1969
and in 1973 was given one of the first
certificates of clinical competence in
acupuncture offered in the United States. He
later went on to study at the Chinese Medical
Institute in the People’s Republic of China, and
further continued his acupuncture studies for
decades, traveling throughout the world. As a
result, he is considered by many to be one of
the most well-trained acupuncturists in America
today.
In 1973, as a neophyte who had only
recently begun practicing acupuncture, Dr.
Amaro experienced that Ryadoraku allowed
him to perform at a level closer to an
accomplished master. By establishing a normal
range for each patient, based on their individual
meridian readings, he observed that Ryadoraku
clearly showed essential information regarding
which channels were energetically involved –
knowledge not easily accessible in any other
way. Having used Dr. Nakatani’s system in his
practice of acupuncture for almost 10 years, he
concluded that it was absolutely essential for
obtaining an accurate diagnosis of the
acupuncture meridians, and eventually felt the
necessity to make this technology widely
available to others.
Dr. Amaro is shown here about to perform an EMI
examination using one of the earliest computers, a
Commodore 64, circa 1981-82.

To further increase both the ease of analysis


and the effectiveness in diagnosing the
meridians, Dr. Amaro eventually went on to
develop a computerized system based on
Nakatani’s work. In Dr. Amaro’s own words,
“One of the most exciting applications of
Electro Meridian Imaging is without question
the computer enhanced version. The entire
procedure with the computer takes less than 2
minutes to perform, and the information derived
is landmark. Clinical response using this
diagnostic procedure is legendary.”
In EMI a digital electrical device known as a
neurometer uses a constant low voltage of only
5.2V to measure the electrical conductivity of
the skin. The patient is asked to hold a copper
ground in one hand, while a moistened
electrode tip is applied to the selected test
points to locate the areas of lowered electrical
resistance. A greater current flowing through
the skin at these test points indicates their
correct location, and gives readings between 0
and the maximum of 200 microamps,
represented graphically on a computer screen.

An important aspect of EMI is its reliability


and reproducibility, as it can be duplicated from
one practitioner to the next. Easy to learn and
simple to explain to the patient, EMI permits
the channel evaluation to be displayed on a
computer screen as well as to be printed out. It
allows the practitioner to keep a permanent
record of each patient’s meridian readings, and
to compare them, if necessary, at each visit.
Based on the insights gained through EMI, the
practitioner can proceed with performing either
traditional or needleless therapy.
Therapeutic low-level lasers
One of the needleless methods of meridian
therapy presented in this book is the use of
low-level lasers, already utilized around the
world for nearly four decades. Therapeutic
lasers, used for both locating and treating the
acupuncture points, are generally of low
intensity and emit particular frequencies able to
penetrate into the body as deeply as possible
without causing any damage to the tissues
themselves. When applied, the light from a laser
is able to stimulate the electrons within the
tissues to release a slight electrical current,
believed to be the mechanism of action when
administered to the acupuncture meridians.
Not all of the body’s exterior is able to
transmit light below the surface of the skin.
Interestingly, those areas that do conduct light
well have also been found to correspond to the
acupuncture points. Once set into motion, these
points have also been shown to conduct light
along the entire course of the meridian. It has
been hypothesized that the channels themselves
actually serve as a means for carrying
information throughout the body in the form of
lightwaves, and thus for regulating and
coordinating the physiological function of the
various organs and glands. The effects of laser
light therapy have been shown to include
changes at the molecular level of the tissues,
stimulating rapid healing and regeneration due
to both increased DNA synthesis and energy
production within the cells.
In addition, current statistics reveal that more
than fifty percent of the entire population
choose not to undergo acupuncture treatment
simply because it involves the use of needles. It
would therefore benefit the modern-day
practitioner to master not only the traditional
needle form of treatment but also to get familiar
with non-invasive, and therefore non-
threatening, means of performing meridian
therapy, such as low-level laser.
Kinesiology
Another contemporary form of diagnosis,
known as kinesiology, radically changed the
way various forms of health care were
practiced and understood, and increased the
effectiveness of nutrition and chiropractic in
particular. Starting in 1964, George Goodheart
DC began developing this newly-found method
into a modern science for both diagnosing and
treating various ailments. As a result, muscle
testing allowed a chiropractic practitioner to not
only have a more precise diagnosis of the spine
but also to gather more feedback regarding
other functional states of the body as well. In
nutrition, kinesiology promoted the more
precise use of supplements for treating specific
gland and organ dysfunction.
Likewise, kinesiology is now poised to offer
similar insights into the field of acupuncture as
an additional tool to rapidly gain insight into
each acupuncture point, and to determine
which locations along the channels need to be
treated in the first place. For instance, the
method of running the meridians with a cold
laser can reveal unstable points when the
patient is simultaneously monitored with muscle
testing. By establishing patterns of imbalance,
this method of evaluation also discloses a great
deal of information about each patient’s
meridian system as a whole.
Some shortcomings of acupuncture
Given the body’s great ability to adapt, both
energetically and physiologically, to all types of
stressors, the energetic system (including the
acupuncture meridians) attempts to compensate
for biochemical malfunction in the organs, and
likewise, an organ’s biochemistry is self-
adjusting in an attempt to make up for excess
or deficiency in the meridian system.
However, both of these compensations can
only go so far, and eventually, excess or
deficiency in the meridians, along with
inflammation or under-activity in the organs
themselves, may only be fully correctable by
addressing each imbalance on its own.
Specifically, the energetics of the body may
need to be balanced through acupuncture or
other similar means, and the biochemistry of the
organs, in turn, might need to be addressed on
a physical level through nutrition and
detoxification.
Here we actually begin to see not only the
strengths but also some of the weaknesses of
acupuncture for, like any other system of
healing, acupuncture excels in certain areas
(like balancing the intricate network of Chi), yet
it nevertheless lacks in others (such as in
addressing nutritional deficiencies). This is why
long ago traditional Chinese medicine
prescribed herbs and diet to build the vitality,
and meridian therapy was primarily used to
restore balance to the vitality that was already
there.
Another example of limitations in
acupuncture is its inability, in some cases, to
fully restore the energy flow of so-called
interference fields. These disrupted energy
fields can result from various traumas, including
injuries, surgeries and even vaccinations. Such
areas may appear normal visually and be
asymptomatic themselves, but in fact they can
often be the direct source of ongoing disruption
in the flow of Chi. Furthermore, interference
fields can reflex to practically any seemingly
unrelated areas of the body, often causing
unexplained symptoms that can last for years
without resolution.
For example, thyroid dysfunction in a large
number of women might often be the direct
result of having had a C-section delivery or
episiotomy years or even decades earlier.
Interestingly, the C-section or episiotomy scar
crosses over the Conception vessel, directly
reflexing to the thyroid gland, also found on the
same meridian. In such cases, acupuncture may
bring only temporary relief, and the symptoms
may keep on returning in spite of repeated
treatments. In these situations the patient may
require additional forms of therapy, such as
specialized mud packs applied externally to the
scar or site of injury. This ancient form of
treatment, especially when combined with
acupuncture, can often result in a permanent
state of relief.
The future of acupuncture
One of the best indicators of where the
future of acupuncture lies may be found in the
work of Joie Jones PhD, a physics professor at
the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Jones
has recently demonstrated scientifically the
reality of the meridians, and has also shown that
different forms of stimuli can be used to affect
them. By experimenting with both ultrasound
and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), he
has shown that many different forms of
meridian therapy produce a response in the
region of the brain precisely corresponding to
the part of the body being treated.
Working with both ultrasonics and MRI, Dr.
Jones has been able to simultaneously locate,
treat, and monitor the effects of acupuncture
point stimulation. He has discovered that
stimulating points with ultrasound appears to be
just as effective as needle treatment, and that
both elicit the same response in corresponding
parts of the neuroanatomy. In one example he
uses the point Bl-67, which when stimulated,
affects the visual cortex region of the brain. Bl-
67 (located on the little toe at the opposite end
of the channel that begins at the inner corner of
the eye), is a commonly-known point for
treating conditions of the eye itself, and Dr.
Jones’ work clearly confirms this.
Even beyond such valuable findings, his
work has further demonstrated that points can
be not only treated but also actually located
using ultrasound devices. He hypothesizes that
in the future technologies such as ultrasound
may be used to provide the practitioner with a
precise means of both point location and
treatment. He believes that the less-than-stellar
response to acupuncture may sometimes be
due to the practitioner’s inability to accurately
find the right points, let alone being able to
select the correct ones to treat in the first place.
After researching other forms of meridian
treatment as well, Dr. Jones has come to the
conclusion that a variety of energetic stimuli are
effective in creating similar responses, and
believes that in the future the acupuncture
therapist may even leave needles behind and
progress to highly effective forms of treatment
that are painless and carry no risk of injury or
infection. Without any doubt, there have been
other numerous studies in this field conducted
all over the world, and these projects will
continue to expand our knowledge and
understanding in the realm of subtle energy.
Summary
As might be expected of such an ancient
health care system which has withstood the test
of time over more than twenty five centuries,
meridian therapy in its various forms is just as
valid now as it was at its inception. To
emphasize, the ideas presented here strongly
reinforce, rather than refute, the foundational
principals of traditional acupuncture. In fact,
Quantum Acupuncture – The Next Level is
written for all those who desire to expand their
current knowledge of traditional Chinese
medicine, whatever their understanding or
experience may be. It provides a bridge
between ancient and modern methods available
to both diagnose and treat imbalances in the
Chi. This manual is about the essential points of
acupuncture and how to recognize and use
them on a daily basis in a practical way. It
visually shows the relationship of the energy
channels to the physical body, and describes
modern methods of diagnosing and treating
them.
Chapter I – Five
Elements and the
Chakras
Five Elements
The study of the relationship between
meridians is described, in part, through the
theory of Five Elements. On one hand, this
system elegantly illustrates how the meridians
energetically nourish each other, but on the
other it also shows the effects of a control
mechanism.
Red = Fire
Orange = Earth
Grey = Metal
Blue = Water
Green = Wood
Black = No element is involved

The Nurturing cycle


In the nurturing cycle energy flows from yin
organs to yin organs and from yang to yang
accordingly. For example, since Fire feeds
Earth, the Heart (yin Fire element) nurtures the
Spleen (yin Earth element) and the Small
Intestine (yang Fire element) nurtures the
Stomach (yang Earth element). Likewise, the
Heart is nurtured by the Liver (yin Wood
element), while the Small Intestine is fed by the
Gallbladder (yang Wood element), and so on.

The Control cycle


Among just the yin channels there exists
another cycle which limits the nurturing cycle so
that it does not become excessive. This is
known as the control cycle, where the
strengthening and weakening points on the
channels skip over a meridian either ahead or
behind. In this case a channel draws not just
from one, but from two elements back in the
Five Element cycle and sends the Chi ahead by
not just one but two elements as well. For
example, the Heart is said to control the Lung,
and is itself controlled by the Kidney.
Therefore, Ht-4 (the Metal point on the Heart
channel) might theoretically be used to send the
Chi on to the Lung (Metal element), whereas
Ht-3 (the Water point on the Heart channel) is
commonly used to draw in vitality from the
Kidney (Water element).

Beyond the Five Elements


As profound as the effect of the Five
Elements can be in the practice of acupuncture,
by itself it offers only an incomplete perspective
of the meridian system. For instance, although it
gives important insights into how to use the
elemental points found on all of the yin
channels, other Five Element points located on
the yang meridians are not included. Because of
this, we need to expand our perspective on the
function of other point groups (which will be
discussed in detail in chapter III) besides those
merely associated with the Five Elements.
24-hour Horary cycle
Another interconnection the meridians have
with each other is based on the 24 hours of the
day and is known as the horary cycle, during
which the Chi flows like a wave through each
of the meridians. Every channel contains the
peak of this wave for two hours, the crest of
the wave then moving on to the next channel.
Through the course of the day the Chi
completes three circuits in the body, flowing
from head to toe as it moves throughout the 12
main channels, beginning at the Heart according
to one system of thought, or at the Lungs
according to another.
An example of this cycle might be the Heart,
which receives the peak of Chi during the
middle of the day beginning at 11:00 am. After
two hours, at 1:00 pm, the crest shifts to the
next channel, in this case the Small Intestine.
The point where the Chi enters the channel is
known as the Entry point, and where it leaves
as the Exit point. The Exit point of one
meridian is where the energy is passed on to
the Entry point of the next channel. Many of the
Entry and Exit points are located at the
beginning and end of the meridians, although
sometimes the Chi enters or exits at nearby
locations other than the beginning or end of the
channel.
Chakra system in meridian therapy
Although the subject of the chakra system
may require volumes of information on its own,
the author nevertheless feels it is important to
include at least a brief mentioning of the
chakras in relation to acupuncture. The two
snakes coiled around the caduceus (the symbol
of modern medicine adopted in the early
1900’s to replace the cross) represent the two
vital forces of yin and yang which coil their way
up the spine through the two channels known
as Ida and Pingala. These two passages also
encircle a central subtle energy canal located
within the spinal cord, known as the
Sushumna, and together the three are said to
power the whole totality of our being. This
energy historically has been known to be
influenced by spiritual practices, such as
meditation, prayer and breath-work, etc.. At
the same time, acupuncture can also serve in
helping to balance these subtle energies as well.
Speaking of this, Dr. Amaro comments, “The
number of severe and disabling health
conditions which may be treated through the
meridian system and chakras has few equals
throughout the healing professions. It is truly
incredible. When one develops an awareness
of the caduceus, the chakras and specific
acupuncture points, along with the knowledge
gained from Electro Meridian Imaging, it will
create an entirely new dimension of clinical
response never before seen in conventional
acupuncture.”
Chapter II – The
Meridians
The meridian network
All of the various organs and structures of
the body are joined together via an intricate
network of energy channels, both major and
minor, known as the meridians and their
collaterals, operating from the inside-out as
well as from the outside-in. The external
portion of the meridians, containing their
treatable points, is what is normally shown on
acupuncture charts and is relatively superficial.
The internal portion of each meridian lies deep
within the organs and body cavities, and
although perhaps accessible through certain
forms of cold laser therapy, would only result in
injury if needle treatment were attempted at
these deeper regions.
In studying acupuncture, there is a tendency
to focus on the pathways along the outer
surface of the body, since this is where the
treatable acupuncture points lie. However, it
should always be kept in mind that the
disturbances themselves are frequently found
far deeper within the patient’s system, often
physically remote from the actual points
themselves treated with needles, moxa,
massage or therapeutic laser.
Traditionally, meridians and organs are
classified as yin or yang. The yin organs, such
as the heart and lungs, function continuously,
whereas the yang organs, such as the bladder
and colon, operate intermittently. The
production of vital energy is said to be
dependent on a healthy condition of the organs
themselves, whereas the distribution of this
energy is said to be dependent on the
meridians. The yin organs store vital energy,
whereas the yang organs transform it.
Ultimately, the yin organs act as a reservoir of
energy for the body as a whole, while the yang
organs transform the energy within the
environment into a form which can then be
stored and utilized when needed.
There are 12 regular meridians that either
originate in or pass through their associated
internal organs, either directly via the main
channel itself, or indirectly via a connecting
channel. This arrangement permits each
meridian to affect its affiliated organ, and vice
versa. Changes in the internal organs also
manifest in their corresponding sense organs,
again via the meridians and their collaterals.
Any dysfunction of the sense organs, such as
the eyes and ears, for example, found on the
surface of the body, therefore tends to
correspond to unhealthy physiological function
of the corresponding internal organs.
It should be remembered that there are no
less than 71 acupuncture meridians, all
interconnected so as to supply every portion of
the body with vitality.
The 71 meridians include:
12 Primary meridians – bilateral
channels with their own points
12 Internal meridians – connecting
each channel with its associated
organ
8 Extraordinary meridians –
considered to be the core
reservoir of energy for the entire
meridian system
15 Luo meridians – connecting
the yin and yang pairs of channels
12 Divergent meridians –
branching off the main channels
12 Musculo-tendeno meridians –
responsible for the health of the
musculo-skeletal system, as well
as the body’s initial defense
against illness

