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EVERYONE HAS A STORY

Interdisciplinary Unit Plan connecting


Art and English Grade 5

https://xn--diseocreativo-lkb.com/que-es-el-storytelling/

Lesson 1: What’s your story?


Lesson 2: What’s their story?
Lesson 3: What’s the story?

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Joanie Oates
Art Ed Curriculum PK-8
March 8, 2018
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Everyone has a Story
5th grade

• Unit Map p.3

• Unit Plan Outline p.4

• Rubric p. 5

• Lesson Plan 1: Everyone has a Story? p.7

• Lesson Plan 2: What’s their Story? p.12

• Lesson Plan 3: What's the story? p.18

https://insight.kellogg.northwestern.edu/article/the-power-of-persuasive-storytelling

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UNIT PLAN OUTLINE
TITLE/BIG IDEA and Grade Level

STAGE I – DESIRED RESULTS:

 UNIT TRANSFER GOAL: Students will be able to independently use


their learning to engage artistically with their own story, emphasize with
others, and develop an awareness of social justice issues

• ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS - Students will understand that:


• A self-portrait does not necessarily have to be a picture of your
own face/body
• Artists and writers alike can bring to light stories of other people,
places, and things
• Individuals can start social justice conversations and expose
important issues through art

• ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
• Why is it important to reveal our own stories and the stories of
others?
• What does it take to know someone else’s story?
• How can art help us become more empathetic citizens of the
world?
• How might the use of art make a difference for social
change/social justice?

• STANDARDS ADDRESSED
ART
• Standard 3: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression
• Standard 4: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting
• Standard 7: Roles of artists in communities
• Standard 10: Interdisciplinary connections
ENGLISH
• Standard 6.5: Write stories with formal and informal language
• Standard 8.2: Retell a main event from a story read or heard
• Standard 19.6: For imaginative/literary writing: Write or dictate
short poems

• ACQUISITION/ UNIT OBJECTIVES


Students will know/will be able to…
• How to tell the story of themself through self-portraiture

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• Reflect on their own art with creative writing and poetry
• The importance of fighting for social change
• Use text and illustrations to tell a specific story

STAGE 2 – ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE

• RUBRIC: can be used for all three lessons

• PERFORMANCE TASKS/PRODUCTS AS EVIDENCE


Lesson 1: Album cover “self-portrait” that expresses who the student is
and what they’re interested in.
Lesson 2: A children’s book created for the age of Kindergartner readers
that tells someone else’s story.

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Lesson 3: Creating sculptures to start conversations about a specific
social justice issue or current event.

STAGE 3 – LEARNING PLAN

• SCOPE AND SEQUENCE OF LESSONS:


• Lesson 1: What’s Your Story? Students will reflect
on what makes them, THEM! After listening to some
expressive and self-reflective songs by relatable
artists, students will create mixed media album cover
self-portraits. Students will also a complete an artist
statement as a self-assessment to explain their
artwork.

• Lesson 2: What’s Their Story? After participating in


a “speed-dating” icebreaker game with a partner, they
will tell the story of someone else through a short
children’s picture book. The teacher will show many
examples of children’s books so they can see picture
books come in many forms and almost anything that
tells a story will be acceptable for this project!
Students will write and illustrate their children’s books
and then read their creations with their Kindergartener
buddies.

• Lesson 3: What’s the Story? After watching a


presentation and video students will choose the
current event or issue they would like investigate
further. They will create social justice “statues” that
start a conversation and express their feelings about
their topic. They will explore why this issue is
important and why the story needs to be told. Their
sculptures will be accompanied by a written poem or
short statement explaining their work.

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Lesson 1: What’s Your Story?

What’s Your Story?


5th grade

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/502855114636869474/

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Joanie Oates
March 9th, 2018

Introductory Information:
• Lesson title: What’s your story?
• 5th grade
• Class size: 20 students
• Length of class period: 55 minutes 2-4 full classes

STAGE 1: DESIRED RESULTS


A. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS: Students will understand that…
 Self-portraits can help tell the story of who you are
 Self-portraits do not necessarily have to be a picture of your face
 Album covers can express the artist and what the songs represent

B. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
 Why is it important to tell our own stories?
 How can art help us express ourselves?
 What is the definition(s) of a self-portrait?

