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Home Africa Nigeria marks four-year anniversary of Chibok kidnap Stiff new licence
fees threaten Tanzanian... Previous Story Image Image AMISOM DSRCC urges military
commanders to... Next Story
Nigeria marks four-year anniversary of Chibok kidnap
By AFP

Added 14th April 2018 10:36 AM

"We are here to show (the) government that we are still missing our sisters,"
Zakaria Galang, a brother of one of the students who is yet to return, told AFP.

Chibokgirls 703x422
A video released in January by Boko Haram showed at least 14 of the abducted
schoolgirls.BOKO HARAM/AFP / Handout

Nigeria on Saturday marked four years since Boko Haram abducted more than 200
schoolgirls from the remote town of Chibok, with renewed calls for their release
and that of thousands of others seized in the bloody conflict.

A total of 219 girls were taken from the Government Girls Secondary School in the
remote town in Borno state on the evening of April 14, 2014 and have become an
enduring symbol of the Islamist insurgency.

Four years on, 112 are still being held.

On Friday night, about 100 people attended a vigil in Nigeria's biggest city,
Lagos, under a busy flyover whose pillars are now adorned with brightly painted
murals of the missing girls.

"We are here to show (the) government that we are still missing our sisters,"
Zakaria Galang, a brother of one of the students who is yet to return, told AFP.

Further events are planned in the capital, Abuja, on Saturday.

'All hope is not lost'

Nigeria's president in 2014, Goodluck Jonathan, was heavily criticised for his
response to the abduction but the man who replaced him, Muhammadu Buhari, has had
more success.

Since 2016, 107 girls have been found, released or escaped as part of a government
deal with Boko Haram and the administration has said back-channel talks are ongoing
for further releases and a possible end to the wider conflict.

father of one of the missing schoolgirls prays for his daughters release at a
vigil in agos ahead of the fouryear anniversary of her abduction A father of
one of the missing schoolgirls prays for his daughter's release at a vigil in Lagos
ahead of the four-year anniversary of her abduction. AFP / PIUS UTOMI EKPEI
Another activist, Habiba Balogun, said she hoped that would happen after nearly
nine years of violence that has left at least 20,000 dead and made more than 2.6
million homeless.

"The government has said that they are ready to negotiate; they want to bring this
nightmare to an end," she said.

Buhari pledged to the Chibok girls' parents that their daughters "will never be
forgotten or abandoned to their fate" despite the time that had passed.

The former military ruler has repeatedly claimed Boko Haram was virtually defeated
but while there have been clear army gains, security threats remain.

In February, fighters loyal to a Boko Haram faction headed by Abu Mus'ab al-Barnawi
seized 112 schoolgirls and one boy from the town of Dapchi, in Yobe state.

One hundred and seven were returned in mid-March. Five reportedly died, while one
girl -- the only Christian in the group -- is still being held.

Buhari said the return of so many students from Dapchi and Chibok "should give
confidence that all hope is not lost" and showed the government was "doing its very
best".

There had been "unexpected setbacks" in talks because of infighting within Boko
Haram.

But he added: "We will continue to persist, and the parents should please not give
up. Don't give up hope of seeing our daughters back home again."

'Meaningful action'

Boko Haram has used kidnapping as a weapon of war during the conflict, seizing
women and girls to act as sex slaves or suicide bombers, and men and boys to fight.

UNICEF said this week more than 1,000 children had been verified as abducted in
northeast Nigeria since 2013, although the real figure is estimated to be much
higher.

Amnesty International's Nigeria director, Osai Ojigho, said the Chibok abduction
was a small part of a bigger issue.

The government needed to deliver "meaningful action on behalf of all these victims
of Boko Haram's crimes".

"Far more support must also be provided for past victims," she said, proposing a
register for abducted people.

The International Crisis Group meanwhile said the copycat abduction in Dapchi
showed more needed to be done to protect schoolchildren in the restive region.

