You are on page 1of 9
Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary TASK 1: PLANNING COMMENTARY Respond to the prompts below

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

TASK 1: PLANNING COMMENTARY

Respond to the prompts below (no more than 9 single-spaced pages, including prompts) by typing your responses within the brackets. Do not delete or alter the prompts. Pages exceeding the maximum will not be scored.

  • 1. Central Focus

    • a. Describe the central focus and purpose of the content you will teach in the learning segment.

[ The central focus of my learning segment is found in the Minnesota state standard for World history 9.4.3.8.2: The development of interregional systems of communication and trade facilitated new forms of social organization and new belief systems. (Classical

Traditions, Belief Systems and Giant Empires: 2000 BCE - 600 CE. The benchmark that is associated with this standard is to Describe the development, characteristics, and decline of civilizations in Southwest Asia and around the Mediterranean Sea (Mesopotamia, Egypt, Persia, Greece, Rome); describe their interactions. (Classical Traditions, Belief Systems, and Giant Empires: 2000 BCE 600 CE). I have adjusted this to: Describe and explain the development, characteristics, interactions, and decline of Ancient Greece.

The purpose is to continue to look at the development of civilizations and the way that they turned into empires. The Greeks are an interesting group to study due to the huge diversity between the separate groups/tribes, but how they all identify as Greek. The main goal in my eyes is to have the students have a more wholistic understanding of the Greeks and most importantly how Greek culture and ideas interacted with each other, their enemies, and themselves.]

  • b. Given the central focus, describe how the standards and learning objectives within your learning segment address

    • facts and concepts

    • inquiry, interpretation, or analysis skills

    • building and supporting arguments or conclusions

[ My first lesson target/plan is to have the students identify the geographic and cultural implications of early Greek development. Specifically looking at landscapes and the Iliad and Odyssey. This lesson plan will help teach the students vocabulary such as Arete open them up to the idea that due to what landscape the Greek state was placed they might be resource deficient. This lesson plan will teach the students the development of the different groups.

My second lesson target/plan is for the students to explain why the Persian War started, the aftermath (Golden Age of Greece) following up to the Peloponnesian War, and the interactions between Greek city-states. We have already learned about the Persian Empire and understand that Zoroastrianism was the main religion. They also know that King Darius was an extremely strong ruler. This section deals with the implications of needing resources outside of the mainland polis (colonies). It also shows the way that Greeks (as a whole) interacted with people outside of themselves. This fits under the interactions of the central

focus. After the War is considered the “Golden Age of Greece”. This is due to the massive

increase in trade and the great philosophers, writers, and mathematicians of the time. We will be looking at the way that the two powerhouses of Greece, Sparta and Athens, vied for

power be creating defensive “leagues”. Creating even more tension.

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

1 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary The Third Lesson target/lesson plan is a case study

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

The Third Lesson target/lesson plan is a case study on comparing and contrasting the Spartans and Athenians. We will be looking at the cultural differences as well as the implications that could arise from these differences (Peloponnesian War). We will be looking at the differences up until the Peloponnesian War which will see the rise and dominance of Athens through trade, and the height of the Spartan armies. This section will not only teach two totally contradictory philosophies in culture but also government. Again, this section will directly piggy back off lesson plan 2. It will also help students understand why the Peloponnesian War happened. The students will be taught how to write a compare and contrast essay and asked to produce one comparing and contrasting Sparta and Athens.

The 4 th and final lesson is explaining how Alexander the Great interacted with different groups as he expanded his empire. Alexander the Great had on the world. Such things as the spread of philosophy, battle styles, and architecture are just a few of the major impacts that the Greeks had throughout their brief rule over the territories ranging from Greece to central India. This period is called the Hellenistic Era and tells us a ton about the way that ideas and culture was affected by the Greeks. Once again I will be looking for the students to write a paragraph for me explaining how Alexander the Great interacted with different

groups as he expanded his empire and using specific examples from the book or lecture.”

At the end of all this, the students will be able to describe and explain the development, characteristics, interactions, and decline of civilization Ancient Greece. This overarching theme or goal is only achievable through the four lesson plans before this. At the end the students will have built up evidence to support they understand the development of Greece through geography. They will show they can explain the characteristic of its people in lesson 3. Explain the interactions between groups and ideas in lesson 4 and 2. Finally they will understand the decline of Greece in lesson 4. They will understand that though the Greek empire diminished, in size and power, their ideas and advancements continued.]

