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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Billed by its purveyors as a “quick cash” solution for life’s unexpected financial emergencies, payday
lenders peddle this modern-day snake oil to 12 million1 hardworking men and women each year. For
too many, a cycle of seemingly inescapable debt follows. They have fallen victim to an industry that
has used harassment, intimidation, and threats to keep that cycle spinning for this $46 billion2
industry.

When the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) was created in 2010 as part of the Dodd-
Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, it was charged with overseeing the payday
lending industry among other responsibilities.3 4 Just a few years later, the CFPB released startling
research detailing the damaging effects payday lending has on the financial wellbeing of consumers.5
It found:

• Only 15% of payday loan borrowers are able to repay their loans on time. The remaining
85% either default or take out a new loan to cover old loan(s).
• More than 80% of payday loan borrowers rolled over (renewed) their loans into another
loan within two weeks.
• More than one-in-five new payday loans end up costing the borrower more in fees than the
total amount actually borrowed.
• Half of all payday loans are borrowed as part of a sequence of at least ten loans in a row.

It is findings like these that propelled the CFPB to carefully consider over a number of years and
eventually promulgate a tough new rule designed to protect consumers from payday lending
industry-induced debt cycles. These important safeguards are now under attack by payday industry-
backed politicians in Congress and CFPB “Acting Director” Mick Mulvaney who took more than
$60,000 in campaign cash from payday lenders6 before his legally
dubious installation by President Trump in November of 2017.7

This debt cycle being addressed by the CFPB is purposeful. It is by
design. That’s how payday lenders make their money. As Daniel
Feehan, then-president and CEO of payday lender Cash America,
admitted at a 2007 conference, “[t]he theory in the business is [that]
you’ve got to get that customer in, work to turn him into a repetitive
customer, long-term customer, because that’s really where the
profitability is.”8

In fact, an internal company training manual for payday lending
giant ACE Cash Express depicting the cycle of a payday loan dubbed
it, “The Loan Process.”9 10 Using a circular graphic that resembles an image commonly used for
recycling, the manual shows a consumer taking out a loan with ACE, spending all of the money, not
having the ability to repay the loan, and then either taking out another loan with ACE or having their
account sent to collections and returning to the beginning of the cycle by taking out a new payday
loan from ACE to get their account out of collections.

For most payday loan borrowers, this isn’t about a one-time loan to help cover an unforeseen
financial emergency. Research from The Pew Charitable Trusts found most payday loans (nearly

1 "Payday Lending in America: Who Borrows, Where They Borrow, and Why," The Pew Charitable Trusts, 7/19/12
2 Mandi Woodruff, "The $46 billion payday lending industry is in for a big blow," Yahoo! Finance, 2/10/15
3 Nick Bourke, "Meaningful Payday Loan Reform Is Within Reach," The Pew Charitable Trusts, 7/21/15
4 Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Press Release, 3/25/14
5 CFPB Data Point: Payday Lending, The CFPB Office of Research, 3/14
6 OpenSecrets search for Payday Lenders, Center for Responsive Politics, accessed 12/13/17.
7 “English v. Trump,” Gupta/Wessler, accessed 3/5/18.
8 Thomas B. Edsall, "Making Money Off the Poor," The New York Times, 9/17/13
9 Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Press Release, 7/10/14
10 Danielle Douglas, “Payday lender Ace Cash Express to pay $10 million over debt-collection practices,” The Washington Post, 7/10/14

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 1 of 32


70%) are used to cover recurring everyday expenses like a utility bill or food, while only 16% of
loans are used to cover unexpected expenses.11

That’s exactly what payday lenders are counting on – customers who are already having trouble
meeting their day-to-day living expenses who then take out a payday loan only to find it nearly
impossible to pay off on time without taking out a new payday loan, and thus kicking off or extending
the cycle of debt.

It is no wonder that Pew also found Americans favor more regulation of the payday lending industry
by a margin of 3-to-1.12 That, along with the impact these financial products have on consumers may
explain why the CFPB ultimately finalized its thoughtfully considered, tough new rule to reign in the
worst abuses of payday lenders.13

In addition to the broad support for reform found in Pew’s research, a bipartisan poll conducted on
behalf of the Center for Responsible Lending found that a mere 10% of Americans had a favorable
opinion of payday lenders.14 In the face of such dismal polling numbers, one wouldn’t expect to see so
many Members of Congress going to bat for such an unsavory and wildly unpopular industry.

But payday lenders have been preparing for this regulatory fight since the CFPB’s inception. The
industry wields tremendous power not only over those it is able to ensnare with its risky financial
products, but also over the levers of power in Washington. According to analysis conducted by Center
for Responsive Politics, over the years payday lenders have given nearly $13 million in campaign
contributions15 to incumbent members of and candidates for the U.S. House of Representatives and
U.S. Senate – the industry has also spent more than $63.5 million lobbying these bodies.16

What are these payday lenders hoping to accomplish by spending so lavishly to lobby Congress and
shower these powerful legislators with so much campaign cash?

This report details how more than a dozen members of Congress from both parties received
significant campaign contributions from payday lending industry executives and political action
committees (PACs) just before or soon after taking official actions that benefited the industry. Taken
as a whole, the timing of these contributions raises a serious question of whether they were made as
a quid pro quo for official action. It is our hope that the serious questions raised by illuminating the
suspicious, even crass timing of industry contributions and official actions taken, will lead to further
investigation and discussion of these important issues.












11 "Payday Lending in America: Who Borrows, Where They Borrow, and Why," The Pew Charitable Trusts, 7/19/12
12 CFPB Proposal for Payday and Other Small Loans, The Pew Charitable Trusts, 7/28/15
13 Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, Press Release, 10/5/17
14 Bipartisan Support for Financial Regulation and Enforcement, Lake Research Partners and Chesapeake Beach Consulting, 1/22/15
15 OpenSecrets.org Search for “Payday Lenders: Money to Congress,” Center for Responsive Politics, accessed 3/12/18.
16 OpenSecrets.org Search for “Payday Lenders Annual Lobbying,” Center for Responsive Politics, accessed 3/12/18.

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 2 of 32


NOTEWORTHY FINDINGS

This report includes numerous other examples of suspiciously timed campaign contributions.

• Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL): Accepted at least $46,250 from the payday lending industry in
the days before and after taking official actions to help the industry.

• Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID): Two days after taking $1,000 from a payday lending industry PAC,
Crapo voted against an amendment "that would create a deficit-neutral reserve fund" to
"ensure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has the authority and autonomy to
protect consumers from predatory lending."

• Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA): Two days after joining Crapo in voting against the
aforementioned amendment, Toomey took $10,000 from the payday lending industry
followed by another $3,000 in the five days following his vote.

• Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC): Just days after voting against an amendment that would "ban
individuals convicted of fraud related to financial transactions, including predatory lending
to veterans, from generally advertising or soliciting non-publicly traded securities," Scott
took $2,000 from a payday lending industry.

• Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL): Hastings routinely takes actions to benefit the payday industry
within days of taking their campaign cash. Case in point, in the days after authoring an op-ed
defending the payday lending industry in the conservative Washington Examiner, he
received $20,000 in campaign contributions from the industry.

• Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX): The powerful chair of the House Financial Services Committee
voted to cap funding for the CFPB and require it to “consult” with bubreau-regulated
industries “before implementing new rules.” The next day, Hensarling received $5,200 in
campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.

• Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX): Days after co-sponsoring legislation to repeal the law that created
the CFPB, which regulates payday lenders, Hurd received $2,700 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry.

• Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO): One of the payday lending industry’s favorite members
of Congress, Rep. Luetkemeyer often takes actions to benefit the industry within days of
taking its campaign cash. For example, he received $5,000 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry before voting to cripple the CFPB ability to hold industries like
payday lenders accountable.

• Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC): The week after sending the CFPB a letter “expressing
concern” over the bureau’s work to rein in the worst abuses of the payday industry, Rep.
McHenry received a $2,000 campaign contribution from a payday lending industry PAC.

• Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-NY): After co-sponsoring a bill that would allow payday lenders to
charge annual interest rates up to 391 percent, Rep. Meeks received $2,500 in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry.

• Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM): Four days after sending a letter to the Attorney General and
FDIC protesting Operation Choke Point, a Department of Justice effort opposed by payday
lenders that targeted unscrupulous lending practices, Rep. Pearce received $2,000 in
campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 3 of 32


• Rep. Bruce Poliquin (R-ME): Within days of voting to cap funding for the CFPB which
regulates payday lenders and requiring the bureau to consult with bureau-regulated
industry before implementing new rules, Rep. Poliquin received $3,500 in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry.

• Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA): Three days after voting to weaken the CFPB by subjecting its funding
to additional bureaucratic red tape, Rep. Royce received $3,000 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry.

• Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX): Three days before voting for legislation designed to undercut
Operation Choke Point, a Department of Justice effort opposed by payday lenders that
targeted unscrupulous lending practices, Rep. Sessions received $3,500 in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry.

• Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH): The day after sending a letter to the CFPB “expressing concern”
over the bureau’s work to rein in the worst abuses of the payday industry, Rep. Stivers
received $2,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.

• Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS): No member of Congress has taken more money from the payday
lending industry than Rep. Yoder. The investment has paid off time and again. After voting to
cripple the CFPB ability to hold industries like payday lenders accountable by changing its
structure, Yoder received $5,000 in campaign contribution from the payday lending
industry.

• Former Rep. and CFPB "Acting Director" Mick Mulvaney: A dishonorable mention, three
days before sending a letter to the CFPB “expressing concern” over the bureau’s work to rein
in the worst abuses of the payday industry, then-Rep. Mulvaney received $9,000 in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry. In the days prior to and following the letter,
Mulvaney received a total of at least $18,800 in campaign contributions from payday
lenders.

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 4 of 32


Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL)


EXAMPLE 1. Sen. Shelby received over $50,000 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry surrounding a vote against an amendment
that sought to ensure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) had
“the authority and autonomy to protect consumers from predatory lending.”


On March 26, 2015, Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) voted against an amendment "that would create a
deficit-neutral reserve fund" to "ensure the CFPB has the authority and autonomy to protect
consumers from predatory lending" and other abusive "practices in the financial marketplace."17
Earlier that month, he received $46,250 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry;
a week and a half after the vote, he received an additional $5,000.18

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Shelby for U.S. Senate ACE Cash Express $5,000 3/2/15
Shelby for U.S. Senate Checksmart Financial $5,000 3/2/15
LLC PAC
Shelby for U.S. Senate Wolfberg, Robert (PLS $2,700 3/2/15
Financial)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Bassford, Dennis J. $2,500 3/2/15
(Moneytree Inc.)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Bassford, Dennis J. $2,500 3/2/15
(Moneytree Inc.)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Hodges, Michael L. $2,500 3/2/15
(AMSCOT Financial)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Hodges, Michael L. $2,500 3/2/15
(AMSCOT Financial)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Hodges, Tina K. $2,500 3/2/15
(Advance America)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Hodges, Tina K. $2,500 3/2/15
(Advance America)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Jones, John Bailey $2,500 3/2/15
(Checks Into Cash)
Shelby for U.S. Senate MacKechnie, Ian $2,500 3/2/15
(AMSCOT Financial)
Shelby for U.S. Senate MacKechnie, Jean $2,500 3/2/15
(AMSCOT Financial)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Pendergrass, Courtney $2,500 3/2/15
E. (Check Into Cash)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Rawle, Todd $2,500 3/2/15
(Community Choice
Financial)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Rawle, Tracy (Check $2,500 3/2/15
City)
Shelby for U.S. Senate Pls Good Neighbor PAC $2,500 3/2/15
Shelby for U.S. Senate Wolfberg, Robert (PLS $1,050 3/2/15
Financial)
TOTAL $46,250


17 CQ Vote Report, S Con Res 11, Congressional Quarterly, 03/26/15; S.Amdt.842 to S.Con.Res.11, Senate Vote 117, 03/26/15
18 Follow the Money search for Payday Lender contributions to Richard Shelby, National Institute on Money in State Politics, accessed 12/05/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 5 of 32



Recipient Donor Amount Date
Shelby for U.S. Senate Community Financial $5,000 4/07/15
Services Association of
America PAC
TOTAL $5,000



EXAMPLE 2. Sen. Shelby received nearly $6,000 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry in the days following a vote on an
amendment he authored that included “dangerous carve outs for payday
lenders” from strong consumer protection oversight.


