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THE MILTON H.

ERICKSON FOUNDATION
Presents

LASTING SOLUTIONS

DO NOT PRINT.
You will receive a printed
copy when you pick-up
your registration materials.

SAN FRANCISCO
DECEMBER 5-9, 2012
CONFERENCE
SPONSORS

THE MILTON H. ERICKSON FOUNDATION, INC. is a federal nonprofit corporation


formed to promote and advance the contributions to the health sciences by the late
Milton H. Erickson, MD. In addition to organizing congresses, workshops, Brief Ther-
apy and Couples Conferences, the Erickson Foundation also organized six landmark
Evolution of Psychotherapy Conferences attracting more than 7,000 professionals
from around the world to each conference. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation does
not discriminate on the basis or race, color, religion, age, national or ethnic origin,
physical challenge, gender or sexual orientation.

Co-sponsored by the Clinical Psychology Program,


San Francisco State University. Running continually
since 1952, the program is designed to qualify stu-
dents to provide mental health services in diverse
settings. These include community mental health
centers, schools, hospitals, private practice, and managed care environments. The
program emphasizes theoretical and applied training from a psychodynamic, family
systems and community psychology perspective.
THE MILTON H. ERICKSON FOUNDATION
welcomes you to the 11th

C o n fe r e n c e

CONTENTS
Faculty …………………………………………………...……………...…..……….. 2
Fundamental Hypnosis Track ………………….…….……………….…….... 7
Important Conference Information ……………….……..…………......…. 8
Continuing Education Information ……………………....….….………….. 9
Milton H. Erickson Foundation Activities …………..…….…………….. 11
Maps ……………………………………………………..…Back & Inside Covers

CONFERENCE PROGRAM
Conference Program at a Glance ……………………...………………….. 13

Pre-Conference
Wednesday, December 5 …………………………………………….……..… 14

Brief Therapy Conference


Wednesday, December 5 ………………………………… ……..……….….. 15
Thursday, December 6 ……………..………..…………………...…………... 21
Friday, December 7 …………………………………..……….………..…...…. 27
Saturday, December 8 ……………………………………..………..…….…. 31
Sunday, December 9 ……………………………………..…………...…….…. 37

Post-Conference
Monday, December 10 ………………………………...……….………...….. 46

PAID ADVERTISEMENTS …………………...………………………………………….. 48

Page 1
STEVE ANDREAS, MA, has been learning, developing
FACULTY FRANK DATTILIO, PHD, ABPP, is a board-certified clini-
and teaching patterns in Neuro-Linguistic Program- cal psychologist and marital and family therapist. He
ming (NLP) since 1977. With his wife and partner maintains a dual-faculty position in the Department
Connirae he has co-edited and/or authored many of Psychiatry at both Harvard Medical School and the
NLP books—classics from the early days of the field, University of Pennsylvania. Dattilio is one of the lead-
and new innovations—and over 50 NLP articles. He is ing figures in the world on Cognitive-Behavioral Ther-
author of Six Blind Elephants, Transforming Your Self, apy. He is author of 230 professional publications,
and Virginia Satir: the Patterns of Her Magic. He is co-author of including 15 books. He also is the recipient of numerous state and
Heart of the Mind and Change Your Mind—and Keep the Change. national awards and his works have been translated into 25 lan-
Andreas has also written a new eBook entitled Help with Negative guages and are used in 80 countries. His 2010 book, Family Ther-
Self-Talk, Vol. 1, which includes many unique and powerful new apy Homework Planner, was co-authored with Louis J. Bevilacqua
patterns for quickly transforming troublesome internal voices. and Arthur E. Jongsma.

ELLYN BADER, PHD, is in private practice and is Co- ROBERT DILTS has a global reputation as a leading
Director of The Couples Institute in Menlo Park, Cali- developer, author, coach and trainer in the field of
fornia. Over the past 25 years she has conducted Neuro-Linguistic Programing (NLP). He has worked
professional training programs in couples therapy and closely with NLP co-founders John Grinder and Rich-
has trained therapists throughout the U.S., as well as ard Bandler at the time of NLP’s creation, and also
in Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia. She is studied personally with Milton H. Erickson, M.D., and
past-president of the International Transactional Gregory Bateson. A founder of NLP University in
Analysis Association and recipient of the Clark Vincent Award for Santa Cruz, CA, Dilts pioneered the applications of NLP to educa-
outstanding literary contribution to the field of marital therapy from tion, creativity, health, leadership, belief systems and the develop-
the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. She ment of what has become known as “Third Generation NLP.” Dilts
and her husband, Peter Pearson, PhD, co-authored the books, In has authored more than 20 books on a variety of topics relating to
Quest of the Mythical Mate: A Developmental Approach to Diagno- NLP and coaching. He is the principal author of Neuro-Linguistic
sis and Treatment in Couples Therapy and Tell Me No Lies: How to Programming Vol. I (which serves as the standard reference text
Face the Truth and Build an Honest Marriage. for the field), and has authored or co-authored numerous other
books on NLP including Changing Belief Systems with NLP, Be-
JON CARLSON, PSYD, EDD, ABPP, is Distinguished Pro- liefs: Pathways to Health and Well Being, Tools of the Spirit, From
fessor of Psychology and Counseling at Governors Coach to Awakener, and NLP II: The Next Generation.
State University and a psychologist at the Wellness
Clinic in Lake Geneva, Wisconsin. He has authored PAUL EKMAN, PHD, was TIME magazine’s Top 100 K
170 journal articles and 55 books including Time for most influential people of 2009. He is the author
a Better Marriage, Adlerian Therapy, The Mummy at of more than 100 articles, as well as co-author of
the Dining Room Table, Bad Therapy, and Creative Emotion in the Human Face, Unmasking the E
Breakthroughs in Therapy. He has created more than 300 profes- Face, and Facial Action Coding System. Ekman is
sional DVDs with leading professional therapists and educators. In the editor of Darwin and Facial Expression and Y
2004, the American Counseling Association named him a “Living co-editor of Handbook of Methods in Nonverbal
Legend.” In 2011, he received the Career Contributions Award from Behavior Research, Approaches to Emotion, The Nature of
the American Psychological Association. Emotion, and What the Face Reveals. He also is author of N
Face of Man, Telling Lies, Why Kids Lie, Emotions Revealed,
PATRICK CARNES, PHD, CAS, is a nationally known Dalai Lama-Emotional Awareness, and editor of the third edi- O
speaker on sex addiction and recovery issues. He K tion (1998) and the fourth edition (2009) of Charles Darwin’s
is author of Out of the Shadows: Understanding The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1998).
Sexual Addiction, Contrary to Love: Helping the E Currently, Ekman is manager of the Paul Ekman Group, LLC T
Sexual Addict, The Betrayal Bond: Breaking Free (PEG), a small company that produces training devices rele-
of Exploitive Relationships, Open Hearts, Facing
Y
vant to emotional skills and is initiating new research relevant E
the Shadow, In the Shadows of the Net, and The to national security and law enforcement.
Clinical Management of Sex Addiction. Carnes is currently the
Executive Director of the Gentle Path program at Pine Grove N ROXANNA ERICKSON-KLEIN, RN, PHD, balances her
Behavioral Center in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. He is the pri- time between clinical, writing, and teaching activi-
mary architect of Gentle Path treatment programs for the ties. She is co-author (with Betty Alice Erickson and
treatment of sexual and addictive disorders. He also pio- O Dan Short) of Hope & Resiliency: Understanding
neered the founding of the Certified Sex Addiction Therapist the Psychotherapeutic Strategies of Milton H.
program. Carines was awarded the distinguished Lifetime T Erickson. With a special interest in the Erickson
Achievement Award of the Society for the Advancement of Foundation archives, she is co-editor of the Col-
Sexual Health (SASH). Each year, SASH (formerly known as lected Works of Milton H. Erickson and is currently
NCSA/C) bestows a “Carnes Award” to deserving researchers E engaged in compiling an International Glossary to bring more con-
and clinicians who have made outstanding contributions to sistency to translations of professional Ericksonian literature.
the field of sexual medicine.

Page 2 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


STEVEN FRANKEL, PHD, JD, is an ABPP certified clini- MICHAEL HOYT, PHD, (Yale ’76) is senior staff psycholo-
cal and forensic psychologist, as well as an attor- gist at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in San
ney-at-law. Dr. Frankel has been on the faculty of Rafael, California. He is the author and editor of nu-
the University of Southern California for over 35 merous books, most recently, Brief Psychotherapies:
years and is currently a Clinical Professor of Psy- Principles and Practices (2009) and Therapist Stories
chology. He served as an Adjunct Professor of Law of Inspiration, Passion, and Renewal: What’s Love Got
at Loyola Law School (Los Angeles) and is now an to Do with It? (2012). He is a Woodrow Wilson Fellow
Adjunct Professor at Golden Gate University School of Law. He and has been honored as a Continuing Education Distinguished
has published over 50 articles and book chapters, and received Speaker by both the American Psychological Association and the
the USC Award for Teaching Excellence early in his academic ca- International Association of Marriage and Family Counselors. He
reer. He was similarly honored by his state’s professional society also is a Contributor of Note for the Milton H. Erickson Foundation,
some years later. Frankel’s full-day continuing education curricu- and is a recipient of the prestigious APF Cummings Psyche Prize for
lum in law and ethics for mental health professionals (over 50 lifetime contributions to the primary role of psychologists in organ-
workshops per year) has earned him Outstanding Teacher Award. ized healthcare.

BRENT GEARY, PHD, is a licensed psychologist with a JEFFREY KOTTLER, PHD, is the author of more than 85
private practice in Phoenix, Arizona. Since 1988, he books that have been translated into more than a
has also been the Director of Training for the Milton dozen languages. His books are used in universities
H. Erickson Foundation. He teaches internationally around the world and are considered classics among
and edited two books with Jeffrey Zeig—The Hand- practicing teachers, counselors, psychologists, health
book of Ericksonian Psychotherapy and The Letters professionals, and social justice advocates. Some of
of Milton H. Erickson. his most highly regarded works include: On Being a
Therapist, Changing People’s Lives While Transforming Your Own:
STEPHEN GILLIGAN, PHD, was among the group of stu- Paths to Social Justice and Global Human Rights, The Client Who
dents who gathered around the founders of NLP dur- Changed Me, Bad Therapy, and Creative Breakthroughs in Therapy:
ing its formation at U.C. Santa Cruz from 1974-1977. Tales of Transformation and Astonishment. Kottler is professor of
Milton Erickson and Gregory Bateson became his Counseling at California State University, Fullerton. He also has co-
teachers and mentors. He became a premier teacher founded Empower Nepali Girls (www.EmpowerNepaliGirls.org)—an
and practitioner of Ericksonian hypnotherapy. Moti- organization that provides educational scholarships for lower caste
vated by his experiences as a therapist, a teacher, girls at-risk in Nepal.
and by his own personal quest, he developed a new practice of
radical awakening incorporating Ericksonian psychotherapy, Aikido, HARRIET LERNER, PHD, is one of our nation’s
Buddhism, meditation, and the performance arts. His work, known most respected voices on the psychology of
K
as Self-relations Psychotherapy, reconnects mind-body processes women and marriage and family relation-
and encourages and supports radical change. His eight books in- ships. For three decades, she was a staff E
clude the classic Therapeutic Trances, The Courage to Love, The psychologist and psychotherapist at The Men-
Legacy of Milton Erickson, The Hero’s Journey (with Robert Dilts), ninger Clinic in Topeka Kansas and a faculty Y
and the forthcoming Generative Trance. member and supervisor in the Karl Men-
ninger School of Psychiatry. Currently in private practice in
ROBERT GREENBERG, PHD, is an American com- K Lawrence Kansas, she is the author of numerous scholarly N
poser, pianist, and musicologist. He has com- articles and 11 books, including The New York Times bestsel-
posed more than 45 works for a variety of in- ler, The Dance of Anger, Women in Therapy, The Dance of O
struments and voices and has recorded a num- E Connection, and The Dance of Fear. Lerner has been a guest
ber of lecture series on music history and mu- on Oprah, CNN, NPR and numerous other media. She is also,
sic appreciation for The Teaching Company. Y with her sister, an award-winning children’s book author, and T
Greenberg has received numerous awards, she hosts a blog for Psychology Today and The Huffington
including three Nicola De Lorenzo Prizes in composition, and Post. Lerner’s new book is Marriage Rules: A Manual for the E
three Meet the Composer grants. Additionally, he has received
N Married and The Coupled Up.
commissions from the Koussevitzky Foundation of the Library
of Congress, the Alexander String Quartet, XTET, and the San O PETER LEVINE, PHD, is a therapist, author, and edu-
Francisco Contemporary Music Players. He has lectured for cator who specializes in the treatment and under-
some of the most prestigious musical and arts organizations standing of chronic stress and tonic immobility,
in the U.S. and is the resident composer and music historian T more commonly known as Post Traumatic Stress
for National Public Radio’s “Weekend All Things Considered.” Disorder (PTSD). Levine is the developer of Somatic
He also hosts the "Saturday Morning Series" (a lecture com- E Experiencing® (a body awareness approach to the
bined with performances) with the Alexander String Quartet. treatment of trauma) and founder of the non-profit
educational and research organization The Somatic Experiencing
KENNETH HARDY, PHD, is a Professor of Family Therapy Training Institute (formerly known as The Foundation for Human
at Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He Enrichment), dedicated to the worldwide healing and prevention of
also is Director of the Eikenberg Institute for Relation- trauma. He is also an author of numerous books about trauma and
ships in New York City, where he maintains a practice post traumatic stress disorder, including In an Unspoken Voice:
specializing in working with traumatized children and How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness and the
families. He is the co-author of Revisioning Family New York Times bestseller Waking the Tiger: Healing Trauma.
Therapy: Race, Class, and Culture in Clinical Practice; Teens Who
Hurt: Clinical Interventions for Breaking the Cycle of Youth Violence;
and Minorities and Family Therapy.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 3
CAMILLO LORIEDO, MD, PHD, is Professor of Psychia-
FACULTY BILL O’HANLON, MS, has written over 30 books, in-
try and Psychotherapy at the University of Rome, cluding several on brief therapy—A Brief Guide to
School of Medicine, and the School of Specializa- Brief Therapy, The Change Your Life Book and Do
tion. Since 1998, he has been a member on the One Thing Different, which landed him on The Oprah
Board Directors for the Milton H. Erickson Founda- Winfrey Show. He also was Milton Erickson’s gar-
tion. Loriedo has recently been elected President of dener in 1977. Since 1978, O’Hanlon has given over
the Italian Society of Psychotherapy. Since 2005, 3,000 talks worldwide. He has been a top-rated presenter at many
he’s been a member of the Editorial Board of the American Jour- national conferences and was awarded the Outstanding Mental
nal of Clinical Hypnosis and has been awarded the Milton H. Erick- Health Educator of the Year in 2001 by the New England Educa-
son Lifetime Achievement Award for outstanding contribution to tional Institute. He also is known for his storytelling, irreverent hu-
the field of Psychotherapy. He has authored over 350 scientific mor, and clear and accessible style. Find out more about him at
papers and 26 books. billohanlon.com.