  • c. Explain how your plans build on each other to help students make connections between facts, concepts, and inquiry, interpretation, or analysis skills to build and support arguments or conclusions about historical events, a topic/theme, or a social studies phenomenon.

[At my school, the history teachers use a form of analysis called PEGGS: P=philosophy E=economics G=government G=geography and S=society. As we push through my lesson plans we will continuously change the unit of analysis creating a more wholistic view of the Greek civilization. Geography is one of the few things that almost all the Greek city-states had in common. Due to the mountainous landscape the city-states grew in isolation. The first lesson lays down the framework for overarching ideas of Greek culture such as the Polis, City-states, Arete, and the history of Greeks in general (Iliad and Odyssey). After talking about how population boomed, and city-states started to look for more land, some groups conquered and took over more land (Sparta) and others looked to colonize better farmland around the Mediterranean (Athens). When colonizing, Athens colonies of Ionia (Ionian Greeks) ended up fighting the Persians. With the help of the Athenian Army they burned down the capitol of Sardis including a Zoroastrian temple, thus the Persian War

started. We will talk at length about Spartan warriors and how they were the best. We will also talk about Athenian Navy and how their merchant style of life created great seafarers.

After the war is over, Athens and Sparta created defensive leagues to help “protect”

themselves and expand trade. This is when Direct Democracy flourished. They also had multiple renown philosophers such as Aristotle, Socrates, and Plato. This will roll over perfectly into the third section where we compare and contrast Sparta and Athens. All the prior knowledge of the militaristic Spartans will be reassessed as well as their culture and government(oligarchy). We will also look at the Athenian traders and culture. The use of

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

2 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary Direct democracy and the development of philosophy, art and

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

Direct democracy and the development of philosophy, art and architecture all things known as Athenian. It will show that these two groups would have not liked each other on principle and war would be likely. Finally, the last section I will talk about the Macedonians, led by Philip II taking over the whole of Greece (minus Sparta). Then after Philip II dies his son Alexander the Great takes over the Persians, Egyptians, Mesopotamians and all groups up to the Indus River. This take over led to the ability of Greek ideas being dispersed or the Hellenistic Era. Though this empire ends quite quickly, the Hellenistic era and the reach of Greek culture spreads for a much longer time. My plans try to stay in chronological order or at the very least scaffold into one another to help students stay in a zone of proximal development.]

  • 2. Knowledge of Students to Inform Teaching For each of the prompts below (2ab), describe what you know about your students with respect to the central focus of the learning segment.

Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners, struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic knowledge, and/or gifted students).

  • a. Prior academic learning and prerequisite skills related to the central focusCite evidence of what students know, what they can do, and what they are still learning to do.

[ Most students have had a baseline of knowledge about Government from past history classes. All middle school students take U.S.History in seventh grade in this district. I do not expect them to remember many details from this time however there may be some recognition as we go along. Most will be able to locate Greece on a map. They have also been taught how to analyze civilizations through their philosophy/religion, economics, government, geography, and sociology/culture or PEGGS for short. PEGGS, as well as analysis of other civilizations from the time period (Persia, China, Egypt, India, Olmec). There should be an understanding of technology of the age as well. Bronze and other precious metals and their use in war and farming give civilizations advantages for having them. They will also know that most civilizations were either theocracies or had a centralized government.

Some of the students can write a paragraph with a thesis, three to five supporting facts and a conclusion. They also know how to use the K-W-L graphic organizer and have strategies for taking multiple choice question tests/assignments. They all know how to create a timeline and use graphic organizers such as Venn Diagrams. Most are still learning how to incorporate information into paragraphs in a consistent manner. The students are also working on creating strategies for studying and working on homework. Most students are well organized. We are going to expanding their ability to write essays specifically looking at compare and contrast essays.]

  • b. Personal, cultural, and community assets related to the central focusWhat do you know about your students’ everyday experiences, cultural and language backgrounds and practices, and interests?

[ This is a very diverse class. I have students who have Eastern African ancestry, Pilipino ancestry, Latin American ancestry, Western European ancestry and Eastern European ancestry. The majority of my students are white Christian children who have lived in the United States their whole lives. The next largest population is of students with Eastern

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

3 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary African ancestry who have lived in the United states

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

African ancestry who have lived in the United states their whole lives. Most students who are not white are either Christian or Muslim. There is a large population of second generation immigrants in the classroom that tend to be more aware of what is happening politically in the USA for a 14-year-old. This will be an asset during this section because we will be analyzing government in this section. Understanding the US government will greatly help understanding of the topic. Overall there is very little community or cultural assets around for studying ancient Greece or Greek culture. Another analysis that might get the students interested is looking at the Olympics. All the students understand how the Olympics, and competition can be fun. The students have also gone out of their way to say that they prefer a worksheet when taking notes than not having a worksheet and freehand taking notes. They like having that structure since there is a large amount of information, but they don’t need to know it all.]