In May 2010, Sen. Shelby introduced an amendment that President Obama said "''would weaken
consumer protection oversight'" and include "'dangerous carve outs for payday lenders' and other
financial services operations.'"19 In the two weeks following the vote on his amendment, he received
$5,800 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.20

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Shelby for U.S. Senate Integrity Texas $2,400 5/20/10
Funding, LP
Shelby for U.S. Senate Integrity Texas $2,400 5/20/10
Funding, LP
Shelby for U.S. Senate Aycox, Rod (Select $1,000 5/10/10
Management
Resources)
TOTAL $5,800


19 "Senate Democrats Block GOP Effort To Weaken Consumer Lending Protection," The Frontrunner, 05/07/10
20 Follow the Money search for Payday Lender contributions to Richard Shelby, National Institute on Money in State Politics, accessed 12/05/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 6 of 32


Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID)


EXAMPLE 1. Sen. Crapo received $1,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry two days before voting against an amendment that
sought to ensure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) had “the
authority and autonomy to protect consumers from predatory lending.”


On March 26, 2015, Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID) voted against an amendment "that would create a deficit-
neutral reserve fund" to "ensure the CFPB has the authority and autonomy to protect consumers
from predatory lending" and other abusive "practices in the financial marketplace."21 Two days
earlier, he received a $1,000 donation from the payday lending industry.22

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Mike Crapo for U.S. Financial Services PAC $1,000 3/24/15
Senate
TOTAL $1,000


21 CQ Vote Report, S Con Res 11, Congressional Quarterly, 03/26/15; S.Amdt.842 to S.Con.Res.11, Senate Vote 117, 03/26/15
22 Follow the Money search for Payday Lender contributions to Mike Crapo, National Institute on Money in State Politics, accessed 12/05/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 7 of 32


Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA)


EXAMPLE 1. Sen. Toomey received $10,000 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry two days before voting against an amendment
that sought to ensure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) had
“the authority and autonomy to protect consumers from predatory lending.”
In the week following the vote, Toomey received an additional $3,000 from
payday lenders.


On March 26, 2015, Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA) voted against an amendment "that would create a
deficit-neutral reserve fund" to "ensure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has the authority
and autonomy to protect consumers from predatory lending" and other abusive "practices in the
financial marketplace."23 Two days before the vote, he received $10,000 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry. In the week following the vote, he received an additional $3,000.24

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Pat Toomey Campaign Webster, William $800 3/31/15
Committee (Advance America)
Pat Toomey Campaign Webster, William $200 3/31/15
Committee (Advance America)
Pat Toomey Campaign Clark, Agartha $1,000 3/30/15
Committee (Moneytree Inc.)
Pat Toomey Campaign Hodges, Michael $1,000 3/30/15
Committee (Advance Financial)
Pat Toomey Campaign MacKechnie, Ian $2,500 3/24/15
Committee (AMSCOT Financial)
Pat Toomey Campaign Ace Cash Express, Inc. $2,500 3/24/15
Committee PAC
Pat Toomey Campaign Checksmart Financial $2,500 3/24/15
Committee LLC PAC
Pat Toomey Campaign Pls Good Neighbor PAC $2,500 3/24/15
Committee
TOTAL $13,000


23 CQ Vote Report, S Con Res 11, Congressional Quarterly, 03/26/15; S.Amdt.842 to S.Con.Res.11, Senate Vote 117, 03/26/15
24 Follow the Money search for Payday Lender contributions to Pat Toomey, National Institute on Money in State Politics, accessed 12/05/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 8 of 32


Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC)


EXAMPLE 1. Sen. Scott received $2,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry just eleven days after voting against an amendment
that sought "to ban individuals convicted of fraud related to financial
transactions, including predatory lending to veterans, from generally
advertising or soliciting non-publicly traded securities."


On November 3, 2011, then Rep. Tim Scott (R-SC) voted against amending the "Access to Capital for
Job Creators Act" "to ban individuals convicted of fraud related to financial transactions, including
predatory lending to veterans, from generally advertising or soliciting non-publicly traded
securities."25 26 Eleven days later, he received $2,000 in campaign contributions from the payday
lending industry.27

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Tim Scott Campaign Advance America $1,000 11/14/11
Committee
Tim Scott Campaign Advance America $1,000 11/14/11
Committee
TOTAL $2,000



EXAMPLE 2. Sen. Scott received hundreds of dollars in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry just nine days before voting against an
amendment that sought to ensure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau
(CFPB) had “the authority and autonomy to protect consumers from predatory
lending.”


On March 26, 2015, Sen. Scott voted against an amendment "that would create a deficit-neutral
reserve fund" to "ensure the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has the authority and autonomy
to protect consumers from predatory lending" and other abusive "practices in the financial
marketplace."28 Nine days before the vote, he received $500 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry.29

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Tim Scott Campaign Advance America $500 3/17/15
Committee
TOTAL $500


25 "House Passes Bi-Partisan Small Business Bills," US Fed News, 11/04/11
26 "November 2011 Vote History," U.S. Representative Phil Roe, M.D., accessed 09/26/17 and HR 2940, House of Representatives Vote 827, 11/03/11
27 Follow the Money search for Payday Lending contributions to Tim Scott, National Institute on Money in State Politics, accessed 12/05/17
28 CQ Vote Report, S Con Res 11, Congressional Quarterly, 03/26/15; S.Amdt.842 to S.Con.Res.11, Senate Vote 117, 03/26/15
29 Follow the Money search for Payday Lending contributions to Tim Scott, National Institute on Money in State Politics, accessed 12/05/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 9 of 32


Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Hastings received $8,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry in the days before and after sending the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) a letter “expressing concern” over the
bureau’s work to rein in the worst abuses of the payday industry.


In September 2016, Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-FL) sent a letter to the CFPB "expressing concern about
the agency's proposal to rein in payday lending and other short-term credit."30 Two weeks earlier, he
received $5,00031 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry. He received an
additional $3,00032 in the month following his letter.