LYNN LYONS, LICSW, is a licensed clinical social CHRISTINE PADESKY, PHD, Co-founder of the Center for
worker and psychotherapist who lives in Concord, Cognitive Therapy in Huntington Beach, California, is
New Hampshire where she has a private practice. For a Distinguished Founding Fellow of the Academy of
20 years, Lyons has helped individuals, families, and Cognitive Therapy and former President of the Inter-
groups overcome their anxiety, manage food and national Association for Cognitive Psychotherapy.
weight challenges, compete effectively, and parent British CBT therapists voted her the “Most Influential
confidently. She is a “how-to” therapist and her work- International CBT Therapist,” the California Psycho-
shops, seminars, and private sessions teach concrete skills and logical Association awarded her its “Distinguished Contribution to
usable techniques. Her approach combines her extensive knowl- Psychology,” and the Academy of Cognitive Therapy bestowed its
edge of clinical hypnosis, with cognitive and strategic therapies to 2007 Aaron T. Beck Award on her for enduring contributions to the
interrupt negative patterns and change lives for the better. She also field. Padesky is a leading cognitive therapy innovator and devel-
works extensively with those who struggle with eating disorders, ops audio CD and DVD therapist training materials
particularly compulsive or emotional eating and binge eating disor- (store.padesky.com). Her recent and fifth book, Collaborative Case
der. Her website is www.lynnlyonsnh.com. Conceptualization and her bestselling self-help book Mind Over
Mood (www.mindovermood.com) was voted by BABCP as the most
SCOTT MILLER, PhD, is the founder of the Interna- influential cognitive therapy book of all time.
tional Center for Clinical Excellence, an international
consortium of clinicians, researchers, and educators ESTHER PEREL MA, LMFT, is a master trainer, thera-
dedicated to promoting excellence in behavioral pist, and workshop leader and an acknowledged
health services. Miller conducts workshops and international authority on couples therapy, culture,
training in the U.S. and abroad, helping hundreds of and sexuality. Her bestseller, Mating in Captivity,
agencies and organizations, both public and private, has been translated into 24 languages. Perel
to achieve superior results. He is the author of numerous articles serves on the faculty of the Family Studies Unit,
and books including, The Heart and Soul of Change (with Mark Department of Psychiatry, New York University
Hubble and Barry Duncan), The Heroic Client: A Revolutionary Way Medical Center, the International Trauma Studies Program and
to Improve Effectiveness through Client-Directed, Outcome- the Ackerman Institute for the Family. Fluent in nine languages,
Informed Therapy (with Barry Duncan and Jacqueline Sparks), She works on four continents bringing a rich and dynamic multi-
Staying on Top and Keeping the Sand Out of Your Pants: The cultural perspective to her practice, teaching and writing. Details
Surfer's Guide to the Good Life (with Mark Hubble and Seth at www.estherperel.com.
Houdeshell), and the forthcoming Achieving Clinical Excellence in
Behavioral Health: Empirical Lessons from the Field's Most Effec- ERVING POLSTER, PHD, is a veteran teacher of Ge-
tive Practitioners (with Mark Hubble and William Andrews). stalt therapy and has attracted students worldwide
to his homebase in San Diego, California. He has
JOHN NORCROSS, PHD, ABPP, is Professor of Psychol- authored many books, including the classic Gestalt
ogy at the University of Scranton, Professor of Psy- Therapy Integrated: Contours of Theory & Practice.
chiatry at SUNY Upstate Medical University, a clini- In A Population of Selves, Dr. Polster explores per-
cal psychologist in part-time practice, and an inter- sonal diversity and presents a theory of the self
nationally-recognized authority on behavior change which narrows the gap between theoretical principles and the
and psychotherapy. He has co-written or edited 20 therapeutic practice. He also has written Every Person’s Life Is
books including, Psychotherapy Relationships that Worth a Novel in which he spells out the therapeutic applicability
Work, Changeology, and Leaving It at the Office: of the kinship between the novelist and the psychotherapist. More
Psychotherapist Self-Care. He edits the Journal of Clinical Psychol- recently he has written Uncommon Ground: To Enhance Everyday
ogy: In Session and has received multiple awards such as Pennsyl- Living, and From the Radical Center: The Heart of Gestalt Therapy.
vania Professor of the Year from the Carnegie Foundation and He has also authored numerous anthology chapters, elaborating
election to the National Academies of Practice. An engaging therapy basics. Polster is currently completing a book on the Life
teacher and clinician, Norcross has conducted workshops and Focus Community, an instrumentality in the communal application
lectures in 30 countries. of psychotherapy.

Page 4 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


WENDEL RAY, PHD, is Professor of Family System CASEY TRUFFO, MFT, works as a practice-building
Theory, Marriage & Therapy Program, University of coach for therapists on five continents. She is the
Louisiana-Monroe (ULM); Senior Research Fellow author of Be A Wealthy Therapist: Finally You Can
and former Director of the Mental Research Insti- Make a Living While Making a Difference. Founder
tute (MRI) Palo Alto, California. Author of 10 books of the International Therapist Leadership Institute
available in eight languages, Ray conducts work- (www.InTLI.com), her mission is to enrich the lives
shops in Brief Systemic Therapy, nationally and and careers of therapists worldwide. For free tips and videos visit
internationally. His recent books are: Focused BeAWealthyTherapist.com
Problem Resolution: MRI Brief Therapy Center Selected Papers;
Paul Watzlawick: Insight may cause Blindness; and Don Jackson: MICHELE WEINER-DAVIS, MSW, LCSW, is an interna-
Interactional Theory in the Practice of Therapy. tionally renowned relationship expert, bestselling
author, and psychotherapist specializing in a solu-
ERNEST LAWRENCE ROSSI, PHD, is an internationally- tion-oriented approach that helps people revitalize
renowned psychotherapist, teacher, and pioneer in flat-lined marriages. Her books include, In Search of
the psychobiology of mind-body healing. He re- Solutions: a New Direction in Psychotherapy, The
ceived Lifetime Achievement Awards from the Erick- Sex-Starved Marriage: A Couple's Guide to Boosting
son Foundation, 1980; American Association of Their Marriage Libido, and her most recent, The Sex-Starved Wife:
Psychotherapy, 2003; and American Society of Clini- What to Do When He's Lost Desire. Weiner-Davis is Director of The
cal Hypnosis, 2008. Rossi has published 36 books Divorce Busting Center and Founder of www.divorcebusting.com
and 175 papers on therapeutic hypnosis, psychotherapy, dreams, and recipient of The American Association of Marriage and Family
consciousness and creativity. His most recent book is Creating Con- Therapys’ prestigious Outstanding Contribution to the Field of Mar-
sciousness: How Psychotherapists can Facilitate Wonder, Wisdom, riage and Therapy Award and Smart Marriages’ Impact Award.
Beauty & Truth.
REID WILSON, PHD, is author of the classic self-help
KATHRYN LANE ROSSI, PHD, RYT-500, is a graduate book, Don't Panic, co-author with Dr. Edna Foa, of
of The Cambridge Graduate School for Psychology, Stop Obsessing!, and co-author of Achieving Com-
Los Angeles, and is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist fortable Flight, a self-help kit for the fearful flier. He
in California. She received her post doctoral training designed and served as lead psychologist for Ameri-
at the UCLA School of Medicine in Couples Therapy can Airlines' first national program for the fearful
where she was certified for Advanced Training in flier. Wilson served on the Board of Directors of the
Sex Therapy in 1992. She is currently Professor of Anxiety Disorders Association of America for 12
Psychology at The New Neuroscience Institute for Therapeutic Hyp- years, and as Program Chair of the National Conferences on Anxi-
nosis, Psychotherapy, and Rehabilitation of Rome and San Lorenzo ety Disorders from 1988-1991. He is Clinical Associate Professor
Magoria (Benevento), Italy. Rossi teaches workshops training psy- of Psychiatry at the University of North Carolina School of Medi-
chotherapists nationally and internationally, and recently edited The cine. His free self-help website— anxieties.com—serves 385,000
New Neuroscience Edition of the Collected Papers of Milton H. visitors (16 million hits) every year.
Erickson (17 volumes) and half dozen other Erickson/Rossi books
on CDs. She recently edited Creating Consciousness: How Thera- MICHAEL YAPKO, PHD, IS A clinical psychologist who is
pists can Facilitate Wonder, Wisdom, Beauty & Truth. internationally recognized for his work in clinical
hypnosis, brief psychotherapy, and the strategic
RONALD SIEGEL, PSYD, is Assistant Clinical Professor treatment of depression. He routinely teaches to
of Psychology, Harvard Medical School and on the professional audiences all over the world (30 coun-
Board of Directors and faculty at the Institute for tries). He is the author of 12 books including, Mind-
Meditation and Psychotherapy. Seigel is co-author fulness and Hypnosis and the classic text, Trance-
of Back Sense: A Revolutionary Approach to Halting work: An Introduction to the Practice of Clinical Hypnosis (4th ed.).
the Cycle of Chronic Back Pain; and coeditor of He is a recipient of lifetime achievement awards for his contribu-
Mindfulness and Psychotherapy. He is also author tions to hypnosis and psychotherapy from the Milton H. Erickson
of The Mindfulness Solution: Everyday Practices for Everyday Prob- Foundation and the International Society of Hypnosis.
lems; and coeditor of Wisdom and Compassion in Psychotherapy:
Deepening Mindfulness in Clinical Practice. JEFFREY ZEIG, PHD, is the Founder and Director of
The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, and architect of
JANIS ABRAHMS SPRING, PHD, is a nationally ac- the Evolution of Psychotherapy Conference, Brief
claimed expert on issues of trust, intimacy, and for- Therapy Conference, Couples Conference, and the
giveness. She is author of the award-winning books, International Congresses on Ericksonian Approaches
How Can I Forgive You? The Courage to Forgive, The to Psychotherapy. He is on the Editorial Board of
Freedom Not To; Life with Pop: Lessons on Caring for numerous journals; Fellow of the American Psycho-
an Aging Parent, and After the Affair: Healing the logical Association (Division 29, Psychotherapy); and Fellow of the
Pain and Rebuilding Trust When a Partner Has Been Unfaithful In American Society of Clinical Hypnosis. He is a Distinguished Practi-
private practice for 35 years, Spring is a recipient of the Connecti- tioner in the National Academy of Practice in Psychology of the Na-
cut Psychological Association’s Award for Distinguished Contribu- tional Academies of Practice and an Approved Supervisor of the
tion to the Practice of Psychology and recipient of the Connecticut American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. A clinical
Marriage and Family Therapy Association’s Award for Distinguished psychologist, Zeig has a private practice and conducts workshops
Family Service. Board Certified in Clinical Psychology, she is a for- internationally in 40 countries. He has been an invited speaker at
mer clinical supervisor in the Department of Psychology at Yale major universities and teaching hospitals and has edited, co-edited,
University and a popular media guest on programs such as NPR authored or coauthored more than 20 books on psychotherapy that
and Good Morning America. www.janisaspring.com. appear in 12 foreign languages.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 5
Short Course Faculty
Naji Abi-Hashem, PhD Christine Guilloux, DESS
Helen Adrienne, LCSW Virgil Hayes, DO, MSW
Ronald Alexander, PhD Jeanne Hernandez, PhD
Assen Alladin, PhD Richard Hill, MA, MEd
Norma Barretta, PhD Debbie Joffe Ellis, MDAM
Phillip Barretta, MA Pennie Johnson, MA
Daniel Bass, Dipl. Psych Thomas Kirsch, MC
Deborah Beckman, MS Dale Klein-Kennedy, MA
Cheryl Bell-Gadsby, MA, RCC Richard Landis, PhD
Bob Bertolino, PhD John Lentz, DMin
Dale Bertram, PhD Fabio Leonardi, Psychology
Betty Blue, PhD Eva Long, PhD
Consuelo Casula, Lic Psych Hernan Cancio Lopez
Erika Chovanec, PhD Lindasue Marshall, MSW
Tracey Clifford, EdD, LCSW Robert McNeilly, MBBS
Dan Booth Cohen, PhD, MBA Richard Miller, MSW
Sheldon Cohen, MD Michael Munion, MA
Kathleen Donaghy, PhD, PC Gabrielle Peacock, MBBS
Susan Dowell, LCSW, BCD Maggie Phillips, PhD
Joseph Dowling, MS, LPC Susan Pinco, PhD
Linda Duncan, EdD Michael Rankin, MA
Roxanna Erickson-Klein, PhD Sheri Reynolds, MA, MFT
Maria Escalante de Smith, MA Thomas Roberts, LCSW
Jeffrey Feldman, PhD Nicole Ruysschaert, MD
Miguel Fernandez, PhD Arnold Slive, PhD
Anja Ferrari-Malik, MD Rob Staffin, PsyD
Neil Fiore, PhD Steve Sultanoff, PhD
Bette Freedson, MSW Carme Timoneda-Gallart
Tobi Goldfus, LCSW-C BCD Karen Wall, MA
Gerry Grassi, Psychology Bart Walsh, MSW
Eric Greenleaf, PhD Claudia Weinspach, Dipl. Psych.
Bruce Gregory, PhD Robert Wubbolding, EdD
Birgitta Gregory, PhD Edwin Yager, PhD

Continuing Medical Education Policy on Disclosure


THE MILTON H. ERICKSON FOUNDATION is justifiably proud of the conferences and other educational opportunities it sponsors, taking care
that the conduct of these activities conforms to the standards and principles of behavioral and medical sciences, thus ensuring bal-
ance, independence, objectivity and scientific rigor in all its individually sponsored or jointly sponsored educational activities. All faculty
participating in a sponsored activity, and those who review and therefore are in control of content, are expected to disclose to the activ-
ity audience any relevant financial interest or other relationship (1) with the manufacturer(s) of any commercial product(s) and/or pro-
vider(s) of commercial services discussed in an educational presentation and (2) with any commercial supporters of the activity.
(Relevant financial interest or other relationship can include such things as grants or research support, employee, consultant, major
stock holder, member of speaker’s bureau, etc.). The Foundation’s compliance with these standards assures that potential conflicts of
interest are identified prior to our educational activities.

The intent of this disclosure is to provide attendees with information on which they can make their own judgments. It remains for the
audience to determine whether there are interests or relationships that may influence the presentation with regard to exposition or
conclusion.

The Milton H. Erickson Foundation Board of Directors, Administrative Staff and the Conference presenters have indicated neither they
nor an immediate family member has any conflict of interest to disclose.