"The abductions illustrate that Boko Haram remains a menace to swathes of northeast
Nigeria," it added in a report published on Thursday.

"They throw into doubt the government's claim to have defeated the movement;
instead, insurgents may be newly emboldened to keep fighting.

"The kidnappings cast a pall over education, particularly of girls, and thus the
prospects for socio-economic development of the region."
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New vision logoSaturday,April 14,2018 16:40 PM


rss facebook twitter linkedIn uganda pinterest instagram pinterest

Search
imagesMENU
Home Africa Nigeria marks four-year anniversary of Chibok kidnap Stiff new licence
fees threaten Tanzanian... Previous Story Image Image AMISOM DSRCC urges military
commanders to... Next Story
Nigeria marks four-year anniversary of Chibok kidnap
By AFP

Added 14th April 2018 10:36 AM

"We are here to show (the) government that we are still missing our sisters,"
Zakaria Galang, a brother of one of the students who is yet to return, told AFP.

Chibokgirls 703x422
A video released in January by Boko Haram showed at least 14 of the abducted
schoolgirls.BOKO HARAM/AFP / Handout

Nigeria on Saturday marked four years since Boko Haram abducted more than 200
schoolgirls from the remote town of Chibok, with renewed calls for their release
and that of thousands of others seized in the bloody conflict.

A total of 219 girls were taken from the Government Girls Secondary School in the
remote town in Borno state on the evening of April 14, 2014 and have become an
enduring symbol of the Islamist insurgency.

Four years on, 112 are still being held.

On Friday night, about 100 people attended a vigil in Nigeria's biggest city,
Lagos, under a busy flyover whose pillars are now adorned with brightly painted
murals of the missing girls.

"We are here to show (the) government that we are still missing our sisters,"
Zakaria Galang, a brother of one of the students who is yet to return, told AFP.

Further events are planned in the capital, Abuja, on Saturday.

'All hope is not lost'

Nigeria's president in 2014, Goodluck Jonathan, was heavily criticised for his
response to the abduction but the man who replaced him, Muhammadu Buhari, has had
more success.
Since 2016, 107 girls have been found, released or escaped as part of a government
deal with Boko Haram and the administration has said back-channel talks are ongoing
for further releases and a possible end to the wider conflict.

father of one of the missing schoolgirls prays for his daughters release at a
vigil in agos ahead of the fouryear anniversary of her abduction A father of
one of the missing schoolgirls prays for his daughter's release at a vigil in Lagos
ahead of the four-year anniversary of her abduction. AFP / PIUS UTOMI EKPEI

Another activist, Habiba Balogun, said she hoped that would happen after nearly
nine years of violence that has left at least 20,000 dead and made more than 2.6
million homeless.

"The government has said that they are ready to negotiate; they want to bring this
nightmare to an end," she said.

Buhari pledged to the Chibok girls' parents that their daughters "will never be
forgotten or abandoned to their fate" despite the time that had passed.

The former military ruler has repeatedly claimed Boko Haram was virtually defeated
but while there have been clear army gains, security threats remain.

In February, fighters loyal to a Boko Haram faction headed by Abu Mus'ab al-Barnawi
seized 112 schoolgirls and one boy from the town of Dapchi, in Yobe state.

One hundred and seven were returned in mid-March. Five reportedly died, while one
girl -- the only Christian in the group -- is still being held.

Buhari said the return of so many students from Dapchi and Chibok "should give
confidence that all hope is not lost" and showed the government was "doing its very
best".

There had been "unexpected setbacks" in talks because of infighting within Boko
Haram.

But he added: "We will continue to persist, and the parents should please not give
up. Don't give up hope of seeing our daughters back home again."

'Meaningful action'

Boko Haram has used kidnapping as a weapon of war during the conflict, seizing
women and girls to act as sex slaves or suicide bombers, and men and boys to fight.