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Hastings for Congress MacKechnie Sr., Ian $2,500 09/14/16
(AMSCOT Financial)
Hastings for Congress MacKechnie, Jean $2,500 09/14/16
(AMSCOT Financial)
Hastings for Congress Community Financial $3,000 10/13/16
Services Association of
America PAC
TOTAL $8,000



EXAMPLE 2. Rep. Hastings received $20,000 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry in the days after he authored an op-ed published
in the conservative Washington Examiner defending the payday lending
industry.


On September 28, 2015, Rep. Hastings wrote an op-ed praising payday loans in the conservative
Washington Examiner.33 Three weeks after authoring the op-ed, he received $20,000 in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry.34

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Hastings for Congress MacKechnie, Tracy $1,500 10/19/15
(AMSCOT Financial)
Hastings for Congress Bassford, Dennis J. $1,500 10/19/15
(Identified by Follow
the Money)
Hastings for Congress MacKechnie, Catriona $1,000 10/19/15
Jean (AMSCOT
Financial)
Hastings for Congress Checksmart Financial $5,000 10/19/15
LLC PAC
Hastings for Congress Checksmart Financial $5,000 10/19/15

30 Ian McKendry, "Bipartisan Group of Lawmakers Urges CFPB to Ease Up on Payday Rule," American Banker, 09/30/16
31 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Alcee Hastings, Follow The Money, accessed 12/06/17
32 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Alcee Hastings, Follow The Money, accessed 12/06/17
33 Alcee Hastings, "Why payday loans are in consumers' best interests," Washington Examiner, 09/28/15
34 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Alcee Hastings, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 10 of 32


LLC PAC
Hastings for Congress Ace Cash Express $5,000 10/19/15
Hastings for Congress Pls Financial Services $1,000 10/19/15
PAC
TOTAL $20,000

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 11 of 32


Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Hensarling received $5,200 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry the day after voting to cap funding for the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) which regulates payday
lenders and requiring the bureau to consult with industry before
implementing new rules.


On February 4, 2015, Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX) voted to cap funding for the CFPB and require it "to
consult with private-sector employers before implementing new rules."35 The next day, he received
$5,200 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.36

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Friends of Jeb Ahlberg, Trevor L. $2,700 02/05/15
Hensarling (Cottonwood
Financial)
Friends of Jeb Ahlberg, Trevor L. $2,500 02/05/15
Hensarling (Cottonwood
Financial)
TOTAL $5,200



EXAMPLE 2. Rep. Hensarling received $5,000 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry in the days before voting to weaken the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) by subjecting its funding to
additional bureaucratic red tape.


On July 15, 2014, three weeks after receiving $5,000 in campaign contributions from the payday
lending industry,37 Rep. Hensarling voted to subject CFPB funding to bureaucratic red tape.38

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Friends of Jeb Cash America $5,000 06/26/14
Hensarling International Inc. PAC
TOTAL $5,000



EXAMPLE 3. Rep. Hensarling received $5,000 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry just days before voting to cripple the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) by changing its structure and allowing
Congress to meddle with its funding.


35 Joseph Lawler, "House passes bill targeting CFPB, regulations," Washington Examiner, 02/04/15 and Pete Schroeder, "House bill would cap CFPB budget," The Hill,

02/04/15 and HR 50, House of Representatives Vote 64, 02/04/15


36 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Jeb Hensarling, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
37 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Jeb Hensarling, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
38 Cristina Marcos, "House rebuffs bid to limit congressional review of CFPB," The Hill, 07/15/14 and HR 5016, House of Representatives Vote 411, 07/15/14

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 12 of 32



On February 27, 2014, Rep. Hensarling voted to weaken the CFPB by subjecting it to the
Congressional appropriation process, "replace the CFPB's single director with a five-member board,"
and "make it easier for a council of federal regulators to overrule the CFPB's decisions."39 Experts
have said such a move would hobble the CFPB and "slide [the bureau] into gridlock and inaction."40
The week before, he received $5,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.41

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Friends of Jeb Ace Cash Express Inc. $5,000 02/18/14
Hensarling PAC
TOTAL $5,000


39 Alan Zibel, "House Passes Bill Limiting Consumer Regulator," The Wall Street Journal, 02/27/14 and HR 3193, House of Representatives Vote 85, 02/27/14
40 AFL CIO et. al Letter to Representative, 5/03/11
41 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Jeb Hensarling, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 13 of 32


Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Hurd received $2,700 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry just two weeks after co-sponsoring legislation to
repeal the law that created the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)
which regulates payday lenders.


On July 20, 2015, Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX) co-sponsored a bill to repeal "the Consumer Financial
Protection Act of 2010, which established the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau."42 Two weeks
later, he received $2,700 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.43

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Hurd for Congress Ahlberg, Trevor L. $2,700 08/05/15
(Cottonwood
Financial)
TOTAL $2,700


42 HR 3118, House of Representatives, 07/20/15
43 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Will Hurd, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 14 of 32


Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Luetkemeyer received thousands of dollars in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry in the days before and the day
after sending the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) a letter
“expressing concern” over the bureau’s work to rein in the worst abuses of the
payday industry.


In September 2016, Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO) sent a letter to the CFPB "expressing concern
about the agency's proposal to rein in payday lending and other short-term credit."44 Ten days before
sending the letter, he received $5,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry –
the day after sending the letter, he received another $2,500.45

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Blaine Luetkemeyer Community Financial $2,500 09/30/16
Campaign Committee Services Association of
America PAC
Blaine Luetkemeyer Cash America $2,500 09/19/16
Campaign Committee International Inc. PAC
Blaine Luetkemeyer World Acceptance $2,500 09/19/16
Campaign Committee Corporation PAC
TOTAL $7,500



EXAMPLE 2. Rep. Luetkemeyer received hundreds of dollars in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry the week after voting against
an amendment that would have protected the Consumer Financial Protection
Bureau’s (CFPB) ability to hold payday lenders accountable.