Page 6 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


The FUNDAMENTAL HYPNOSIS TRACK
Thursday, December 6 Thursday, December 6 Saturday, December 8 Saturday, December 8
9:45 AM-12:45 PM 2:00 PM-5:00 PM 8:30 AM-11:30 AM 2:00 PM-5:00 PM
Powell AB Powell AB Powell AB Powell AB
(6th Floor , Tower 3) (6th Floor, Tower 3) (6th Floor, Tower 3) (6th Floor ,Tower 3)

WORKSHOP WORKSHOP WORKSHOP WORKSHOP


1 2 3 4
BASIC PRINCIPLES INDUCTION THE HYPNOTIC APPLICATION OF
OF HYPNOSIS APPROACHES PHENOMENA INDIRECTION IN
AND INDUCTION CLINICAL HYPNOSIS
You must attend all 4 workshops
to receive your certificate.
Brent Geary, PhD is a licensed psychologist with a private
12 CEs
practice in Phoenix, Arizona. Since 1988, he has also been the
Director of Training for the Milton H. Erickson Foundation. He teaches
internationally, and edited two books with Jeffrey Zeig—The Handbook of
Ericksonian Psychotherapy and The Letters of Milton H. Erickson.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 7
IMPORTANT INFORMATION
BOOKSTORE reserved for attendees with physical challenges and for VIPs. Please
A bookstore featuring works by the faculty, as well as related titles, do not block aisles or sit on the floor in meeting rooms. Strict regula-
will be open each day throughout the Conference. The bookstore is tions are enforced. We appreciate your cooperation. PLEASE BE
located on the “BR” Ballroom Level, in Yosemite Room B, near Regis- CONSIDERATE OF OTHERS: DO NOT USE CELL PHONES AND PLEASE
tration (see map on page 60). TURN OFF YOUR CELL PHONE RINGERS DURING SESSIONS.
Bookstore Hours:
Thursday, December 6 7:00 am-6:00 pm IDENTIFICATION BADGES
Friday, December 7 7:00 am-6:30 pm Each attendee is issued a name badge. Please wear your badge at all
times. Only persons who wear identification badges will be admitted
Saturday, December 8 7:30 am-6:00 pm
to Conference sessions.
Sunday, December 9 8:00 am-3:00 pm
VOLUNTEERS
EXHIBITS A number of volunteers are assisting with the Conference. Volunteers
A small but diverse group of exhibits of interest to attendees will be can be identified by special ribbons on their name tags. If you are
open throughout the meeting. Exhibits will be located on the “BR” asked to change seats to accommodate someone who is physically
Ballroom Level, Yosemite Foyer near Registration (see map on page challenged, please comply.
60).
Exhibit Hours: SMOKING POLICY
Wednesday, December 5 Noon-7:00 pm There is one isolated smoking floor, otherwise there is no smoking
permitted in the hotel.
Thursday, December 6 7:30 pm - 5:30 pm
Friday, December 7 8:00 am - 7:30 pm PARKING
(Book Signing Reception: 5:45 - 6:45 pm) Reduced conference rate for self-parking is $28 per day with in and
Saturday, December 8 8:00 am - 5:30 pm out privileges. (Regular rate is $53.58 per 24 hours; valet: $59.28 per
24 hours.)
Sunday, December 9 8:00 am - Noon
LOST & FOUND
AUDIO AND VIDEO RECORDINGS Please turn in found items to the Erickson Foundation Registration.
Most presentations will be audio recorded, and some video recorded Desk. At the end of the day these items will be turned over to the
and available for purchase. The Audio and Video Recordings Booths hotel security.
will be located in the Yosemite Foyer exhibits area, near Registration.
LITERATURE TABLES
SITE, SESSIONS & SEATING Literature tables will be located throughout the hotel. There is a charge
The Brief Therapy Conference is held at to display materials. Please ask at the Erickson Foundation desk for
THE HILTON SAN FRANCISCO UNION SQUARE information and permission to display literature on these Free-Take-
333 O’Farrell Street One tables. Unauthorized material will be removed.
San Francisco, California 94102
Tel: 415-771-1400 • Fax: 415-771-6807 SYLLABUS, CE Paperwork & Procedures
This book contains educational objectives, presentation descriptions,
Attendance at the individual sessions of the Conference is limited by location of events and other important information. Additional copies
room size. There is no pre-registration. Early arrival to individual ses- will be available for $20, while supplies last.
sions will ensure optimal seating. The first row of all meeting rooms is

PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
Attendees will increase their clinical effectiveness by:
1. Applying methods of brief therapy techniques in specific situations encountered in the practice of medicine, dentistry, psychiatry, psychol-
ogy, social work and counseling.
2. Comparing basic principles and techniques of contemporary schools of brief therapy.
3. Utilizing multi-level therapeutic communication.
4. Demonstrating brief therapy principles of diagnosis, thereby improving observational skills.
5. Comprehending the commonalities that underlie successful clinical work.
6. Appreciating the historical development of psychotherapeutic disciplines.

ELIGIBILITY
The Brief Therapy Conference is open to professionals in health-related fields, including physicians, doctoral-level psychologists and dentists who
are qualified for membership in, or are members of, their respective professional organizations (e.g., AMA, APA, ADA), and to professionals with
mental health-related graduate degrees (e.g., MSW, MA, MS, MSN) from accredited institutions. Applications also will be accepted from full-time
graduate students in accredited programs in the above fields who supply a letter from their department certifying their full-time student or intern
status as of December 2012.

Page 8 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


IMPORTANT INFORMATION
EARN UP TO 43 CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT H OURS
31 Continuing Education Credit Hours for the Brief Therapy Conference
4-6 Continuing Education Credit Hours for Law & Ethics (Pre-Conference)
2 Continuing Education Credit Hours for the Paul Ekman Workshop (Pre-Conference)
6 Continuing Education Credit Hours for Post-Conference Workshops

Credit Hours Per Day:


Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012 – Pre-Conference: 6.0 credit hours
Total Credit Hours:
Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012: 3.0 credit hours (short courses) Full Conference – Dec. 5-9, 2012: 31.0 credit hours
Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012: 9.0 credit hours Full Conference + Pre-Conference – Dec. 5-12, 2012: 37.0 credit hours
Friday, Dec. 7, 2012: 7.0 credit hours Full Conference + Post-Conference – Dec. 5-10, 2012: 37.0 credit hours
Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012: 7.0 credit hours Full Conference + Pre- and Post-Conference – Dec. 5-10, 2012: 43.0 credit hrs
Sunday, Dec. 9, 2012: 5.0 credit hours
Monday, Dec. 10, 2012 – Post-Conference: 6.0 credit hours Maximum Credit Hours: 43.0

ACCREDITATION
A.M.A. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, Inc., is accredited by the B.R.N. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, Inc. Provider approved by the
Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide con- California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 9376 for
tinuing medical education for physicians. The Milton H. Erickson Foun- 43.0 contact hours.
dation, Inc., designates this live activity for a maximum of 43.0 AMA
B.B.S. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, Inc., is a board-approved
PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credits
provider (PCE No. 398). This course meets the qualifications for 43.0
that commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as re-
A.P.A. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, Inc., is approved by the quired by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences.
American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for
State of Florida Department of Professional Regulation. The Milton H.
psychologists. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, Inc. maintains re-
Erickson Foundation, Inc. is approved by the Florida Board of Clinical
sponsibility for this program and its content. Credit is provided on an
Social Work, Marriage and Family Therapy and Mental Health Counsel-
hour-per-hour basis (43.0 hours maximum).
ing as a provider of continuing education (CE Provider #:50-2008).
N.A.S.W. This program is approved by the National Association of Social
Workers (Provider #886392793) for 43 social work continuing educa- Please note: It is your responsibility to contact your licensing/
tion contact hours. certification board directly to determine eligibility to meet your
continuing education requirements.
N.B.C.C. The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, Inc., is recognized by the
National Board for Certified Counselors to offer continuing education
for National Certified Counselors (Provider No. 5056). The Foundation The Milton H. Erickson Foundation, Inc. is applying to other certification
adheres to N.B.C.C. Continuing Education Guidelines. This program boards for continuing education approval. Information will be updated
provides a maximum of 43.0 contact hours. as approvals are received.

CE PROCEDURES
Required sign-in/sign-out sheets are located in the center section of your conference
syllabus. For your convenience, please use these pages, one for each day of the confer-
ence. After you have completed each form, please place it in the conveniently located
drop-boxes or at the Erickson Foundation registration desk.

ONE EASY STEP: You can obtain your certificate online by going to the Brief Therapy
website: www.BriefTherapyConference.com and follow the link on the home page. Use
this password, and complete the evaluation form and print it out immediately. If
you do not have internet access, or prefer obtaining your certificate by mail, please stop
by the registration desk and we’ll help you get a paper form. But please be aware that
your certificate will take 8-10 weeks to be mailed.

PLEASE NOTE: Attendees will receive a separate Documentation of Attendance onsite


for the Law & Ethics and Paul Ekman pre-conference workshops.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 9
THE MILTON H. ERICKSON FOUNDATION
TRAINING OPPORTUNITIES
Started in 1980, the educational outreach activities of The Milton H. INTENSIVE TRAINING IN ERICKSONIAN APPROACHES
Erickson Foundation have made it a leading provider of continuing edu- TO HYPNOSIS & THERAPY
cation opportunities for mental health professionals.
Since 1987, the Foundation has offered Intensive Training in Erick-
CONFERENCES sonian Approaches to Hypnosis and Psychotherapy. Held three times
The Foundation organizes educational conferences designed to a year in Phoenix, Arizona, these workshops have limited enrollment
share and explain state-of-the-art methods, while refining and for individualized instruction, and are organized into Fundamental,
enhancing clinical skills. Currently these conferences include: Intermediate, and Advanced levels of training. All focus on principles,
• The International Congress on Ericksonian Approaches to Hypno- applications, and techniques of Ericksonian Hypnotherapy.
sis and Psychotherapy (begun in 1980 and scheduled every
three years) MASTER CLASS IN BRIEF PSYCHOTHERAPY
• The Brief Therapy Conference (begun in 1988 and scheduled New to the educational opportunities offered by the Foundation is
roughly every three years); the Master Class in Brief Psychotherapy. This program is limited to
• The Couples Conference (first held as a stand-alone conference in 12 participants and open only to licensed, experienced mental
1995 and approximately year thereafter). health professionals. A special aspect of the Master Class is that it
is held at the Erickson home, in Dr. Erickson’s office and teaching
The Evolution of Psychotherapy study, where he conducted his famous teaching seminars.
Apart from other conferences is the celebrated Evolution of Psychother-
apy Conference. The Foundation organized the first Evolution confer-
ence in 1985 in Phoenix. Over 7,000 attended, and the numbers have
remained consistent ever since. It was instantly hailed as a landmark
conference—“The largest gathering ever devoted to the practice of psy-
chotherapy” by TIME. The faculty included Aaron Beck, Bruno Bettle-
heim, Murray Bowen, Albert Ellis, Robert and Mary Goulding, Jay Haley,
Ronald D. Laing, Arnold Lazarus, Cloé Madanes, Judd Marmor, James
Masterson, Rollo May, Salvador Minuchin, Zerka Moreno, Ervin Polster,
Miriam Polster, Carl Rogers, Ernest Rossi, Virginia Satir, Thomas Szasz,
Paul Watzlawick, Carl Whitaker, Lewis Wolberg, Joseph Wolpe and Jef-
frey Zeig. At the suggestion of Virginia Satir, the conference was re-
peated every five years. A four-year cycle was initiated with the 2009
conference. The next Evolution of Psychotherapy Conference will be
held in Anaheim, California in December of 2013. Intensives Class visits the Erickson house.

THE FOUNDATION OFFICE, ARCHIVES AND THE ERICKSON HOME


Phoenix home: the same home where he conducted his
famous teaching seminars.
● The new center provides a home base for the Founda-
tion’s dedicated staff, as well as serving as a destination for
practitioners. We can now focus our energy in one place,
maximize our efforts, expand our rich archives and continue
to enhance the skills of students and professionals.
● In 2010 the Foundation purchased Dr. Erickson’s last
home in Phoenix, Arizona. The Foundation is committed to
preserving the legacy of the late Dr. Erickson by transform-
ing the home at 1201 E. Hayward Avenue into a museum.
The home, where “the master” both lived and worked in
the last decade of his life, will be preserved with integrity
to give visitors an emotionally-charged experience. Friends
of the Foundation can rediscover the man behind the
Since its inception, the Foundation has operated out of modest ‘40s methods by “experiencing Erickson” in his actual environment.
style bungalows in central Phoenix. Now, for the first time in our three-
decade history, the Foundation has
moved its headquarters and archives
into new facilities, and launched a
capital campaign to support the new
headquarters as a center of study for
Ericksonian psychotherapy and hyp-
nosis. Funds raised will also be used
to create a museum in Dr. Erickson’s

Page 10 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


MILTON H. ERICKSON FOUNDATION
AUDIO, VIDEO & THE FOUNDATION PRESS
The Milton H. Erickson Foundation has for pur- for mental health care providers. These include classics like The
chase professionally recorded audio from its Handbook of Ericksonian Psychotherapy. Also offered are DVDs of Dr.
meetings, available in CD and many as MP3 Erickson, discussed by Jeffrey Zeig, such as Advanced Techniques of
downloads. Professionally produced videos of Hypnosis & Psychotherapy: Working with Resistance. An especially im-
one-hour clinical demonstrations by members portant project is the limited edition Collected Works of Milton H. Erick-
of the faculty of the 1981, 1982, 1984, 1989 son, of which Volumes 1 through 11 are already in print.
and 1997 Erickson Foundation Seminars, and
the 1986, 1988, 1992, 1994, 1999, 2001,
2004, and 2007 Erickson Congresses also can
be purchased. Audio and video recordings from
the 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005 and 2009
Evolution of Psychotherapy Conferences, and
the Brief Therapy Conferences also are available from the Founda-
tion.

The Erickson Foundation distributes recordings of lectures by Milton


H. Erickson from the 1950s and 1960s, when Erickson’s voice was
strong. Releases in our audio series are announced in the Newsletter.

THE ERICKSONIAN MONOGRAPHS


The Foundation is sponsor of The Ericksonian Monographs. The
highest quality articles on Ericksonian hypnosis and psychotherapy
are included in The Monographs. Ten issues were published under FOUNDATION NEWSLETTER
the editorship of Stephen Lankton. The Monograph series evolved The Milton H. Erickson Foundation publishes a Newsletter for profession-
into the Annual of Brief Therapy. These are available from Taylor & als three times a year to inform its readers of the activities of the Founda-
Francis. tion. Articles and notices that relate to Ericksonian approaches to hypnosis
and psychotherapy are included. Submissions should be sent to
CURRENT THINKING AND RESEARCH IN BRIEF THERAPY karen@erickson-foundation.org. Business and subscription matters should
be directed to the Erickson Foundation at 2632 E. Thomas Rd., Suite
Current Thinking and Research in Brief Therapy: Solutions, Strate-
200, Phoenix, AZ 85016; newsletter@erickson-foundation.org.
gies and Narratives. Evolving from the Ericksonian Monographs,
this series contains only the highest quality articles on brief therapy NEWSLETTER STAFF
theory, practice and research. Volumes I, II and III are available
from Taylor & Francis. Richard Landis, PhD
Executive Editor
THE FOUNDATION PRESS began by publishing the proceedings of the
1998 Brief Therapy and Evolution of Psychotherapy Conferences. The Karen Haviley
PRESS makes a library of print, audio and video resources available Production Manager

INSTITUTES, WEBSITES & STAFF


THE ERICKSON INSTITUTES STAFF
There are 140 Milton H. Erickson Institutes/Societies in the United
States and abroad that have permission to use Dr. Erickson’s name in Matthew Braman ……………………………………………. Multimedia Specialist
the title of their organization. Institutes provide clinical services and
professional training. There are Institutes in major cities in North Fred Huang …………………………………….…….. Marketing Project Specialist
America, South America, Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, South
Rachel Kennedy …………………………………. Service & Product Coordinator
Africa and the Philippines.
Christian Khin ……………………………………….… IT Specialist & Webmaster
WEBSITES
www.erickson-foundation.org Chandra Lakin ………………………………………….…… Administrative Director

www.EricksonFoundationStore.com Chuck Lakin …………………...……………. Director of Marketing & Publishing

CouplesConference.com Marnie McGann ……………………..…………………….……….. Project Specialist

www.EricksonCongress.com Stacey Moore …………………………………………………….….Finance Manager

BriefTherapyConference Rachel Shipwash Wu ……………………….... Faculty & Institute Coordinator

www.EvolutionofPsychotherapy.com Jeffery K. Zeig ……………………………………………….……. Director & Founder