  • 3. Supporting Students’ History/Social Studies Learning Respond to prompts below (3ac). To support your justifications, refer to the instructional materials and lesson plans you have included as part of Planning Task 1. In addition, use principles from research and/or theory to support your justifications.

    • a. Justify how your understanding of your students’ prior academic learning and personal, cultural, and community assets (from prompts 2ab above) guided your choice or adaptation of learning tasks and materials. Be explicit about the connections between the learning tasks and students’ prior academic learning, their assets, and research/theory.

[Founded on and centered around Jerome Bruner’s theory on scaffolding knowledge. I also look to Lev Vygotsky’s theory of Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) which is the

difference between what a learner can do without help, and what he or she cannot do. The goal is to

have students use schemas of incorporating new knowledge with what they already know and

building upon it. This can be seen in the overlap between all of my lesson plans and the continuous looking back at what we already know and pushing forward using schema that have been developed in the past or new schema being developed currently. Finally, Howard

Gardner’s Eight Multiple Intelligences suggest all students acquire all eight intelligences in some

way, they prefer and are engaged in one or possibly two. Therefore, students are not having direct instruction the entire class period, but are also able to be active participants with visuals, think-pair shares and demonstrations to help us interpret and understand the history of Ancient Greece. The learning segment builds on each lesson objective skill to promote and enhance higher levels with Bloom’s Taxonomy throughout. This is done by building on identifying specific traits of the Greek homeland and people and moving forward to analyze and compare and contrasting events and groups. These higher Blooms will push the students to analyze all of the content they have learned this unit and force them to use schema they have developed over the

first month and a half of school. Lastly, I am able to follow Bloom Taxonomy’s last level of evaluation through each lesson’s exit slip assessment of evaluating the lesson objective tied to

each lesson gaining student data on overall conceptualization of the learning target. At Century High School they are pushing for freshman to write more to better prepare them for the ACT. The Social Studies and English teams have specifically been targeted to step up and have the students write more. With that being said I am having the students practice a writing prompt every in three of the four lessons. Worked into these lessons are practice pieces and even a day where I go over how to write a compare and contrast essay. This time will also be used to once again reflect on how to write a good essay. I am doing this with the thought of Zone of Proximal Development coined by Lev Vygotsky. There are multiple students who I do not expect to be able to write a great essay, however they might be at a point where they are

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

4 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary working on getting their paragraphs set up in the

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

working on getting their paragraphs set up in the correct format. In reference to student’s past experience, as you can see in my pre-assessments there are students who have understanding and knowledge of democracy developing in Greece. I will use scaffolding of their previous knowledge to not only give them information on what democracy is, but also push the students to understand why democracy developed and how it is different than the democracy we have here in the USA.]

  • b. Describe and justify why your instructional strategies and planned supports are appropriate for the whole class, individuals, and/or groups of students with specific learning needs.

Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners, struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic knowledge, and/or gifted students).

[ The instructional strategies I have chosen are appropriate for not only my general education students, but also for all my students with IEPs and 504s. This is due my use of multiple formats and ways of connecting the content to my students’ abilities, levels and learning styles. Within my learning segment I am actively engaging my students using multiple different Intelligences (Gardner) and modifications. As previously stated within my Context of Learning, I have multiple students who have 504s and IEPs that demand modification of homework and tests as well as the positioning they have in the classroom. I also have some IEPs that only allow some students to write a few sentences in a row together. This has been the hardest part of my modifications due to the fact that the on-site goal of my school is to use WICOR (see context of learning) to increase ACT scores. I have had to adjust my expectations and needs from specific students for this, however I am still using the same strategies, just with modification. An example would be the compare and contrast paragraph I am having students do in lesson plan 3. While I am asking for at least 5 sentences from most students, for a couple of the IEP and 504 students, they will only need to write down a good thesis sentence that describes what would be talked about in their paragraph. After that they are allowed to use bullet points and facts to allow them to get their ideas on paper. For the other students who need chucked assignments (assignments broken up to help keep anxiety down, they are normally the full assignments just done at a slower pace) they will be asked to write a thesis and their first detail/point of their essay on day one. Then asked to write two more details for day two and finally the conclusion on the third day. They are essentially doing the same work as the general education students. An example of using Multiple Intelligences in the classroom would be in lesson 1 where I am posting maps and pictures of Greece to help the students understand the type of landscape Greece has. This will help my 504 and IEP students who are reading at a level lower than their grade level.]