On July 6, 2016, Rep. Luetkemeyer voted against removing a provision from the 2017 Financial
Services and General Government Appropriations Act that prohibited "funds from being used by the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to enforce regulations or rules with respect to payday loans,
vehicle title loans or other similar loans." 46 47 A week later, he received $500 in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry.48

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Blaine Luetkemeyer Financial Service $500 07/13/16
Campaign Committee Centers of America Inc.
PAC
TOTAL $500



44 Ian McKendry, "Bipartisan Group of Lawmakers Urges CFPB to Ease Up on Payday Rule," American Banker, 09/30/16
45 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Blaine Luetkemeyer, Follow The Money, accessed 12/06/17
46 H.R.5485, Library of Congress, accessed 09/26/17
47 "July 2016 Vote History," U.S. Representative Phil Roe, M.D., accessed 09/26/17 and HR 5485, House of Representatives Vote 369, 07/06/16
48 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Blaine Luetkemeyer, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 15 of 32



EXAMPLE 3. Rep. Luetkemeyer received $1,000 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry four days after voting to weaken the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) by subjecting its funding to
additional bureaucratic red tape.


On July 15, 2014, Rep. Luetkemeyer voted to subject the funding for the CFPB to additional
bureaucratic red tape.49 Four days later, he received $1,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry.50

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Blaine Luetkemeyer Axcess Financial $1,000 07/19/14
Campaign Committee Services Inc. PAC
TOTAL $1,000



EXAMPLE 4. Rep. Luetkemeyer received $1,500 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry two weeks after introducing a bill that
would have reversed actions taken by Congress to protect consumers from
payday lenders.


On April 15, 2013, Rep. Luetkemeyer introduced legislation that "would negate actions Congress and
federal officials had established for safeguarding consumers from payday lenders."51 52 Two weeks
later, he received $1,500 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.53

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Blaine Luetkemeyer Dasher, Alan $1,500 04/30/13
Campaign Committee (Cashback Payday
Loans)
TOTAL $1,500



EXAMPLE 5. Rep. Luetkemeyer received $5,000 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry before voting to cripple the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) ability to hold industries like payday
lenders accountable by changing the bureau’s structure and making it more
easily overruled.


In July 2011, three weeks after receiving $5,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending
industry,54 Rep. Luetkemeyer voted to replace the CFPB’s director with "a five-member oversight
panel" and "make it easier to overturn regulations imposed by the bureau," moves that would cripple


49 Cristina Marcos, "House rebuffs bid to limit congressional review of CFPB," The Hill, 07/15/14 and HR 5016, House of Representatives Vote 411, 07/15/14
50 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Blaine Luetkemeyer, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
51 HR 1566, House of Representatives, 04/15/13
52 Justin Wingerter, "Ethics complaint against Rep. Kevin Yoder alleges pay-for-play with payday loan industry," Topeka Capital-Journal, 10/09/15
53 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Blaine Luetkemeyer, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
54 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Blaine Luetkemeyer, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 16 of 32


its ability to hold industries like payday lenders accountable.55 Experts have said such a move would
hobble the CFPB and "slide [the bureau] into gridlock and inaction."56

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Blaine Luetkemeyer Community Financial $5,000 06/27/11
Campaign Committee Services Association of
America PAC
TOTAL $5,000


55 Seung Min Kim, "House bill revamps consumer agency," Politico, 07/21/11 and HR 1315, House of Representatives Vote 621, 07/21/11
56 AFL CIO et. al Letter to Representative, 5/03/11

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 17 of 32


Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. McHenry received $2,000 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry the week after sending the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau (CFPB) a letter “expressing concern” over the bureau’s
work to rein in the worst abuses of the payday industry.


In September 2016, Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC) sent a letter to the CFPB "expressing concern about
the agency's proposal to rein in payday lending and other short-term credit.”57 A week later, he
received $2,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.58

Recipient Donor Amount Date
McHenry for Congress Community Financial $2,000 10/06/16
Services Association of
America PAC
TOTAL $2,000


57 Ian McKendry, "Bipartisan Group of Lawmakers Urges CFPB to Ease Up on Payday Rule," American Banker, 09/30/16
58 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Patrick McHenry, Follow The Money, accessed 12/06/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 18 of 32


Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-NY)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Meeks received $2,500 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry after co-sponsoring a bill that would allow payday
lenders to charge annual interest rates up to 391 percent.


On February 26, 2009, Rep. Gregory Meeks co-sponsored a bill that would allow payday lenders to
charge annual percentage rates up to 391 percent. Meeks argued that the bill would "provide
'options' for people who, in earlier times, 'would come back without a limb' if they failed to repay
loan sharks on the street."59 Three weeks later, he received $2,500 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry.60

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Gregory Meeks Ace Cash Express Inc. $2,500 03/19/09
Campaign Committee PAC
TOTAL $2,500


59 HR 1214, House of Representatives, 02/26/09 and Editorial, "391 Percent Payday Loan," New York Times, 04/12/09
60 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Gregory Meeks, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 19 of 32


Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Pearce received a $3,500 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry just before sending a letter to the Inspector General
of the Department of Justice (DOJ) asking for an investigation into Operation
Choke Point, a DOJ effort opposed by payday lenders that targeted
unscrupulous lending practices.


On October 16, 2014, Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM) wrote a letter to the Inspector General of the
Department of Justice requesting an "investigation into the Department of Justice (DOJ) program
known as Operation Choke Point and the DOJ officials and staff involved in its creation and
execution." 61 The operation aimed to "prevent unscrupulous Internet-based companies – some
payday lenders, for instance – from gaining access to the banking system through intermediaries
known as third-party payment processors."62 Three weeks before sending the letter, he received
$3,500 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.63

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Stevan E. Pearce Ace Cash Express Inc. $2,500 09/30/14
Campaign Committee PAC
Stevan E. Pearce Cash America $1,000 09/24/14
Campaign Committee International Inc. PAC
TOTAL $3,500



EXAMPLE 2. Rep. Pearce received $2,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry four days after sending a letter to the Attorney
General and FDIC protesting Operation Choke Point, a DOJ effort opposed by
payday lenders that targeted unscrupulous lending practices.