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 11
For your convenience...
The onsite bookstore carries hundreds
of titles by faculty authors and on
related topics! The store is located on
“BR” Ballroom Level
Yosemite Room B

Bookstore Hours
Thursday, December 6 7am-6pm
Friday, December 7 7am-6:30pm

THE BOOKSTORE Saturday, December 8 7:30am-6pm


Sunday, December 9 8am-3pm

IS OPEN
Need Coffee?
We’ve got you covered.
Tea, too.
IN THE YOSEMITE FOYER,
Your choice. NEAR REGISTRATION

Wednesday, Dec. 5 10:00-10:15 AM


Thursday, Dec. 6 9:30-9:45 AM
Friday, Dec. 7 9:00-9:15 AM
Saturday, Dec. 8 10:00-10:30 AM
Sunday, Dec. 9 10:30-10:45 AM

IN PLAZA B, LOBBY LEVEL


Monday, Dec. 10 10:00-10:30 AM
Courtesy of
THE MILTON H. ERICKSON FOUNDATION
Page 10
CONFERENCE PROGRAM AT A GLANCE
PRE-CONFERENCE POST-CONFERENCE
Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday SUPER SUNDAY Monday
December 5 December 6 December 7 December 8 DECEMBER 9 December 10
7:00 AM 7:00 AM 7:00 AM 7:30 AM 7:30 AM 8:00 AM
REGISTRATION REGISTRATION REGISTRATION REGISTRATION REGISTRATION REGISTRATION
5 All-Day 30
8 AM
AM--12 PM 8 AM - 8:15 AM 8 AM-9 AM 8:30 AM-11:30 AM Super Short 9 AM-12 PM
Convocation INTERACTIVE EVENTS Workshops 23-33 Courses Courses Brief
8:30 AM-
3:00 PM
8:30 AM-
3:00 PM
Therapy
8:30 AM-9:30 AM 9:15 AM-10:15 AM Fundamental
KEYNOTE ADDRESS 1 INTERACTIVE EVENTS Hypnosis
Master
Paul Ekman Workshop 3 Class
BRIEF THERAPY:
Law & Ethics 10:30 AM-11:30 AM
9:45 AM-12:45 PM INTERACTIVE EVENTS lunch break
MICHAEL YAPKO
Treating
8:30 AM-
EXPERIENTIAL
Part 1 10 AM
Workshops 1-11 Depression Short APPROACHES
12:45 PM-1:45 PM Experientially: COMBINING GESTALT
lunch break lunch break Hypnosis and Courses
Fundamental KEYNOTE ADDRESS 4 29-38 AND HYPNOSIS
Mindfulness as
Hypnosis Patrick Carnes Therapeutic Part 1
1 PM - 3 PM 12:45 PM-1:45 PM
Workshop 1 KEYNOTE ADDRESS 3 Contexts
Law & Ethics Harriet Lerner, PhD 2 PM-5 PM
ELLYN BADER
Part 2 lunch break Workshop 34-44 10:15 AM- lunch break
Passion, Vitality 11:45 AM
2 PM-3 PM and Intimacy:
1 PM - 3 PM 2 PM-5 PM Fundamental Integrating Short
INTERACTIVE EVENTS Attachment, Courses Part 2
Workshops 12-22 Hypnosis
PAUL 3:15 PM-4:15 PM
Workshop 4 Differentiation
and
39-49 1:30 PM-
4:30 PM
EKMAN Fundamental
Hypnosis I NTERACTIVE EVENTS
Neuroscience

Workshop Workshop 2
4:30PM-5:30 PM
5:15-6:15 PM RONALD SIEGEL lunch
Special Screening Harnessing break
dinner break INTERACTIVE EVENTS Mindfulness:
11:45 AM–
Tailoring the
“Viktor & I” Practice to the 1:00 PM
7 PM-9 PM 5:45 PM– 6:45 PM An Alexander Vesely Problem
Conference KEYNOTE ADDRESS 2 Authors’ Hour Film
PETER LEVINE &
Robert Greenberg
Begins! MAGGIE PHILLIPS
Finding Free- 1 PM-
dom from Pain: 3 PM
3:15 PM-4:45 PM Solving the Short
Short Courses Complex
Puzzle of
Courses
1-14 Trauma 50-59
and Pain
5 PM-6:30 PM
Short Courses KATHRYN ROSSI
15-28 Mythic Yoga:
Creative Trans-
formations
through Body
and Mind

BriefTherapyConference.com Page
Page131
PRE-CONFERENCE
Wednesday-December 5
7:00 AM REGISTRATION YOSEMITE FOYER

8:00 AM - 12:00 PM
LE 1 LAW & ETHICS IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
PART 1
with DANCING WITH THE RISKS:
Steve Frankel, PhD, JD
safe steps; tricky steps; landmines
This workshop in law, ethics and regulation focuses on three of the four most frequent causes for actions
against mental health professionals, nationwide. Since the 2010-2011 law/ethics/regulation workshop fo-
cused primarily on boundary violations (including sexual contact between professional and patient/client),
this 2012-2013 workshop focuses on incompetence, criminal convictions and cases involving high-conflict
custody problems. The workshop emphasizes awareness and management of risk factors in the major areas
of high risk practice via music videos illustrating the principles taught in the program. These include coping
with negative publicity on the internet, the risks of "creative" techniques, riskier vs. safer models of interven-
tion, coping with the need to "rescue" patients/clients, management of angry/dissatisfied patients/clients,
and more.
Educational Objectives: 1) List the top four high-risk areas of practice, 2) Define and give two examples of
“substantial relationship” laws, 3) List two characteristics of an “apology,” 4) List at least three issues that
should be included in clinical records (private practice version) or two types of threats that occur between
professional and patient/client (agency version)
12:00-1:00 PM LUNCH BREAK

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
LE 2
LAW & ETHICS IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
PART 2
Continues on themes from Part 1 on awareness and management of risk factors in the major areas of high-
risk practice.
Educational Objectives: 5) Describe at least two problem areas for high-conflict custody cases, 6) List at
least two requirements for practice continuity (private practice version) or one statute bearing on minors who
can authorize their own treatment (agency version.)

PC 1 PAUL EKMAN’S IMPERIAL BALLROOM B

Microexpressions Workshop
During this workshop participants will acquire the skill to see very brief
microexpressions, which prior to this training they did not notice.

Dr. Ekman’s work has shown that, contrary to the belief of some anthropologists (including Margaret Mead), facial
expressions of emotion are not culturally determined, but universal across human cultures and thus biological in
origin. Ekman reported on facial microexpressions which could be used to assist in lie detection. His work on lying
has contributed to the study of social aspects of lying, why we lie, and why we are often unconcerned with detect-
ing lies. He developed the Facial Action Coding System (FACS) to taxonomize every human facial expression, and
conducted and published research on a wide variety of topics in the general area of non-verbal behavior.

Educational Objectives: 1) Learn how to recognize concealed emotions. 2) Understand what motivates the
appearance of concealed emotions in micro-expressions

Page 14 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Conference Begins!
Short Courses 1-28 Wednesday-December 5
3:15 PM - 4:45 PM
SC 1 TWO VOICES, ONE DREAM: IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
A BRIEF THERAPY TECHNIQUE FOR COUPLES
Eric Greenleaf, PhD, and Christine Guilloux, DESS
When we are in love, “Life is like a dream,” and each values the other. This brief exercise reintroduces a lov-
ing dream of the couple, utilizing values of childhood and the pleasure of trance to help them accomplish this
once again. The female and male therapists induce the trance together.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe a conjoint trance induction used in brief therapy. 2) Describe a technique
for recovering positive memories of childhood.

SC 2 OPENING TO THE HEART OF HEALING IMPERIAL BALLROOM B


Maggie Phillips, PhD
This workshop will present effective clinical applications of HeartMathTM tools and heart coherence feedback
training. Participants will learn positive emotion-focused techniques for self-regulation and emotional stabili-
zation demonstrated to improve clinical outcomes when working with stress, anxiety, panic, grief, anger, and
other toxic emotions as well as applications with mindbody symptoms such as insomnia, chronic pain,
asthma, and hypertension. Participants will also receive “hands on” training in the use of individual heart
rhythm monitors and review ways of using them effectively with a wide variety of clients.
Educational Objectives: 1) List two of the latest research findings on emotional physiology and intelligence,
heart-brain interactions, and heart-rate variability. 2) Practice two techniques to increases the heart coher-
ence and lower stress-related heart variability that contributes to heart disease, emotional distress, and
chronic health problems. 3) Demonstrate how to use heart coherence personal training devices and how to
teach clients to use them.

SC 3 CREATING CONNECTIONS FOR LASTING SOLUTIONS IN FAMILY THERAPY UNION SQUARE 1-2
Gabrielle Peacock, MBBS
This workshop will focus on the importance of building relationships in Family Therapy. It will introduce par-
ticipants to “connecting questions” that generate the experience of connection and relating between family
members. There will be demonstration and practice so that small groups will be able to feel for themselves
the experience of connection and become more able to translate this into their work.
Educational Objectives: 1) List two examples of connecting questions to connect individuals with each other.
2) List two examples of connecting questions that consolidate the family unit.

SC 4 USING MOVIES IN ERICKSONIAN THERAPY FRANCISCAN C


Daniel Bass, Dipl. Psych
Movies are complex multisensory stories reflecting a specific world. They transport messages and solutions in
order to provide the viewer with the possibility of identifying with the movie characters, get absorbed in it, em-
pathize, recognize consciously or subconsciously one’s own central topics in life. They provide the possibility
of being catalysts for developmental processes that can be used in psychotherapy. In this presentation partici-
pants will learn about the processes of watching movies and the transfer into therapy.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe several techniques of how movies can be used to elicit therapeutic proc-
esses. 2) Describe a method of how therapists can identify and apply therapeutically useful movies

SC 5 SPLENDID PRESENCE: UNION SQUARE 15-16


THE MEETING BETWEEN BUDDHIST/MINDFULNESS PRACTICES AND CLINICAL HYPNOSIS
Thomas Roberts, LCSW
This Short Course will explore the reciprocal contributions between hypnotherapy and Buddhist/mindfulness
meditation. Participants will learn how to incorporate the language of mindfulness (spaciousness, accep-
tance/patience, openness, compassion) into the therapeutic/hypnotherapeutic practices, thus helping clients
embrace the benefits that both have to offer.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe three qualities of Buddhist/mindful language. 2) Explain how Buddhist/
mindfulness language integrates with traditional hypnotherapeutic language. 3) Describe why “Acceptance
first” helps reduce resistance.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 15
Wednesday-December 5 Short Courses 1-28
SC 6 NEUROMUSCULAR AWARENESS: UNION SQUARE 19-20
A MIND-BODY METHOD TO TREAT PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PAIN
Anja Ferrari-Malik, MD
Neuromuscular awareness is a method which focuses on the discovery and development of the skill to perceive
one’s own internal bodily sensations and to act upon this awareness to reduce pain. The ability to recognize
small bodily changes helps the client to create a new pathway in mind-body connection.
Educational Objectives: 1) Demonstrate an experiential method of reconnecting to bodily sensations. 2) Point
out and underline the relationship between phenomenological and mental systems. 3) Define a useful correla-
tion between the condition of the body and the mental state.

SC 7 BLENDING SCIENCE, SPIRITUALITY AND BELIEFS Plaza A


TO ENHANCE THE EFFECT OF PSYCHOTHERAPY
Assen Alladin, PhD
Mindfulness-based psychotherapy provides an evidence-based model for integrating diverse cultural beliefs and
wisdoms in therapy. This course will demonstrate how to integrate cultural beliefs and wisdoms in short-term
psychotherapies. Non-Western societies attach more importance to the heart. The heart is considered central to
producing changes in psychotherapy because a person validates reality not by how they think (cognition) but
how the person feels (affect). Moreover, societal pressure and the focus on individualism unintentionally create
“neurosis” and a tendency towards “narcissism” in our culture. This Short Course will demonstrate how to utilize
wisdoms (derived from various cultures) in brief therapies to help clients reframe their dysfunctional beliefs and
values; become more mindful of their inner reality; and harmonize their mind (cognitions) and heart (feeling).
Educational Objectives: 1) List three main reasons for synthesizing cultural beliefs and values in brief psycho-
therapy. 2) State three strategies for reframing rigid cultural values. 3) Use a strategy to help your client harmo-
nize the mind (cognition) and the heart (feeling) in therapy.

SC 8 BRIEF THERAPY WITH GAY MEN FRANCISCAN B


Richard Miller, MSW
Successful brief psychotherapeutic work with gay men includes the use of clinical hypnoses as well as an accept-
ing compassionate stance of the psychotherapist. Ego-state work and positive self-representations create healing
from years of internalized shame. Specific psychosocial issues for gay men, core issues common in the gay male
community, customized hypnoses scripts, and effective short-term treatment strategies will be discussed.
Educational Objectives: 1) Assess specific clinical needs for gay male patients and develop customized interven-
tions based on these needs. 2) Describe and utilize at least three successful hypnotic techniques specific for gay
men. 3) Create dialogues pertaining to safer sexual practices and drug use that are motivational for their patients.
4) Distinguish between interventions that may be shame based versus those that are compassionate.

SC 9 CORE INTELLIGENCE: THE CENTERING PROCESS YOSEMITE A


Tracey Clifford, EdD, LCSW
Create transformation using a three step process: Inward, Outward, Upward! Help clients leave ego defenses
behind and rise to live centered in their Core Intelligence™. Teach clients to live consciously by traveling
through.... seven gateways that untangle voices from the past. Free from chaos that stresses them in the work-
place, home, and relationships!
Educational Objectives: 1) Introduce the cornerstone tool of Core Intelligence: The Centering Process. 2) Identify
the obstacles and barriers causing clients to be stuck, and show them how to remove them through the seven
gateways.

Please be considerate of others. Do not


use cell phones, and please turn off your
cell phone ringers during sessions.

Page 16 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Short Courses 1-28 Wednesday-December 5
SC 10 EMOTIONAL SUPER STRENGTHS: PLAZA B
TRANSFORM EMOTION, TRANSFORM THE PERSON
Linda Duncan, EdD
This workshop focuses on four categories of emotion---fear, anger, sadness, and joy, and illustrates their po-
tential negative impacts. Problems arise when we respond to the impacts ineffectively---typically through some
form of avoidance---instead of discovering our potential to transform the emotion. The key to transformation
lies in responding with the emotional super strength hidden within each emotion. With anger the strength is
self-mastery; with fear/ personal power; with sadness/ acceptance; with joy/ gratefulness. The workshop con-
cludes with the Emotional Plan for Daily Living---a set of four principles that help integrate their super
strengths into an overall approach to life.
Educational Objectives: 1) Match four emotional super strengths with the appropriate category of emotion. 2)
Identify at least one principle of the Emotional Plan for Daily Living and describe how one would enact it.

SC 11 NARRATIVE THERAPY AND SOLUTION FOCUSED BRIEF THERAPY: UNION SQUARE 22


A WORKING HYBRID
Miguel Fernandez, PhD
It is the purpose of this short course to introduce and apply the concepts of both Narrative Therapy (NT) and
Solution Focus Brief Therapy (SFBT) simultaneously in a therapeutic setting. The use of imagery and symbol-
ism take the “storied” nature of problems and link them to the tapestry of all stories that a client brings into
therapy. The Miracle Question looks at the “preferred view” of the problem and differentiates the singular
vista of the problem against the preferred view of the client that has the vistas of the tapestry. EARS is used to
give the client control over the preferred view of the problem.
Educational Objectives: 1) Use the concepts of stitching and color coding to identify the problem story from the
client’s overall tapestry. 2) Use the concept of tool kitting behavior , to describe the singular vista of the problem
from the client’s tapestry of stories. 3) Use the acronym of EARS to describe the tool kitting for success.

