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Speech-Language Therapy Lesson Plan

Core Curriculum Content English Language Arts Standards » Language » Grade 1


Standards (Schools Only) CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.5
With guidance and support from adults, demonstrate understanding of
word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.5.A
Sort words into categories (e.g., colors, clothing) to gain a
sense of the concepts the categories represent.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.5.B
Define words by category and by one or more key attributes
(e.g., a duck is a bird that swims; a tiger is a large cat with
stripes).
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.1.5.C
Identify real-life connections between words and their use e.g.,
note places at home that are cozy).

Diagnosis A.F. is eligible for services under IDEA as multiply disabled. He has a
diagnosis of global developmental delay, autism and motor apraxia.

Medical History A.F. was born in Peru to a young mother from a low socioeconomic
background. The pregnancy was characterized as complicated,
because it was unplanned and unwanted. A.F.’s biological mother took
herbal substances in hopes of terminating the pregnancy. He was born
at home and was not brought to the hospital until one day later, where
he was found to have toxic chemical exposure. His birth mother fed
him regular cow milk without supplementations and was left in his
crib for most of the day until he was 11 months old. At 11 months
A.F. was placed for adoption and was unable to roll over, sit up, crawl
or walk on his own. He also was not babbling or engaging in joint
attention with anyone. A.F. was adopted by a family in America at 12
months old who were aware of his history. A.F. began receiving
services through Early Intervention, however he did not sit
independently until 15 months old and did not begin walking until 22
months old. A.F. is now 13 years old and is non-verbal, he uses
Proloquo2go on an iPad to communicate. He receives occupational
and speech therapy three times a week at school and sees a speech-
language pathologist through a private practice outside of the school.

Long & Short-Term Long-Term Goals:


1) Improve overall expressive (semantic and syntactic) language
Behavioral Objectives& skills.
Short-Term Session 2) Improve overall receptive language.
Objectives
Short-Term Objectives:
1) A.F. will be able to use his communication device to answer
wh- questions given visual cues (printed pictures) and verbal
prompts with 80% accuracy
Session Objectives:
Activity #1 and 2: A.F. will be able to use his
communication device to answer “where” questions on items
found in the household (ex- “bathroom,” “kitchen” etc) when
given a visual of the item (ex- picture of bathtub, picture of
refridgerator), with verbal and gestural cues with 80%
accuracy

Activity #1 and 2: A.F. will be able to use his


communication device to answer “what” question on items
commonly found in the household (ex-“What do you keep in
the refridgerator?”) when given a visual of the item with verbal
and gestural cues with 80% accuracy

2) A.F. will be able to develop understanding and use of


sentences increasing in length and complexity indepdently
with 80% accuracy
Session Objective:
Activity #1 and 2: A.F. will be able to use his
communication device to create SVO sentences about
household items given gestural prompts (ex- “The bathtub is in
the bathroom”) with 80% accuracy

3) A.F. will be able to sort objects and pictures into categories


given visual cues (printed pictures) with 80% accuracy
Session Objective:
Activity #1 and 2: A.F. will be able to place common
household objects into correct room given visual cues (printed
pictures) and gestural cues with 80% accuracy

4) A.F. will be able to demonstrate spatial concepts (on/off,


up/down, in/out, under/over, above/below, front/back, next to,
middle, around, through) with 80% accuracy
Session Objective:
Activity #1 and 2: A.F. will be able to demonstrate
understanding of spatial concepts, in/out and on/off by putting
away activity at end of session with verbal and gestural cues
with 80% accuracy
5) A.F. will be able to follow a 2-step direction with 80%
accuracy
Session Objective:
Activity #1 and 2: A.F. will be able to follow a 2-step
direction while cleaning up the activity at the end of the
session with verbal and gestural cues with 80% accuracy

Rationale (Purpose): Children with autism spectrum disorder are often characterized by
having persistent deficits in communication and social interaction
(Bedwani, Bruck & Costley, 2015). It is estimated that between 30-
50% of these children, do not use functional speech. There is evidence
to suggest that AAC can improve the quality of life by supporting
children diagnosed with ASD and are non-verbal, to increase their
communication (Bedwani, et al., 2015). AAC technology, with built in
speech generating capacity, can deliver independence for spontaneous
expression. The use of AAC in a structured learning environment,
where expectations are well defined, allows the child to use their
device to respond to educational activities, that are foundational to
development of complex language (Bedwani, et al., 2015).

Step-by-Step Procedures for Activity # 1: What Goes Together?


Direct Instruction (Guided
A.F. will have a board placed in front of him with pictures that depict
Practice):
the inside of a house. The “house” is broken down into a field of four
with a bathroom, kitchen, bedroom and living room. The activity
comes with eight smaller pictures that need to be matched into the
correct “room.” There are two pictures for each “room.” These
include:

> Bathroom- bathtub, sink


> Kitchen- table, refrigerator
> Bedroom- bed, dresser
> Living room- couch, television

I will choose an object to present to A.F. at random, and have him


label the object first. If I show him the bathtub, I will ask, “What is
this?” Depending on A.F.’s answer, or if it is clear he needs assistance,
I will provide prompting and help him navigate his device. Once A.F.
labels the object, I will ask further questions to get him
communicating with his device, for example I will ask, “What do you
do in the bathtub?” I will be looking for an answer such as, “I take a
bath.” Finally, I will ask, “What room does the bathtub go in?” I will
be looking for him to answer, “in the bathroom.” Now, A.F. will also
place the picture of the bathtub into the bathroom on the board.
I will prompt A.F. to create longer sentences with his device, so he is
not relying on one-word answers or the use of gestures. I plan to use
verbal cues to help him navigate his device, and gestural prompts if he
is having trouble, and finally physically prompting if verbal and
gestural prompts are not enough. I will hold A.F.’s hand or finger as I
navigate through the iPad to create the sentence.
I will continue the activity this way until we have matched all the
objects, or until the end of the session. I plan to ask A.F. further
questions about objects, such as, “What color is the table?” “Does
your dog Bella sleep in your bedroom?” etc.