C. STATE STANDARDS ADDRESSED:


• Standard 3: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression
• Standard 4: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting
• Standard 10: Interdisciplinary connections

D. ACQUISITION/ LEARNING OBJECTIVES:


 The students will know how to tell the story of themselves through self-
portraiture
 The students will be skilled at creating drafts and revising when
necessary
 The students will be skilled at writing an artist statement

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/album/s
moke-mirrors-deluxe/950834146
STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE
A. PERFORMANCE TASK OR FINAL PRODUCT: The final product should be a
completed album cover of their pretend (or maybe future!) music album. It
should involve more than one medium and be self-expressive. Abstract or
realistic creations are both welcome and encouraged!

B. CONTINUUM OF ASSESSMENTS: Students will be required to write a short


artist statement that also explains their album cover.

STAGE 3: LEARNING PLAN


A. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
 Drafting paper
 Water color paper or thicker paper for final
 Pencils
 Colored pencils
 Water colored pencils
 Markers
 Sharpies
 Acrylic paint
 Water colors
 Tape
 Glue
 Scissors
 Stencils of shapes and letters
 Collage materials

B. RESOURCES: VISUALS, TEXT, MEDIA AND WEB


 K. P. (2015, July 08). I.m.a.g.i.n.e~d.r.a.g.o.n.s. Retrieved March 09,
2018, from https://www.pinterest.com/pin/513832638713275364/
 Retrieved March 09, 2018, from
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/513832638713275364/
 RAINEY, K. (n.d.). THE MEANING OF FREEDOM: AN
EXPLORATION INTO SELF-PORTRAIT POEMS. Retrieved March 09,
2018, from http://communitywordproject.org/news-and-
events/meaning-freedom,370/

C. VOCABULARY WITH DEFINITIONS:


 Self-portrait: A representation of oneself by oneself

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 Collage: a piece of art that involves various materials together
 Album cover: artwork that is on the front of a music album
 Mixed media: Art making that involves more than one medium

D. TEACHER INSTRUCTION: The teacher will….


DAY 1:
 Have pencils and drafting paper ready at tables
 Introduce lesson by playing a song that tells a personal story and
facilitating a conversation about it— example song: 7 Years by
Lukas Graham

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lukas_Graham_(2015_album)

 Explain that album covers are art and can be very self-expressive
 Show examples of different kinds of album art
 Explain that a self-portrait does not have to be a picture of your
face—it can be anything that you think represents you
 Instruct students to create a rough draft of their self-portrait album
cover reminding them the final draft will be a mixed-media piece
 Get out further materials while students are working on rough drafts
 Play music that tells stories in the background
 Only allow students to move on to final paper when they have a
complete rough draft
 Go around to help students and check in individually
 Give ten minute and five minute time warnings
 Clean up
DAY 2:
 Before students get materials out to continue working… show your
benchmark and explain that they will have to write an artist
statement when they’re done—so it would be a good idea to begin
thinking about what they’ll write.
 Have students continue working
 Play music that tells stories in the background

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 Go around to check in with students
 Continue classes like this until project is finished…
Hang pieces around school with artist statements next (if student is
confortable with it)

E. QUESTIONS TO GENERATE DISCUSSION:


 What does it mean for something to be a self-portrait?
 How does art and music connect?
 How can the use of text help create self-expressive artwork?
 How can album covers become self-portraits?

http://communitywordproject.org/news-and-events/meaning-freedom,370/

F. LEARNING ACTIVITY: The students will….


 Engage in a discussion about music, art, and storytelling
 Create a rough draft of their album cover in pencil
 Create a final draft of their mixed-media album cover using at least
3 mediums
 Be able to explain their artwork both verbally and through an artist
statement
 Reflect on their own work and the work of their classmates

G. . DIFFERENTIATION:
 Stencils, printed pictures, and teacher assistance will be provided
when necessary—keeping in mind abstract art is more than
welcome
 Artist statement can be typed or said aloud if writing it is not
possible—statements can be as short as 1-2 sentences

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Lesson 2: What’s their Story?

What’s Their Story?