SC 12 “FLOURISH” OR THE PETALS OF SATISFACTION IN LIFE AND WORK FRANCISCAN D


Nicole Ruysschaert, MD
In this workshop we will adopt a positive approach and focus on aspects that are part of the FLOURISH model:
Flow, Utilization, Resilience, Imagery to stimulate High levels of pleasure and satisfaction. These aspects can
be developed with Self Hypnosis exercises. Impact of the FLOURISH model on development and happiness
will be reviewed. In practical exercises you can discover how to work out your own “petals of satisfaction.”
Educational Objectives: 1) Revise concepts of flow, resilience, satisfaction and their utility in thriving. 2) De-
velop creativity and practice self-hypnosis exercises to develop these characteristics.

SC 13 TREATMENT ENGAGEMENT, ALLIANCE, AND ADHERENCE UNION SQUARE 23-24


IN BRIEF THERAPY WITH LATINOS:
PRACTICAL STRATEGIES FOR LASTING SOLUTIONS
Thomas Kirsch, MC, and Hernan Cancio Lopez
Latinos seeking treatment often do not feel understood in therapy, and many do not return for a second visit.
Lack of engagement with Latinos in treatment leads to a failure of Latinos in adhering to treatment recom-
mendations. Participants will learn strategies to promote treatment engagement, alliance, and adherence
with Latinos.
Educational Objectives: 1) List five key factors which contribute to treatment non-adherence in brief therapy
with Latinos. 2) Describe two practical strategies to engage Latinos in their treatment, build therapeutic alli-
ance, and promote treatment adherence and lasting solutions.

SC 14 SCRIPTS, PROTOCOLS AND METAPHORS: FRANCISCAN A


DISCOVERING THE POWER WITHIN THE CLINICIAN
Rob Staffin, PsyD
If you have ever felt like it would be nice to have a script or metaphor to facilitate the progress of a client in
therapy, this course is for you. Participants will learn how to utilize their own interest, skills and abilities to
create interventions tailored to their clients.
Educational objectives: 1) Given a patient, utilize the therapist's own talents, interests and wisdom to develop
metaphors that can be tailored to the presenting issues of their clients. 2) Describe the model of assessment
they can employ to enhance the effectiveness of their interventions.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 17
Wednesday-December 5 Short Courses 1-28
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM
SC 15 COMPETENCY BASED BRIEF THERAPY FOR LASTING CHANGE UNION SQUARE 23-24
(THE BARRETTA HYPNOTIC GUIDE TO CHANGING BELIEFS
AND GETTING WHAT YOU WANT OUT OF LIFE)
Norma Barretta, PhD, and Phillip Barretta, MA
CBBT focuses on the person’s own resources as the basic component of developing the ability to create lasting
changes. We keep insight out of sight and focus on behavioral shifts and updates of beliefs. Unconscious process
is a major contributor to lasting solutions and the ability to use hypnotic linguistic patterns of “temporary” (in refer-
ence to the present state) and “permanent” (in reference to the solution leading to the desired state) is an essen-
tial element of the model. Practice will be provided with demonstrations and casework elicited from the group.
Educational Objectives: 1) Differentiate between present state and desired state. 2) Use hypnotic language em-
phasizing temporariness of problems” and permanence of solutions/changes. 3) Guide the patient to access
past resources for use in the present.

SC 16 SYSTEMIC FAMILY CONSTELLATIONS: UNION SQUARE 1-2


A BROKEN HEART CAN HEAL…SOMETIMES IN ONE BEAT
Dan Booth Cohen, PhD, MBA
This process identifies and releases transgenerational trauma. This simple process consistently uncovers con-
nections between present day issues and transgenerational traumas. Within a single session, the burden of
memory is transformed into an enduring source of strength and healing.
Educational Objectives: 1) Explain the reasons why SFC is the fastest growing form of therapeutic intervention in
Europe. 2) Describe how new insights in transgenerational systemic family can augment and support individual
psychotherapy.

SC 17 BORROWING FROM ERICKSON'S NATIVE AMERICAN ROOTS FRANCISCAN C


TO DO BRIEF THERAPY THAT CHANGES LIVES AND LIFESTYLES
Jeanne Hernandez, PhD
This workshop explores the Native American principles such as harmony, hope and respect as they relate to
Ericksonian brief therapy, and introduces exercise for grounding and internal stability that ward off stress, de-
pression and daily conflict and that simplify complex decision-making in life, all of which bring clients to therapy.
Educational Objectives: 1) Discuss the healing aspects of harmony, hope and respect. 2) List three techniques
of psychotherapy based upon Native American traditional thinking.

SC 18 THE BRIEF, LASTING AND VIGOROUS APPROACH IMPERIAL BALLROOM B


OF RATIONAL EMOTIVE BEHAVIOR THERAPY
Debbie Joffe Ellis, MDAM
Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) is a most effective, vigorous and compassionate approach. Many
clients experience life-enhancing gains after REBT sessions, and the benefits last when the clients continues to
practice the principles they are taught in therapy. In this course, attendees will learn the main principles, tech-
niques and methods of REBT, observe a demonstration of the approach, observe its effectiveness as brief ther-
apy, do exercises and have questions answered.
Educational Objectives: 1) Explain the main principles, techniques and methods of REBT, its effectiveness as a
brief therapy, and the clients for whom such brief therapy can be most beneficial. 2) Distinguish between
healthy rational and unhealthy irrational thinking. 3) Distinguish between health and unhealthy negative emo-
tions. 4) Describe the REBT emphasis on, and the application of, unconditional acceptance.

SC 19 APPLYING SENSORY BODY WORK AND IMPROVISATIONAL THEATER UNION SQUARE 22


FOR SEXUAL ABUSE SURVIVORS IN BRIEF THERAPY
Claudia Weinspach, Dipl. Psych.
The utilization of body work and improvisational theater can be employed for different therapeutic purposes. In a
therapy group with sexually abused survivors it is a useful tool in the tradition of Ericksonian therapy. Since sen-
sory body work and improvisational theater elements are excellent tools to absorb the patients’ attention in an
equally structured and playful way, they become actors and creators of their new body experience. This is an
experiential workshop.
Educational Objectives: 1) Apply improvisational theater as a playful, active trance induction. 2) Utilize a reper-
toire of short vignettes for therapeutic work in a group.

Page 18 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Short Courses 1-28 Wednesday-December 5
SC 20 TRANSFORMING PATIENT'S VULNERABILITY INTO IDENTITY STRENGTH Yosemite A
Consuelo Casula
Patients bring to therapy unhappiness caused by personal, social, professional, and moral problems, and thera-
pists need to face them with an approach based on utilizing the hidden strengths in each component of the per-
son. This workshop will present the Identity Strength Focused approach, with its method, techniques and meta-
phors to empower patients in healing their wounds, following spiritual values, finding the strength coming from
mind-body coherence, empathy with others, and engagement in their job.
Educational Objectives: 1) Assess strengths and vulnerability of the five components of Identity: Body, Social,
Professional, Spiritual and Secret Identity. 2) Apply the embedded strengths of each component of identity to
reach mindfulness and mind-sight, empathy, equality, engagement, empowerment, and equanimity.

SC 21 SELF-ACTUALIZATION THEORY IN BRIEF-THERAPY PRAXIS Union Square 15-16


Erika Chovanec, PhD
The objectives of this informative and experiential workshop are: 1) to introduce an integrative hypnotherapeutic
approach to brief-therapy inspired by Maslow’s theory of Self-Actualization and Being-Motivation; 2) to demon-
strate, via video recordings and experiential activities, how the therapist’s attitude of acceptance and Being-
Perception encourage client’s Being-Motivation and how to use hypnotherapeutic language to foster Self-
Actualization; 3) to point out the ways in which the theory relies on Epigenetic Knowledge and discuss the simi-
larities and differences it has with Ericksonian Psychotherapy
Educational Objectives: 1) List three main characteristics of the therapist’s attitude that contribute to the proc-
ess of Self-Actualization in clients. 2) Explain three characteristics of the therapist’s Being Perception and their
utilization in the hypnotic trance. 3) Describe three communication techniques that may be used to encourage
the development of Being Motivation.

SC 22 CREATING LASTING SOLUTIONS IN HYPNOSIS UNION SQUARE 19-20


Robert McNeilly, MBBS
We all want solution and we want them to last. Experience and learning are predictably useful ways of solutions
to become permanent. Hypnosis is a wonderful way of generating experiences and after Erickson, of facilitating
learning. In this practical workshop we will explore tailoring our hypnotic conversation to fit the unique individu-
ality of each client, they are naturally more willing to connect with more of their innate resources, and learn in
their own unique way.
Educational Objectives: 1) Elicit specific missing resources that have resulted in the creation of a problem. 2) Ex-
plain ways of reconnecting clients with this missing resource. 3) Create an experience of learning so the solution
will be lasting.

SC 23 BRIEF THERAPY IN CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS: Plaza B


LASTING SOLUTIONS TO EMOTIONAL, BEHAVIORAL AND RELATIONAL PROBLEMS THROUGH
THE MIRROR OF NEW INTERACTIVE METAPHORS
Carme Timoneda-Gallart, PhD
Emotional problems in children and teenagers are frequent and have important negative effects on their quality
of life. Emotional, behavioral and relation problems are usually the reason that parents and educators ask for
professional help. Our challenge is to change the emotional learning acquired unconsciously by the child. In this
course, some new “interactive” metaphors used in more than two hundred cases will be presented: the “empty -
full glass”, “the pathways” and “the train”.
Educational Objectives: 1) Explain three interactive metaphors by reading the child’s answer as a clue of nega-
tive emotional learning. 2) Write three important characteristics of the metaphor of the train.

SC 24 THE INTERPLAY-MIND, BRAIN, BODY, GENE: Franciscan A


HOW THIS BECOMES BEHAVIOR, AFFECT AND MENTAL STATE
Richard Hill, MA, MEd
The Interplay is a word for the relationship between the broad complex of processes that collectively create our
clients. Our inner world expresses itself in more than just behavior and affect. This presentation will show how
this occurs and how body states and even gene expression are explicitly expressed through “9 voices” from our
implicit self. A brief therapeutic process will be described that dovetails into whatever therapy you practice to
positively affect the Interplay.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe the notion of a complex interplay of psychobiological processes. 2) Describe
9 observable factors that express implicit processes. 3) Introduce a brief therapy that dovetails into existing indi-
vidual practice.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 19
Wednesday-December 5 Short Courses 1-28
SC 25 HOW TO THOROUGHLY CO-CREATE BRIEF THERAPY EFFICIENTLY AND EFFECTIVELY Franciscan D
Virgil Hayes, DO, MSW
Psychotherapy is a blend of art and science. However, the art of using a conceptual framework to co-create
solutions is overlooked in favor of medical paradigms. This short course focuses on nonmedical understandings
of anxiety and depression creation to enable the clinician to be more effective in co-creating solutions. Case
discussion and lecture for all skill levels.
Educational Objectives: 1) List at least three words that describe anxiety and depression. 2) List two sources of
anger. 3) List at least five attitudes of effective brief therapy.

SC 26 FROM WORRY TO WONDER: Imperial Ballroom A


EVOKE YOUR UNCONSCIOUS TO MAKE THE IMPOSSIBLE POSSIBLE
Neil Fiore, PhD
Learning to shift from worry to wonder releases conscious struggle and makes more energy available for rapid
recovery and healing. Reframing worry as a request from the unconscious mind for a plan to survive an antici-
pated crisis can reduce stress hormones and muscle tension while enhancing immune system health. Knowing
you can access a deep unconscious wisdom and support frees the conscious mind and prepares it to receive a
therapeutic surprise.
Educational Objectives: 1) Define worry to a client as a helpful process that seeks a pan for survival and self-
acceptance. 2) Describe two effective ways of responding to the “Yes, but” and the “What if”-voice of the cli-
ent’s worrying mind. 3) List three ways to shift the client from worry to wonder about the support of the body and
unconscious.

SC 27 ILLUMINATING SOLUTIONS WITH THE TRANCE-SENDING LIGHT Franciscan B


OF COMPASSIONATE PLAYFULNESS
Betty Blue, PhD
Participants are invited to explore and experience spiritually uplifting, trance-forming, life-affirming, compassion-
ately bonding and solution rehearsing processes and techniques comprising Transcendence-focused Playful-
ness. Emphasis will be on how such processes may transform learned helplessness into personal empowerment
and contribute to emotion-based neurochemical regulation, well-being, immunoenhancement and gene expres-
sion. Examples and group participation will highlight “Metaphorplay”, playful paradox, soothing and energizing
imagination activation, musical catharsis and reciprocating the compassionate radiance of “natural highs”.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe three playful transcendence-focused techniques that can be useful with
clients experiencing life challenges or disappointments. 2) Describe how playfully uplifting catharsis may contrib-
ute to immune system enhancement.

SC 28 HUMOR MATTERS: Plaza A


CLINICAL APPLICATION OF HUMOR IN PSYCHOTHERAPY
Steve Sultanoff, PhD
Humor in the serious realm of psychotherapy? In this lively presentation, filled with anecdotes and clinical illus-
trations, we will explore the rationale for and practical application of the conscious and purposeful use of hymor
in psychotherapy. Humor can create change in the central aspects of human experience—cognitions, emotions,
behaviors, and physiology. We will explore how humor can be a powerful tool to build the relationship, diagnose,
and treat, and we will differentiate between empathic and hostile styles of humor.
Educational Objectives: 1) Explain the link between humor and feelings, behaviors, thoughts, and biochemistry.
2) Express how to consciously and purposefully use humor to build therapeutic relationship, treat, and diagnose.

Required sign-in/sign-out sheets are located in the center section of


this syllabus. For your convenience, please use these pages, one for
each day of the conference. After you have completed each form,
please place it in the conveniently located drop-boxes or at the Erick-
son Foundation registration desk.

Page 20 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Workshops 1-11 Thursday
Thursday--December 6
7:00 AM REGISTRATION YOSEMITE FOYER

8:00 AM CONVOCATION GRAND BALLROOM B

8:30 AM - 9:30 AM
K1 KEYNOTE ADDRESS 1 GRAND BALLROOM B
BEHAVIORAL CLUES TO DECEIT
PAUL EKMAN, PHD
Dr. Ekman explores the nine motivations for serious lies and why lies succeed—and why and
when they fail. He illustrates the behavioral clues to spotting lies — with video examples. He will
enable you to see micro expressions of concealed emotions, while explaining why and when mi-
cros occur, what they do and don't tell you. . He also will demonstrate online interactive training
tools.
Educational Objectives: 1) Make more accurate judgments of truthfulness and lying.
2) Understand how to be less susceptible to stereotypes and preconceptions.

9:45 AM - 12:45 PM
FH 1 Fundamentals of Hypnosis Workshop 1 POWELL AB
BASIC PRINCIPLES OF HYPNOSIS AND INDUCTION
Brent Geary, PhD
This segment will cover essential topics and terminology in hypnosis. The process of a hypnotic session will be
explained. Participants will practice observing and elicitation of focused awareness in hypnotic subjects.
Educational Objectives: 1) Define induction, utilization, and termination in hypnotic contexts. 2) List four ways
in which attention can be focused. 3) Explain advantages of using linkage in hypnotic induction.