UNICEF said this week more than 1,000 children had been verified as abducted in
northeast Nigeria since 2013, although the real figure is estimated to be much
higher.

Amnesty International's Nigeria director, Osai Ojigho, said the Chibok abduction
was a small part of a bigger issue.

The government needed to deliver "meaningful action on behalf of all these victims
of Boko Haram's crimes".

"Far more support must also be provided for past victims," she said, proposing a
register for abducted people.

The International Crisis Group meanwhile said the copycat abduction in Dapchi
showed more needed to be done to protect schoolchildren in the restive region.
"The abductions illustrate that Boko Haram remains a menace to swathes of northeast
Nigeria," it added in a report published on Thursday.

"They throw into doubt the government's claim to have defeated the movement;
instead, insurgents may be newly emboldened to keep fighting.

"The kidnappings cast a pall over education, particularly of girls, and thus the
prospects for socio-economic development of the region."

ShareThis Copy and PasteLive help is offline... Content Rights and


PermissionRSSAdvertiseSubscribeFeedbackArchiveAbout UsBook Advert Saturday,April
14,2018 16:40 PM MENU Home Africa Nigeria marks four-year anniversary of Chibok
kidnap Stiff new licence fees threaten Tanzanian... Previous Story AMISOM DSRCC
urges military commanders to... Next Story Nigeria marks four-year anniversary of
Chibok kidnap By AFP Added 14th April 2018 10:36 AM "We are here to show (the)
government that we are still missing our sisters," Zakaria Galang, a brother of one
of the students who is yet to return, told AFP. A video released in January by Boko
Haram showed at least 14 of the abducted schoolgirls.BOKO HARAM/AFP / Handout
Nigeria on Saturday marked four years since Boko Haram abducted more than 200
schoolgirls from the remote town of Chibok, with renewed calls for their release
and that of thousands of others seized in the bloody conflict. A total of 219 girls
were taken from the Government Girls Secondary School in the remote town in Borno
state on the evening of April 14, 2014 and have become an enduring symbol of the
Islamist insurgency. Four years on, 112 are still being held. On Friday night,
about 100 people attended a vigil in Nigeria's biggest city, Lagos, under a busy
flyover whose pillars are now adorned with brightly painted murals of the missing
girls. "We are here to show (the) government that we are still missing our
sisters," Zakaria Galang, a brother of one of the students who is yet to return,
told AFP. Further events are planned in the capital, Abuja, on Saturday. 'All hope
is not lost' Nigeria's president in 2014, Goodluck Jonathan, was heavily criticised
for his response to the abduction but the man who replaced him, Muhammadu Buhari,
has had more success. Since 2016, 107 girls have been found, released or escaped as
part of a government deal with Boko Haram and the administration has said back-
channel talks are ongoing for further releases and a possible end to the wider
conflict. A father of one of the missing schoolgirls prays for his daughter's
release at a vigil in Lagos ahead of the four-year anniversary of her abduction.
AFP / PIUS UTOMI EKPEI Another activist, Habiba Balogun, said she hoped that
would happen after nearly nine years of violence that has left at least 20,000 dead
and made more than 2.6 million homeless. "The government has said that they are
ready to negotiate; they want to bring this nightmare to an end," she said. Buhari
pledged to the Chibok girls' parents that their daughters "will never be forgotten
or abandoned to their fate" despite the time that had passed. The former military
ruler has repeatedly claimed Boko Haram was virtually defeated but while there have
been clear army gains, security threats remain. In February, fighters loyal to a
Boko Haram faction headed by Abu Mus'ab al-Barnawi seized 112 schoolgirls and one
boy from the town of Dapchi, in Yobe state. One hundred and seven were returned in
mid-March. Five reportedly died, while one girl -- the only Christian in the group
-- is still being held. Buhari said the return of so many students from Dapchi and