The relation between meridians and


their organs
In the evaluation of the acupuncture
meridians, each channel can exist in one of
three states – balanced, excess or deficient.
Accordingly, each corresponding organ can be
either balanced, excess or deficient as well.
Knowing that the meridians actually pass
through their associated organs, either directly
along the meridian’s main course, or indirectly
via an internal channel, we might expect that if
the meridian were excess its associated organ
would also be excess, and that likewise if the
meridian were deficient the associated organ
would be deficient as well.
However, this may not be the case in clinical
practice. Indeed, an excess meridian has a
tendency to produce an excess organ, but if the
organ is too weak to respond metabolically to
the increased flow of Chi (because of its
nutrient deficiency or toxicity, for example),
then it may remain under-active. In this case it
is much like trying to whip a tired horse – the
horse is too exhausted to respond to any
external stimulation. Similarly, an organ may
require more than just an increased supply of
energy, and may also need nutrients specific to
its function, or some form of detoxification, in
order to restore its function and vitality.
Likewise, a deficient meridian can be
associated with not only a deficient organ but
also with an organ in excess (because of its
congestion or inflammation, for instance). In this
case, the organ itself may require more Chi to
overcome its diseased state, but the associated
channel might be unable to supply that energy.
This situation may be likened to a flashlight with
the batteries running low, when the flashlight
can work only if supplied with enough electrical
current from the battery. In the same fashion, an
excess organ might not be able to restore its
function until fully provided with a sufficient
flow of vital force.
Chapter II overview
The following section presents visually-
supported information on each of the 12
primary meridians, along with the Governor and
Conception vessels. In the images, the surface
meridians (presented in solid lines) as well as
their primary internal portions (depicted in
broken lines) are shown in the colors
associated with the Five Elements. In addition,
the organs themselves are also shown in their
own elemental colors as well. A list of the most
important points (referred to as primary
points) is given for each meridian, based on
information derived from pulse readings and
EMI evaluation, and particularly from running
the meridians with a soft laser along with
kinesiological testing (described in detail in
chapter IV). For clarity (since this information
is not presented in the descriptions of the
meridians themselves), the chart below lists the
12 primary channels in relation to their yin or
yang properties, as well as to the elements they
belong to.
I - Heart
There are 9 points on the surface pathway of
the Heart meridian. The channel begins in the
heart itself, then one portion of it descends to
the small intestine while another ascends to the
tongue and eyeball. The main pathway runs
through the lung, leaves the chest cavity at the
armpit, and travels down the arm to exit at the
little finger.
The primary points on the Heart meridian are
Ht-3, Ht-5, Ht-7, Ht-8 and Ht-9.
II - Small Intestine
There are 19 points on the surface pathway
of the Small Intestine meridian. The channel
begins at the little finger, travels up the medial
arm, over the shoulder and neck, and ends on
the face, anterior to the ear. It connects at Gv-
14, from where it travels to St-12, and
continues downwards through the heart at Cv-
17 and stomach at Cv-13 and Cv-12.
The primary points on the Small Intestine
meridian are Si-1, Si-3, Si-4, Si-7 and Si-19.
III - Bladder
There are 67 points on the surface pathway
of the Urinary Bladder meridian. The channel
begins at the eye then runs over the head and
splits into two parallel meridians on each side of
the body. After traveling down the back, the
two separate channels then rejoin at the hip to
continue as one meridian passing down the
back of the leg. It then proceeds along the
lateral portion of the foot, ending at the little
toe. The meridian passes through the kidney at
Bl-23, connects to the hip at Gb-30 and to the
bladder at Bl-35. It connects to the Governor
vessel at Gv-24, Gv-20, Gv-16 and Gv-4.
The Bladder meridian is the longest channel
of the body, containing separate segments that
each possess somewhat unique properties.
Located on the head are points primarily used
for local treatment of the head and face,
including the sensory organs, sinuses, mouth
and brain, etc.. At at the opposite end of the
channel are points located on the foreleg and
foot, often being used as elemental points to
balance the system as a whole, as well as to
treat the head and face region. Between these
two extremes lie the Association points that
run along the back, often used to affect the
internal organs of the body.
The Bladder meridian has a vast array of
primary points. The points on the head include
Bl-1, Bl-2, Bl-3 and Bl-10. The points in the
general back area include Bl-11, Bl-12, Bl-13,
Bl-14, Bl-15, Bl-16, Bl-17, Bl-18, Bl-19, Bl-
20, Bl-21, Bl-22, Bl-23, Bl-25, Bl-26, Bl-27,
Bl-28, Bl-30, Bl-31 to 35, Bl-36 and Bl-37.
Points in the leg and foot region include Bl-40,
Bl-57, Bl-58, Bl-60, Bl-62, Bl-63, Bl-64, Bl-
65, Bl-66 and Bl-67.
IV - Kidney
There are 27 points on the surface pathway
of the Kidney meridian. The channel begins at
the bottom of the foot, passes up the medial leg
into the abdomen, and ends in the chest just
below the clavicle. The meridian travels through
the lower back at Gv-1, then through the
bladder (emerging at Cv-3 and Cv-4), and
finally passes through the kidney, liver, heart
and lungs on its way to Kd-27. A branch
connects to Cv-17 where it joins with the
Pericardium meridian, connecting via its Exit
point, Kd-22.
The primary points on the Kidney meridian
are Kd-1, Kd-2, Kd-3, Kd-4, Kd-5, Kd-6,
Kd-7, Kd-9 and Kd-27.
V - Pericardium
There are 9 points on the surface pathway of
the Pericardium meridian. The channel begins in
the chest and then travels down the medial arm
into the hand, ending on the middle finger. An
internal branch emerges at Cv-17 and
descends through the abdomen to Cv-12 and
Cv-7.
The primary points on the Pericardium
meridian are Cx-1, Cx-3, Cx-4, Cx-5, Cx-6,
Cx-7, Cx-8 and Cx-9 (every single point on
the channel except Cx-2).
VI - Triple Heater
There are 23 points on the surface pathway
of the Triple Heater meridian. The channel
begins on the hand, runs along the posterior
arm, over the shoulder and neck and above the
ear, to end at the lateral eyebrow. An internal
portion of the channel passes through Gv-14
where it crosses over to St-12. From there it
continues to Cv-17 (passing through the heart)
and then descends to Cv-12 and Cv-7 in the
abdomen.
The primary points on Triple Heater meridian
are Tw-1, Tw-3, Tw-4, Tw-5, Tw-6, Tw-8
and Tw-23.
VII - Gallbladder
There are 44 points on the surface pathway
of the Gallbladder meridian. The channel begins
at the lateral corner of the eye, makes multiple
passes over the side of the head, and crosses
over the neck, shoulder and lateral portion of
the thorax. It then traverses the hip and finally
passes down the lateral portion of the leg,
ending on the fourth toe.
A portion of the channel connects to Gv-14,
continues on to St-12 and passes through the
liver and gallbladder. It then travels through the
sacrum at Bl-31, Bl-33 and Gv-1 and connects
to the Stomach meridian at St-30. Finally it
departs at Gb-41 and connects to the Liver
channel at Lv-1.
Similar to the Bladder, the Gallbladder
meridian passes through three distinct regions:
first, the head, neck and shoulder; second, the
back and hip; and third, the leg and foot. The
primary points on the head, neck and shoulder
are Gb-1, Gb-8, Gb-13, Gb-14, Gb-20 and
Gb-21. On the back and hip they include Gb-
22, Gb-24, Gb-25 and Gb-26 and Gb-30. On
the leg and foot they are Gb-34, Gb-36, Gb-
37, Gb-39, Gb-40, Gb-41, Gb-43 and Gb-
44.
VIII - Liver
There are 14 points on the surface pathway
of the Liver meridian. The channel begins on
the large toe, passes up the medial portion of
the leg, then travels up the abdomen to the
middle of the thorax. On its way the channel
passes through the groin at Cv-3 and Cv-4 and
then through the liver, gallbladder, stomach and
lungs. A portion eventually continues upwards
through the throat, mouth and eye to end on the
top of the head at Gv-20. Another segment
passes upward to exit at Lv-14 and connects
with Lu-1.
The primary points on the Liver meridian are
Lv-1, Lv-2, Lv-3, Lv-4, Lv-5, Lv-6, Lv-13
and Lv-14.
IX - Lung
There are 11 points on the surface pathway
of the Lung meridian. The channel begins at a
deep level in the abdomen at Cv-9 and Cv-12,
then passes through the large intestine and
stomach upwards through the lungs and
trachea, eventually emerging at Lu-1. From
there the external pathway of the meridian
travels from the upper chest down the lateral
portion of the arm to the wrist at Lu-7 where it
exits, and then continues on to the thumb.
The primary points on the Lung meridian are
Lu-1, Lu-5, Lu-6, Lu-7, Lu-8, Lu-9, Lu-10
and Lu-11 (all but Lu-2, Lu-3 and Lu-4).
X- Large intestine
There are 20 points on the surface pathway
of the Large Intestine meridian. The channel
begins on the index finger (although the Entry
point is Li-4, located in the web of the thumb).
From there it traverses the lateral portion of the
arm, crosses over the shoulder and throat, and
then encircles the mouth to end on the opposite
side of the nose. A portion connects to Gv-14,
passes over to St-12 and descends through the
lungs and abdomen to terminate beside the
navel at St-25, the channel’s Alarm point.
The primary points on the Large Intestine
meridian are Li-1, Li-3, Li-4, Li-6, Li-10, Li-
11 and Li-20.
XI - Stomach
There are 45 points on the surface pathway
of the Stomach meridian. The channel begins
below the eye, travels down the face, then up
to the forehead, before turning downwards
again. It crosses the throat, thorax and
abdomen, and continues down the antero-
lateral portion of the leg to eventually terminate
on the second toe.
A portion of the meridian passes through
both Gv-26 and Cv-24, then travels to St-12,
where a descending branch passes through the
stomach and spleen at Cv-12 and Cv-13. It
then rejoins the main channel at St-30 in the
groin area and continues down the leg to the
foot, where a segment branches off from the
Exit point St-42 to connect to Sp-1. The
Stomach channel is unique in that it is the only
bilateral meridian to travel down the front of the
body rather than upwards.
The primary points on the Stomach meridian
are St-1, St-3, St-4, St-5, St-6, St-7, St-21,
St-23, St-25, St-27, St-29, St-34, St-36, St-
37, St-39, St-40, St-41, St-42 (the latter
generally used for testing only), St-44 and St-
45.
XII - Spleen
There are 21 points on the surface pathway
of the Spleen meridian. The channel travels
along the medial portion of the large toe, foot
and leg, to continue up the abdomen. It then
passes along the lateral portion of the chest
before terminating on the side of the ribcage. A
portion passes through Cv-3 and Cv-4,
continues upwards, and eventually connects to
Cv-10. Here it passes through the pancreas,
stomach and spleen. It later travels through the
heart before exiting at Sp-21.
The primary points on the Spleen meridian
are Sp-1, Sp-2, Sp-3, Sp-4, Sp-5, Sp-6, Sp-
8, Sp-9 and Sp-21.
XIII - Governor vessel
There are 28 points on the surface pathway
of the Governor vessel. The channel begins at
the tip of the coccyx then travels up the spine
and over the skull to end on the upper gum at
Gv-28. By crossing the tongue it then connects
to the Conception vessel at Cv-24.
The primary points on the Governor vessel
are Gv-1, Gv-3, Gv-4, Gv-7, Gv-9, Gv-14,
Gv-16, Gv-20, Gv-23, Gv-24, Gv-24.5 (also
referred to as Yintang) and Gv-26.
XIV - Conception Vessel
There are 24 points on the surface pathway
of the Conception vessel. The channel begins at
Cv-24 on the chin and descends to Cv-1
located on the perineum. It then crosses the
anus and connects to Gv-1 at the tailbone.
The Conception vessel is the only channel
that is numbered backwards. It is thought that
in the uterus, before birth, the Governor and
Conception meridians of the fetus both flow
upwards, and the flow of Chi is completed by
passing through the mother’s meridian system.
After birth, however, the individual becomes an
autonomous being with a self-sufficient system
of meridians and their collaterals. At that time
the upward flow of vitality in the Conception
vessel is believed to reverse and begin to flow
downwards, connecting with the Governor
vessel to complete the cycle.
The primary points on the Conception vessel
are Cv-3, Cv-4, Cv-5, Cv-6, Cv-8, Cv-10,
Cv-12, Cv-14, Cv-17, Cv-22 and Cv-24.
Chapter III – Point
Group Use in Diagnosis
and Treatment
Point group properties
Acupuncture points do not occur on the
meridians haphazardly, and thus have been
organized over the centuries into various groups
according to their function. Each category is
distinguished by the uniqueness of its particular
therapeutic properties, and each possesses the
ability to not only help balance its own meridian
but often other related channels as well. For
example, Tonification points strengthen,
whereas Sedation points decrease their
meridian by either drawing energy from the
previous channel in the Five Element cycle or,
accordingly, by sending their energy on to the
next.
Another group to mention is the Luo points –
points that connect not only paired meridians,
such as the Spleen and Stomach or Liver and
Gallbladder, etc., but also the left and right
channels of the same organ as well. When
balancing paired meridians, only the deficient
channel is treated so, for example, in the case
of a deficient Spleen and excess Stomach, only
the Luo point of the Spleen would be treated,
and vice versa in the case of a deficient
Stomach. When balancing the left and right
channels of the same organ, the Luo point of
both sides would be treated accordingly.
But even with the addition of Luo points to
the points of Tonification and Sedation
described by the Five Elements, these are still
only a portion of the points available to either
strengthen or calm the meridians. For example,
there are also Source, Accumulation, Entry-
Exit and Command points, just to name a few,
none of which are diagnosed specifically by
determining imbalances within the Five
Elements themselves. At the same time, a
determination of either an excess or deficiency
nevertheless serves as one of the significant
indicators for any of these additional points to
be treated. Because of this lack of a clear
indication for treating points other than those
defined by Five Element theory, many of these
other point groups are often overlooked,
resulting in treatments that fall below the
potential that might be achieved when the role
of all the point groups is well understood and
taken into consideration.
There are quite a few other groups of points
with their own unique effect on the body, as
well as on emotional conditions, such as in the
case of Luo or Tsing points. Some other
groups, such as the Well, Spring and Stream
points, may be best for treating imbalances at
the opposite end of their meridian, while others
may be preferred for treating their associated
organ, but not the channel itself, as is typically
the case of the Bladder Association and Alarm
points. Further, certain points, such as St-36
and Lv-3, may correct a wide range of
imbalances throughout the body, while others
may primarily affect a more localized region of
the physical anatomy.
Acupuncture points for meridian
evaluation and treatment
Another important issue to mention is that
although the primary goal in treating the
meridians is to strengthen whenever there is a
deficiency and to calm whenever there is an
excess, this does not mean, however, that every
point is only able to tonify or sedate exclusively.
There are many points that actually do either,
according to the body’s requirements, without
the need to specifically choose one function or
the other. In the practice of acupuncture there
are many points that operate in this way, which
can often make them safe choices for treatment
because of their ability to normalize the
channels without specifically tonifying or
sedating them.
For example, Lu-7, the Luo point for the
Lung, may either strengthen or calm this
meridian, as may the Accumulation, Alarm or
Meeting points, to name a few. They can all be
used for potential strengthening or calming, and
many of them can also have profound effects
throughout the meridian system as a whole. The
task of the practitioner is to clearly recognize
which points are actually in need of treatment
during any particular session.
In classical acupuncture, certain groups of
points have been found to be especially
effective for not only treating, but also for
evaluating the condition of the organs and
meridians. Of course, the most classically used
points for diagnosis are the Pulse points
located on the wrists (Lu-7, Lu-8 and Lu-9). It
is not the state of the point itself, however,
being evaluated in this case, but the condition
formed as the blood flows through the radial
artery (thus the term reading the pulses).
However, this is only one single group of points
traditionally used to evaluate the meridians, and
in most cases only an expert with perhaps
decades of experience can actually use them
effectively.
On the other hand, it is possible, in the
author’s opinion, that many other acupuncture
points, and perhaps even all of them, can be
used not only for treatment itself but actually for
meridian evaluation as well. For instance, two
well-known point categories sometimes used
for this purpose are the Alarm and Association
points. In general, whenever points of these
two groups are found to be in a state of stress
(based on palpation or a patient’s localized
symptoms, for example) it is likely that the
related organs themselves are disturbed as well.
Another example of point groups with an
expanded use for not only treating but also
diagnosing the meridians are the Source points,
used for electronic evaluation of the meridians
such as in EMI.
Carrying this process one step further, we
can even use each acupuncture point to build
our diagnosis of the meridian system as a
whole, instead of an evaluation based on only a
select number of points, such as the Pulse or
Source points. The closest system approaching
such kind of diagnosis based on point
evaluation was introduced by Dr. Voll, a
German physician who measured the electrical
resistance of a wide range of points on the
body in an attempt to evaluate the energetic
state of their associated organs.
Chapter III overview
This chapter presents traditional point group
classifications in the highly illustrative form of
both charts and visual images. Each point is
color-coded according to the Five Element
nature of the point itself (except for the Bladder
Association and Pulse points, shown according
to the elements of the organs they relate to). To
help distinguish the difference between the
meridians and their points, the points
themselves are shown in more intense elemental
colors, while the meridians appear in lighter
pastel shades.
For clarity, the points on the near surface of
the body are generally shown with drop-
shadows, while the points located on the far
side of the body appear as partially transparent.
Point locations as displayed in the images are
not meant to define their exact position
(presented in detail in chapter IV), but rather to
show them in a bigger context of the general
anatomy. In addition, as point groups can often
be known by more than just one name,
alternative names are mentioned as well to
avoid confusion which might result from
terminology used by different schools of
thought.