On August 22, 2013, Rep. Pearce signed a letter to Attorney General Eric Holder and Federal Deposit
Insurance Commission (FDIC) Chairman Martin Ginsburg protesting Operation Choke Point, an effort
to "prevent unscrupulous Internet-based companies,” including payday lenders, “from gaining access
to the banking system through intermediaries known as third-party payment processors."64 Four
days later, he received $2,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.65

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Stevan E. Pearce Taylor, Donna (Check $2,000 08/26/13
Campaign Committee Into Cash)
TOTAL $2,000


61 Blaine Luetkemeyer et. al. to Michael Horowitz et. al., 10/16/14
62 The Editorial Board, "'Operation Choke Point' Hits the Mark," The New York Times, 10/10/14
63 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Steve Pearce, Follow The Money, accessed 12/04/17
64 Blaine Luetkemeyer et. al. to Eric Holder et. al., 08/22/13 and Community Financial Services Association of America et. al. v. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation et.

al., Case 1:14-cv-00953 and The Editorial Board, "'Operation Choke Point' Hits the Mark," The New York Times, 10/10/14
65 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Steve Pearce, Follow The Money, accessed 12/04/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 20 of 32


Rep. Bruce Poliquin (R-ME)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Poliquin received $3,500 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry the day before voting to cap funding for the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which regulates payday
lenders, and requiring the bureau to consult with industry before
implementing new rules.


On February 4, 2015, Rep. Bruce Poliquin (R-ME) voted to cap funding for the CFPB and require it "to
consult with private-sector employers before implementing new rules."66 In the weeks before and
after voting for the bill, he received $3,500 in campaign contributions from the payday lending
industry.67

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Poliquin for Congress Jones, John Bailey $500 01/29/15
(Check Into Cash)
Poliquin for Congress Advance America Cash $1,000 02/05/15
Advance Centers Inc.
PAC
Poliquin for Congress Community Financial $1,000 02/10/15
Services Association of
America PAC
Poliquin for Congress Axcess Financial $1,000 02/10/15
Services Inc. PAC INC.
PAC
TOTAL $3,500


66 Joseph Lawler, "House passes bill targeting CFPB, regulations," Washington Examiner, 02/04/15 and Pete Schroeder, "House bill would cap CFPB budget," The Hill,

02/04/15 and HR 50, House of Representatives Vote 64, 02/04/15


67 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Bruce Poliquin, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 21 of 32


Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Royce received $1,500 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry days after voting for legislation designed to undercut
Operation Choke Point, a Department of Justice effort opposed by payday
lenders that targeted unscrupulous lending practices.


On February 4, 2016, Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA) voted for a bill that was written to "effectively stall
'Operation Choke Point,'68 which aimed to "prevent unscrupulous Internet-based companies – some
payday lenders, for instance – from gaining access to the banking system through intermediaries
known as third-party payment processors."69 Two weeks later, he received $1,500 in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry.70

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Royce Campaign Financial Service $1,500 02/18/16
Committee Centers of America Inc.
PAC
TOTAL $1,500



EXAMPLE 2. Rep. Royce received $5,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry days after voting to cap funding for the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which regulates payday lenders, and
requiring the bureau to consult with industry before implementing new rules.


On February 4, 2015, Rep. Royce voted to cap funding for the CFPB and require it "to consult with
private-sector employers before implementing new rules."71 Two weeks later, he received $5,000 in
campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.72

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Royce Campaign Cash America $5,000 02/20/15
Committee International Inc. PAC
TOTAL $1,500



EXAMPLE 3. Rep. Royce received $3,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry three days after voting to weaken the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) by subjecting its funding to additional
bureaucratic red tape.


68 Victoria Finkle, "Luetkemeyer Tries Again on Anti-Choke Point Bill," American Banker, 02/06/15; Cristina Marcos, "House passes bill to halt 'Operation Choke Point',"

The Hill, 02/04/16; and HR 766, House of Representatives Vote 63, 02/04/16
69 The Editorial Board, "'Operation Choke Point' Hits the Mark," The New York Times, 10/10/14
70 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Ed Royce, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
71 Joseph Lawler, "House passes bill targeting CFPB, regulations," Washington Examiner, 02/04/15 and Pete Schroeder, "House bill would cap CFPB budget," The Hill,

02/04/15 and HR 50, House of Representatives Vote 64, 02/04/15


72 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Ed Royce, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 22 of 32



On July 15, 2014, Rep. Royce voted to subject the funding for the CFPB to additional bureaucratic red
tape.73 Three days later, he received $3,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending
industry.74

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Royce Campaign Axcess Financial $3,000 07/18/14
Committee Services Inc. PAC
TOTAL $3,000



EXAMPLE 4. Rep. Royce received $1,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry after voting to cripple the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) ability to hold industries like payday lenders
accountable by changing the bureau’s structure and making it more easily
overruled.


On July 21, 2011, Rep. Royce voted to replace the CFPB’s director with "a five-member oversight
panel" and "make it easier to overturn regulations imposed by the bureau," moves that would cripple
its ability to hold industries like payday lenders accountable.75 Experts have said such a move would
hobble the CFPB and "slide [the bureau] into gridlock and inaction."76 Two weeks later, he received
$1,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.77

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Royce Campaign Tillmon, Cassandra (VC $1,000 08/03/11
Committee Funding)
TOTAL $1,000


73 Cristina Marcos, "House rebuffs bid to limit congressional review of CFPB," The Hill, 07/15/14 and HR 5016, House of Representatives Vote 411, 07/15/14
74 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Ed Royce, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
75 Seung Min Kim, "House bill revamps consumer agency," Politico, 07/21/11 and HR 1315, House of Representatives Vote 621, 07/21/11
76 AFL CIO et. al Letter to Representative, 5/03/11
77 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Ed Royce, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 23 of 32


Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Sessions received $3,500 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry days after voting for legislation designed to undercut
Operation Choke Point, a Department of Justice effort opposed by payday
lenders that targeted unscrupulous lending practices.


On February 4, 2016, Rep. Sessions voted for a bill that was written to "effectively stall 'Operation
Choke Point,'78 which aimed to "prevent unscrupulous Internet-based companies – some payday
lenders, for instance – from gaining access to the banking system through intermediaries known as
third-party payment processors."79 Three days prior, he received $3,500 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry80 and two weeks after that he received another $2,000.81

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Pete Sessions for Cash America $2,500 02/01/16
Congress International Inc. PAC
Pete Sessions for Feehan, Daniel (Cash $1,000 02/01/16
Congress America Inc.)
Pete Sessions for Ace Cash Express Inc. $300 02/19/16
Congress PAC
Pete Sessions for Ace Cash Express Inc. $1,700 02/19/16
Congress PAC
TOTAL $5,500



EXAMPLE 2. Rep. Sessions received $10,600 in campaign contributions from
the payday lending industry after voting to weaken the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau (CFPB) by subjecting its funding to additional bureaucratic
red tape.