  • c. Describe key misconceptions within your central focus and how you will address them.

[ The largest misconception that I think will be had throughout this section is that students will believe that there is no relation between the first lesson plan and the last lesson plan. The concept of development over time is something that we have been struggling with as a class. I will have the students create timelines that show the development of Athens in lesson plan three. This will show the way that the past greatly affects the future. This schema will be incredibly important in the future to help students understand why events happen (Piaget). In slide show for lesson three slide 38 I ask the students why the Peloponnesian War happened. I then go over the past altercations and affects going all the way back to lesson one when we discussed how mountains created isolation of different polis’ and this created rivalries.]

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

5 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary 4. Supporting History/Social Studies Development Through Language As you

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

  • 4. Supporting History/Social Studies Development Through Language

As you respond to prompts 4a–d, consider the range of students’ language assets and needswhat do students already know, what are they struggling with, and/or what is new to them?

  • a. Language Function. Using information about your students’ language assets and needs, identify one language function essential for students to learn the history/social studies content within your central focus. Listed below are some sample language functions. You may choose one of these or another more appropriate for your learning segment.

Analyze

Compare/contrast

Construct

Describe

Evaluate

Examine

Identify

Interpret

Justify

Locate

[ The language function that I feel is most appropriate for this unit of history is analyze. First, I believe this because it is a higher-level Blooms Taxonomy word that as a class we will strive to achieve. Secondly, as the class continues into the future we will need to be able to analyze different groups. This analysis will include all of the other words in the rubrics. If students are not able to achieve analysis of Ancient Greece, it is something that we will need to continue to practice. Third, most of the students are able to identify, describe, locate, examine, and justify

for lack of a better word “things” in history. Analysis is something that will push most students

out of their comfort zone, but will not be out of the ZPD.]

  • b. Identify a key learning task from your plans that provides students with opportunities to practice using the language function identified above. Identify the lesson in which the learning task occurs. (Give lesson day/number.)

[ The language function being assessed is analyze. It is practiced in all four lessons, but the word analysis is specifically used in lesson 4 on 10/25/17, The students will write a paragraph to “analyze how Alexander the Great interacted with different groups as he expanded his empire”. This is the first time that they will be asked to take a step back and use the skills they have developed in lesson one through three. In lesson one the students practice identification. This will help the students process specific events, institutions, people, and groups that are important. In lesson two they are asked to examine. This examination of Persian and the Golden Age of Greece will allow them to build on their identification of traits and start to think about how these traits affect one another. The third lesson is a compare and contrast between Athens and Sparta which again builds to an analysis because to compare and contrast students need to be able to look at multiple groups and understand how they developed, where they developed and how they act. Then be able to notice the similarities and differences between the groups. Especially when the two groups seem extremely similar or different. Finally lesson four they have all the skills needed to truly analyze Alexander the Greats and his interactions with the groups of people he came into contact with during his conquests. This relies heavily on ZPD from Vygotsky. If students do not understand one lesson I will need to reteach to ensure they are able to accomplish the next.]

  • c. Additional Language Demands. Given the language function and learning task identified above, describe the following associated language demands (written or oral) students need to understand and/or use:

    • Vocabulary/symbols

    • Plus at least one of the following:

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

6 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916

 Discourse  Syntax Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary [ The language function and
  • Discourse