5th grade

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30659420-amelia-who-could-fly

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Joanie Oates
March 9th, 2018

Introductory Information:
• Lesson title: What’s their story?
• 5th grade
• Class size: 20 students
• Length of class period: 55 minutes 3-4 full classes

STAGE 1: DESIRED RESULTS


A. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS: Students will understand that…
 You have to get to know someone and practice empathy to tell their
story
 Artists and authors alike can uncover the stories of other people,
places and things
 You have to practice patience when teaching someone else (reading
their books to Kindergarteners)

B. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
 Why is it important to tell other people’s stories?
 What does it take to tell someone else’s story?
 How can art help us become more empathetic citizens of the world?

C. STATE STANDARDS ADDRESSED:


 Standard 2: Elements and Principles of Design
• Standard 4: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting
• Standard 10: Interdisciplinary connections

D. ACQUISITION/ LEARNING OBJECTIVES:


 The students will know how to tell the story of someone else through a
children’s picture book
 The students will be skilled at creating drafts and revising when
necessary
 The students will be skilled at creating illustrations and writing that go
together

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19
219121-long-walk-to-freedom 13
STAGE 2: ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE
C. PERFORMANCE TASK OR FINAL PRODUCT: The final product should be a
completed children’s book with illustrations that go along with the text. The
illustrations can be made with colored pencils, markers, and collaged.

D. CONTINUUM OF ASSESSMENTS: The text included in their children’s book


will serve as the assessment. It is important that the students think about
how their illustrations will go along with their written story.

STAGE 3: LEARNING PLAN


F. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
 Drafting paper
 4-10 pages of nicer paper to make into book
 Pencils
 Erasers
 Colored pencils
 Markers
 Sharpies
 Glue
 Scissors
 Stencils of shapes and letters
 Collage materials
 Hole puncher
 Assorted string

G. RESOURCES: VISUALS, TEXT, MEDIA AND WEB


 Markel, M., & Pham, L. (2016). Hillary Rodham Clinton: Some Girls are
Born to Lead. New York, NY: Balzer Bray, an imprint of HarperCollins.
 Retrieved March 09, 2018, from
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/30659420-amelia-who-could-
fly
 Retrieved March 09, 2018, from
https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/19219121-long-walk-to-
freedom

H. VOCABULARY WITH DEFINITIONS:

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 Author: a writer of a book, article, or report
 Illustrator: a person who draws or creates pictures for magazines,
books, advertising, etc.
 Collage: a piece of art that involves various materials together

I. TEACHER INSTRUCTION: The teacher will….


DAY 1:
 Have pencils and drafting paper ready at tables
 Begin by reading Some Girls are Born to Lead: Hillary Rodham
Clinton and have other books that tell the story of someone out for
students to see
 Explain the project and show your bench mark
 Have students make a list and brainstorm who they want to write
about—famous people, family members, teacher at school, etc…
 Have ipads available for research if necessary
 Go around to check in individually with students
 Allow them to start rough draft if they’re ready
 Give out homework sheet and explain what to they will have to do
 Clean up
DAY 2
 Bring in homework sheets
 Have final draft paper and pencils on tables already
 Check in with students about the person they’ve chosen
 Have students create drawings and story in pencil first then they
can add the mediums they would like after
 Work time
 Clean up

Homework
worksheet 

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DAY 3
 Get right to work! Goal is to finish today
 Go around helping students when needed
 Goal is to bind books today (even if they aren’t completely done
yet)
 Clean up
DAY 4
 Go visit our kindergartener buddy class and read our books to them

J. QUESTIONS TO GENERATE DISCUSSION:


 What does it take to know someone else’s story?
 Whose stories are important to tell?
 How can art and text interact to tell stories?

H. LEARNING ACTIVITY: The students will….


 Listen to a children’s book
 Choose a person they want to write a short children’s book about
 Complete homework worksheet
 Complete rough draft sketches and story
 Create a children’s book and learn how to bind their books
 Share their book with a kindergartner buddy

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I. . DIFFERENTIATION:
 Stencils, printed pictures, and teacher assistance will be provided
when necessary—keeping in mind abstract art is more than
welcome
 Artist statement can be typed or said aloud if writing it is not
possible—statements can be as short as 1-2 sentences

Lesson 3: What’s the Story?

What’s The Story?