1. Tonification and Sedation points


2. Master points of the
Extraordinary vessels
3. Source points
4. Luo points
5. Accumulation points
6. Command points
7. Alarm points
8. Bladder Association points
9. Influential points
10. Transporting points
11. Meeting points
12. Ma Dan-Yang points
13. Vitality Collapse points
14. Entry-Exit points
15. Ghost points
16. Pulse points
17. Menstruation points
18. Pregnancy points
19. Musculo-tendeno points
* An Entry or Exit point that is not found at
the beginning or end of the channel
1 – Tonification and Sedation points
As already described in chapter I, there
exists a nurturing cycle, where yin flows into yin
and yang flows into yang, and also a control
cycle, where the yin meridians skip ahead in the
cycle and nurture the second meridian instead.
This then becomes a self-reinforcing as well as
a self-regulating system of energy – the
foundation for not only the Tonification and
Sedation points, but also for other Five Element
points as well (such as based on the control
cycle). Points associated with the Five
Elements are also known as the Five Phase
points.
In this context, tonifying points draw from
the previous element, while sedating points
send the energy on to the next. For example,
Ht-9 (the Wood and Tonification point for the
Heart), draws from the Liver (belonging to the
Wood element). On the other hand, Ht-7 (the
Earth and Sedation point for the Heart), sends
the energy to the Spleen (belonging to the Earth
element).
When not just one but two meridians are
unbalanced, tonification and sedation can
sometimes (but certainly not always) be the
most effective. For instance, a deficient Heart
can be treated by using the Heart Tonification
point Ht-9 (Wood element), but if the Liver
channel is also in excess, treating the Liver
Sedation point Lv-2 (Fire element) may further
add to the strengthening effect on the Heart, as
well as help to calm the Liver.
This principal of treating two meridians
instead of one extends to the control cycle as
well. In the above example of a deficient Heart,
it may be useful to find out if the Kidney is also
excess, in which case Kd-2 (the Fire point on
the Kidney meridian) might be treated to send
the Chi on to the Heart channel. On the other
hand, if the Heart meridian is excess and the
Lung deficient, Lu-10 (the Fire point on the
Lung meridian) might also be treated to draw
the excess Chi into the Lung, calming the Heart
and strengthening the Lung at the same time.
2 – Master points
Lying deep within the body are 8 additional
channels known as the Extraordinary vessels.
These are considered to be separate from,
although intimately connected with, the 12
primary meridians. Except for the Conception
and Governor vessels, none of these
Extraordinary channels have their own
individual points for treatment, but instead are
affected through points on the meridians
directly connected with them.
Besides acting as reservoirs of vitality, the
Extraordinary vessels also link the 12 primary
meridians together. For example, the Governor
vessel is said to link all the yang, and the
Conception vessel to bind all the yin channels.
The Extraordinary vessels also include the
Penetrating vessel, the Belt meridian, both the
Yin and Yang Heel vessels, and the Yin and
Yang Linking vessels, making a combined total
of eight.
Lying on the Extraordinary vessels are
specific points known by many names,
including the Master, Tuning, Cardinal or
Confluent points, used to open and maintain
the Extraordinary vessels themselves. These
Master points are some of the most powerful
and most commonly treated points in
acupuncture, and are generally used to balance
the deepest core energies of the body. Treating
the Extraordinary vessels is like cleaning the
gutters of a house, where any excess or toxicity
can be drained away and the flow of essential
healing force can be restored.
The Extraordinary vessels always occur in
pairs, and the Master point of one paired
meridian is called the Coupled point of the
other. Oftentimes both paired meridians are
unbalanced, so that the Master and Coupled
points may both be treated in the same session.
Master points (shown for paired vessels):
Lu-7 – Conception vessel, benefits the
reproductive and endocrine systems
Kd-6 – Yin Heel vessel, especially affects
the brain, chest and reproductive system
Si-3 – Governor vessel, is important for
the spine, head and brain
Bl-62 – Yang Heel vessel, affects the brain
and lateral portion of the body
Cx-6 – Yin Linking vessel, regulates all yin
organs, especially the heart and chest, along
with the deep interior of the body in general
Sp-4 – Penetrating vessel, regulates
organs in the abdomen and pelvis
Tw-5 – Yang Linking vessel, is vital for
strengthening the exterior Chi of the body, and
for controlling fevers, treating musculo-skeletal
problems, and affecting all conditions near the
surface of the body
Gb-41 – Belt meridian, which encircles the
waist and binds the vertically-running meridians
together, is especially important for low back
conditions and reproductive disorders
3 – Source points
Also known as the Yuan points, the Source
points (considered to be one of the locations
where the Chi enters the meridians), are
commonly used to treat any condition in the
meridians and their associated organs, whether
excess or deficient. Besides being essential in
EMI as the points for electronic evaluation,
they are also key points used for treatment.
There are two types of Source points: those
located on the yin meridians and those on the
yang. The Source points on the yang meridians
are said to principally treat the channels
themselves, whereas the Source points on the
yin meridians are said to treat their associated
organs (which is not so much a hard and fast
rule, but merely a general guideline to consider
in clinical practice).
The Source points on the yin channels belong
to the Earth element, and are of major
importance in balancing their respective organs.
On the other hand, the Source points on yang
channels are not associated with any specific
element but are so-called stand-alone points,
often having a primary effect on the meridians
themselves.
For example, the three Source points of the
yin meridians of the leg, associated with the
kidney, liver and spleen, are all reliably and
consistently treated to balance both over-active
and under-active conditions of these three
organs respectively. On the other hand, the
Source points of the yang meridians found on
the leg, namely the Bladder, Gallbladder and
Stomach, are generally used less by some
practitioners for affecting their related organ
and more for treating the meridian itself.
4 – Luo points
Each of the 12 primary meridians has a Luo
point, sometimes called a Junction or Luo-
connecting point, where a portion of the
meridian diverges from the main channel.
Treating the Luo points is primarily useful in
addressing the following three conditions:

imbalances between the left and


right sides of a single organ
disorders of the paired yin/yang-
related meridians
emotional disorders

In actual practice these points are often used


to treat not only disorders of their immediate
organ and meridian, but also their yin/yang
related organs or channels. They are also some
of the most important points in acupuncture for
relieving conditions brought about by emotional
stress and tension.
5 – Accumulation points
Each of the 12 main meridians has an
Accumulation point, also known as the Xi Cleft
point, typically indicated for the treatment of
acute symptoms and pain. Whether the
condition pertains to an organ itself or is found
along a channel, these points are often excellent
for treatment in extreme and even life-
threatening situations. In general, they are often
underutilized in classical acupuncture, although
many of them have shown consistent
importance in treatment through research and
testing.
6 – Command points
Command points are said to regulate or
“command” a general region of the physical
anatomy, compared to influencing merely a
specific organ or gland. Therefore, it is rare that
a treatment does not include one or more of
these broad-spectrum points.
7 – Alarm points
Also called the Mu points (meaning “to
gather”), the front Alarm points are “where the
Chi gathers and concentrates on the anterior
surface of the body,” specifically in association
with the organs themselves. Much like the
Bladder Association points described below,
these points have less effect on the meridians,
but can be used to treat both excess and
deficient conditions of their associated organs.
The exceptions are the Alarm points of the
lung, liver and gallbladder, where Alarm points
are actually located on their respective
meridians. These points are like major circuit
breakers (again similar to the Bladder
Association points), that may need to be
“reset” once there is any major acute or chronic
problem in an organ.
Interestingly, half of these points are on the
Conception vessel, located on the anterior
midline of the body, while the other half lie
bilaterally off of the body’s center. Most of
them are important to consider in daily practice.
8 – Bladder Association points
Also known as the Back Shu points,
Bladder Association points are located 1 1/2
sun (two fingers breadth) lateral to the spinous
processes of the vertebral column. Running
from the upper back all the way down to the
sacrum, these points can be used to treat every
internal organ and gland in the body. Being
equally effective for either excess or deficiency,
they are often primary points to consider for
addressing any organ condition, perhaps
especially true when the yin organs in particular
are involved.
To emphasize, the Bladder Association
points do not affect disorders of the meridians
themselves, other than imbalance in the Bladder
channel on which they are found, but are often
important for restoring harmony to their
associated organs.
9 – Influential points
The 8 Influential points, sometimes known
as the Assembling, Meeting or Master points,
all affect either some general aspect of the Chi
or else certain generalized physical systems of
the body. Given that most of these points are
important for other reasons as well (some being
also Alarm points, for instance), it is easy to
understand why many of them are commonly
utilized over and over again in daily practice.
10 – Transporting points
Known as the Five Shu points, the
Transporting points are located either near or
distal to the knees and elbows. Considering
that the fingers and toes are the site of transition
from yin to yang or from yang to yin, the
Transporting points are where the Chi is either
returning to the body’s surface after coursing
through the internal organs, or is preparing to
dive more deeply after having already flowed
near the surface. These are the Well, Spring
and Stream points, typically used to treat the
anatomical region at the opposite end of the
meridian, and the River and Sea points said to
affect conditions of the respiratory or digestive
areas (all five groups are described below).
An interesting phenomenon can sometimes
occur when there is extreme stress to either an
organ or channel that the author has come to
call “collapse of the meridian”. In this severe
state of disturbance of the Chi, not only one
point but sometimes several points in a row
become imbalanced, which is particularly likely
to occur in the Transporting points (specifically
when the disturbance at the opposite end of the
channel is more than the body’s defense
mechanism is able to withstand). In this case it
can be extremely valuable to treat not only just
one of the Transporting points on a meridian
but sometimes several in a row, and this
method of therapy can often produce
spectacular results in a short period of time.
However, in a typical situation, not all of the
Transporting points carry equal importance,
and so only those found to be consistently
prominent through testing are listed without
parentheses.
* Gb-41 occurs out of sequence, skipping
over Gb-42
(1) The Jing-Well points
The first Transporting point, known as the
Jing-Well point, or simply the Well point, is
always found at the end of the fingers or toes,
with the notable exception of Kd-1, located on
the bottom of the foot. Well points are
especially helpful for treating symptoms at the
opposite far end of the meridian, but can also
be useful in cases of acute and even extreme
conditions associated with not only the
meridians but the related organs as well. They
also effect changes in consciousness caused by
emotional stress, often called “disorders of the
spirit” in classical Chinese medicine. Since the
Chi changes from yin to yang or from yang to
yin at the fingers and toes, these points are
particularly dynamic in their ability to affect the
energy flow, although this does not mean that
their effect is always strongly pronounced along
the entire meridian as a whole.
The Well points belong either to the Wood
element for the yin meridians or else to the
Metal element for the yang.
(2) The Spring points
The Spring point is the second Transporting
point located on the fingers and toes, and is
said to “clear heat and inflammation,” especially
(similar to the Well points) from the uppermost
portion of the channel. Spring points are either
of the Fire element (for the yin meridians) or the
Water element (for the yang), and both may be
used for clearing inflammation, swelling and
pain whenever it is located at the opposite end
of the channel.
(3) The Stream points
The third Transporting point is the Stream
point, which is either of the Earth element (for
the yin meridians) or the Wood element (for the
yang). The Stream points of the yin channels
are also the Source points, known to be some
of the most important points on the yin
meridians, often indicated for treating disorders
of the organs themselves. Stream points of the
yang meridians, on the other hand, may have
less influence on the organs and more on the
meridians. In either case, Stream points are
also typically used for treating conditions found
at the opposite end of the channel.
*Gb-41 is the only Stream Point that is out
of order on the meridian, skipping Gb-42
(4) The River points
The fourth of the Transporting points, known
as the River point, is generally located near the
wrists and ankles. River points are typically
considered effective in treating respiratory
conditions, and are of either the Metal element
(for the yin meridians) or the Fire element (for
the yang). It is important to remember that
many of these points are also valuable for
reasons other than for simply being used as
River points, which will be discussed later in
chapter IV describing each meridian and point
in turn.
(5) The Sea points
The fifth Transporting point, known as the
Sea point, is located either at the elbows or the
knees. Sea points are often particularly
effective for treating digestive conditions. While
not all of them are useful in this way, two
classical examples of yang Sea points are St-36
and Gb-34, the most powerful points on their
respective meridians for treating disorders of
the stomach and gallbladder themselves.
In contrast, some of the yin Sea points, also
located at the elbows and knees, generally tend
to be less influential for the digestive system,
and more pronounced in their systemic effect
related to the Five Elements in general.
The Sea Points are either of the Water
element (for the yin meridians), or more
importantly, of the Earth element (for the yang),
and therefore traditionally digestive system-
related.
Lower He-Sea points
Not exactly in the Transporting point
category, but still called Sea points, the lower
He-Sea points are powerful for treating the
yang organs of the body. These are often the
main points for affecting these organs directly,
and are generally of high-priority in
acupuncture.
11 – Meeting points
There are 6 main Meeting points – points
where three or more meridians come together,
which can be of great impact. They
simultaneously treat all of the meridians
involved, allowing the channels to share and
equalize the energy amongst them. These are all
key points which help to balance either the yin
or yang meridians of the body.
12 – Ma Dan-Yang points
Ma Dan-Yang was a famous Taoist, born in
the 12th century AD, who developed 11
miraculous acupuncture points later named after
him. These were eventually published in the
Jade Dragon Manual two centuries later. Still
another century after that, Xu Feng, known for
introducing the highly significant 8 Extraordinary
meridians, added a 12th point and gave the
group a new name: “Song of the twelve points
shining bright as the starry sky and able to heal
all the many diseases.”
All 12 of the Ma Dan-Yang points, also
known as the 12 Heavenly Star points, are
some of the most important points in
acupuncture. They each address a wide and
varied range of conditions associated with
various regions of the body. Considering how
most of these points also fall into several other
important categories as well, it is easy to
understand why each of them is so important in
treating both the organs and the channels.
13 – Vitality Collapse points
Traditionally treated to “return the yang,”
Vitality Collapse points are used to restore
strength and vitality once the Chi has become
weakened or exhausted. This typically occurs
as the result of accumulated stress (acute and
chronic, physical and emotional) that has
overcome the individual’s ability to cope with it.
This condition of diminished and imbalanced
vitality often coincides with widespread
imbalance throughout the meridian system as a
whole.
Classically, these points have been described
as being valuable for treating a wide array of
symptoms, such as fatigue, loss of
consciousness and aversion to cold. Each and
every one of them is an extremely important
and vital point.
14 – Entry-Exit points
Entry-Exit points are the junction where one
meridian flows into another, the Chi passing
from the Exit point of one channel to the Entry
point of the next. This happens according to the
24-hour cycle, in which each meridian has a
two hour period when it receives a greater flow
of the vital force.
There are two categories of Entry-Exit
points: those found on the hands and feet, and
those located on the head and torso. In the first
case, the hand-off always involves a change
from yin to yang (on the hands) or from yang to
yin (on the feet), and usually occurs on the
fingers or toes (there are some exceptions to
this, however, since a few of these Entry-Exit
points are located somewhat towards the wrists
and ankles instead).
Entry-Exit points of the hands and feet are
located near the surface of the body, where the
Chi is the most superficial (the needle
penetration itself may be only one or two fen,
or tenths of an inch). It is here that the energy is
preparing to transform into its opposite, and
where it is most easily influenced by the least
amount of stimulation. These are therefore
powerful points to cause an immediate change
in the meridians, making many of them common
points in everyday therapy.
In the case of Entry-Exit points located on
either the head or torso, the hand-off never
involves a change from yin to yang or from
yang to yin, but instead stays either yin or yang
respectively. On the head, this connection is
always from yang to yang, corresponding to
this portion of the body being relatively yang.
Likewise, on the torso the connection is always
from yin to yin, correlating with this portion of
the body being relatively yin.
Similar to the Entry-Exit points on the hands
and feet, these are very powerful points,
because instead of effecting a change of yin and
yang, they allow yin to support yin and yang to
support yang. In this case, it is the continuity
that must be nurtured and not the
transformation (as takes place on the hands and
feet).
* An Entry or Exit point that is not found at the
beginning or end of the channel
15 – Ghost points
Ghost points are said to realign the spirit
with the physical body, usually following severe
physical or emotional stress. In many situations
they can be key points for rapidly restoring
balance to the channels.
16 – Pulse points
Pulse points are the classical points on the
wrists where the Chi in the meridians is
evaluated. There are three locations on each
wrist, where the points on the left and right
sides each reveal information about their
corresponding half of the channels. Each point
has a deep and a superficial position, creating
12 different locations for evaluating the 12
major meridians (the Extraordinary vessels,
including the Governor and Conception, are not
read by the pulses). Over twenty different
qualities of the pulses are said to reveal a
wealth of information regarding the balance of
the Chi, but this form of diagnosis is not simple
to practice, and may take a lifetime to master.
17 – Menstruation points
Points to promote menstruation are based on
centuries of practical experience, and can be
highly effective for bringing on the menstrual
period.
18 – Pregnancy points
These are points to promote conception,
even when there is a history of infertility or
repeated miscarriages.
* Located two sun lateral to Gv-4 (below
the spinous process of the second lumbar
vertebra)
** Located four finger widths lateral to Cv-
3)
19 – Musculo-tendeno points
The Musculo-tendeno regulating points are
said to affect the three yin and the three yang
Musculo-tendeno meridians of the arms and
legs. For example, Cv-3 aids in balancing the
three yin Musculo-tendeno meridians of the leg,
namely those of the kidney, liver and spleen.
Although Musculo-tendeno meridians are
associated with their primary channels, they are
only superficial, and do not penetrate deeply
into the internal organs.
Chapter IV – Key Points
on the Meridians
A new perspective is gained
As might be expected, emerging electro-
meridian technologies such as EMI have
brought new knowledge and insight regarding
the meridians and their interconnections. One of
the most important discoveries has been of so-
called split meridians, which previous to Dr.
Nakatani’s work had never been recognized in
the entire history of acupuncture. Prior to
Ryadoraku there was no known way to
determine split meridians, which occur when
there are significant variations between the left
and right channels of an individual organ – a
condition that traditional diagnosis is unable to
differentiate. Since left and right paired
meridians are tightly interconnected, they must
be equalized with each other for both the
channels themselves and their associated
organs to function properly.
This finding, in turn, has also led to the
development of an additional use of Luo points,
traditionally utilized to balance paired meridians
such as the Kidney and Bladder or the Heart
and Small Intestine, etc.. The knowledge of
split meridians now allows Luo points to be
used for balancing the left and right sides of any
individual organ as well. Electro-meridian
technologies also make it clear which channels
are in excess and which are deficient, which is
invaluable in terms of treatment.
Apart from evaluating the meridians
according to the Five Elements, EMI has also
been used to analyze the Musculo-tendeno
meridians (diagnosed specifically when there
are orthopedic symptoms present) by using the
Tsing points located on the fingers and toes.
Thus, EMI plays a major role in measuring two
different meridian systems involving two
different forms of examination, one related to
the meridians associated with the internal
organs, and the other related to the musculo-
skeletal system as a whole.
While EMI offers a new perspective on the
meridians based on objective energetic
methods of testing, kinesiology, in turn, can help
to better evaluate not only the entire meridian
system as a whole, but also the condition of
each acupuncture point individually, making
these two modalities valuable additions to the
modern-day arsenal for meridian evaluation and
treatment.
Importance of EMI evaluation
The examples of EMI charts offered in this
chapter are not meant to cover every
conceivable meridian reading, but rather to
demonstrate one or two possibilities for the
particular acupuncture point being described.
Also, for simplicity, only the key meridians are
shown out of balance in the EMI sample charts,
the rest being displayed as more or less normal.
In a real-life evaluation performed on a real
patient, the readings are rarely as
straightforward as exhibited in these examples.
Almost invariably, the more unhealthy the
patient is, the more diverse in every way is the
charting of their meridians. The possibilities
range across every imaginable extreme in
everyday practice, and as with other forms of
assessment, the experienced practitioner will
eventually come to recognize these various
patterns of imbalance in the channels.
It is important to remember as well that EMI
is only one way to evaluate the meridian
system, and without doubt, this particular form
of meridian analysis does not reflect all the
various aspects of Chi. It is still critical to
consider such factors as a patient’s history
along with other findings and symptoms and,
importantly, to further evaluate each individual
acupuncture point itself. As already mentioned,
this can be performed by running the meridians
with a soft laser while monitoring the
individual’s response with kinesiology, or
perhaps by using some other method of
energetic evaluation as well.
To summarize, Electro Meridian Imaging is
able to show relative excess and deficiency in
the meridians, highly useful for displaying the
following three important factors:

1. Imbalances between the left and


right sides of a particular
meridian, called splits, such as
within the heart itself
2. Imbalances between the yin and
yang paired meridians, such as
between the Heart and its paired
channel the Small Intestine
3. Imbalances between different
elements, often leading to the use
of either the nurturing or control
cycles, such as between the Liver
and Heart channels on one hand,
or the Liver and Spleen channels
on the other

EMI charts
A typical EMI chart, as shown below,
visually represents the vital force flowing
through each of the meridians on a scale of 0 to
200. A value of 0, which is an unlikely finding,
represents no vitality in a meridian, while 200,
usually meaning off the chart, indicates the
maximum excess possible in a channel. The
ideal range is normally around 100 for all
meridians, with any reading above 100
considered to be an excess and any below 100
a deficiency. A variation of more than 30
points, either between different meridians or
between the left and right sides of a single
organ, is considered abnormal.
The channels, as shown on EMI charts, are
labeled at the bottom (left to right) starting with
the Lung and ending with the Stomach. The left
meridian of each organ is depicted on the left
side while the right meridian is shown on the
right respectively. The order of each channel
shown in the chart reflects the actual sequence
of reading the meridians during EMI evaluation.
If both sides of a meridian are either excess
or deficient, they are shown in either red or
blue respectively. If there is a split of 30 points
or more, the channels are listed in yellow. In
case the meridian pairs are balanced, they are
shown in either grey (if both sides fall within the
patient’s 30 point average) or green (if either
the left or right sides lie beyond the average
reading).
Acupuncture point evaluation and
frequency of treatment
Based on a serious study of acupuncture
meridians, it becomes apparent that not all
acupuncture points are created equal.
Depending on the frequency of their need for
treatment, some points are found to be active
on the vast majority of patients with a wide
range of symptoms, whereas others show up
far less frequently and for a narrower range of
conditions. It comes as no surprise that this
important discovery is in accord with the
observations of traditional oriental practitioners.
The so-called active points are normally
found by running each meridian with a 50mW
soft laser, done simultaneously with
kinesiological testing to find out which points
induce a patient’s weak muscular response. As
with other kinesiological findings, a stable
acupuncture point (that is neither excess nor
deficient) thus shows no reaction to stimulation
from the laser when the laser is used simply as
a method of challenge and not as a form of
treatment. An unstable point, on the other hand,
is observed to produce a muscular weakening
upon testing, although if the laser stimulation is
prolonged, its energy is usually sufficient for
balancing unstable points. Other methods of
challenging the points, such as using the north
and south poles of a magnet, are not found to
be as reliable as low-level laser for
demonstrating when a specific point is
sufficiently out of balance to actually require
treatment.
These findings allow us to create a grading
scale based on the frequency of active points,
with points that fall below a certain minimum
simply not being listed or rated. It is important
to mention that apart from running the meridians
with a soft laser, the process of evaluating
several thousand patients also included such
parameters as pulse evaluation, EMI readings,
patient symptoms and practitioner’s objective
findings. However, not all points were tested on
every patient at every session, and the results
presented here represent general guidelines
based upon the authors own experience,
leaving room for unlimited additional research
and study.
What is more, such classification is not meant
to infer the importance of any individual point
(based solely on its rating) for any specific
treatment, but simply reflects the relative
frequency of point treatment in the number of
studied cases.
Below is a five-star-based scale reflecting
relative frequency of treatment of each
acupuncture point:

Slight frequency points only rarely show


active, although when they do they can often be
primary for treating their particular associated
condition. An example would be Bl-21, the
Association point for the stomach, which is not
generally active in the majority of patients,
although in those with a primary stomach
condition it can become an important, if not
essential, point for therapy.
Low frequency points show up in some
patients and only occasionally.
Moderate frequency points appear more
commonly in patients overall, and are
apparently also important for their support of a
wider range of the patient’s meridian system as
a whole.
High frequency points manifest over and
over again across a large group of patients with
a wide range of complaints. These points
appear to play a valuable role in supporting an
individual’s entire meridian system overall,
although they can also be key locations for
treating local conditions as well.
Essential frequency points show up so often
and in such a wide variety of patients with a
broad range of conditions that they appear
necessary for supporting the core strength and
balance required by most individuals. Many of
these points are those already defined by
classical Chinese medicine as being broad in
their effect and common in their need for
treatment.
It is important to emphasize that the last two
categories (of both high and essential
frequency) are the most frequently treated
under the widest range of conditions and on the
largest group of patients. The first three
categories of slight, low and moderate
frequency generally appear far less commonly
than the last two classifications. To reiterate,
this does not mean that these less frequently
treated points are any less important, because
for the patient who needs them, these are the
most important points, regardless of how often
they appear in the patient population.
All in all, these five classifications may be, in
most cases, most of what a practitioner needs
to effectively address any condition with
acupuncture, other than when points are
primarily local in their effect and not systemic
throughout the meridian system. This will further
allow the practitioner to determine in a clear
and logical manner which points to treat and,
perhaps just as importantly, which to leave
alone, during any particular session, as based
on the results of energetic findings for each
patient on the day of treatment.
Chapter IV overview
The following chapter presents many well-
known as well as more obscure points of
acupuncture, including their average frequency
of treatment in everyday practice.
Accompanying photographic images show not
only exact point locations but also examples of
their range of influence on various regions of the
physical anatomy. In addition, EMI charts,
included in many point descriptions, represent
typical findings that might indicate the points’
need for treatment.
For clarity, the meridians are shown in their
own elemental color, as are the specific points
on the meridians themselves (black is used
when no element is involved). This method of
marking the points offers a clear way for
understanding the significance of each point
within the Five Elements of the meridian system
as a whole. For example, in the case of Ht-3,
the Heart meridian is shown in red, representing
the Fire element, and the point number appears
in blue, referring to the Water element on the
Heart channel.
The Bladder Association and Pulse points
are colored according to their associated
organs, and not to the element of the points
themselves, as they are not part of the Five
Element system.
When specifically referring to meridians, the
names are usually capitalized, and when
referring to the organs themselves, they
typically appear in lower case (such as the
Lung channel vs. the lung as an organ).
To emphasize the significant properties of
each point, such properties are shown in bold,
such as Water, Tonification or Jing-Well
point when related to the meridians themselves.
This also includes the listings for Command,
Master, Coupled and Association points
when their influence extends beyond just the
named meridians.
I – Heart meridian
Ht-3
– is the Water and Sea point on
the Heart meridian. As such, it is able to draw
excess energy from the Kidney meridian into
the Heart channel. It can be wonderfully
strengthening for the heart, especially when the
Heart meridian is deficient and the Kidney is
excess.1
Ht-5
– is a Ma Dan-Yang point and the
great Luo point for the Heart channel. It is
typically treated either when the left and right
Heart meridians are split, or else when the
Heart is deficient and the Small Intestine is
excess. As a Luo point on a yin meridian, this
point can have a profound emotional effect in
releasing heartache and resentment. Since it
neither specifically stimulates nor sedates, it can
often be a safe choice when treating severe
conditions of the heart.
Ht-7
– is the Earth, Source, Sedation and
Stream point for the Heart meridian. As the
Sedation point, it is ideally suited for treating all
conditions of excess in the Heart meridian,
especially when the Spleen is also deficient. As
the Source point, it may presumably treat either
excess or deficiency of the Heart channel, but
in actual practice it is rarely the primary point
for balancing deficiency itself.2
Ht-8
– is the Fire, Horary and Spring point
for the Heart meridian, and is typically used to
treat severe imbalances within the heart. As the
Fire point, it commonly affects such conditions
as inflammation in the heart itself, and can also
be a wonderful point whenever there is severe
emotional stress affecting this vital organ.
Ht-9
– is the Wood, Tonification, Exit
and Jing-Well point for the Heart meridian. It
can therefore be used to treat all conditions of
deficiency in the Heart, especially when the
Liver meridian is also excess. However, both
excess and severe deficiency in this important
organ often present similar symptoms, and it is
therefore essential to perform an objective EMI
evaluation so that either stimulation or sedation
may be appropriately applied. As the Jing-Well
point, Ht-9 can have a rapid and profound
effect on the heart, not only physically but
emotionally as well. As the Exit point, this
location opens the energy of the Heart meridian
to flow into the Small Intestine channel.3
II – Small Intestine meridian
Si-1
– is the Metal, Jing-Well and Entry
point for the Small Intestine meridian, which
can have an immediate and powerful effect on
the small intestine itself. Its most common use,
however, may be in treating conditions at the
opposite end of the channel, in the region of the
ear, cheek and side of the face. As the Entry
point, it opens the Small Intestine meridian to
receive the energy from the Heart channel.
Si-3
– is the Wood, Tonification and
Stream point for the Small Intestine meridian,
but more importantly, the Master point for
the Governor vessel and Coupled point for
the Yang Heel vessel.
As the Tonification point, it is ideally suited to
treat deficiency in the Small Intestine meridian,
particularly when the Gallbladder is in excess.
As the Master Point for the Governor vessel,
Si-3 is used over and over again, along with its
paired point, Bl62, to treat all types of
conditions pertaining to the spinal column,
extending from the tailbone, up the back and
neck, over the top of the cranium and into the
face. As the Coupled point for the Yang Heel
vessel, it is also used to treat conditions of the
lateral leg as well as the head and brain.
Whenever there is a trauma that affects the
brain and spinal cord, either from physical
injury or emotional stress, the use of this
valuable point might be considered.
As the Stream point, Si-3 can also be used
to treat symptoms at the opposite end of the
meridian, typically on the throat and face.4
Si-4
– is the Source point for the Small
Intestine meridian, and therefore the diagnostic
point when using EMI. As the Source point, it
is able to treat all conditions of the Small
Intestine meridian, both excess and deficient.

Si-7
– is the Luo point for the Small Intestine
meridian, closely associated with its paired
channel, the Heart. This point can be used to
treat splits between the left and right Small
Intestine meridians, and is also a key point
when the Heart meridian is excess and the
Small Intestine is deficient. As the Luo point
connected with the Heart, it can have a
profound effect not only physically but
emotionally as well, combating feelings of
sadness and despair.5
Si-19
– is the Exit point for the Small Intestine
meridian located immediately anterior to the
ear. It is therefore commonly used to treat
many conditions of the internal and external
portions of this sense organ, and is often used
to relieve ear infections in children. As with all
potentially sensitive points on the face, it is
advantageous in this case to have the pain-free
option of using laser in place of the more
traditional needle treatment. As the Exit point,
Si-19 opens the Small Intestine meridian to
flow into the Bladder channel.
III – Bladder meridian
Bl-1
located at the inner canthus of the eye, is the
Entry point for the Bladder meridian, important
for treating all conditions of the eye itself. Due
to the sensitivity of this region, laser treatment is
an excellent option in this case. As the Entry
point, Bl-1 opens the Bladder meridian to
receive the energy from the Small Intestine
channel.
Bl-2
– located at the inner eyebrow, is an
excellent local point for treating conditions of
the face and forehead region. It may relieve
symptoms caused by either physical
disturbance or emotional stress that affect the
face, head or frontal cortex of the brain.
Bl-3
– located at the hairline on the forehead,
is a very good point for addressing conditions
of the face and head, often brought about by
mental stress which may also affect the brain
itself.
Bl-10
– located on the upper neck, is a
powerful point for treating a wide range of
conditions that may affect the neck, head and
face. It is commonly used when physical
symptoms are present in this area, or when
emotional trauma has caused an energetic split
between the head and the rest of the body, the
neck being the link between the two.
Bl-11
– is the Influential point for bone, and
can potentially be used to benefit any condition
within the osseous structures of the whole
body. However, because of the broadness of
this point’s scope, its effect is general rather
than specific, and appears to have no focused
action on any part of the anatomy other than
the upper back and shoulder region where the
point itself is located.
Bl-13
– is the Association point for the lung,
able to balance the lungs, whether excess or
deficient, and to alleviate conditions of the nasal
area. As with all Association points, other than
Bl-28 which is found on its own meridian, the
Lung Association point is said to influence its
corresponding organ, but to have little if any
influence on the meridian itself. Emotionally,
feelings of grief, often affecting the lungs, can be
relieved by treating this point.
Bl-14
– is the Association point for the
pericardium, able to influence a vast array of
internal organs, including the reproductive,
nervous and vascular systems, as well as the
adrenals, pericardium and heart. As a rule, the
organs and glands associated with the
pericardium tend to show imbalance before the
body allows the heart itself to become
disturbed (due not only to physical affliction but
also emotional shock and trauma). Bl-14 can
be used as a general treatment for the
pericardium itself and its protected organs,
whether excess or deficient.

Bl-15
– is the Association point for the heart,
used to influence the heart itself, either excess
or deficient, regardless of whether the cause is
physical or emotional. Treatment of this point
may relieve feelings of resentment, often
underlying any disturbance of this vital organ.
Bl-16
– is the Association point for the
Governor vessel, said to benefit this central
channel, whether excess or deficient.
Bl-17
– is the Influential point for the blood,
said to influence all conditions affecting or
related to the blood itself.
Bl-18
– is the Association point for the
liver, influencing all conditions of this organ,
whether excess or deficient. In clinical practice
this is a common point for treatment, not only
because of the exposure of the liver to various
forms of toxicity, but also because of anger and
resentment which may damage the liver as well.
Conditions of the eyes, often directly connected
to the liver itself, may also be benefited by this
important point.
Bl-19
– is the Association Point for the
gallbladder, influencing all conditions of the
gallbladder itself, whether excess or deficient.
Apart from physical symptoms, retained
emotions such as resentment may also lead to
disturbance of this point.