  • Syntax

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

[ The language function and vocabulary identified for lesson four includes: Tyrant, Phalanx, Epicureanism, Stoicism, Iliad, Conquest, Hellenistic Era. These vocabulary terms are crucial in Lesson 4 in supporting students’ needs for successfully using the language function of Analysis. In helping to build the students success throughout Lesson 4, key vocabulary is a focus of the focused note taking sheet, specifically the Hellenistic Era. It is also reviewed the next day when we go over the notes as a class. During this review we break into groups, I note which students are finished and participating. These students tend to be my higher- level students who understand the vocabulary and can use the words orally and in writing. As students contribute to discussion orally I will continue to provide support to my below and approaching level students to get a better understanding of the vocabulary terms and concepts. By using proximity and having the students discuss with partners, I can hear student’s use of the vocabulary terms. The vocabulary terms are assessed at the end of Lesson four with their focused note taking sheet and paragraph. In the other lessons we go through the vocabulary that includes: Oligarchy, Ephor, Acropolis, Agora, Democracy, Direct democracy, Ostracism, Age of Pericles, Tragedy, Socratic method, Peninsula, Seafarers, Mycenaean Greeks, Isolation, Arete, Homer, Iliad, and Odyssey. These are assessed in multiple ways. The first is through focused note taking sheets and the formative assessments turned in to me at the end of each lesson. The other is in the paragraphs that are written by the students to help prepare them for essay questions. The syntax that I will be looking at when assessing vocabulary is for the students to either have a pure definition of the word, or an analysis of the word. Examples would be for the Hellenistic Era. I would be looking for the students to write about what happened during the Hellenistic Era and why it was/is still important. “When Analyzing the way that the Hellenistic Era affected (fill in the

blank), see that they changed the way that they (Fill in the Black)” When it comes to the term Ephor, I just need for them to use the word correctly as the group of five men who were

auditors of Sparta voted on every year. “The Ephors were extremely powerful men who

audited everything that the Spartan government did for one year.” When it comes to discourse, most of the notes are done in small groups. These groups are totally random and change at the start of every unit. The groups are allowed to work wherever they want in the classroom or in the forum outside of the room. While in these groups, students read in round robin or in the best way for the group. If the students are not going to read round robin, they must speak to me beforehand.]

  • d. Language Supports. Refer to your lesson plans and instructional materials as needed in your response to the prompt.

    • Identify and describe the planned instructional supports (during and/or prior to the learning task) to help students understand, develop, and use the identified language demands (function, vocabulary/symbols, discourse, or syntax).

[ When looking at Researcher Howard Gardner’s Eight Multiple Intelligences and scaffolding by Lee Vygotsky, my instructional practices are implemented to best support my students. I have given opportunities for peer interactions while discussing with a partner next to them and their reading groups, and conferring with the teacher. In addition, intrapersonal, visual, and bodily kinesthetic intelligences have been incorporated throughout multiple and different occasions in my lesson to support language for all students in my class. Beyond peer interactions and discussions, I provide immediate verbal feedback while walking around the room, conferring with partners, and listening to their discussions. By providing immediate

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

7 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary feedback, students can be certain if they have a

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

feedback, students can be certain if they have a misconception of a vocabulary word. Prior to the first lesson of the learning segment, students have become familiar with the language demand of discourse through the expectations within large group times, small groups, and independent time. Throughout the learning segment, students receive varied instructional support. One of the instructional supports is that of teacher modeling and demonstrating a “compare and contrast.” During this, students are able to see and hear how the teacher completes the targeted learning objective and practices associated to the central focus of interpreting characters feelings. The modeling implemented throughout the learning segment sets the students up for success within their own independent practice time where they can refer back to the “compare and contrast” when writing. Modeling also supports my students with IEPs and their accommodations and modifications. By learning through the teacher doing it first, students are getting the opportunity to practice and apply the learning objective, while having multiple opportunities and experience to practice demonstrating the language function of interpreting characters feelings. As for my guided notes, I have modified them to fit all of my learners needs. For my struggling readers, I have worksheets with minimal reading on them and grouped them so as to give them modifications such as visual aids and extra help. As a class we also have a vocabulary quiz at the beginning of the unit. This consists of having the students write down all the vocabulary for the unit the day before we start the unit. We normally have a vocabulary quiz about three days into the unit. This helps the students get associated with the vocabulary. I also put the vocabulary right at the beginning of each lesson after the learning target. An example of this is my Lesson four plan. This helps students have some prior knowledge about what the word means and is. Then during the lesson, they are able to put the word into sequence or place.]

  • 5. Monitoring Student Learning In response to the prompts below, refer to the assessments you will submit as part of the materials for Planning Task 1.

    • a. Describe how the planned formal and informal assessments provide direct evidence of how students learn and use facts, concepts, and inquiry, interpretation, or analysis skills to build and support arguments or conclusions about historical events, a topic/theme, or a social studies phenomenon throughout the learning segment.