Activity # 2: Category Sorting

This activity will be planned if there is extra time during the session.
The category sorting includes miniature real-life objects that need to
be sorted. Instead of having a “house” board, I will use three sorting
cups that objects can be placed in. The cups will be used as a
bedroom, kitchen and bathroom. Each “room” will have three items
that need to be matched. These include:

> Bedroom- miniature: bed, blanket and dresser


> Kitchen-miniature: fork, spoon and refrigerator
> Bathroom- miniature: bathtub, towel and toothbrush.

This will be planned like the prior “What goes together” activity. I
will choose an object to present to A.F. at random, and have him label
the object first. If I show him the bathtub, I will ask, “What is this?”
Depending on A.F.’s answer, or if it is clear he needs assistance, I will
provide prompting and help him navigate his device. I will also switch
the way I have A.F. identify the items by asking, “What can you take a
bath in?” Or even simpler, “Find the bathtub,” if needed. Once A.F.
labels the object, I will ask further questions to get him
communicating with his device, for example I will ask, “What do you
do in the bathtub?” I will be looking for an answer such as, “I take a
bath.” Finally, I will ask, “What room does the bathtub go in?” I will
be looking for him to answer, “in the bathroom.” Now, A.F. will also
place the picture of the bathtub into the bathroom on the board.
I will prompt A.F. to create longer sentences with his device, so he is
not relying on one-word answers or only gestures. I plan to use verbal
cues to help him navigate his device, and gestural prompts if he is
having trouble, and finally physically prompting if verbal and gestural
prompts are not enough. I will hold A.F.’s hand or finger as I navigate
through the iPad to create the sentence.
I will continue the activity this way until we have matched all the
objects, or until the end of the session. I plan to ask A.F. further
questions about the items, such as, “What color is the towel?” “Does
your dog Bella sleep in your bedroom?” “What food can you eat with
a spoon?” etc.

Required Materials: What goes together activity (includes: “house” boards, and object
pictures), category sorting activity (includes: miniature objects, and
sorting cups), iPad with proloquo2go

Anticipatory Set (Lead-in The session will begin with the clinician asking A.F., “How are you
Activity): feeling today?” This will provide him some “practice” using his iPad
in a social interaction. After a short discussion, I will introduce the
activity to A.F.. I will place the “home” board on the table and point to
each room individually and say the name of the room. For example, I
will point to “bedroom,” say bedroom and then find the room in his
iPad and touch the word on his device. I will continue to do this for
each of the four rooms, and then provide an example of one of the
items. For example- I will pick up “table,” and place it in the kitchen,
then on his device I will make the sentence “the table is in the
kitchen.” If I see that A.F. is engaged and appears ready to try
independently, I will have him label and match and item.

Closure Activity: To close the activity, I will ask A.F. to put each on of the picture items
into the box one by one. This will work on following directions,
receptive language, and spatial concepts. I will say, “Pick up the bed,
and put it in the box,” while gesturing to the box. Once all of the items
and the “house” board are in the box, I will say, “Put the top on the
box.” Then I will tell A.F. speech is “all done,” and have him use his
iPad to tell me he is going back to the classroom.

Cueing/Modeling: Before beginning the lesson, I will go through to name each of the
rooms in the “house,” while pointing to the room, and then find the
word in A.F.’s iPad. I plan to match one or two objects into the correct
room before he has his first turn so he is aware of what to do. Once I
have matched an object into the room, I will say, “the bathtub is in the
bathroom,” for example, and then make the sentence on his device. As
A.F. begins to match the objects to the correct room, I will see if he
can match the object indepdently. If I see he is having difficulty I will
decrease the field from four to two, and give him a verbal cue, “Does a
refridgerator go in the bedroom or the kitchen?” I will also gesture to
the correct room if the verbal cue is not enough. The same amount of
cueing and modeling will be used as A.F. makes sentences out of the
objects and room on his device.

Checking for Simple, explicit, easy to understand instructions will be provided to


Understanding: A.F. prior to initiating each activity, with the use of cueing and
modeling. Once instructions have been provided, he will take a turn on
his own to demonstrate his comprehension of the information that is
being auditorily presented to him. Further modeling and cueing will be
offered if breakdown occurs, by repeating, rephrasing and/or gesturing
as needed. Correct responses will be positively reinforced. Incorrect
repsonses will be worked further on by decreasing the field of four to
two.

Adaptations/Differentiation: Teaching instruction for activities will be molded to meet A.F.’s


individual needs during the session. Level of difficulty, amount and
type of cueing during the lessons will be modified regularly, based on
A.F.’s performance. If I notice A.F. is struggling I can make the field
of vision smaller for him, into either two or three. I can also provide
additional verbal cueing, such as, “Is a bed in the kitchen or
bedroom?” If further cueing is needed, I can provide gestural cues,
such as pointing to the correct room.
If the activity appears too simple for A.F., I can reduce the amount of
cueing I provide. I can also place several household items in front of
him and have him find the item I say or describe.

Plans for Independent Physical homework is not provided for A.F.. He uses his iPad in his
Practice (Homework) classroom and home to communicate. He is encouraged to use his
device to express his wants, needs and comment during social
interactions. The use of his device outside of the speech room offers
valuable additional practice to reinforce target language concepts, and
can lead to greater improvement on his speech goals

Assessment Student performance on each objective will be documented by noting


amount and type of cueing needed during the session. At this time
A.F. is not assessed on number of correct/incorrect answers.