Bl-20
– is the Association Point for the
spleen, commonly found active in a wide range
of patients. This point can help balance either
over-active or under-active conditions of both
the spleen and its companion organ, the
pancreas, both of which are located on this
meridian. Emotions of worry and anxiety about
the future may also find relief through treatment
of this point, as well as conditions of the mouth,
which is associated with this meridian.
Bl-21
– is the Association point for the
stomach, used to influence both excess and
deficient conditions of the stomach itself.
Besides its physiological influence, this point
can also be useful for relieving feelings of
disappointment, which often lead to disturbance
of this organ.
Bl-22
– is the Association point for the
Triple Heater, used to balance both excess
and deficient conditions of the pituitary and
thyroid, the two endocrine glands most closely
associated with this channel. Considering that
these two glands are primary regulators of the
body’s physical metabolism, as well as relate to
feelings of hope and optimism, treatment of this
point may help to overcome pessimism and
discouragement, along with assisting physically
in regaining metabolic balance.
Bl-23
– is the Association point for the
kidneys, probably the most frequently treated
of all Association points. Used to balance
conditions of both excess and deficiency in the
kidneys themselves, this point is able to
influence both kidney physiological function as
well as feelings of fear and sexual insecurity that
may underlie their disturbance. Conditions
related to the ears may also find improvement
through treatment of this point.
Bl-25
– is the Association point for the large
intestine, used to affect either excess or
deficient conditions within the colon itself.
Besides improving the physiological function of
the colon, feelings of guilt and unworthiness
may also find relief through treatment of this
point.
Bl-26
is often helpful in the treatment of low back
conditions.
Bl-27
– is the Association point for the small
intestine, and can be used to treat both excess
and deficient disorders of the small intestine
itself. Various physiological imbalances, as well
as underlying emotional conditions such as
sadness, may both be benefited through
treatment of this point.
Bl-28
– is the Association point for the
bladder, and the only Association point
located on its own meridian. Besides
addressing conditions within the bladder itself,
this point may also alleviate feelings of
restlessness and impatience, the emotions
related to the bladder.
Bl-31 to 34
are used primarily for affecting the lumbar
and sacral regions of the spine.

Bl-40
– is the Earth and Sea point, a Ma
Dan-Yang point, and the Command point for
the lower back. This location is commonly
used to treat various conditions of the spine,
particularly pain in the lower back region, for
which it is often the primary point. As the Earth
and Sea point, it is also said to influence the
digestion as well.

Bl-57
– is a Ma Dan-Yang point, commonly
used for treating conditions of the spine, ranging
from the neck to the lower back.
Bl-58
– is the Luo point for the Bladder
meridian, a prime location for treating
conditions of the spine, extending all the way
from the neck to the lower back. Being the Luo
point, Bl-58 is often most effective when the
Kidney meridian is excess and the Bladder is
deficient, or when there is a split between the
left and right-sided Bladder meridians.
Not only disturbance of either the meridian
or its related organ, but also emotional states of
fear, restlessness and impatience, may be
alleviated by treating this point.6
Bl-60
– is a Ma Dan-Yang point, and the
Fire and River point on the Bladder meridian,
used to treat inflammation in the bladder itself,
as well as conditions found along the length of
the channel. Being located on the foot, it also
influences the opposite end of the meridian,
including the head, neck and face.*
*Caution: Bl-60 should not be treated
during pregnancy.

Bl-62
– is the Master point for the Yang
Heel vessel and the Coupled point for the
Governor vessel, with a powerful influence on
the brain, spine and legs. Often treated with its
paired point Si-3, it is commonly used to
realign one’s spirit with the physical body, thus
the designation Ghost point. Being located on
the foot, it can powerfully influence the head
and brain at the opposite end of the meridian.
Bl-63
– is the Accumulation point for
the Bladder meridian, used to affect severe
conditions of the bladder itself as well as of the
Bladder channel. This includes conditions of the
legs along with symptoms in the lower, mid and
upper back, and even those extending all the
way to the head, neck and face. Being located
on the foot, this point holds a powerful
influence over the head and face region.

Bl-64
– is the Source point and thus the
diagnostic EMI point for the Bladder meridian,
used to treat all conditions, both excess and
deficient, in the bladder, and especially in the
Bladder channel itself. Powerfully influencing
conditions of the legs and hips, as well as the
entire neck and back region, this point exerts
considerable influence on the opposite end of
the channel, specifically the head and face.
Bl-65
– is the Wood, Sedation and
Stream point for the Bladder meridian, used to
treat any condition of surplus in this channel,
especially when the Gallbladder is also
deficient. As the Stream point located on the
foot, it also wields considerable influence over
much of the head and face, located at the
opposite end of the meridian.
Bl-66
– is the Water, Horary and Spring
point for the Bladder meridian, used to treat
both excess and deficient conditions in this
channel. As the Spring point, it is particularly
effective for treating inflammatory conditions at
the opposite end of the meridian, especially the
region of the forehead, eyes and nose.
Although said to be most effective between
3:00 pm and 5:00 pm, in clinical practice the
time of day is far less important than treating
this point regardless, whenever possible.

Bl-67
– is the Metal, Tonification and
Jing-Well point for the Bladder meridian, used
to treat any condition of deficiency in this
channel, especially when the large intestine is
also excess. As the Jing-Well point, it can be
used to quickly affect conditions of not only the
bladder, but also of the meridian itself,
especially when those symptoms are present at
the opposite end of the channel, on the face.
Emotionally, feelings of restlessness and
impatience may irritate the nervous system,
affecting the spinal region and brain, all of
which may be helped through treatment of this
point. As the Exit point, Bl-67 opens the
energy of the Bladder meridian to flow into the
Kidney channel.*
*Caution: Bl-67 should not be treated
during pregnancy.7
IV – Kidney meridian
Kd-1
– is the Wood, Sedation,
Entry and Jing-Well point for the Kidney
meridian, used to treat all conditions of excess
in both the kidneys and their channel, especially
whenever there is a deficiency in the Liver
meridian as well. This is one of the great points
of acupuncture, often used to restore vitality
whenever there is a collapse of energy
throughout the meridian system as a whole.
Kd-1 is a primary grounding point in
acupuncture, since it is the only acupoint that
touches the ground while a person is standing.
As such, it is commonly used to relieve
restlessness and fear, and thus to restore
feelings of being emotionally grounded and at
peace.
As this point is especially sensitive to needle
therapy, many patients prefer it be treated with
laser, a highly effective therapeutic method
when used correctly and for a sufficient amount
of time. As the Entry point for the Kidney
meridian located on the bottom of the foot, it
also helps the system to get recharged by the
various energetics of the earth. Kd-1 helps the
body to be electromagnetically regenerated,
and the mind to regain its steadiness and clarity.
As the Jing-Well point, Kd-1 is especially
effective for addressing conditions at the
opposite end of the meridian, located in the
upper chest, specifically in the heart and lung
region. Emotionally, this point holds a profound
influence whenever feelings of fear and sexual
insecurity have caused a disruption in the
kidneys themselves.
As the Entry point, this site opens the Kidney
meridian to receive the vitality from the Bladder
channel.
Kd-2
– is the Fire and Spring point for the
Kidney meridian, typically used to address
conditions of inflammation, both in the kidneys
themselves as well as along the channel. This is
especially true when the disturbance is located
either at the opposite end of the meridian in the
chest area, or in the kidneys themselves.
As the Fire point, this is also a location to
consider whenever the Kidney meridian is
excess and either the Heart or Pericardium
meridians are deficient.8
Kd-3
– is the Earth, Source and
Stream point for the Kidney meridian,
effectively used to treat all conditions, both
excess and deficient, of the kidneys and the
meridian itself. As the Stream point, it is
particularly valuable in treating symptoms
located at the opposite end of the channel, in
the chest.
As an Earth point, Kd-3 is especially potent
for re-grounding, and thus is highly effective for
treating energetic collapse in the meridian
system as a whole. Being the Earth point on the
Kidney meridian, it is also excellent whenever
the Kidney meridian is deficient and the Spleen
is excess.
Kd-4
– is the Luo point for the Kidney
meridian, useful for treating many physical and
emotional conditions associated with the
kidneys, particularly those brought on by fear
and sexual insecurity.
Being the Luo point, Kd-4 is highly effective
whenever the Kidney meridian is deficient and
the Bladder is excess. It is also often the first
point to consider whenever the Kidney
meridians on the left and right sides are
significantly unequal.
Being located near Kd-3, this point is easy
to overlook in favor of its more popular
neighbor, but in the situations mentioned above
this may be the preferred location for
treatment.9
Kd-5
– is the Accumulation point for the
Kidney meridian, used whenever there is a
severe imbalance within the kidneys or the
channel itself. As with Kd-4 above, it is easy to
overlook this point in favor of Kd-3, the better-
known Source point, but on occasion Kd-5
may be a valuable location to treat.
Kd-6
– is the Master point for the Yin
Heel Vessel and Coupled point for the
Conception vessel, and one of the great
points for affecting symptoms along the anterior
midline of the torso. Its influence also includes
the medial portion of the legs and extends into
the chest region.
This point is often treated along with its
coupled point Lu-7, the Luo point for the Lung.
In fact, splits in the Lung meridian, as revealed
through EMI, may be the single most important
indicator that the Conception vessel, as well as
the Yin Heel vessel, both need treatment.
Kd-7
– is the Metal, Tonification and
River point for the Kidney meridian, used
whenever there is deficiency in the Kidney
channel, especially whenever the Lung is also in
excess. In the author’s experience, this point
shows a need for treatment far less frequently
than the Sedating point for the Kidney, Kd-1.10
Kd-22
is the Exit point for the Kidney meridian,
allowing the Chi to move from the Kidney into
the Pericardium channel. In clinical practice this
point shows less frequent need for treatment
than the last point on the meridian, Kd-27. Kd-
22 appears to be more relevant for addressing
conditions of the lungs rather than for treating
the kidneys themselves.
Kd-23 to 26
– are local points used primarily to treat
conditions in the chest, generally related to the
lung and heart region.
Kd-27
– known as the Home of the
Association points, is said to affect all of the
Association points found along the back on the
Bladder channel, and to reset the circuit
breakers of the meridian system as a whole. It
has been classically used in Applied
Kinesiology for testing the energetic balance
between the left and right sides of the body.
This point may require treatment in conditions
of emotional stress brought about by fear and
insecurity, as well as by physiological
disturbances associated with the kidneys
themselves.
V – Pericardium meridian
Cx-1
– is the Entry point for the Pericardium
meridian, commonly treated to allow energy
from the Kidney meridian to enter the
Pericardium channel.

Cx-3
– is the Water and Sea point for the
Pericardium meridian, typically treated when
the Pericardium channel is deficient and the
Kidney is excess. This can be an excellent point
for handling symptoms of both hormonal
imbalance and adrenal fatigue, as well as for
supporting the nervous system and heart
itself.11
Cx-4
– is the Accumulation point for
the Pericardium meridian, and one of the great
points for treating severe imbalance in the
pericardium itself. Not only physiological
disturbance but also severe emotional shock
and trauma can lead to imbalance in both the
pericardium and the autonomic nervous system.
This, in turn, may affect the adrenals, brain,
vascular and hormonal systems, and eventually
the heart itself. Cx-4 can be used to treat both
excess and deficiency of the pericardium.

Cx-5
– is the Metal and River point
(sometimes known as Arm 3 Yin) for the
pericardium meridian, linking together the three
yin channels of the arm. It plays an important
role in allowing the three vital meridians of the
Heart, Pericardium and Lung to share their
energy amongst them. Often known as the
second Luo point of the Pericardium, this
powerful point affects not only the heart and
lungs, but also the nervous system and
adrenals, as well as both the male and female
reproductive systems.12

Cx-6
– is the Luo point for the
Pericardium meridian, the Command point for
the chest, and the Master point for the Yin
Linking vessel. It is one of the truly great
points of acupuncture, and is frequently in need
of treatment.
Said to influence all the yin organs and the
deepest-seated energies of the body, this point
also serves as the Coupled point for the
Penetrating vessel. Therefore, Cx-6 and its
Coupled point Sp-4 (Master point for the
Penetrating vessel) are often treated as a pair.
Splits in either the Pericardium or Spleen
meridians, as revealed through EMI, often
serve as the primary indicators of imbalance in
both the Yin Linking and Penetrating vessels. In
fact, if both the Pericardium and Spleen
meridians show splits, it is almost a certain
indicator of significant imbalance in not just
these channels themselves but also in the
above-mentioned Extraordinary vessels as well.
Being the Luo point, Cx-6 is especially useful
whenever the Triple Heater meridian is excess
and the Pericardium is deficient, or whenever
there is a split between the left and right
Pericardium meridians. Being the Command
point for the chest, this is a point to seriously
consider whenever there are conditions
affecting the upper torso, particularly the heart
and lung area.
Because of the close association of both the
Pericardium and Spleen meridians to the
reproductive system (especially female), and
the Penetrating vessel’s association with the
reproductive organs as well, Cx-6 has a
uniquely powerful influence on this essential
portion of the male and female anatomy,
perhaps equaled only by Sp-6 found on the leg.

Cx-7
– is the Earth, Sedation, Source and
Stream point for the Pericardium meridian,
frequently used whenever the Pericardium is
excess, especially when the Spleen channel is
also deficient.
As the Source point (and therefore the
diagnostic point when using EMI), this location
is sometimes said to be effective in addressing
both meridian excess and deficiency, although
in practice it is nearly always used to treat
excess and almost never deficiency itself.
Cx-7 can also be employed to help realign
the spirit with the physical body, a disturbance
which may result from severe physical or
emotional upset and trauma.13
Cx-8
– is the Fire, Horary and Spring point
for the Pericardium meridian, and an important
location for treating either excess or deficiency
in the pericardium, often resulting from severe
physical or emotional upheaval or injury. It is
far less important to treat this point during its
classical horary period of 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm,
compared to simply addressing it whenever
necessary.
Cx-8 can be valuable for restoring balance
following collapse of Chi in the entire meridian
system, as well as for realigning the spirit with
the physical body. This point is often useful in
reawakening the very will to live, which may be
lost following deeply disturbing physical or
emotional shock and trauma.
Also, as the Exit point, where energy flows
from the Pericardium meridian into the Triple
Heater, this can be an important location to
restore the connection between these two
profoundly important channels.
As the Fire point, Cx-8 can also be highly
effective in treating any condition of
inflammation in the pericardium itself or in the
chest region in general.
Cx-9
– is the Wood, Tonification and
Jing-Well point for the Pericardium meridian,
and the first site to consider when treating any
deficiency of the Pericardium, especially
whenever the Liver channel is also excess.
As the Jing-Well point, this location can be
particularly effective in bringing about rapid
changes in the pericardium itself, as well as in
affecting the chest region in general at the
opposite end of the channel. Also, as the Jing-
Well point on a yin meridian, and specifically on
the channel which is the protector of the heart,
Cx-9 can have a powerful influence in relieving
emotional shock and trauma.
This point also has a strong physical effect in
supporting the reproductive, vascular and
nervous systems, as well as the adrenal glands.
It is sometimes called the Stroke point,
because of its both therapeutic and preventative
influence on the vascular system as a whole.14
VI – Triple Heater meridian
Tw-1
– is the Metal, Entry and Jing-Well
point for the Triple Heater meridian, particularly
useful for treating conditions at the opposite
end of the channel, such as the side of the head
and face. As the Entry point, it opens the Triple
Heater meridian to receive the Chi from the
Pericardium channel.

Tw-3
– is the Wood, Tonification and Stream
point for the Triple Heater meridian, and one of
the points to consider for treating deficiency in
the Triple Heater itself, particularly when the
Gallbladder channel is also in excess.
Tw-4
– is the Source point for the Triple Heater
meridian (and thus the EMI diagnostic point),
utilized for treating both excess and deficient
conditions of the Triple Heater channel itself.
Tw-5
– is both the Luo point for the
Triple Heater meridian and the Master Point
for the Yang Linking vessel, serving as one
of the great points of acupuncture.
As the Luo point, it is the first location to
consider whenever the Pericardium meridian is
excess and the Triple Heater is deficient. It is
also a primary point whenever there is a
significant split between the left and right Triple
Heater channels.
Being the Master point for the Yang Linking
vessel, it is also the Coupled point for the
Belt meridian. Therefore, splits in the Triple
Heater, as assessed by EMI, are often a
primary indicator of imbalance in both the Yang
Linking and Belt meridians. As is often the case
when treating paired Extraordinary vessels,
whenever Tw-5 shows out of balance, it is
important to also consider its Couple point,
Gb-41. Together, these two points powerfully
influence the complete exterior energy of the
body, known classically as the Wei-Chi. This
includes the body’s entire defense system
against external pathogens, as well as much of
the health of the musculo-skeletal system in
general.15
Tw-6
– is the Fire, Horary and River
point for the Triple Heater meridian, typically
treated whenever there is an imbalance, either
of excess or deficiency, in the Triple Heater
channel itself. When this point shows active, it
is more important to simply treat it whenever
possible, rather than waiting for its horary
period of 9:00 pm to 11:00 pm.
Tw-8
– sometimes known as Arm 3
Yang, joins together the three yang meridians of
the arm, namely the Large Intestine, Small
Intestine and Triple Heater, allowing them to
share their energy with one another. This is a
powerful point for affecting conditions on the
posterior-lateral region of the arm, shoulder
and neck, as well as on the side of the head
and face.16
Tw-23
– is the last point on the Triple Heater
meridian (although not the Exit point), useful for
treating conditions on the side of the head,
especially near the eye and temple. It also
appears to be useful for opening the Chi of the
Triple Heater so that it may flow into the
Gallbladder channel.
VII – Gallbladder meridian
Gb-1
– is the Entry point for the Gallbladder
meridian, typically used for treating conditions
on the side of the head, particularly near the
eye and temple (similar to Tw-23 located
immediately above it). This point is useful for
opening the Gallbladder meridian to receive the
vitality from the Triple Heater channel.
Gb-8
– is sometimes used to treat portions of
the head and brain located superior to the ear.
Gb-13
is said to affect the musculo-tendeno portion
of the three yang meridians of the arm, namely
the Large Intestine, Small Intestine and Triple
Heater.
Gb-14
– is sometimes used to improve both
physical and emotional conditions affecting the
forehead and frontal cortex region of the brain.