5th grade

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https://www.eastbayexpress.com/oakland/eleventh-annual-social-justice-symposium-healing-through-
resistance/Content?oid=5091299

Joanie Oates
March 9th, 2018

Introductory Information:
• Lesson title: What’s the story?
• 5th grade
• Class size: 20 students
• Length of class period: 55 minutes 3-4 full classes

STAGE 1: DESIRED RESULTS


A. ENDURING UNDERSTANDINGS: Students will understand that…
 Individuals can start social justice conversations and expose important
issues through art
 Students will understand that important messages can be conveyed
effectively through art
 Students will understand that some artists use their art as a tool to start
conversations

B. ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

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 How might the use of art make a difference for social change/social
justice?
 Why is it important to make art that can start conversations about
social issues and current events?
 Can art bring people together?

C. STATE STANDARDS ADDRESSED:


• Standard 4: Drafting, Revising, and Exhibiting
 Standard 3: Observation, Abstraction, Invention, and Expression
• Standard 10: Interdisciplinary connections

D. ACQUISITION/ LEARNING OBJECTIVES:


Students will know how to…
• The importance of fighting for social change
• Identify an issue, idea, and/or topic they care about and want to create
a sculpture about it
• Engage in conversations about important issues

STAGE 2:

https://mashable.com/2016/09/24/public-art-social-good/

ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE
E. PERFORMANCE TASK OR FINAL PRODUCT: The final product should be
sculpture either made from clay or wire that they think represents a social
justice issue and has the ability to help fight for social change.

F. CONTINUUM OF ASSESSMENTS: Students will title their sculptures and


write short poem or statement that accompanies the work.

STAGE 3: LEARNING PLAN


K. MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT:
 Drafting paper
 Pencils
 Erasers
 Wire

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 Clay
 Clay tools

L. RESOURCES: VISUALS, TEXT, MEDIA AND WEB


 Retrieved March 09, 2018, from
https://mashable.com/2016/09/24/public-art-social-good/
 Retrieved March 09, 2018, from
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/530580399834600473/?lp=true
 Retrieved March 09, 2018
https://www.ted.com/talks/cleo_wade_want_to_change_the_world_star
t_by_being_brave_enough_to_care#t-556840

M. VOCABULARY WITH DEFINITIONS:


 Sculpture: the art of making two- or three-dimensional representative
or abstract forms
 Conversation: exchange of ideas by spoken word OR by making
artwork!
 Social justice: Concept that all individuals are to be treated equally by
official law and society as a whole
 Expression: the process of making one’s thoughts and feelings known!
 Public art: artwork that is out in an open or shared space (we will get
into the legality of it during class!)

N. TEACHER INSTRUCTION: The teacher will….


DAY 1:
 Have pencils and drafting paper ready at tables
 Give slideshow presentation about social justice issues
 Explain what a sculpture is and how we are going to make them
 Provide students with a list of possible (age-appropriate) social
justice issues they could create art about
 Show a benchmark from both materials
 Show ted talk video for inspiration and to bring together the whole
storytelling unit
 Discuss ted talk
 Give time for students to brainstorm and sketch out possible
sculpture ideas
 Go around and interact with students and give help when
necessary
 Clean up
DAY 2
 Have their sketchbooks out on the tables already and have clay
and wire materials out
 After checking everyone rough drafts idea, allow them to get started
on their sculptures

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 Go around helping students when needed
 Allow the rest of class to work
 Explain clean up and storing of clay
 Clean up
DAY 3
 Have students get right to work- goal is for students working with
clay to be done sculpting today
 (If some students finish earlier they can being working on their
poem or statement)
 Have tables have a group discussion on where they are now in
their sculptures, what they’re about, and why they chose those
topics
 Keep working!
 Clean up and store clay appropriately
 Fire clay pieces so they are ready to glaze next class
DAY 4
 Glaze pieces
 Work on poems and statements today
 (Even though the pieces wont be completely glazed and fired, have
students share their work and their titles and poems if they are
ready)
 Clean up

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/530580399834600473/?lp=true

O. QUESTIONS TO GENERATE DISCUSSION:

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 What is social justice?
 What role can art play in social justice?
 What social justice issues do you want to fight for through art
activism?
 Would anyone like to share their project ideas?

J. LEARNING ACTIVITY: The students will….


 Brainstorm a topic they really care about
 Create a sketch of the sculpture they want to create
 Create a social justice sculpture using either clay or wire
 Share their ideas and artwork with their classmates
 Write a short poem or statement about their artwork

K. . DIFFERENTIATION:
 Reference posters, list of topics, benchmarks will be available and
in sight at all times
 Accommodations will be provided where I see necessary/helpful

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