WS 1 SOCRATIC DIALOGUE: FOUR STEPS TO EMPOWERING CLIENTS PLAZA B


Christine Padesky, PhD
Socratic dialogue has been a part of Beck's cognitive therapy since the beginnings of this therapy in the
1970's. Even so, little has been written to help therapists learn to master this practice. Padesky outlined 4
steps in the Socratic Dialogue process twenty years ago that now serve as a foundation for learning this ap-
proach. This workshop illustrates these four steps with clinical demonstrations and practice exercises designed
to help participants improve their mastery of the approach. Drawing ideas from her forthcoming book, The Ox-
ford Guide to Socratic Methods in CBT (Padesky & Kennerley, Eds., Oxford U Press, expected publication June,
2013), Padesky teaches the most recent perspectives on use of Socratic Dialogue in therapy including use of
Socratic Dialogue in working with imagery.
Educational Objectives: 1) Identify and practice the four stages of Socratic Dialogue. 2) Recognize two errors
therapists commonly make and what to do instead. 3) Compare deconstructive and constructive uses of So-
cratic dialogue with imagery.

WS 2 PRACTICING THE NEW NEUROSCIENCE OF PSYCHOTHERAPY GRAND BALLROOM B


Ernest Rossi, PhD
Group and individual demonstrations of Rossi’s new Activity-Dependent Approaches to the 4-stage creative
process for optimizing of gene expression, brain plasticity, problem solving and mind-body healing. Practical
approaches for all the psychotherapies as presented in Rossi’s 2012 book, Creating Consciousness: How
Therapists can Facilitate Wonder, Wisdom, Beauty, and Truth.
Educational Objectives: 1) List 3 activity-dependent approaches to facilitating gene expression, brain plasticity,
and mind-body healing in psychotherapy. 2) Build skills in recognizing and facilitating the 4-stage creative proc-
ess in psychotherapy with implicit processing heuristics.

Please be considerate of others. Do not use cell


phones, and please turn off your cell phone ringers
during sessions.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 21
Thursday
Thursday--December 6 Workshops 1-11
WS 3 PROMOTING ADVOCACY AND SOCIAL JUSTICE YOSEMITE A
THROUGH BRIEF BUT SUSTAINED ACTION
Jeffrey Kottler, PhD
This inspirational workshop will focus on an expanded role of therapists to become more directly and actively
involved in community activism, global human rights, and advocacy on behalf of those who have been most mar-
ginalized and oppressed. Dozens of different projects will be described, representing a wide variety of contexts,
speciallties, settings, and outcomes. Participants will discuss their own dreams and plans to make a greater
difference in their communities, and the world at large.
Educational Objectives: 1) Review a dozen case examples of social justice in action by busy practitioners in a
variety of settings. 2) Explore possibilities for becoming more directly involved in service and advocacy. 3) Dis-
cuss ways to sustain and support projects over the long-haul

WS 4 ANXIETY BE GONE! TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR WORRIES PLAZA A


Reid Wilson, PhD
Chronically anxious clients continually scan their world for potential catastrophes that they feel incapable of
facing. Participants will learn a set of therapeutic strategies—physiological, cognitive and behavioral—for treating
worries, based on the latest research. These will help clients face unneeded worries head-on and dispatch with
them rather than being consumed by them or trying to avoid them.
Educational Objectives: 1) Distinguish helpful worries (signals) from intrusive worries (noise). 2) Clarify the spe-
cific skills of worry exposure. 3) List 4 methods for generating alternative perspectives.

WS 5 DON JACKSON, MD – UNION SQUARE 22


REDISCOVERING THE BRIEF THERAPY OF A FORGOTTEN FATHER
Wendel Ray, PhD
Obscured by the passage of time Don D. Jackson, MD is as important in the development of Interactional theory
and effective brief therapy as his two contemporaries Milton Erickson and Gregory Bateson. Rare video/audio
recordings will be used to teach practical and learnable techniques of brief therapy Jackson introduced.
Educational Objectives: 1) List 4 conceptual frameworks derived from Jackson Communication/Interactional
theory. 2) Be able to describe 4 techniques for joining with and using the clients behavior to promote change.

WS 6 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES OF THERAPY I: FRANCISCAN A-B


RESILIENCE, AN EXPERIENTIAL APPROACH
Jeffrey Zeig, PhD
What are the characteristics of an advanced therapist? There was an artistry to the work of Milton Erickson, Vir-
ginian Satir, and Carl Whitaker. Brief therapists of all persuasions can learn to advance their artistry. Those who
seek counseling often seem to suffer a lack of resilience. Traumatized clients have lost ability to access their
resilient foundation. Explaining the need for resilience is not enough; clinicians need proper tools to help. Resil-
ience can be access through experiential methods, not didactic information. Through lecture, demonstration,
and practice groups, we will realize methods to promote resilient vitality.
Educational Objectives: 1) Given a patient, indicate an experiential plan to elicit resilience. 2) List four psycho/
social elements of resilience. 3) Explain the value of an experiential approach.

WS 7 THREE POSITIVE CONNECTIONS NEEDED FOR THERAPY TRANSFORMATION IMPERIAL BALLROOM B


Stephen Gilligan, PhD
Psychotherapy is an exploration of how individuals can forge positive, therapeutic responses to life challenges.
This workshop focuses on the three core connections that allow clients to do this: (1) Positive intention and
goals (“towards a positive future”); (2) Somatic Centering (“embodied presence”); and (3) Field Resources
(“positive connections beyond the problem”). We will see how in a repetitive problem, all three of these connec-
tions are typically absent. More importantly, we will see how clients may be helped to developed and sustain
these positive connections while engaging with challenging material—e.g., a past trauma, a present difficulty, or
a future possibility. Participants will be offered multiple techniques and examples, as well as several demonstra-
tions to illustrate this positive orientation to psychotherapy.
Education Objectives: 1) Show three methods for developing therapeutic change. 2) Describe three techniques
for connecting a client to a positive, skill-based state of being. 3) Describe a practical self-scaling method for
measuring level of positive connections.

Page 22 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Workshops 1-11 Thursday
Thursday--December 6
WS 8 BRIEF ADLERIAN THERAPY UNION SQUARE 15-16
Jon Carlson, PsyD, EdD
Adlerian psychotherapy is an effective brief therapy model that integrates from many other approaches. Adler’s
ideas highlight the importance of not only understanding the individual but the social context. This approach
emphasizes working from a multi-cultural orientation and highlights personal responsibility. This approach uses
a four-step process: Engagement, Assessment, Insight, and Reorientation. The focus of the treatment is positive
as the therapist uses encouragement strategies to help the client identify their assets and strengths. DVD exam-
ples of actual sessions will be used to highlight the process and demonstrate how short-term change is possible
with this approach.
Education Objectives: 1) Understand the key components of Brief Adlerian Psychotherapy. 2) Able to use
encouragement to empower clients and increase hope and awareness of strengths.

WS 9 “MORE CLIENTS FOR ME:” FRANCISCAN C-D


HOW TO FIND THE MARKETING ACTIVITIES THAT WILL BRING YOU SELF-PAYING CLIENTS
Casey Truffo, MFT
Tired of wasting time with marketing activities that don’t work? Feeling overwhelmed with all the marketing ac-
tivity choices? You are not alone. Casey Truffo offers practical, step-by-step instructions to get your phone ring-
ing while making sure you are marketing in alignment with your purpose and values.
Educational Objectives: 1) State the 4 key questions to ask oneself in order to spend one's marketing time, en-
ergy, and marketing dollar wisely. 2) Identify at least 2 effective marketing activities. 3) Describe the difference
between an online marketing plan and a community marketing plan

WS 10 BRIEF FAMILY THERAPY UNION SQUARE 23-24


Camillo Loriedo, MD, PhD
The therapeutic relationship appears to be the key element for short-term treatment. The use of rapport in Erick-
sonian Psychotherapy is an excellent example of the essential use of the therapeutic relationship in Brief Family
Therapy. As demonstrated by Carl Whitaker’s position in family therapy, therapist’s emotions, fantasies, and
isomorphic behaviors can provide useful suggestions both for diagnosing and effectively utilizing the therapeutic
relationship.
Educational Objectives:

WS 11 REACH: IMPERIAL BALLROOM A


PUSHING YOUR CLINICAL EFFECTIVENESS TO THE NEXT LEVEL
Scott Miller, PhD
The field of therapy is undergoing a period of dramatic change: regulatory and documentation requirements, gov-
ernment cutbacks and changing insurance policies, declining incomes and economic uncertainty. Thankfully, a
simple, evidence-based alternative exists for maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency of treatment based on
using ongoing client feedback to empirically tailor services to the individual client needs and characteristics. Over
a dozen randomized clinical trials, involving a wide range of clients and presenting complaints, document that the
principles and practices associated with Feedback Informed Treatment (FIT) improve outcomes and client satis-
faction by as much as 65%, cuts dropout rates in half, and decreases the risk of deterioration by one third. FIT
does not require a great deal of time and can be incorporated into any therapeutic approach or treatment setting.
Many clinicians and agencies around the world are using the data generated by FIT to provide evidence of effec-
tiveness and accountability to regulatory bodies, payers, and funders.
Educational Objectives: 1) Learn a simple, valid and reliable method for evaluating progress in treatment. 2)
Discover a simple, valid and reliable method for evaluating the quality of the therapeutic relationship. 3) Under-
stand measures of alliance and outcome to identify cases most at risk for drop out, deterioration, or treatment
failure.

12:45
12:45--2:00 PM LUNCH BREAK

Page 23
Thursday
Thursday--December 6 Workshops 12-22
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
FH 2 Fundamentals of Hypnosis Workshop 2 POWELL AB
INDUCTION APPROACHES
Brent Geary, PhD
Various frameworks for hypnotic induction will be explained, demonstrated, and practiced during this portion of
the training.
Educational Objectives: 1) Cite three useful aspects of the eye fixation technique. 2) Explain reasons why a count-
ing technique is appropriate for anxious subjects. 3) Define “fractionation” and discuss its use in induction.

WS 12 INTEGRATING HYPNOSIS INTO OUR TREATMENT OF CHILDREN FRANCISCAN C-D


Lynn Lyons, MSW
Hypnosis is a powerful tool when working with children and families. Participants will learn how to incorporate
concrete methods of “being hypnotic” with children (formally and informally) in order to improve focus, emo-
tional management, sleep, and tolerance of medical procedures. Determining a treatment goal and creating
interventions will be taught.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe three possible circumstances where hypnosis can be used in treatment with
children. 2) List three ways in which hypnosis with children can differ from hypnosis with adults. 3) Describe two
ways to incorporate parents in a hypnotic intervention with a child.

WS 13 THE LINCOLN PERSPECTIVE: IMPERIAL BALLROOM B


LESSON ABOUT COPING WITH AND OVERCOMING DEPRESSION
FROM AN AMERICAN PRESIDENT
Bill O’Hanlon, MS
Abraham Lincoln suffered from what was known as “melancholy” most of his life. In this presentation, you will
learn the effective coping and self-treatment strategies he used to deal with and overcome lifelong depression.
An inspirational talk with lessons for modern clinicians and clients.
Educational Objectives: 1) List at least one strategy Abraham Lincoln used to cope with or overcome depression.
2) Translate at least one of Lincoln’s strategies into an intervention for one of your own clients. 3) Define inclusion.

WS 14 SINGLE-SESSION PSYCHOTHERAPY: ENHANCING ONE-MEETING POTENTIALS UNION SQUARE 23-24


Michael Hoyt, PhD
Many therapies involve brief lengths of treatment, including a single session. A structure will be presented for
organizing the tasks and skills involved in different phases (pre, early, middle, late, and follow-through) of ther-
apy. Numerous case examples, including video, will illustrate brief therapy techniques useful both in initial ses-
sions and in the course of longer treatments.
Educational Objectives: 1) List the tasks and skills involved in different phases of treatment. 2) Describe brief
therapy techniques that may be useful in different clinical situations. 3) Consider application to participants’
own cases.

WS 15 ATTENTION: THE ELIXIR OF THERAPEUTIC GROWTH GRAND BALLROOM B


Erving Polster, PhD
Dr. Polster will flesh out the roles of an attention triad of concentration, fascination and curiosity in evoking am-
plified interpersonal immersion in the therapeutic process. The resulting involvement leads to a quasi-hypnotic
energy opening the client to new experience. Conceptual perspectives will be elaborated, augmented by live
demonstrations of therapy sessions.
Educational Objectives: 1) Create a combination of safety and urgency in the therapeutic relationship. 2) See
past the client’s self-denigration and accentuate contrastingly enabling qualities. 3) Evoke those stories which
help clients recognize the actuality of their lives.

Page 24 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Workshops 12-22 Thursday
Thursday--December 6
WS 16 STRENGTHS-BASED COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY PLAZA B
Christine Padesky, PhD
One of the "new" developments in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is the emphasis on strengths at each
stage of therapy. In a strengths-based approach, experiential methods often trump analytic approaches because
they facilitate expressions of the heart as well as the head.. Some of the changes in CBT over the past three
decades (i.e., an increased emphasis on behavioral experiments, imagery, and a greater appreciation of neuro-
science) provide platforms for these "new" therapy methods. Come to this workshop to observe and experience
strengths-based CBT in practice.
Educational Objectives: 1) Employ questions designed to bring strengths into client awareness. 2) Help clients
devise metaphors and imagery to encapsulate their strengths. 3) Devise strengths-based behavioral experi-
ments to help clients apply strengths to areas of life difficulty.

WS 17 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES OF THERAPY II: CREATING EMOTIONAL IMPACT FRANCISCAN A-B


Jeffrey Zeig, PhD
Communication is composed of nonverbal/paraverbal contextual aspects; the words only convey part of the
message. We will study the effective use of prosody, proximity, gesture, expression and context, and how those
channels can be woven into the process of communication to create dramatic moments that empower effective
clinical outcomes.
Educational Objectives: 1) Define "microdynamic" gift-wrapping. 2)Indicate two ways in which micrody-
namic methods increase therapeutic impact. 3) Given a patient, indicate how to use gestures and sounds to
increase impact. 4) Define "utilization" and indicate how it is effective.

WS 18 ENHANCING RESILIENCE THROUGH SELF-LEADERSHIP


Robert Dilts IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
Resilience is the capacity of people to withstand or recover quickly from difficult conditions.
When individuals are challenged, they can sometimes rise to the occasion. But if the challenge seems too great,
they may “crash and burn.” This is where the skills of self-leadership are an essential resource. Self-leadership
is about ensuring that you are personally prepared to be your best, meet challenges, overcome obstacles and
reach your goals.
Educational Objectives: 1) List the three key qualities required for resilience. 2) Describe three skills of self-
leadership and their relationship to resilience.

WS 19 GAINING PERSPECTIVE: A BALANCING ACT PLAZA A


Steve Andreas, MA
Many problems in living result from a lack of perspective—events are viewed in isolation, rather than in relation
to other events that can provide balance. A variety of very simple and very brief interventions to achieve differ-
ent kinds of perspective will be demonstrated and taught.
Educational Objectives: 1) Distinguish between simultaneous and sequential perspective. 2) Create perspective
verbally and nonverbally. 3) List three ways to create visual perspective.