Gb-20
– is a great point for treating all types of
conditions, both physical and emotional, that
may be affecting the head and neck area.
Gb-21
– can be useful for treating conditions of
the shoulder and neck, its influence extending
into the occipital region.
Gb-22
is said to treat the musculo-tendeno portion
of the three yin meridians of the arm, namely
the Lung, Pericardium and Heart.
Gb-24
– is the Alarm point for the
gallbladder, effective for treating both excess
and deficient conditions of this organ. Similar in
many ways to the gallbladder Association
point, the Alarm point is particularly effective
for treating the gallbladder itself, although (as it
is located on its own meridian), it is also helpful
in treating the Gallbladder channel as well.
It is also important to remember that the
gallbladder is notorious for producing difficult
to diagnose symptoms such as headaches and
pain in the legs, hips, back, shoulders and neck
regions, which may or may not occur along
with the traditional right-sided subcostal pain.

Gb-25
– is the Alarm point for the
kidney, useful for treating both excess and
deficient conditions of the kidneys themselves,
as well as of the adrenal glands, physically
located atop each kidney. As with the
Association point, the kidney Alarm point may
also be useful for releasing emotions of fear and
sexual insecurity, as well as for conditions
occurring in the kidney-associated sense organ,
the ears.

Gb-26
is sometimes used to benefit the reproductive
organs, particularly when promoting the
menstrual period in women.*
*Caution: Gb-26 should not be treated
during pregnancy.
Gb-30
– is a Ma Dan-Yang point, considered
an essential location for treating many
conditions of the hips and lower back. It can
also be employed whenever there is collapse of
the vitality in the meridian system as a whole.
Gb-34
– is the Earth and Sea point for
the Gallbladder meridian, and also both a Ma
Dan-Yang point and the Influential point for
sinews. Treating this point generally benefits
the ligamentous tissues throughout the body,
especially when the symptoms are present on
the lateral leg and foreleg. As the Earth point on
the Gallbladder meridian, it is also particularly
helpful for treating disturbances of the digestive
system, especially when associated with the
gallbladder itself.
Gb-36
– is the Accumulation point for the
Gallbladder meridian, occasionally used
whenever there is an extreme imbalance in
either the channel or in the gallbladder itself.
Gb-37
– is the Luo point for the
Gallbladder meridian, used whenever there is a
split between its left and right sides, or
whenever the Gallbladder is deficient and the
Liver channel is excess.
This is also a common point for benefiting
any condition occurring along the lateral side of
the body, a region extending along the leg, hip,
sacrum, back, shoulder and neck, up to the
side of the head. As the Luo point, although on
a yang meridian, Gb-37 can also be effective in
addressing emotional issues of the gallbladder,
particularly anger with a desire for revenge.17
Gb-39
– is the Influential point for
marrow, sometimes called Leg 3 Yang, and
often an important site for treating the brain
itself. As a valuable point connecting the three
yang meridians of the leg, namely the Bladder,
Gallbladder and Stomach, it can be highly
effective for allowing these three channels to
share their energy amongst them.
This is also a common point for treating
musculo-skeletal conditions occurring
anywhere along the lateral portion of the body
(including the leg, hip, torso and back, and
extending through the shoulder, neck and head
regions as well).18
Gb-40
– is the Source point for the
Gallbladder meridian, also known by some as
Amaro’s point, based on the clinical
experience of Dr. Amaro, who found it
repeatedly useful for treating many conditions
along the channel itself. As with several other
Source points located on yang meridians, Gb-
40 is particularly effective for addressing
musculo-skeletal conditions, in this case
symptoms extending all the way from the foot
to the head. Whether the meridian itself is
excess or deficient, this point may help relieve
conditions anywhere along the lateral portion of
the body.
Gb-41
– is the Wood, Horary,
Stream and Exit point for the Gallbladder
meridian, as well as the Master point for the
Belt meridian, and yet another one of the
great points of acupuncture.
As the Wood and therefore Horary point, it
strongly influences the Liver channel, and thus
benefits the health of ligaments, tendons,
cartilage and discs throughout the body. As the
Stream point, Gb-41 powerfully affects the
opposite end of its meridian, especially the
lateral portion of the head and face.
Being the Exit point, it conducts the Chi from
the Gallbladder into the Liver channel.
Although important for many reasons, Gb-
41really excels as the Master point for the Belt
meridian, and thus as the Coupled point for
the Yang Linking vessel. The Belt meridian is
the only channel running horizontally around the
body, extending from the lower back and
dipping down anteriorly to enter the lower
pelvis. It thus links together all of the meridians
running up and down the torso, and has a
powerful influence both on the lower back itself
as well as the on pelvic region in general.
Being the Coupled point for the Yang Linking
vessel, Gb-41 powerfully influences the entire
exterior energy, or Wei-Chi, of the body as a
whole. This point is commonly treated along
with Tw-5, and indeed, splits in the Triple
Heater meridian, as evaluated by EMI, may
indicate not only imbalance in the Triple Heater
itself, but also in the Yang Linking vessel and
Belt meridian as well.

Gb-43
– is the Water, Tonification and
Spring point for the Gallbladder meridian, and
the primary location to consider whenever the
Gallbladder is deficient, especially when the
Bladder channel is also in excess.
As the Spring point, Gb-43 is often used to
treat conditions at the opposite end of the
channel, especially near the ear, temple, eye
and side of the face, particularly whenever
there is inflammation involved.19
Gb-44
– is the Metal and Jing-Well point for
the Gallbladder meridian, typically used to bring
rapid balance to both the Gallbladder channel
and the organ itself. It may also be beneficial in
addressing emotional issues affecting the
gallbladder, such as feelings of anger and
resentment. It can be particularly helpful for
relieving conditions at the far opposite end of
the meridian, including the side of the head, eye
and temple region.
VIII – Liver meridian
Lv-1
– is the Wood, Horary, Jing-Well
and Entry point for the Liver meridian, highly
influential in addressing conditions of the
reproductive system in both men and women.
Although it is the Horary point, classically
treated in the early morning between 1:00 am
and 3:00 am, it is far more important to simply
treat this point whenever the situation allows.
As the Jing-Well point on a yin meridian, Lv-
1 can also be highly effective for relieving anger,
the primary emotion associated with the liver.
As the Entry point, it opens the Liver to
receive the Chi from the Gallbladder channel.
Lv-2
– is the Fire, Sedation and
Spring point for the Liver meridian, and a
primary point to consider whenever the Liver is
excess, especially when either the Heart or
Pericardium channels are also deficient.
As the Spring point, Lv-2 exerts an influence
that extends to the opposite end of the channel,
even including the face and head.
This point may also benefit conditions where
pent-up anger is a significant cause of the
meridian excess.
Lv-3
– is the Earth, Source and
Stream point for the Liver meridian and a Ma
Dan-Yang point as well, serving as one of the
great points of acupuncture. It is commonly
used to treat all conditions, whether excess or
deficient, of both the Liver meridian and its
associated organ.
Besides benefiting all disorders of the liver, it
is also known as one of the Four Gates (two
gates being Lv-3 located on the left and right
foot, and the other two being Li-4 found on the
left and right web of the hand). Together these
points are used to free up stagnant energy, and
to address pain anywhere in the body. Lv-3
therefore has a profound effect on the entire
meridian system, offering not only numerous
physical benefits, but the emotional advantage
of releasing anger as well.
Lv-3 can also be considered whenever the
Liver meridian is excess and the Spleen channel
is deficient.
*Caution: Lv-3 should not be treated during
pregnancy.20

Lv-4
– is the Metal and River point for the
Liver meridian, and an excellent point to treat
whenever this meridian is deficient and the Lung
channel is excess.
Lv-5
– is the Luo point for the Liver
meridian, and the point of choice whenever the
Liver channels are split on the left and right
sides, or when the Liver is deficient and the
Gallbladder channel is excess. As the Luo point
located on a yin meridian, this point is closely
associated with feelings of anger, an emotional
aspect of the liver.
Lv-5 commonly shows up in conditions of
imbalance in the reproductive system, both
male and female. Although it can be highly
effective in clinical practice, in many cases it
probably suffers the fate of being somewhat
underutilized when addressing various
conditions of the liver itself.21
Lv-6
– is the Accumulation point for
the Liver meridian, and another potent location
for treating a wide range of conditions in both
the liver itself and the reproductive system in
general. Much like Lv-5, it may often remain
unrecognized and underutilized. However,
testing the meridians by running them with a
cold laser helps to reveal points such as this
one, giving them a much greater importance in
actual clinical use. Much like Sp-6 and Lv-5,
Lv-6 can have a profound effect on both the
male and female reproductive systems.
Lv-13
– is both the Alarm point for the
spleen and the Meeting or Influential point
for all yin organs, and a common point for
treating any condition, whether excess or
deficient, of the spleen itself. As the pancreas is
also energized by the Spleen meridian, it can be
benefitted by this point as well.
As the Influential point for all yin organs, Lv-
13 can have a positive influence on the lungs,
pericardium and heart, as well as on the
kidneys, liver and spleen.
Since all Alarm points can be affected by the
emotions associated with their correlated
organs (perhaps especially in the case of the yin
meridians), issues of worry and concern about
the future, as well as anger (since Lv-13 is
located on the Liver meridian), may also be
relieved through treatment of this point.

Lv-14
– is the Alarm and Exit point for the
Liver meridian, which acts as a circuit breaker
for the liver, and can be utilized for treating any
condition of either excess or deficiency within
the liver itself. Being located directly on the
Liver meridian, it can also be used to treat its
channel as well. As with other Alarm points
(perhaps especially those related to the yin
channels), addressing this point can alleviate
feelings of anger, the primary emotion related to
the liver.
Being the Exit point, treating this location
may also free the Chi to flow from the Liver
into the Lung channel.
IX – Lung meridian
Lu-1
– is the Entry and Alarm point for
the Lung meridian, and a circuit breaker for the
lung, used to treat any condition of the lungs
themselves, whether excess or deficient. Being
located on the Lung meridian, it can also be
used for treating this channel directly. As the
Entry point, Lu-1 opens the Lung meridian to
receive the Chi from the Liver channel.

Lu-5
– is the Water, Sedation and Sea point
for the Lung meridian, and often the point of
first choice whenever the Lung is excess,
especially when the Kidney channel is also
deficient. As the Water point, it is commonly
used to treat inflammation in the lungs
themselves.22
Lu-6
– is the Accumulation point for
the Lung meridian, often used to treat severe
conditions of the lungs, whether excess or
deficient. This point may be easily overlooked,
although it is often especially beneficial when
symptoms in the respiratory organs are more
extreme.
Lu-7
– is a vital point that occupies
a wide range of positions in the meridian
system. (1) It is both the Luo and Exit point
for the Lung meridian, (2) it serves as the
Command point for the neck, (3) it was
highly valued by the ancient practitioner Ma
Dan-Yang, and (4) it serves as the Master
point for the Conception vessel, all of which
together make it one of the great points of
acupuncture.
As the Luo point, it is the location of first
choice for treating splits between the left and
right Lung meridians, as well as whenever the
Lung is deficient and the Large Intestine
channel is also in excess.
As the Command point for the neck, it can
be used to treat any condition of the neck
region, and is one of the first points to consider
for any complaint related to this area.
As the Master point for the Conception
vessel, Lu-7 strongly affects conditions along
the anterior midline of the body (starting at the
mouth and chin and descending over the throat,
thyroid, thymus, heart and bronchial area, then
crossing the stomach, pancreas and intestines,
and eventually passing over the reproductive
and bladder region to finally end in the
perineum).
As the Coupled point for the Yin Heel
vessel, Lu-7 also influences the medial portion
of the leg, although its effect is particularly
strong in the abdomen and chest region. Lu-7 is
often treated along with Kd-6, and together
they govern both the Conception and Yin Heel
vessels.
Finally, as the Exit point, it is often treated to
allow the Chi to flow from the Lung into the
Large Intestine channel at another great point,
Li-4.
Lu-8
– is the Metal, Horary and River
point for the Lung meridian, directly associated
with the respiratory system, used to treat any
condition of the lungs, whether excess or
deficient. Although it is classically suggested to
treat this point between its horary hours of 3:00
am and 5:00 am, it is far more important to
address it whenever circumstances allow.

Lu-9
– is the Earth, Source, Tonification
and Stream point for the Lung meridian, as
well as the Influential point for vessels. It is
generally the first point to consider whenever
the Lung is deficient, especially when the
Spleen channel is also in excess.
As the Source point, Lu-9 is used when
charting the meridians with EMI. Also, as the
Source point on a yin meridian, it is thought to
help balance both excess and deficiency in the
lungs, although in actual practice, this point is
almost always used whenever there is a
deficiency, and not an excess.
As the Influential point, it deserves serious
consideration whenever the pulses in general
are weak, reflecting a lack of vitality in the
vessels.23
Lu-10
– is the Fire and Spring point for the
Lung meridian, often used to treat conditions at
the opposite end of the channel (especially in
the throat, lung and chest region), particularly if
inflammation is involved. Treatment of this point
may be especially effective whenever the Lung
is deficient and either the Heart or Pericardium
channels are excess.
Lu-11
– is the Wood and Jing-Well point for
the Lung meridian, commonly used to bring
about a rapid change in the lungs, whether
excess or deficient. It is also used to help
release grief, the primary emotion related to the
lungs.
Lu-11 is further used to help realign the spirit
with the physical body, often following either
physical or emotional trauma.
As the Well point, it is often employed for
influencing the opposite end of the channel,
particularly the throat, lung and chest area.
As the Wood point, this is a location to
consider whenever the Lung is excess and the
Liver channel is deficient.24
X – Large Intestine meridian
Li-1
– is the Metal, Jing-Well and Horary
point for the Large Intestine meridian, often
used to produce rapid changes in this channel.
As with any Well point, it often excels in
treating symptoms at the opposite end of the
meridian, specifically the mouth and nose
regions of the face. This point is also effective
for conditions caused by feelings of either guilt
or grief.
Li-2
– is the Water, Sedation and Spring
point for the Large Intestine meridian,
occasionally used to calm an excess in this
channel, especially when the Bladder is also
weak. As the Spring point on a yang meridian,
it is often used to affect conditions at the
opposite end of the channel, in this case the
face, particularly when inflammation is
involved.25
Li-3
– is the Wood and Stream point for
the Large Intestine meridian, typically used to
address conditions at the opposite end of the
channel, generally in the throat and face area.