[ The planned formal assessments happen naturally throughout my lesson plans, however, before the learning segment was taught, a pre-assessment was given to all of the students to demonstrate their knowledge on the upcoming learning segment. This pre-assessment was put in place to not only supply data to help drive my future instruction, but also to begin to show current student understanding of the learning segment to later compare the results to the students’ final post assessment. Looking at the data from the pre-assessment I recognize that no one in my class is ready for higher level learning at this point. Every student has some deficit of information that will need to be addressed throughout my lesson plans. From the pre-and post-assessments and composition piece, student growth will then be easily shown due to not only rote memory but analysis of the facts they have learned. Throughout the entire learning segment there are both informal and formal assessments. The informal assessments that are planned and happen often throughout the segment include a varied check for understanding of the targeted skills. Students will discuss with peers as well as small groups, which also provides evidence of the additional language demand of discourse and possible syntax. In Lessons 1, 2, 3, and 4 students will be formally assessed in a variety of ways. In lesson 1 students will be assessed on the notes that they created as a group as well as my personal observations. Lesson 2 the students will turn in a paragraph addressing “At the end of the Persian War, how did Athens and Sparta create a scenario that spelt an upcoming war”. They are also to write down a 1-5 on their sheets to

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

8 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary address their understanding. 1 meaning I have no idea

Secondary History/Social Studies Task 1: Planning Commentary

address their understanding. 1 meaning I have no idea what I am talking about to 5, I could teach this to someone. Lesson 3 the students will practice a compare and contrast essay again 1-5. Lesson 4 they will work in groups to analyze the Hellenistic Era. They will create a poster and share out their findings. The teacher will use the data throughout the learning segment to inform instruction. For example, based on the class performance on the paragraph from Lesson 2, there may be need for additional support and/or scaffolding within Lesson 3 prior to extending student learning for the new concept. The formal assessments given at the end of each lesson promote students to demonstrate and practice their learning throughout the learning segment and allows the teacher to differentiate and adapt instruction(s) to meet the needs of the learners as student. When looking at informal assessments, I will be looking at the way that students work in their groups. All lessons have a group work stage where they know to be using proper vocabulary as well as syntax. Students who are working hard on their note taking and having thoughtful discussions will inherently be practicing the learning target and be achieving a higher score for their informal assessment. Finally, a post assessment or summative assessment is given to gather student achievement on utilizing and applying the skills taught and practiced throughout the learning segment. It is here that students use what they have learned from Lesson 1, 2 and 3, to complete a final assessment and composition piece at the end of the learning segment as each lesson had been taught. This final formal measure of student learning provides direct evidence of students’ composition of interpreting characters feelings.]

  • b. Explain how the design or adaptation of your planned assessments allows students with specific needs to demonstrate their learning.

Consider the variety of learners in your class who may require different strategies/support (e.g., students with IEPs or 504 plans, English language learners, struggling readers, underperforming students or those with gaps in academic knowledge, and/or gifted students).

[ When it comes to students that have IEPs and 504s in my classroom most do not need large modifications to their assessments. When it comes to formal assessments however I have created a test with very similar questions, however one has high order vocabulary in it and the other does not. I also have modified multiple choice questions where there are only two answers instead of four. There are also two students who leave the room to take any and all tests that are given to them. This is only possible with support from the special education office where they take this test. At the office the students have a relaxed quite area where they are able to truly demonstrate their learning and successes. I also allow any other student who would like to go with them to the other location to join them, however only one person has discussed interest in going to the quite room until after the formal assessment given to them during this unit. I allowed that student to retake a similar test in the office and they much better so in the future I hope that student will continue to use this room. Furthermore, the pre-assessment includes multiple-choice questions and short answer questions to students to identify important groups, people, and ideas. The pre-assessment and the entire post-assessment was read out loud to students who are struggling readers and anyone else who wanted it read to them. With the statements, questions, and possible answer choices read to my students, they are able to possess certainty in their understanding of the task as well as the answers to choose from. The purpose of the assessment is to determine the knowledge my students possess on the central focus, learning targets, and language function rather than assessing their comprehension and composition without any support. My post assessment will include a test coving all the learning targets with a multiple choice, short answer question, and essay question. Lastly, both my formal and informal assessments included picture cues, sentence starters, wait time, and additional prompting and support.]

Copyright © 2016 Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.

9 of 9 | 9 pages maximum

All rights reserved. The edTPA trademarks are owned by The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University. Use of the edTPA trademarks is permitted only pursuant to the terms of a written license agreement.

V5_0916