WS 20 THE TREATMENT INTERFACE OF CHRONIC PAIN AND SUBSTANCE DEPENDENCY YOSEMITE A


Roxanna Erickson-Klein, PhD and Marry Ellen Bluntzer, MD
This workshop offers medical and psychotherapy professionals an approach for the management of chronic
pain conditions. Specifically intended for work with patients at risk for medication dependence techniques are
taught that involve self-assessment and active participation, both integral to the healing process. The use of
creative imagination and hypnotic strategies offer opportunities for the subjective perceptual alterations, which
can be used in the adaptation to chronic discomfort.
Education Objectives: 1) Identify parameters for assessing whether a patient is addicted or in increasing clinical
pain. 2) List three potential strategies for use of the imagination in management of chronic pain.

WS 21 JOHN WEAKLAND’S BRIEF THERAPY WITH A HUSBAND SUSPECTED OF INFIDELITY UNION SQUARE 22
Wendel Ray, PhD
John Weakland’s MRI Brief Therapy is among the most effective & influential models in use today. Video re-
cordings of Weakland working successfully with a husband suspected of infidelity will be reviewed and dis-
cussed to demonstrate the MRI Brief Therapy conceptual framework and clinical techniques for competency
based brief therapy.
Education Objectives: 1) Articulate the basic problem formation/attempted solution framework and related con-
cepts of John Weakland’s MRI brief therapy. 2) Describe a working understanding of three therapeutic strate-
gies for evoking change pioneered by Weakland in the practice of effective brief therapy.

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Thursday
Thursday--December 6 Workshops 12-22
WS 22 WORKING AROUND THE PROBLEM: UNION SQUARE 15-16
CONSULTING WITH PARENTS AND TEACHERS
Jon Carlson, PsyD, EdD
Therapists frequently work with the wrong person in treatment and as a result they are unlikely to be helpful.
Research supports that working with the person that brings the problem to you (ie parent or teacher) and not
the identified patient (child or student). By working around the child or adolescent’s problem and focusing on
how they are a problem for the teacher or parent will yield positive gains. This workshop will show how to use the
consultation process to help all parties involved. DVD examples of actual sessions will be used to highlight the
process and demonstrate how short-term is possible with this approach.
Education Objectives: 1) Understand the seven-step process of individual consultation. 2) Able to describe the
rationale for working with a consultation approach.

5:00 PM-7:00 PM DINNER BREAK

7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
K2 BEETHOVEN: GRAND BALLROOM B
REVOLUTION, REINVENTION, AND INNOVATION WITH ATTITUDE!
Robert Greenberg, PhD
Louis (Ludwig) van Beethoven (1770-1827) was product of a violently dysfunctional upbringing. In
the fall of 1802, at just the time his name and fame were beginning to spread across Europe, he
suffered a suicidal depression. Through equal parts self-delusion and sheer will, Beethoven man-
aged to reinvent himself personally and artistically as a hero battling fate itself. Thus armed, he
emerged from his funk in early 1803, and proceeded to create a body of work unlike anything any-
one had ever before imagined. Central to Beethoven's new compositional vision was his convic-
tion that his music be a vehicle for profound self-expression: his therapist's couch. This program
will explore Beethoven's life and times and will then focus on his Symphony No. 5 as an example
of how a piece of instrumental music can become—literally—a highly personalized confessional.
Educational Objectives:

Page 26 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Friday
Friday--December 7
Morning Interactive Events
7:00 AM REGISTRATION YOSEMITE FOYER

8:00 AM - 9:00 AM 9:15 AM - 10:15 AM


GRAND BALLROOM B Clinical Demonstration 3 GRAND BALLROOM B
Clinical Demonstration 1
Increasing Impact in Experiential Psychotherapy Generative Trance and Transformation
JEFFREY ZEIG STEPHEN GILLIGAN
Psychotherapy is a symbolic drama of change, the imperative of This demonstration will show how problems/symptoms may be
which is: “by living this experience you will be different.” viewed as attempts by the creative unconscious to bring transfor-
Educational Objectives: 1) List three essentials of experiential ther- mation and healing, and how the development of a generative
trance can allow that transformation to be realized.
apy. 2) Given a patient with a behavior problem, create an experien-
tial treatment plan to elicit change. Educational Objectives: 1) Describe how symptoms can become
solutions under conditions of generative trance. 2) Explain how a
Clinical Demonstration 2 IMPERIAL BALLROOM A generative trance unfolds from the client’s unique processes and
idiosyncratic values.
Outcome Informed Treatment
SCOTT MILLER Clinical Demonstration 4 IMPERIAL BALLROOM B
Participants will learn a simple method for measuring success rates
that can be used to develop a profile of their most and least effec-
Hypnosis and Family Therapy
tive moments in therapy—what works and what doesn’t. Not only CAMILLO LORIEDO
will attendees learn how to identify their clinical strengths and Specific direct and indirect techniques are required to activate family
weaknesses and how to use the findings in to improve their own resources and to induce a deep and meaningful change of the most
practice, but they will also come away with concrete tools that will rigid family patterns. Indirect as well as direct forms of hypnosis to be
immediately boost clinical abilities and effectiveness. used in the family interview will be presented and special attention
Educational Objectives: 1} Describe a method for determining the will be dedicated to the criteria to follow in order to combine properly
overall success rate of your clinical work. 2) Explain a method for direct and indirect in the different phases of the therapeutic process.
identifying cases at risk for dropping out of treatment or experienc- Educational Objectives: 1) List eleven therapeutic effects that hyp-
ing a negative or null outcome. nosis with families might produce di-per-sé. 2) Describe how to com-
FRANCISCAN B
bine direct and indirect hypnosis in different types of Families.
Topical Panel 1 PLAZA A
Topical Panel 3 PLAZA A
Brief Therapy for Depression
CAMILLO LORIEDO • CHRISTINE PADESKY Therapy and Social Issues
ERNEST ROSSI • MICHAEL YAPKO JEFFREY KOTTLER • ESTHER PEREL
CASEY TRUFFO • MICHAEL YAPKO
Topical Panel 2 PLAZA B
About Milton Erickson Topical Panel 4 PLAZA B
STEVE ANDREAS • ROBERT DILTS The Person of the Therapist
BILL O’HANLON • ROXANNA ERICKSON-KLEIN ELLYN BADER • KENNETH HARDY FRANCISCAN C
BILL O’HANLON • CHRISTINE PADESKY
Dialogue 1 IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
Trauma Dialogue 3 IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
PETER LEVINE • RONALD SIEGEL Humor in Brief Therapy
STEVE ANDREAS • MICHAEL HOYT
Dialogue 2 FRANCISCAN AB
Duped: Lies and Deception in Therapy Dialogue 4 FRANCISCAN AB
JON CARLSON • JEFFREY KOTTLER The Creative Unconscious in Intuition and Healing
ROBERT DILTS • ERNEST ROSSI
Conversation Hour 1 FRANCISCAN CD UNION SQUARE 15-16
Multicultural Issues Conversation Hour 3 FRANCISCAN CD
KENNETH HARDY Beyond the 50-Minute Hour:
What Therapists Do Outside of the Clinic
Conversation Hour 2 YOSEMITE A JON CARLSON
Anxiety Disorders
FRANK DATTILIO Conversation Hour 4 YOSEMITE A
Key Changes in Perspective over a 70-Year Career
ERVING POLSTER

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 27
Friday
Friday--December 7
Morning Interactive Events
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM 12:45 PM - 1:45 PM
Clinical Demonstration 5 GRAND BALLROOM B K3 GRAND BALLROOM B
Creating Consciousness with Activity-Dependent Gene Keynote Address 3
Expression and Brain Plasticity
ERNEST ROSSI REMARKABLE ACTS OF CHANGE:
The new Neuroscience of utilizing Implicit Processing Heuristics in FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE
facilitating the 4-stage creative process in the construction and
creative reconstruction of fear, stress and post traumatic memories HARRIET LERNER, PHD
and symptoms during brief psychotherapy will be demonstrated
with the entire audience, as well as a volunteer. Dr. Lerner will offer clinical examples of how she uses straight-
Educational Objectives: 1) Demonstrate the 4-stage creative proc- forward “coaching” that invites clients, in relatively few ses-
ess in brief psychotherapy. 2) Demonstrate the utilization of Implicit sions, to experiment with bold acts of change that can change
Processing Heuristics in psychotherapy. everything. She will outline the theoretical perspective that
guides this work, and share her personal experience with sys-
Clinical Demonstration 6 IMPERIAL BALLROOM B tems-based remarkable acts of change.
Transforming Negative Self-Talk: Educational Objectives: 1) Describe the concept of “differentia-
Devils into Angels tion of self” in systems theory as can be applied to the “coach-
STEVE ANDREAS ing” process in brief psychotherapy. 2) Explain how a multigen-
Negative Self-talk is a trigger for a huge variety of problematic be- erational perspective can enhance the therapist’s ability to fa-
haviors and responses, from anger to depression. A wide variety of cilitate change in brief psychotherapy.
extremely brief nonverbal and verbal interventions will be demon-
strated for altering these messages in ways that redirect attention
in more positive directions, and elicit more useful responses.
Educational Objectives: 1) Demonstrate three nonverbal interven- INTERACTIVE EVENTS
tions to change the impact of a negative internal voice. 2) Utilize EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES
music or a song to transform Negative Self-Talk. 3) Combine verbal
and nonverbal elements into an intervention for changing Trouble- Topical Panels:
some Self-Talk. Compare and contrast clinical
PLAZA A philosophical perspectives of experts.
Topical Panel 5
Therapist Inspiration and Renewal Dialogues:
JON CARLSON • KENNETH HARDY Given a topic, describe the differing approaches to
MICHAEL HOYT • JEFFREY KOTTLER psychotherapy, and identify the strengths and
PLAZA B weaknesses of each approach.
Topical Panel 6
Brief Therapy for Anxiety Disorders Conversation Hours:
LYNN LYONS • WENDEL RAY Learn the philosophies of various
RON SIEGEL • REID WILSON practitioners and theorists.
Dialogue 5 IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
Brief Therapy and Families
FRANK DATTILIO • CAMILLO LORIEDO

Dialogue 6 FRANCISCAN AB
Technology and the Therapist
BILL O’HANLON • CASEY TRUFFO

Conversation Hour 5 FRANCISCAN CD


New Directions in Divorce Busting
MICHELE WEINER-DAVIS

Conversation Hour 6 YOSEMITE A Please be considerate of


The Psychotherapy Relationship: What Works others. Do not use cell
JOHN NORCROSS phones, and please turn off
your cell phone
Lunch Break ringers during sessions.

Page 28 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Friday
Friday--December 7
Afternoon Interactive Events
2:00 PM - 3:00 PM 3:15 PM - 4:15 PM
Clinical Demonstration 7 GRAND BALLROOM B Clinical Demonstration 9 GRAND BALLROOM B
The Art of Making Small Changes in Brief Therapy Somatic Psychotherapy
BILL O’HANLON PETER LEVINE
It is often easier for clients to make small rather than dramatic Somatic Experiencing® - a short-term naturalistic approach to the
changes. This demonstration will show how to help people make resolution and healing of trauma. Levine addresses the issues at
the smallest change to make a significant difference in moving out the heart of trauma and attachment; the upcoming DSM-5 Diagno-
of their problems and suffering. This method can be especially use- ses and Disorders and the most effective and promising treatment
ful for clients who are reluctant to or resistant to change. modalities available to clinicians today.
Educational Objectives: 1) Utilize the small changes method of Educational Objectives: 1)Describe somatic psychotherapy for treat-
change with a client. 2) Demonstrate creating cooperation with ing traumatic disorders: specifically Levine's own Somatic Experi-
challenging clients. encing. 2) Apply somatic techniques to calm the body and amygdala
as preliminary work for processing traumatic memories
Clinical Demonstration 8 IMPERIAL BALLROOM B
Strategies in the Treatment of Obsessive Worries Clinical Demonstration 10 IMPERIAL BALLROOM B
REID WILSON Assessing a Couple’s Developmental Stage &
Dr. Wilson will demonstrate how the strategic therapist rapidly de- Selecting High-Impact Interventions
velops rapport with clients, confronts erroneous beliefs, and then ELLYN BADER
helps clients ratchet up their own courage and determination to Learn to quickly identify a couple’s developmental stage. Assess
overcome their inner resistance and follow a series of graduated each partner’s role in maintaining arrested development and create
steps toward ending their obsessions. He will then illustrate how to an effective treatment plan that emphasizes “teamwork”.
develop and assign homework. Educational Objectives: 1) Demonstrate how to use a couples his-
Educational Objectives: 1) Identify the common frames of refer- tory and presenting problem to identify their developmental stage.
ence and ensuing actions that limit anxious clients’ ability to generate 2) Select stage-specific interventions to target more rapid change.
change. 2) Collaboratively create a therapeutic frame of reference for
any anxious client. Topical Panel 9 PLAZA A
Resistance
Topical Panel 7 PLAZA A
ROBERT DILTS • STEPHEN GILLIGAN
Person of the Therapist JOHN NORCROSS • ERVING POLSTER
SCOTT MILLER • JOHN NORCROSS
WENDEL RAY • MICHELE WEINER-DAVIS Topical Panel 10 PLAZA B
The Initial Interview in Brief Therapy
Topical Panel 8 PLAZA B
STEVE ANDREAS • FRANK DATTILIO
Brief Therapy with Families and Couples LYNN LYONS • CASEY TRUFFO
ELLYN BADER • FRANK DATTILIO
CAMILLO LORIEDO • ESTHER PEREL Dialogue 9 IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
Anxiety Disorders
Dialogue 7 IMPERIAL BALLROOM A CHRISTINE PADESKY • REID WILSON
Utilization:
The Foundation of Solutions Dialogue 10 FRANCISCAN AB
STEPHEN GILLIGAN • JEFFREY ZEIG Essential Lessons for Successful Brief Therapy
SCOTT MILLER • WENDEL RAY
Dialogue 8 FRANCISCAN AB
Social Factors in Depression Conversation Hour 9 FRANCISCAN CD
ERVING POLSTER • MICHAEL YAPKO Relationships in the Therapist’s Life
JEFFREY KOTTLER
Conversation Hour 7 FRANCISCAN CD
The Evolution of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Conversation Hour 10 YOSEMITE A
CHRISTINE PADESKY Rethinking Couples Therapy:
A Radical Approach to Love, Sex, and Infidelity
Conversation Hour 8 YOSEMITE A ESTHER PEREL
Developments in Positive Psychology
RONALD SIEGEL

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 29
Friday
Friday--December 7 Yosemite Foyer
Afternoon Interactive Events
5:45 PM - 6:45 PM
4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
Clinical Demonstration 11 GRAND BALLROOM B
Aut
hors
HYPNOSIS AS A MEANS OF PROMOTING EMPOWERMENT
Michael Yapko, PhD

Boo ’ Hour
Contrary to the popular mythology about hypnosis, clinical hypnosis
enhances personal mastery by promoting greater self-awareness,
increasing access to personal resources, and amplifying of a sense
of personal agency in actively choosing growth-oriented responses.
How hypnosis can help empower people will be highlighted in this
k si -
clinical demonstration.
Educational Objectives: 1) Demonstrate how hypnosis can highlight gni
specific resources relevant to self-help strategies. 2) Illustrate how
metaphors can be applied in hypnosis as a vehicle of stimulating
therapeutic associations.
ng
Clinical Demonstration 12 IMPERIAL BALLROOM B
TRANSFORMING STUCK STATES
Robert Dilts
States of stuckness, resistance or impasse constitute one of the
ongoing challenges facing any therapist or coach. Rather than op-
posing or capitulating to such resistance, it is possible to help cli-
ents transform these states through a process involving increased
awareness, flexibility and presence. Drawing upon examples of
Milton Erickson’s own work, this demonstration will show a simple
method to support clients to engage and resolve stuck states in
order to achieve a state of greater alignment and integration.
Educational Objectives: 1) Understand and work with stuckness
and resistance with more confidence and ease. 2) Apply a method
to transform naturally occurring reactivity and resistance.