On July 15, 2014, Rep. Sessions voted to subject the funding for the CFPB to additional bureaucratic
red tape.82 Three weeks later, he received $10,600 in campaign contributions from the payday
lending industry.83

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Pete Sessions for Stuart, Brent (Cash $250 08/06/14
Congress America)
Pete Sessions for Clay, David (Cash $250 08/06/14
Congress America)
Pete Sessions for Feehan, Daniel (Cash $2,600 08/06/14
Congress America)
Pete Sessions for Linscott, Curtis (Cash $1,000 08/06/14


78 Victoria Finkle, "Luetkemeyer Tries Again on Anti-Choke Point Bill," American Banker, 02/06/15; Cristina Marcos, "House passes bill to halt 'Operation Choke Point',"

The Hill, 02/04/16; and HR 766, House of Representatives Vote 63, 02/04/16
79 The Editorial Board, "'Operation Choke Point' Hits the Mark," The New York Times, 10/10/14
80 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Pete Sessions, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
81 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Pete Sessions, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
82 Cristina Marcos, "House rebuffs bid to limit congressional review of CFPB," The Hill, 07/15/14 and HR 5016, House of Representatives Vote 411, 07/15/14
83 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Pete Sessions, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 24 of 32


Congress America)
Pete Sessions for Pepe, Vic (Cash $1,000 08/06/14
Congress America)
Pete Sessions for Bessant Jr., Thomas $500 08/06/14
Congress (Cash America)
Pete Sessions for Cash America $5,000 08/06/14
Congress International Inc. PAC
TOTAL $10,600

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 25 of 32


Rep. Steve Stivers (R-TX)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Stivers received $2,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry the day after sending a letter to the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) “expressing concern” over the bureau’s
work to rein in the worst abuses of the payday industry.


On September 29, 2016, Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH) sent a letter to the CFPB "expressing concern
about the agency's proposal to rein in payday lending and other short-term credit."84 The day after
signing the letter, he received $2,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.85

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Stivers for Congress Community Financial $2,000 09/30/16
Services Association of
America PAC
TOTAL $2,000



EXAMPLE 2. Rep. Stivers received $1,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry the week after voting against an amendment that
would have protected the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB)
ability to hold payday lenders accountable.


On July 6, 2016, Rep. Stivers voted against removing a provision from the 2017 Financial Services
and General Government Appropriations Act that prohibited "funds from being used by the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to enforce regulations or rules with respect to payday loans,
vehicle title loans or other similar loans."86 87 The week prior, he received $1,000 in campaign
contributions from the payday lending industry.88

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Stivers for Congress Cash America $1,000 06/28/16
International Inc. PAC
TOTAL $1,000



EXAMPLE 3. Rep. Stivers received $5,200 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry just days after voting to cripple the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) by changing its structure and allowing
Congress to meddle with its funding.


84 Ian McKendry, "Bipartisan Group of Lawmakers Urges CFPB to Ease Up on Payday Rule," American Banker, 09/30/16
85 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Steve Stivers, Follow The Money, accessed 12/06/17
86 H.R.5485, Library of Congress, accessed 09/26/17
87 "July 2016 Vote History," U.S. Representative Phil Roe, M.D., accessed 09/26/17 and HR 5485, House of Representatives Vote 369, 07/06/16
88 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Steve Stivers, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 26 of 32


On February 27, 2014, Rep. Stivers voted to weaken the CFPB by subjecting it to the Congressional
appropriation process, “replace the CFPB’s single director with a five-member board,” and “make it
easier for a council of federal regulators to overrule the CFPB’s decisions.”89 Experts have said such a
move would hobble the CFPB and "slide [the bureau] into gridlock and inaction."90 Two weeks later,
he received $5,200 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.91

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Stivers for Congress Financial Service $2,600 03/14/14
Centers of America Inc.
PAC
Stivers for Congress Financial Service $2,600 03/14/14
Centers of America Inc.
PAC
TOTAL $5,200


89 Alan Zibel, "House Passes Bill Limiting Consumer Regulator," The Wall Street Journal, 02/27/14 and HR 3193, House of Representatives Vote 85, 02/27/14
90 AFL CIO et. al Letter to Representative, 5/03/11
91 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Steve Stivers, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 27 of 32


Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS)


EXAMPLE 1. Rep. Yoder received $5,100 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry in the days before and after sending a letter to the
Inspector General of the Department of Justice (DOJ) asking for an
investigation into Operation Choke Point, a DOJ effort opposed by payday
lenders that targeted unscrupulous lending practices.


On October 16, 2014, Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS) wrote a letter to the Inspector General of the
Department of Justice requesting an "investigation into the Department of Justice (DOJ) program
known as Operation Choke Point and the DOJ officials and staff involved in its creation and
execution." 92 The operation aimed to "prevent unscrupulous Internet-based companies – some
payday lenders, for instance – from gaining access to the banking system through intermediaries
known as third-party payment processors."93 In the weeks before and after sending the letter, he
received $5,100 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.94

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Yoder for Congress Aycox, Rod (Select $2,600 11/03/14
Management
Resources)
Yoder for Congress Community Financial $2,500 09/30/14
Services Association of
America PAC
TOTAL $5,100



EXAMPLE 2. Rep. Yoder received $4,000 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry in the days after voting to weaken the Consumer
Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) by subjecting its funding to additional
bureaucratic red tape.


On July 15, 2014, Rep. Yoder voted to subject the funding for the CFPB to additional bureaucratic red
tape.95 Two weeks later, he received $4,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending
industry.96

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Yoder for Congress Jones III, William A. $2,000 07/31/14
(Check Into Cash)
Yoder for Congress Jones, Abby (Check $2,000 07/29/14
Into Cash)
TOTAL $4,000


92 Blaine Luetkemeyer et. al. to Michael Horowitz et. al., 10/16/14
93 The Editorial Board, "'Operation Choke Point' Hits the Mark," The New York Times, 10/10/14
94 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Kevin Yoder, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
95 Cristina Marcos, "House rebuffs bid to limit congressional review of CFPB," The Hill, 07/15/14 and HR 5016, House of Representatives Vote 411, 07/15/14
96 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Kevin Yoder, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 28 of 32



EXAMPLE 3. Rep. Yoder received $3,500 in campaign contributions from the
payday lending industry days after voting for legislation designed to undercut
Operation Choke Point, a Department of Justice effort opposed by payday
lenders that targeted unscrupulous lending practices.