Chibok "should give confidence that all hope is not lost" and showed the government
was "doing its very best". There had been "unexpected setbacks" in talks because of
infighting within Boko Haram. But he added: "We will continue to persist, and the
parents should please not give up. Don't give up hope of seeing our daughters back
home again." 'Meaningful action' Boko Haram has used kidnapping as a weapon of war
during the conflict, seizing women and girls to act as sex slaves or suicide
bombers, and men and boys to fight. UNICEF said this week more than 1,000 children
had been verified as abducted in northeast Nigeria since 2013, although the real
figure is estimated to be much higher. Amnesty International's Nigeria director,
Osai Ojigho, said the Chibok abduction was a small part of a bigger issue. The
government needed to deliver "meaningful action on behalf of all these victims of
Boko Haram's crimes". "Far more support must also be provided for past victims,"
she said, proposing a register for abducted people. The International Crisis Group
meanwhile said the copycat abduction in Dapchi showed more needed to be done to
protect schoolchildren in the restive region. "The abductions illustrate that Boko
Haram remains a menace to swathes of northeast Nigeria," it added in a report
published on Thursday. "They throw into doubt the government's claim to have
defeated the movement; instead, insurgents may be newly emboldened to keep
fighting. "The kidnappings cast a pall over education, particularly of girls, and
thus the prospects for socio-economic development of the region." 3 Google +0 0
0 Print AAA Fill in your Name and Email Address to receive a Free Newsletter TAGS:
AFRICA NIGERIA, BOKO HARAM, CHIBOK GIRLS Related articles Buhari's re-election bid
kicks off Nigeria's presidential race Nigeria's Buhari to run for re-election next
year Nigeria central bank meets after months of limbo Two South Africa white
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Melbourne shopping centre Heart surgery? Slate it for the afternoon, study says
Most ReadMost Commented Municipal mayors support Kampala Metropolitan plan 14 Apr
2018 Turkey welcomes strikes on Syria as 'appropriate' 14 Apr 2018 Makerere
releases 2018 list of gov�t sponsored students 14 Apr 2018 S.Africa lays to rest
'Mama' Winnie Mandela 14 Apr 2018 AMISOM DSRCC urges military commanders to
implement transition plan... 14 Apr 2018 TODAY'S PAPER (Click to Buy and Read
Online) News Business Education Sports Life and style Magazines Jobs Opportunities
Opinions Epaper Stream Special Editions LIVE UPDATE � 2018 - New Vision. All Rights
Reserved.. Live help is offline... Content Rights and
PermissionRSSAdvertiseSubscribeFeedbackArchiveAbout UsBook Advert Saturday,April
14,2018 16:40 PM MENU Home Africa Nigeria marks four-year anniversary of Chibok
kidnap Stiff new licence fees threaten Tanzanian... Previous Story AMISOM DSRCC
urges military commanders to... Next Story Nigeria marks four-year anniversary of
Chibok kidnap By AFP Added 14th April 2018 10:36 AM "We are here to show (the)
government that we are still missing our sisters," Zakaria Galang, a brother of one
of the students who is yet to return, told AFP. A video released in January by Boko
Haram showed at least 14 of the abducted schoolgirls.BOKO HARAM/AFP / Handout
Nigeria on Saturday marked four years since Boko Haram abducted more than 200
schoolgirls from the remote town of Chibok, with renewed calls for their release
and that of thousands of others seized in the bloody conflict. A total of 219 girls
were taken from the Government Girls Secondary School in the remote town in Borno
state on the evening of April 14, 2014 and have become an enduring symbol of the
Islamist insurgency. Four years on, 112 are still being held. On Friday night,
about 100 people attended a vigil in Nigeria's biggest city, Lagos, under a busy
flyover whose pillars are now adorned with brightly painted murals of the missing
girls. "We are here to show (the) government that we are still missing our
sisters," Zakaria Galang, a brother of one of the students who is yet to return,
told AFP. Further events are planned in the capital, Abuja, on Saturday. 'All hope