Li-4
– is the Source and Entry
point for the Large Intestine meridian, as well
as a Ma Dan-Yang point and the Command
point for the face.
As the Source point, it is used in EMI for
evaluating the channel as a whole.
As a Command point, this is perhaps the
single-most important point to consider for any
condition of the face. This includes symptoms
located in the upper and lower jaws, the mouth
and lips, the cheeks, nose and eyes, as well as
all of the sinuses and throat region as well.
Since Li-4 is also one of the Four Gates
(along with Lv-3), this point is commonly
treated in cases of energy stagnation anywhere
in the body, and is one of the great points for
relieving pain, regardless of its source or
location. It is also a valuable site for realigning
the spirit with the physical body, as well as for
restoring the vitality.
As the Entry point, it receives the flow of Chi
from the Lung into the Large Intestine channel.*
*Caution: Li-4 should not be treated during
pregnancy.
Li-6
– is the Luo point for the Large
Intestine meridian, and often the first location to
consider whenever the left and right meridians
of the colon are split, or whenever the Large
Intestine is deficient and the Lung channel is
excess. As the Luo point, although on a yang
meridian, this location may also be considered
when addressing either grief or guilt, the
emotional afflictions associated with the
colon.26
Li-11
– is the Earth, Tonification
and Sea point for the Large Intestine meridian,
as well as a Ma Dan-Yang point, and often the
first location to consider whenever the Large
Intestine is deficient, especially when the
Stomach channel is also in excess.
Being both the Earth and Sea point for the
Colon meridian, Li-11 can be particularly
effective for supporting the digestive system as
a whole. At the same time, this is a powerful
point for addressing not only its associated
organ, but also the meridian as well, and is
often used in therapeutic practice for treating
conditions of the entire arm.
This location is commonly used in
conjunction with Li-4 for treating a wide range
of conditions occurring on the hand, arm,
shoulder, throat and face. In addition, it is a
powerful point for helping to realign the spirit
with the physical body, supporting the vitality in
general.
Li-20
– is the Exit point for the Large
Intestine meridian, particularly effective for
treating conditions of the nose, as well as any
other disorders of the face region in general. It
is one of the first locations to consider
whenever there is inflammation of the mucous
membranes in the nose and sinus region, or for
any other condition located in this area.
As the Exit point, Li-20 opens the energy of
the Large Intestine to flow into the Stomach
channel.
XI – Stomach meridian
St-1
is the Entry point for the Stomach meridian,
most typically used to treat various conditions
of the eyes. However, as it is located
immediately under the eyeball itself, it is more
convenient to use laser in favor of needles at
this delicate location. Sometimes it may even be
beneficial to treat either St-2 or St-3 instead,
both of which also have a powerful influence on
the eye and cheek.
As the Entry point, St-1 opens the Stomach
to receive the Chi from the Large Intestine
channel.
St-3
– is sometimes used to balance the
three Musculo-tendeno meridians of the leg,
namely the Bladder, Gallbladder and Stomach,
as well as for treating local conditions of the
face.
St-4, 5, 7
are points to effectively treat local conditions
of the face.
St-6
is sometimes used to help realign the spirit
with the physical body.
St-12
is an intersection point, sometimes used to
affect all of the yang meridians as they cross
through the clavicle region.
St-21, 23
– are powerful points to treat local
conditions of the abdomen and its internal
organs.
St-25
– is the Alarm point for the large
intestine, and one of the most powerful points
on the abdomen for treating any condition of
the colon itself, whether excess or deficient. It
also wields a considerable influence over the
small intestine and stomach, located in the same
area.
St-27, 29, 30
are points for treating local conditions of the
lower abdomen and pelvis.
St-34
is the Accumulation point for the Stomach
meridian, occasionally used to treat acute
conditions of the stomach itself.
St-35
is known as one of the miracle points of the
knee.
St-36
– is the Earth, Horary and
Sea point for the Stomach meridian, the
Command point for the abdomen and a Ma
Dan-Yang point as well. This is perhaps the
single-most treated point in acupuncture, most
likely to be included in the treatment of any
condition whatsoever.
St-36 is one of the primary points for
building the vitality and improving longevity. The
name Leg 3 Miles implies its profound effect
on maintaining healthy function of the legs, and
in this regard it has no equal.
As the Earth, Horary and Sea point, it is
without doubt one of the most powerful points
anywhere on the body for positively affecting
the digestion, and is usually included in any
treatment of digestive disorders in general.
As the Command point for the abdomen, St-
36 is almost invariably used to address any
condition in this region*.
*Caution: St-36 should not be treated
during pregnancy.
St-37
– is the lower He Sea point for the
large intestine, and one of the most powerful
and effective points for treating any condition of
the colon itself, whether excess or deficient.

St-39
– is the lower He Sea point for the
small intestine, and one of the most effective
points for treating any condition of the small
intestine itself, whether excess or deficient.

St-40
– is the Luo point for the Stomach
meridian, and the primary location for treating
splits between the left and right Stomach
meridians, as well as whenever the Stomach is
deficient and the Spleen channel is excess.
This is also a classic point for addressing
conditions of the mucous membranes of the
head, throat and respiratory areas.
As the Luo point, although on a yang
meridian, St-40 also helps relieve emotional
stress associated with the stomach, primarily
when brought on by feelings of worry or
disappointment.
St-41
– is the Fire, Tonification and River
point for the Stomach meridian, considered for
treatment whenever the Stomach is deficient,
particularly when either the Small Intestine or
Triple Heater channels are also in excess.27
St-42
is the Source and Exit point for the
Stomach meridian, used for charting the
Stomach channel with EMI. In actual practice,
its use is generally more diagnostic than
therapeutic.
St-44
– is the Water and Spring point
for the Stomach meridian, and a Ma Dan-
Yang point as well, often treated for conditions
located at the opposite end of the meridian,
especially in the face area. Perhaps because
there are so many sensory organs at the end of
this channel, including the eyes, nose and
mouth, not to mention the teeth and sinuses as
well, this is one of the great points of
acupuncture, unfortunately often underutilized in
clinical practice.
St-45
– is the Metal, Sedation and Jing-
Well point for the Stomach meridian, and
typically the first point to consider whenever
there is an excess in the Stomach meridian
itself, especially when the Large Intestine is
deficient as well.
As the Jing-Well point, St-45 is able to affect
both the meridian and its associated organ in a
swift manner. However, its primary use (similar
to St-44), often lies in treating conditions at the
opposite end of the channel, including the eyes,
nose, mouth, cheeks and sinuses.
Although on a yang meridian, this point may
wield some influence over the emotional
aspects of the stomach, such as feelings of
disappointment and worry.
XII – Spleen meridian
Sp-1
– is the Wood, Jing-Well and
Entry point for the Spleen meridian, often used
to treat conditions of the immune, digestive and
reproductive systems, as well as to help realign
the spirit with the physical body. It is associated
with both the pancreas and spleen, located on
this meridian. As the Wood point, it is often an
excellent choice for treatment whenever the
Spleen meridian is deficient and the Liver is
excess.
As the Wood point, Sp-1 holds a powerful
influence over the immune system, reproductive
organs and liver, and has some effect on the
digestive system as well.
As the Jing-Well point, it may also be used
for treating conditions at the opposite end of
the meridian, specifically the lateral portion of
the rib cage and the respiratory region in
general.
As the Jing-Well point located on a yin
meridian, Sp-1 can be used to address
emotional conditions associated with the
spleen, specifically feelings of worry and
concern about the future.
As the Entry point, Sp-1 opens the Spleen
meridian to receive the Chi from the Stomach
channel.28
Sp-2
– is the Fire, Tonification and Spring
point for the Spleen meridian, and one of the
points to consider whenever the Spleen is
deficient, especially when either the Heart or
Pericardium channels are excess as well. As the
Spring point, it can also be used for treating
symptoms at the opposite end of the meridian,
such as those in the chest and respiratory area.
Inflammatory conditions of the spleen may also
be addressed using this point.
Sp-3
– is the Earth, Horary, Source
and Stream point for the Spleen meridian, and
a powerful location for benefiting both the
digestive and immune systems. As the Earth
point on the Earth Spleen meridian, this is a
powerful point for strengthening and stabilizing
the digestive area, with a great capacity to
influence not only the pancreas and spleen, but
also their paired organ and meridian, the
stomach.
Although this is the Horary point, classically
best treated between the hours of 9:00 am and
11:00 am, it is far more important to treat it
whenever possible.
As the Source point, Sp-3 is used for
evaluating the Spleen channel using EMI.
Also, especially as the Source point on a yin
meridian, it can be used to treat any excess or
deficiency within the channel, as well as of the
spleen itself.
Sp-4
– is the Luo point for the
Spleen meridian, as well as the Master point
for the Penetrating vessel, and the first point
to consider when there is a split between the
left and right Spleen meridians, or whenever the
Spleen is deficient and the Stomach channel is
excess.
As the Luo point on a yin meridian, Sp-4 has
a powerful influence on the emotions associated
with the spleen, particularly worry and concern
about the future.
As the Master point for the Penetrating
vessel, and therefore the Coupled point for
the Yin Linking vessel, Sp-4 is often treated
together with its Coupled point Cx-6 to
influence both of these Extraordinary vessels.
Sp-4 exerts a strong effect over all internal
organs, especially the yin ones, and particularly
on both the pelvic and chest regions of the
body. It has a powerful influence on the
reproductive system and thus on the hormone
balance, extending its effect into the heart and
lungs along with strengthening the general
vitality as well.29
Sp-5
– is the Metal, Sedation and River
point for the Spleen meridian, and one of the
primary points to consider whenever the Spleen
is excess, especially when the Lung channel is
also deficient.
Sp-6
– sometimes known as Leg 3
Yin, is located where the three yin meridians of
the leg, namely the Kidney, Liver and Spleen,
all join together. Treatment of this key point
allows these three meridians to share their
combined energy.
Sp-6 is another one of the great points of
acupuncture, utilized to address a very wide
range of conditions. Its specialty, however, and
probably its most recognized purpose, lies in
supporting the female reproductive system, for
which it is almost invariably included in any
course of treatment. Its effect on the health of
the female organs, as well as on their hormone
production, is broad in its scope and powerful
in its influence. This point is often treated in
conjunction with other Master points, such as
St-36, Lv-3, Li-4 and Cx-6, all of which have
been proven over the centuries to exert a
profound influence not only on the hormonal
system but on the entire meridian system as a
whole.
Sp-6 is a highly effective point for restoring
balance and vitality to the body in general and
for rescuing the Chi from collapse.*
*Caution: this point should not be treated
during pregnancy.30
Sp-8
– is the Accumulation point for the
Spleen meridian, and a noteworthy site to
consider whenever there is a significant or even
acute imbalance in the spleen itself. Able to
treat both excess and deficiency, Sp-8 can be
easily overlooked, although it has the capacity
to address many conditions within the spleen.

Sp-9
– is the Water and Sea point for
the Spleen meridian, often used to address
problems caused by dietary indiscretion (such
as the excess consumption of cold, raw, sweet
and wet foods), sometimes leading to the
development of yeast-related conditions in the
body.
This point should especially be considered
whenever the Spleen is excess and the Kidney
channel deficient.
Sp-10
is occasionally used to support the immune
system.
Sp-15
can be used to support the digestive system
and the abdominal region in general.
Sp-21
– is the Exit point for the Spleen
meridian, also known as the Home of the Luo
Points, used to help restore balance to all the
meridians as a whole, especially those that are
yin. Therefore, treating this point supports the
kidneys, liver and spleen, as well as the lungs,
pericardium and heart. Located on the lateral
rib cage, Sp-21 is where the Chi exits the
Spleen to enter the Heart channel at the apex of
the armpit.
XIII – Governor vessel
Gv-1
– is the Entry point for the Governor
vessel, utilized to open this channel to receive
the Chi from the Conception vessel. This point
has a strong regulating function on the entire
spinal column and brain, wielding a profound
influence on the whole nervous system. Similar
to Gv-26, located near the opposite end of the
meridian, this point holds a strong influence
over the balance of the autonomic nervous
system (namely the equilibrium between the
sympathetic and parasympathetic systems).
Gv-1 is thought to be closely related to the
cauda equina, which lies within the spinal
column and extends from the lower back down
to the tailbone. Closely associated with the
adrenals, this tissue is thought to influence
balance within the autonomic nervous system as
a whole.
The disadvantage of this point is obviously its
location in close proximity to the reproductive
and elimination orifices. Because of this, many
practitioners prefer to treat the opposite end of
the meridian at Gv-26, located below the nose,
rather than Gv-1 directly.
On a more esoteric level, both Gv-1 and
Gv-26 (along with other Governor vessel
points) are believed to influence the subtle
energy channels of Ida and Pingala and the
central pranic energy channel of the Sushumna,
all directly associated with the chakras.
Because of its location at the tip of the coccyx,
this point also has a strong connection with the
Base chakra (associated with the color red),
representing both physical vitality and the urge
for survival.
Gv-3
– is a point for treating the spinal
column, with an emphasis on the lumbar region
in general.
Gv-4
– located at the level of the Kidney
Association point, is a powerful site for building
and maintaining vitality in the kidneys and
therefore in the body as a whole. It also wields
a potent influence on the entire spinal column
and central nervous system, strongly extending
its effect into the brain itself. Gv-4 deserves
serious consideration in any condition involving
the lumbar and sacral regions as well.

Gv-7, 9
– as well as similar points along the spine –
typically affect the nerves (associated with
various organs), which exit the spinal chord at
different levels of the vertebral column.
Gv-14
– is said to be the central point in
the upper back and shoulder area where all
yang meridians pass through. Because of its
association with each of the yang channels, it
has a powerful influence on all musculoskeletal
conditions of the body, particularly those
affecting the upper back, shoulder and neck
regions.

Gv-16
– is a powerful point for influencing
the entire head and brain area, its effect
extending down the neck and back to continue
all the way to the coccyx. Because of its
location on the neck immediately below the
occiput, it is a powerful point to help realign the
spirit with the physical body, thus the name
Ghost point. Its influence on stabilizing and
supporting the atlas and axis region of the
upper spine can often be dramatic.
Gv-20
– named One Hundred Meetings,
is said to be the single-most point were all the
meridians of the body join together. Its
influence extends throughout the entire meridian
system and includes every portion of the
energetic and physical anatomy.
Linked with the pineal (the endocrine gland
in charge of melatonin production), Gv-20 is
involved with the circadian cycle of daily
activity versus sleep and regeneration.
One of its primary associations, however, is
with the Crown chakra (color violet), which
energetically regulates the entire subtle energy
system. Often associated with a sense of
Oneness with All, an imbalance in Gv-20 may
result in feelings of separation, emotional
isolation and loneliness.

Gv-23, 24
– are potent points for influencing
the skull and brain, as well as for affecting the
forehead and face regions.
Gv-24.5
– also known as Yintang, is a
powerful point for affecting the face and brain
as well as the entire spinal column, its influence
extending all the way down to the tailbone.
Often associated with the third eye or Brow
chakra (color indigo) it is linked to the pituitary,
often referred to as the master gland.
Being able to see the reality of life, rather
than projecting subjective ideas, is said to be
the positive quality of this chakra.
Gv-26
– is the Command point for
resuscitation, and a superb point for restoring
balance to the autonomic nervous system as a
whole. Able to influence not only the face, skull
and brain, but also the entire spinal column as
well, the effects of this point extend all the way
to Gv-1, the opposite point on the meridian
located at the tip of the coccyx.
Often being underutilized, Gv-26 wields a
profound influence over the entire physical
body as well as on the meridian system as a
whole. Although the nearby Gv-28 is the Exit
point for the meridian, Gv-26 almost invariably
serves as the actual point for treatment, opening
the energy of the Governor vessel to flow
across the mouth and tongue to connect with
the Conception vessel.
This is a powerful point for realigning the
spirit with the physical body. Its influence is
believed to extend deeply into the pranic
energies of the subtle anatomy, including the
esoteric channels of Ida and Pingala.
XIV – Conception vessel
Cv-1
is the Exit point for the Conception vessel
(not the Entry point as classically labeled),
which allows the energy to flow from the
Conception into the Governor vessel.
However, because of its physical location in the
reproductive region, many practitioners
consider this point off-limits to most forms of
traditional treatment.
Cv-3
– is the Alarm point for the bladder,
and a point of influence for the three yin
Musculo-tendeno meridians of the leg, namely
the Kidney, Liver and Spleen. This point also
benefits the reproductive and eliminative
functions of the body.
As the Alarm point for the bladder, Cv-3 is
able to balance both excess and deficiency in
the bladder itself, even more so since the organ
lies directly underneath this point in the lower
pelvic region.
Emotionally, feelings of restlessness,
frustration, impatience and fear may all be
improved by addressing this location.
Cv-3 through Cv-6, located in the pelvis, are
all associated with the Reproductive chakra
(color orange), the energetic center related to
reproduction, intimacy and pleasure.
Cv-4
– is the Alarm point for the small
intestine, useful for treating any condition of
the small intestine, whether excess or deficient,
especially since the intestines themselves lie
directly under this point or in close proximity.
The meridians of the Small Intestine, Kidney,
Liver, Stomach and Spleen also pass through
this point and come under its influence.
Feelings of sadness, the primary emotion
associated with the small intestine, may be
improved through treatment of this point.
Cv-5
– is the Alarm point for the Triple
Heater, used to benefit any condition of the
Triple Heater, whether excess or deficient. In
Western anatomy the Triple Heater
corresponds to the pituitary and thyroid, two of
the primary glands regulating metabolism.
Treating this location can exert a broad
effect, influencing the respiratory, cardiac,
reproductive, digestive and eliminative
functions, thus the term Triple Warmer,
corresponding to the three regions of the torso:
the chest, abdomen and pelvis.
Its associated emotions include feelings of
optimism and faith, compared to hopelessness
and despair.
Cv-6
– whose name Sea of Chi accurately
reflects its function, is a center of energy
located in the pelvic area. Its influence includes
not only the surrounding region but also the
health and vitality of the body as a whole.
Along with other points located in this section
of the Conception vessel, Cv-6 is closely
associated with the Reproductive chakra and
feelings of intimacy and pleasure.
Cv-8
– located at the navel, is one of the
great points of acupuncture. As it is forbidden
to needling, this is one location where the use of
laser can be highly effective as well as painless
and safe. As the physical site of the fetus’
connection to the mother in utero, this area
remains immensely powerful after birth, even
into adulthood. Being a site of emotional
vulnerability, this region can embody either
strength and vitality, or else the damaging
effects of emotional stress and trauma.
However, because of its inaccessibility to
traditional needle treatment, it often remains
ignored or overlooked in clinical practice.
Nonetheless, treating this location can help
calm and re-center the mind and emotions,
similar to Kd-1, another great grounding point
of the body.
Cv-9
is a point for strengthening the kidneys.
Cv-10
– is a point with a strong effect on the
pancreas and spleen.