On February 4, 2016, Rep. Yoder voted for a bill that was written to "effectively stall 'Operation
Choke Point,'97 which aimed to "prevent unscrupulous Internet-based companies – some payday
lenders, for instance – from gaining access to the banking system through intermediaries known as
third-party payment processors."98 Three weeks later, he received $2,700 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry.99

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Yoder for Congress Powell, Mary Ann (QC $2,700 02/23/16
Holdings)
TOTAL $2,700



EXAMPLE 4. Rep. Yoder received $5,000 in campaign contribution from the
payday lending industry after voting to cripple the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) ability to hold industries like payday lenders
accountable by changing the bureau’s structure and making it more easily
overruled.


On July 21, 2011, Rep. Yoder voted to replace the CFPB’s director with "a five-member oversight
panel" and "make it easier to overturn regulations imposed by the bureau," moves that would cripple
its ability to hold industries like payday lenders accountable.100 Experts have said such a move
would hobble the CFPB and "slide [the bureau] into gridlock and inaction."101 Three weeks later, he
received $5,000 in campaign contributions from the payday lending industry.102

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Yoder for Congress Aycox, Rod (Select $2,500 08/11/11
Management
Resources)
Yoder for Congress Aycox, Leslie Vail $2,500 08/11/11
(Select Management
Resources)
TOTAL $5,000


97 Victoria Finkle, "Luetkemeyer Tries Again on Anti-Choke Point Bill," American Banker, 02/06/15; Cristina Marcos, "House passes bill to halt 'Operation Choke Point',"

The Hill, 02/04/16; and HR 766, House of Representatives Vote 63, 02/04/16
98 The Editorial Board, "'Operation Choke Point' Hits the Mark," The New York Times, 10/10/14
99 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Kevin Yoder, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17
100 Seung Min Kim, "House bill revamps consumer agency," Politico, 07/21/11 and HR 1315, House of Representatives Vote 621, 07/21/11
101 AFL CIO et. al Letter to Representative, 5/03/11
102 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Kevin Yoder, Follow The Money, accessed 12/01/17

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 29 of 32


DISHONORABLE MENTION
Former Rep. and CFPB "Acting Director" Mick Mulvaney (R-SC)


EXAMPLE 1. Then-Rep. Mulvaney received $18,800 in campaign contributions
from the payday lending industry in the days before and after sending the
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) a letter “expressing concern”
over the bureau’s work to rein in the worst abuses of the payday industry.


In September 2016, Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-SC) sent a letter to the CFPB "expressing concern about
the agency's proposal to rein in payday lending and other short-term credit."103 In the days prior to
and following the letter, Mulvaney received $18,800 in campaign contributions from the payday
lending industry, including $9,000 in the three days prior to sending the letter and another
contribution the day after it was sent. 104

Recipient Donor Amount Date
Mulvaney For MacKechnie, Ian $2,000 09/19/16
Congress Andrew (AMSCOT
Financial)
Mulvaney For Aycox, Rod (Select $2,700 09/19/16
Congress Management
Resources)
Mulvaney For QC Holdings PAC $2,000 09/26/16
Congress
Mulvaney For Community Financial $5,000 09/26/16
Congress Services Association Of
America PAC
Mulvaney For World Acceptance $2,000 09/27/2016
Congress Corporation PAC
Mulvaney For King Jr., George M $100 09/30/16
Congress (Advance America)
Mulvaney For CheckSmart Financial $5,000 10/10/16
Congress LLC PAC
TOTAL $18,800












103 Ian McKendry, "Bipartisan Group of Lawmakers Urges CFPB to Ease Up on Payday Rule," American Banker, 09/30/16
104 Follow The Money search for Payday/Title Loans to Mick Mulvaney, Follow the Money, accessed 3/16/18

Payday Puppets Ÿ Page 30 of 32


METHODOLOGY

For the purposes of this study, Allied Progress examined four U.S. Senators and twelve
Representatives who have taken actions to benefit the payday lending industry within 3 weeks
(before or after) of receiving campaign contributions from industry PACs and employees. The official
actions reviewed either benefited the payday lending industry directly or hampered efforts by the
CFPB or Department of Justice to hold industry accountable. Such actions included votes, sponsoring
or co-sponsoring legislation, writing letters to regulators, and authoring newspaper op-ed columns.

Members Surveyed

• Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL)
• Sen. Mike Crapo (R-ID)
• Sen. Pat Toomey (R-PA)
• Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC)
• Rep. Alcee Hasting (D-FL)
• Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX)
• Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX)
• Rep. Blaine Luetkemeyer (R-MO)
• Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC)
• Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-NY)
• Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM)
• Rep. Bruce Poliquin (R-ME)
• Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA)
• Rep. Pete Sessions (R-TX)
• Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH)
• Rep. Kevin Yoder (R-KS)
• Former Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-SC) – Currently CFPB “Acting Director”

Key Actions Taken

• Voted for S.Amdt. 842 to SCR 11 (2015-16)
• Voted for HR 50 (2015-16)
• Voted for HR 5016 (2013-14)
• Voted for HR 3193 (2013-14)
• Voted against Amending HR 2940
• Voted for HR 5485 (2015-16)
• Voted for HR 1315 (2011-12)
• Voted for HR 766 (2015-16)
• Sponsored or Co-Sponsored HR 1566 (2013-14)
• Sponsored or Co-Sponsored HR 1214 (2009-10)
• Co-Sponsored HR 3118 (2015-16)
• Signed September 2016 letter to the CFPB.
• Signed August 2013 letter to Attorney General Holder and FDIC Chairman Ginsburg.
• Signed October 2014 letter to the Inspector General of the Department of Justice.
• S.Amdt. 3826 to S.Amdt. 3739 (2009-10)
• Wrote September 2015 op-ed in the Washington Examiner.

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