is not lost' Nigeria's president in 2014, Goodluck Jonathan, was heavily criticised
for his response to the abduction but the man who replaced him, Muhammadu Buhari,
has had more success. Since 2016, 107 girls have been found, released or escaped as
part of a government deal with Boko Haram and the administration has said back-
channel talks are ongoing for further releases and a possible end to the wider
conflict. A father of one of the missing schoolgirls prays for his daughter's
release at a vigil in Lagos ahead of the four-year anniversary of her abduction.
AFP / PIUS UTOMI EKPEI Another activist, Habiba Balogun, said she hoped that
would happen after nearly nine years of violence that has left at least 20,000 dead
and made more than 2.6 million homeless. "The government has said that they are
ready to negotiate; they want to bring this nightmare to an end," she said. Buhari
pledged to the Chibok girls' parents that their daughters "will never be forgotten
or abandoned to their fate" despite the time that had passed. The former military
ruler has repeatedly claimed Boko Haram was virtually defeated but while there have
been clear army gains, security threats remain. In February, fighters loyal to a
Boko Haram faction headed by Abu Mus'ab al-Barnawi seized 112 schoolgirls and one
boy from the town of Dapchi, in Yobe state. One hundred and seven were returned in
mid-March. Five reportedly died, while one girl -- the only Christian in the group
-- is still being held. Buhari said the return of so many students from Dapchi and
Chibok "should give confidence that all hope is not lost" and showed the government
was "doing its very best". There had been "unexpected setbacks" in talks because of
infighting within Boko Haram. But he added: "We will continue to persist, and the
parents should please not give up. Don't give up hope of seeing our daughters back
home again." 'Meaningful action' Boko Haram has used kidnapping as a weapon of war
during the conflict, seizing women and girls to act as sex slaves or suicide
bombers, and men and boys to fight. UNICEF said this week more than 1,000 children
had been verified as abducted in northeast Nigeria since 2013, although the real
figure is estimated to be much higher. Amnesty International's Nigeria director,
Osai Ojigho, said the Chibok abduction was a small part of a bigger issue. The
government needed to deliver "meaningful action on behalf of all these victims of
Boko Haram's crimes". "Far more support
must also be provided for past victims," she said, proposing a register for
abducted people. The International Crisis Group meanwhile said the copycat
abduction in Dapchi showed more needed to be done to protect schoolchildren in the
restive region. "The abductions illustrate that Boko Haram remains a menace to
swathes of northeast Nigeria," it added in a report published on Thursday. "They
throw into doubt the government's claim to have defeated the movement; instead,
insurgents may be newly emboldened to keep fighting. "The kidnappings cast a pall
over education, particularly of girls, and thus the prospects for socio-economic
development of the region." 3 Google +0 0 0 Print AAA Fill in your Name and
Email Address to receive a Free Newsletter TAGS: AFRICA NIGERIA, BOKO HARAM, CHIBOK
GIRLS Related articles Buhari's re-election bid kicks off Nigeria's presidential
race Nigeria's Buhari to run for re-election next year Nigeria central bank meets
after months of limbo Two South Africa white farmers jailed for forcing black man
into coffin Five dead as plane crashes into Melbourne shopping centre Heart
surgery? Slate it for the afternoon, study says Most ReadMost Commented Municipal
mayors support Kampala Metropolitan plan 14 Apr 2018 Turkey welcomes strikes on
Syria as 'appropriate' 14 Apr 2018 Makerere releases 2018 list of gov�t sponsored
students 14 Apr 2018 S.Africa lays to rest 'Mama' Winnie Mandela 14 Apr 2018 AMISOM
DSRCC urges military commanders to implement transition plan... 14 Apr 2018 TODAY'S
PAPER (Click to Buy and Read Online) News Business Education Sports Life and style
Magazines Jobs Opportunities Opinions Epaper Stream Special Editions LIVE UPDATE �
2018 - New Vision. All Rights Reserved.. ShareThis Copy and Paste