Cv-12
– is the Alarm point for the
stomach, the Influential point for all yang
organs, and a great point for treating collapse
of vitality in the meridian system as a whole.
As the Alarm point, it is excellent for treating
all conditions of the stomach itself, whether
excess or deficient, as well as for relieving
feelings of disappointment and worry,
associated with this organ.
As an Influential point, it exercises some
control over all yang organs, namely the large
intestine, small intestine and Triple Heater, as
well as the bladder, gallbladder and stomach.
Cv-12 is closely associated with the Solar
Plexus chakra (color yellow), reflecting vitality
and self-esteem.
Cv-13
– is a point for treating the stomach and
intestines.

Cv-14
– is the Alarm point for the heart,
useful for treating many conditions of the heart
itself, whether excess or deficient. This includes
feelings of heartbreak and the ensuing
resentment that can be associated with this vital
organ.
Cv-17
– is the Alarm point for the
pericardium and the Influential point for
Chi. As the Alarm point, it is able to treat many
conditions of the pericardium, whether excess
or deficient, as well as the emotions associated
with this organ, such as the effects of shock or
trauma.
As the Influential point, it wields a powerful
influence over the circulation of vital force,
especially so since it directly overlies the heart
and lungs, the two organs most closely
associated with a healthy movement of the Chi.
This site is directly linked with the Heart chakra
(color green), and to feelings of love, compared
to emotional shock, heartbreak and resentment.
Cv-22
– is a powerful point for influencing
the thyroid gland, as well as for affecting the
throat area in general. It also wields influence
over the upper portion of the lungs and
bronchial region.
This point is closely associated with the
Throat chakra (color blue), representing peace,
clear communication and creative expression.
Taking responsibility for ourselves instead of
blaming others is believed to assist in healing
this center.
Cv-24
– is both the Entry and
Command point for the Conception vessel
(not the Exit point as classically described). As
such, it is one of the most commonly out-of-
balance points of the whole meridian system.
This site can easily be overlooked, although
it holds a profound influence over the entire
Conception vessel, extending down the anterior
midline of the body from the mouth to the
perineum. This powerful point receives the
energy from Gv-28 as the Chi crosses over the
mouth and tongue. It strongly influences not
only the face area, but also the opposite end of
the meridian, such as the pelvic and
reproductive regions.
In addition, Cv-24 is a powerful point for
realigning the spirit with the physical body.
1 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
2 EM I graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of M edical Acupuncture Inc.
3 EM I graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of M edical Acupuncture Inc.
4 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
5 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
6 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
7 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
8 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
9 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
10 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
11 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
12 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
13 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
14 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
15 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
16 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
17 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
18 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
19 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
20 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
21 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
22 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
23 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
24 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
25 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
26 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
27 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
28 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
29 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
30 EMI graphic courtesy Dr. John A. Amaro and the
International Academy of Medical Acupuncture Inc.
Point Location
Sun unit of measurement
Since body measurements are necessarily
proportional, the commonly agreed-upon unit is
the ACI, or Anatomical Chinese Inch. Also
known as a sun or cun, 1 ACI equals either
the widest portion of the thumb or else the
distance between the two inner creases of the
middle phalanx when the finger is flexed. 1.5
ACI equals the width of the middle and index
fingers together, 2 ACI the width of the middle,
index and ring fingers together, and 3 ACI the
width of all four fingers of the hand together
when measured near the base of the fingers. A
shorter length, that of one fen, is equal to one
tenth of an ACI.
These measurements are used constantly in
practice, although it should be remembered that
they are the dimensions of the patient, not the
practitioner. It is essential to compare one’s
own hand length and width to that of the
patient’s before beginning any treatment
session, as these distances are then applied to
the patient’s anatomy when locating the general
region of the point.
The sun measurements of the body
I – Heart
Ht-3 At the medial end of the elbow
crease, halfway between the condyle of
the humerus and the biceps tendon
Ht-5 1 sun proximal to Ht-7
Ht-7 On the wrist crease, just lateral to
the medial flexor tendon of the wrist
Ht-8 On the heart line, between the
fourth and fifth metacarpal
Ht-9 At the nail point of the little finger
on the thumb side
II – Small Intestine
Si-1 The nail point of the little finger on
the side away from the thumb
Si-3 Proximal to the metacarpal-
phalangeal joint of the little finger, where
the pink flesh meets the white flesh
Si-4 On the ulnar side of the hand,
between the 5th metacarpal & the
triquetral
Si-7 5 sun proximal to the wrist crease,
anterior to the ulna
Si-19 Anterior to the tragus of the ear
III – Bladder
Bl-1 At the inner canthus of the eye
Bl-2 At the inner corner of the eyebrow
Bl-3 Directly superior to Bl-2, just
within the normal hairline
Bl-10 At the level of Gv-16 and nearly
1.3 sun lateral, within the trapezius
Bl-11 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of T-
1
Bl-12 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of T-
2
Bl-13* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
T-3
Bl-14* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
T-4
Bl-15* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
T-5
Bl-17 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of T-
7
Bl-18* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
T-9
Bl-19* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
T-10
Bl-20* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
T-11
Bl-21* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
T-12
Bl-22* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
L-1
Bl-23* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
L-2
Bl-25* 1.5 sun lateral to the spinous of
L-4
Bl-27* 1.5 sun lateral to the midline at
the level of the first sacral foramen
Bl-28* 1.5 sun lateral to the midline at
the level of the second sacral foramen
Bl-30 1.5 sun lateral to the midline at the
level of the fourth sacral foramen
Bl-40 At the back of the knee in the
middle of the popliteal crease
Bl-57 8 sun distal to Bl-40 between the
two bellies of the gastrocnemius
Bl-58 1 sun inferior & 1 sun lateral to
Bl-57
Bl-60 posterior to the lateral malleolus,
anterior to the achilles tendon
Bl-62 0.5 sun inferior to the lateral
malleolus
Bl-63 On the lateral foot, proximal to
the 5th metatarsal tuberosity
Bl-64 On the lateral foot, distal to the
5th metatarsal tuberosity
Bl-65 On the lateral foot, proximal to
the 5th metatarsal-phalangeal joint
Bl-66 On the lateral foot, distal to the
5th metatarsal-phalangeal joint
Bl-67 The nail point of the little toe, on
the side away from the large toe (&
about 3 fen proximal!)
* Bladder Association Points are shown in the
color of the element of their associated organ,
not in the color of the point itself (which are not
related to the five elements).
IV – Kidney
Kd-1 On the sole of the foot between
the second and third metatarsals,
proximal to the toe pad
Kd-2 On the medial foot, distal and
inferior to the navicular tuberosity
Kd-3 Just behind the medial malleolus &
anterior to the achilles tendon
Kd-4 0.5 sun posterior to the midpoint
of Kd-3 and Kd-5
Kd-5 1 sun inferior to Kd-3
Kd-6 1 sun below the medial malleolus
prominence
Kd-7 2 sun superior to Kd-3
Kd-9 5 sun superior to Kd-3
Kd-22 to 26 In the 5th through 1st
intercostal space, 2 sun lateral to the
midline
Kd-27 2 sun lateral to the midline, below
the clavicle
V – Pericardium
Cx-1 1 sun superior to the upper edge
of the nipple
Cx-3 In the elbow crease, just medial to
the biceps tendon
Cx-4 5 sun proximal to Cx-7, between
the palmaris longus and flexor carpi
radialis tendons
Cx-5 3 sun proximal to Cx-7, between
the palmaris longus and flexor carpi
radialis tendons
Cx-6 2 sun proximal to Cx-7, between
the palmaris longus and flexor carpi
radialis tendons
Cx-7 At the flexure of the wrist,
between the palmaris longus and flexor
carpi radialis tendons
Cx-8 On the life, between the 3rd & 4th
metacarpals
Cx-9 The nail point of the middle finger,
on the side towards the thumb
VI – Triple Heater
Tw-1 The nail point of the 4th (ring)
finger on the side away from the thumb
Tw-3 Between the 4th & 5th
metacarpals, just proximal to the
metacarpal-phalangeal joint
Tw-4 At the posterior wrist crease,
between the tendons of extensor
digitorum communis and extensor digiti
minimi
Tw-5 2 sun proximal to Tw-4
Tw-6 3 sun proximal to Tw-4
Tw-8 4 sun proximal to Tw-4
Tw-23 At the lateral portion of the
eyebrow, next to the zygomatic
VII – Gallbladder
Gb-1 0.5 sun lateral to the outer canthus
of the eye
Gb-14 1 sun superior to the eyebrow,
inline with the pupil
Gb-20 Lateral to Gv-16, between the
sternomastoid and trapezius
Gb-24 In the 7th intercostal space, 4 sun
lateral to the midline (The location of this
point varies according to the
proportional length of the abdomen and
chest, and this site is sometimes best
tested and treated immediately below the
ribcage)
Gb-25 At the tip of the 12th rib
Gb-30 of the distance from the greater
trochanter to the sacrum
Gb-34 1 sun medial and inferior to the
head of the fibula
Gb-36 7 sun superior to the lateral
malleolus, anterior to the fibula
Gb-37 5 sun superior to the lateral
malleolus, anterior to the fibula
Gb-39 3 sun superior to the lateral
malleolus, between the peroneus longus
& brevis tendons
Gb-40 Level with the anterior & inferior
border of the lateral malleolus
Gb-41 In the space distal to the 4th &
5th metatarsal head junction
Gb-43 In the web between the 4th &
5th toe
Gb-44 The nail point of the fourth toe,
on the side away from the large toe (as
with Bl-67 & St-45, this point is 3 fen
proximal from the proximal border of the
nail)
VIII – Liver
Lv-1 The nail point of the large toe, on
the side away from the midline
Lv-2 In the web between the large toe
& second toe
Lv-3 In the space distal to the junction
of the 1st & 2nd metatarsals
Lv-4 On the ankle, medial to the tibialis-
anterior tendon
Lv-5 5 sun superior to the medial
malleolus, posterior to the tibia
Lv-6 7 sun superior to the medial
malleolus, posterior to the tibia
Lv-13 At the tip of the 11th rib
Lv-14 On the nipple line in the 6th
intercostal space
IX – Lung
Lu-1 In the 1st intercostal space of the
chest, 6 sun lateral to the midline
Lu-5 On the lateral elbow crease,
approximately midway between Li-11 &
Cx-3
Lu-6 5 sun distal to Lu-5, & 7 sun
proximal to Lu-9
Lu-7 1.5 sun proximal to Lu-9, just
medial to the flexor pollicis tendon
Lu-8 1 sun proximal to Lu-9, just medial
to the flexor pollicis tendon
Lu-9 On the wrist crease, just medial to
the flexor pollicis tendon
Lu-10 On the middle portion of the
thumb pad, just medial to the 1st
metacarpal
Lu-11 The nail point of the thumb, on
the side away from the little finger
X – Large Intestine
Li-1 The nail point of the index finger, on
the side towards the thumb
Li-2 On the radial side of the index
finger, distal to the head of the 2nd
metacarpal
Li-3 On the radial side of the index
finger, proximal to the head of the 2nd
metacarpal
Li-4 In the web of the hand, between
the 1st & 2nd metacarpal
Li-6 3 sun proximal to the anatomical
snuffbox at the wrist, on a line
connecting it to Li-11
Li-11 Midway between the lateral
epicondyle & the biceps tendon
Li-20 In the naso-labial groove 3 fen
lateral to the ala of the nose
XI – Stomach
St-3 Below the pupil, near the level of
the inferior border of the nose
St-25 2 sun lateral to, & level with the
superior border of, the navel
St-36 3 sun inferior to the inferior border
of the patella, 1 finger width lateral to the
tibia
St-37 3 sun inferior to St-36
St-39 6 sun inferior to St-36
St-40 Midway between the tibio-
femoral joint and the lateral malleolus, 2
finger widths lateral to the tibia
St-41 Level with the lateral malleolus,
between the extensor hallucis longus and
extensor digitorum longus tendons
St-44 In the web between the 2nd & 3rd
toe
St-45 The nail point on the second toe,
on the side away from the large toe (& 3
fen proximal)
XII – Spleen
Sp-1 The nail point on the large toe, on
the side away from the little toe
Sp-2 On the medial side of the large toe,
distal to the first metatarso-phalangeal
joint
Sp-3 On the medial side of the foot,
proximal to the first metatarso-
phalangeal joint
Sp-4 On the medial side of the foot,
distal to the base of the 1st metatarsal
Sp-5 In line with the anterior and inferior
border of the medial malleolus
Sp-6 3 sun superior to the medial
malleolus, posterior to the tibia
Sp-8 3 sun inferior to Sp-9, posterior to
the tibia
Sp-9 On the medial lower leg, between
the tibia’s medial condyle and the
posterior border of the tibia
Sp-21 On the mid-axillary line in the 6th
intercostal space
XIII – Governor Vessel
Gv-1 At the tip of the coccyx
Gv-3 Between the spinous processes of
the 4th & 5th lumbar vertebra
Gv-4 Between the spinous processes of
the 2nd & 3rd lumbar vertebra
Gv-14 Between the spinous processes
of the C-7 & T-1 vertebra
Gv-16 Between the occiput and the
atlas
Gv-20 At the top of the head, on the
midline of the ears
Gv-23 & 24 0.5 sun posterior to Gv-
24, & 0.5 sun posterior to the normal
hairline
Gv-24.5 Between the eyebrows
Gv-26 Below the nose, 1/3 of the
distance to the upper lip
XIV – Conception Vessel
Cv-3 On the anterior midline, 1 sun
above the pubis
Cv-4 On the anterior midline, 2 sun
above the pubis
Cv-5 On the anterior midline, 3 sun
above the pubis
Cv-6 On the anterior midline, 1.5 sun
below the navel
Cv-8 The navel
Cv-10 On the anterior midline, 2 sun
above the navel
Cv-12 On the anterior midline, 4 sun
above the navel
Cv-13 On the anterior midline, 5 sun
above the navel, & 3 sun below the
sterno-costal angle
Cv-14 Typically, 1 sun below the tip of
the zyphoid (this location often varies
depending on the proportional length of
the abdomen & chest)
Cv-17 On the anterior midline, at the
level of the upper border of the nipple
Cv-22 On the anterior midline in the
supra-sternal notch
Cv-24 On the midline of the chin in the
mento-labial groove
Suggested Reading
Shanghai College of Traditional
Medicine. Acupuncture–A
comprehensive Text. Seattle: Eastland
Press, 1985.
Filshie, Jacqueline. Medical
Acupuncture. China: Churchill
Livingstone, 1988.
Academy of Traditional Chinese
Medicine. An Outline of Chinese
Acupuncture. Peking: Foreign Language
Press, 1975
Cross, John. Acupuncture & the
Chakra System. Berkeley: North
Atlantic Books, 2008.
Lian, Yu-Lin. Pictorial Atlas of
Acupuncture. Slovenia: Konemann,
2005.
Diamond, John. Life Energy. New
York: Paragon House, 1985.
Zhenguo, Yan. Anatomical Atlas of
Acupuncture Points, a Photo Location
Guide. Shanghai: Donica Publishing,
2003.
Ding, Li. Acupuncture Meridian
Theory & Acupuncture Points. Beijing:
Foreign Languages Press, 1991.
Maciocia, Giovanni. Channels of
Acupuncture. Spain: Churchill
Livingstone, 2006.
Beijing College of Traditional Chinese
Medicine. Essentials of Chinese
Acupuncture. Beijing: Foreign
Languages Press, 1980.
Deadman, Peter. Manual of
Acupuncture. Sussex: Journal of
Chinese Medicine Publications, 2005.
Worsley, JR. Traditional Chinese
Acupuncture. Great Britain: BAS
Printers Ltd, 1982.
Clemente, Carmine. Anatomy–A
Regional Atlas of the Human Body.
Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1975.
McMinn, RMH. Color Atlas of Human
Anatomy. Chicago: Year Book Medical
Publishers, Inc, 1977.
Ronald Henry DC, ND, FIAMA
is a Fellow of the International Academy of
Medical Acupuncture,
as well as a chiropractor and naturopath
For information regarding speaking and
teaching engagements please contact:
New Paradigm Healing, Inc.
2299 Pearl Street, Suite 212
Boulder, CO 80302 USA
303 449-0910
QuantumAcupuncture@me.com
www.QuantumAcupuncture.NET
International Academy of Medical
Acupuncture (IAMA)
www.IAMA.edu
EMI equipment can be obtained from
Acu-International at
www.acuinternational.com
Dr. Ron and his wife Natasha