Topical Panel 11 PLAZA A


ESSENTIAL ASPECTS OF BRIEF THERAPY
MICHAEL HOYT • SCOTT MILLER
ERVING POLSTER • REID WILSON

Topical Panel 12 PLAZA B


MIND-BODY ISSUES
STEPHEN GILLIGAN • PETER LEVINE
ERNEST ROSSI • RONALD SIEGEL

Dialogue 11 IMPERIAL BALLROOM A


BRIEF THERAPY WITH CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS
KEN HARDY • LYNN LYONS

Dialogue 12 FRANCISCAN AB
INFIDELITY
ELLYN BADER • ESTHER PEREL
JANIS ABRAHMS SPRING

Conversation Hour 11
1956 FLASHBACK:
FRANCISCAN CD
Meet &
HYPNOSIS, PARADOX, METAPHORICAL TASKS & THE INVENTION OF
BRIEF COUPLES THERAPY
WENDEL RAY
Greet Your
Conversation Hour 12 YOSEMITE A Faculty
THE HOME LIFE OF MILTON ERICKSON
ROXANNA ERICKSON–KLEIN

Page 30 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Workshops 23-33 Saturday
Saturday--December 8
7:30 AM REGISTRATION YOSEMITE FOYER

8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
FH 3 Fundamentals of Hypnosis Workshop 3 POWELL AB
THE HYPNOTIC PHENOMENA
Brent Geary, PhD
The utilization of hypnosis always involves the hypnotic phenomena. This session will explore the various phe-
nomena and their role in clinical contexts. Participants will practice elicitation of hypnotic phenomena.
Educational Objectives: 1) Name the hypnotic phenomena in which experience is created. 2) Discuss the role of
dissociation in elicitation of hypnotic phenomena. 3) Identify the two types of time distortion.

WS 23 UNDERSTANDING & TREATING THE INVISIBLE WOUNDS OF SOCIO-CULTURAL TRAUMA YOSEMITE C


Kenneth Hardy, PhD
This workshop will provide a Socio-cultural view of trauma, highlighting the dynamics of the intersection of op-
pression and trauma. Strategies for effectively engaging and treating individuals and families with ‘oppression
trauma’ will be discussed. Relevant Self of the Therapist issues will be explored.
Education Objectives: 1) Define socio-cultural oppression and its impact on the lives of marginalized individuals
and families. 2) Identify a trauma-based framework for treating individuals and families who are the victims of
oppressive trauma.

WS 24 LEAVING IT AT THE OFFICE: PSYCHOTHERAPIST SELF-CARE YOSEMITE A


John Norcross, PhD, ABPP
What about you—the psychotherapist? Conducting brief treatment places additional and special burdens on the
person of the therapist. This workshop puts the Socratic dicta of “know thyself” and “heal thyself” into practice.
We shall focus on 12 self-care strategies that are clinician-recommended, research-based, and practitioner-
tested. Come join us for focused lectures, copious handouts, group demonstrations, thought experiments, and
interactive discussions; leave with an individualized self-care plan.
Educational Objectives: 1) List at least 6 self-care strategies for psychotherapists supported by the research. 2)
Conduct periodic self-assessments of the effectiveness of personal self-care. 3) Leave with an individualized
action plan for self-care.
PLAZA A
WS 25 TRANSFORMING BELIEFS
Robert Dilts
Our beliefs about ourselves and what is possible in the world around us greatly impacts our day-to-day effective-
ness. As our lives and the world around us changes, we also need to adapt and update our beliefs and stories
about ourselves. Beliefs which have once served us can become limiting if they are too rigid. This seminar will
explore the structure and dynamics of our belief systems, as well as how to identify and update key beliefs and
facilitate change in our clients.
Educational Objectives: 1) Understand and describe the relationship between beliefs, motivation and symptoms.
2) Learn and list a method to help clients identify key beliefs and gain more choices about how to respond to
challenging situations.
IMPERIAL BALLROOM B
WS 26 PRACTICAL PERCEPTUAL SKILLS TRAINING
Steve Andreas, MA
Detecting changes in a client’s posture, tone of voice, direction of gaze, lateral gestures, etc. provides rich in-
stantaneous feedback about how a session is going, and often indicates what kind of intervention will be useful.
Simple exercises will be demonstrated and taught that are useful
irrespective of your theoretical orientation.
Educational Objectives: 1) Distinguish between analog and digital
signals, and how to use them for understanding and change. 2)
Utilize client gestures for both rapport and interventions. 3) Use
postural changes to alter the client’s experience.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 31
Saturday
Saturday--December 8 Workshops 23-33
WS 27 CREATING CONSCIOUSNESS: IMPERIAL BALLROOM A
FACILITATING WONDER, WISDOM, BEAUTY, TRUTH AND SELF-CARE
Ernest Rossi, PhD
Neuroscience documents how experiences of (1) Novelty, (2) Environmental Enrichment, and (3) Mental & Physi-
cal Exercise can optimize gene expression, brain plasticity (brain growth), and mind-body healing. We will prac-
tice psychotherapy as discussed in my recent book Creating Consciousness: How Therapists can Facilitate Won-
der, Wisdom, Beauty, and Truth.
Educational Objectives: 1) List 3 classes of human experience that may facilitate gene expression, brain plastic-
ity, and mind-body healing in psychotherapy. 2) List the classical 4 stages of the creative process in therapeutic
hypnosis.3) Discuss why Refusing to Forgive is not healthy.

WS 28 DON’T ASK ME TO FORGIVE YOU! FRANCISCAN AB


A RADICAL APPROACH TO HEALING INTERPERSONAL WOUNDS (Part 1)
Janis Abrahms Spring, PhD, ABPP
Forgiveness is good for us—right? But when someone deliberately hurts us (through infidelity or other relation-
ship violations) and isn’t sorry, many people choke on forgiveness and find it much too generous. This workshop
will present a radical, healthy alternative to healing ourselves and rising above a violation—without forgiving.
Education Objectives: 1) Describe two techniques to help hurt parties overcome their obsessive preoccupation
with an interpersonal injury. 2) Discuss why Cheap Forgiveness is not healthy. 3) Discuss why Refusing to For-
give is not healthy.

WS 29 SHORT-TERM TREATMENT OF ANXIETY AND MEDICAL ILLNESS SUTTER AB


Frank Dattilio, PhD, ABPP
Clinicians are very likely to encounter patients in their clinical practice that experience both anxiety and medical
illness. Sometimes differentiating the symptoms of each can become extremely difficult and can serve to exac-
erbate either condition. This workshop will introduce some of the cognitive-behavioral techniques that are used
in helping clinicians differentiate symptoms and also intervene, providing patients with skills for managing their
anxiety, as well as their medical illness.
Education Objectives: 1) The participants will be better able to aid patients in differentiating symptoms of anxi-
ety and medical illness. 2) Participants will learn techniques for short-term treatment of anxiety with patients
who have medical illnesses. 3) Participants will learn to determine when to use behavioral as opposed to cogni-
tive interventions or both.

WS 30 CHANGING THE DOING, VIEWING AND CONTEXT: GRAND BALLROOM B


THE ESSENCE OF ALL BRIEF THERAPY
Bill O’Hanlon, MS
After making a connection with and establishing a relationship with the client, I contend that all brief therapy
relies on some variation or combination of three interventions: Changing the doing (actions/interactions), chang-
ing the viewing (focus of attention and meaning attribution/interpretation) and changing the context (the social
or physical environment) involved in or around the problem. The session will give details about how to conceptu-
alize and implement these shifts in brief clinical work.
Educational Objectives: 1) List the three major intervention types in brief therapy. 2) Use at least one method of
changing the doing. 3) Use at least one method of changing the viewing.

WS 31 IT TAKES ONE TO TANGO: PLAZA B


DOING COUPLES THERAPY WITH INDIVIDUALS
MICHELE WEINER-DAVIS, MSW, LCSW
That only one partner is willing to seek relationship therapy should not deter therapists since there is much that
can be accomplished. In fact, there are occasions when working with only one partner is preferable. This work-
shop will explore these situations and offer therapists a conceptual framework for conducting relationship-
oriented sessions with one partner present.
Educational Objectives: 1) How seeing couples with divergent goals conjointly can be detrimental. 2)How to
ascertain the absent partners’ views, feelings and goals for the relationship. 3) How to motivate the client
to take responsibility for change in light of his/her partners’ lack of participation.

Page 32 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Workshops 23-33 Saturday
Saturday--December 8
WS 32 RETHINKING COUPLES THERAPY: FRANCISCAN CD
A RADICAL APPROACH TO LOVE, SEX AND INFIDELITY
ESTHER PEREL, MA, LMFT
Couples therapists are typically discouraged from seeing partners separately lest power imbalances, alle-
giances, or secrets further divide the couple. What's lost in this approach? Through case examples, Esther Perel
will show how to effectively engage such issues as intimacy, sexuality and infidelity by creating separate spaces
where each partner can explore his/her feelings and experiences along with larger relationship dynamics. We
will show how to navigate privacy and secrecy, honesty and transparency, stage interventions around sexual
impasses, and structure a safe and flexible environment to work creatively with infidelity.
Educational Objectives: 1) How to create a safe and non-judgmental therapeutic environment to work with se-
crets, privacy, transparency and truth-telling. 2) Present a more nuanced therapeutic approach for working with
extra-marital relations -- past and present, fantasized or real, disclosed or withheld. 3) Introduce two interven-
tions for couples to rebuild trust and intimacy and to promote erotic recovery following an affair
TAYLOR AB
WS 33 BRIEF THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF ANOREXIA
CAMILLO LORIEDO, MD, PHD
Anorexia and Bulimia Nervosa will be presented in the frame of the Extreme Polarities Theory, and examine why,
in some families, eating disorders develop and there is continuity among opposite forms of disturbances. Princi-
ples of intervention, as well as specific techniques will be presented, including the clinical applications (and ad-
vantages) of direct and indirect hypnosis.
Educational Objectives: 1) List seven patterns that are typical of Eating Disorders Families. 2) Describe six dif-
ferent ways to approach families via brief therapy. 3) How can you adopt hypnosis in order to treat Anorexia and
Bulimia Nervosa.

11:30 AM-12:45 PM LUNCH BREAK

12:45 PM - 1:45 PM
K4 Keynote Address 4 GRAND BALLROOM B
BARGAINS WITH CHAOS: CHALLENGES AND CHOICES
PATRICK CARNES, PHD, CAS
We witness a continuous parade of stars, financial gurus, clergy, politicians and athletes who enter
rehabs sometimes repetitively. Is this about media coverage or are these elite canaries in the coal
mines of our culture signifying a greater danger? Our understanding of addictions with the aid of neu-
roscience is expanding dramatically. With it is the realization of cultural and scientific shifts which
underline the therapist’s role in facing our number one public health problem. One of the gifts of this
challenge is our growth in technology which will transform what every therapist does for a living and
maybe how humans evolve. But maybe we professionals are like the famous—reluctant to face difficult realities.
Educational Objectives: 1) Identify cultural and scientific shifts that impact a therapists’ role. 2) List new ways
to incorporate technology into your professional practice

Workshops 34– 44
2:00 PM - 5:00 PM
FH 4 Fundamentals of Hypnosis Workshop 4 POWELL AB
APPLICATION OF INDIRECTION IN CLINICAL HYPNOSIS
Brent Geary, PhD
One of Erickson’s landmark contributions to hypnosis was his introduction of indirection as a therapeutic ap-
proach. This final section of the training explores the ways in which anecdotes, metaphors, and other indirect
methods can be utilized.
Educational Objectives: 1) Differentiate anecdote and metaphor. 2) Define “indirect suggestion.” 3) Discuss
indirections and contraindications for indirect methods in clinical hypnosis.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 33
Saturday
Saturday--December 8 Workshops 34– 44
WS 34 COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL TECHNIQUES WITH COUPLES SUTTER AB
Frank Dattilio, PhD, ABPP
This workshop focuses on the specific use of cognitive-behavioral strategies as an adjunct to the many treat-
ment modalities of couples’ therapy. It offers a basic overview of the theories of cognitive-behavioral therapy,
particularly as it applies to couples. Participants will learn firsthand techniques and strategies for working with
difficult couples and how to integrate these strategies with their respective modes of treatment. The presenta-
tion is followed by a videotape that demonstrates the implementation of techniques and interventions.
Education Objectives: 1) Describe three cognitive-behavioral strategies with couples. 2) Describe how these strate-
gies can be integrated into other modalities. 3) When to use behavioral as opposed to cognitive strategies.

WS 35 BEYOND ONE TO ONE SESSIONS - YOSEMITE C


PRIVATE PRACTICE PLUS MULTIPLE STREAMS OF THERAPY INCOME
Casey Truffo, MFT
Tired of having your income limited by one-to-one sessions? Recent changes in our culture and technology have
created incredible opportunities for private practitioners. Casey Truffo will discuss how to leverage your time, extend
your reach, and create multiple streams of therapy income with the new Private Practice Plus business model.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe 2 new models of delivering therapy. 2) List two example of multiple streams
of therapy income. 3) Describe the Classic Private Practice business model
WS 36 TRANSFORMING NEGATIVE STATES: Plaza A
A WORKSHOP IN GENERATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY
Stephen Gilligan, PhD
This workshop presents the Ericksonian and Self-Relations Psychotherapy approach to human states of suffer-
ing: depression, anxiety, trauma, addiction, etc. This practical and positive approach assumes that each core
human experience has equivalent potential to be positive or negative, depending on the human relationship to
it; and thus focuses on how problems may be transformed to resources by skillful human connection. Multiple
techniques and examples for will be given, along with an exercise and demonstration.
Education Objectives: 1) Identify a therapeutic approach that accepts and transforms symptoms and problems,
rather than trying to get rid of them. 2) Describe and demonstrate three techniques by which a person can
change a negative state to a positive one. 3) Identify three methods to to safely work with negative emotional
states in psychotherapy.

WS 37 DON’T ASK ME TO FORGIVE YOU! Franciscan AB


A RADICAL APPROACH TO HEALING INTERPERSONAL WOUNDS (PART 2)
Janis Abrahms Spring, PhD, ABPP
Forgiveness of interpersonal injuries is not a gift. It’s an intimate dance between the two people held together by
the injury. This workshop will spell out exactly what offenders must do to earn forgiveness, and what hurt parties
can do to foster the healing process.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe how offending partners can invite hurt partners to talk out their hurts as
part of a forgiving process. 2) Describe how offending partners can identify “a list of contributing factors” to
take responsibility for the harm they caused and earn forgiveness. 3) List two behaviors hurt partners can dem-
onstrate to help offending partners earn forgiveness.

WS 38 ADVANCED GROUP THERAPY TAYLOR AB


Jeffrey Kottler, PhD, with Matt Englar-Carlson, PhD
Brief therapy has always been synonymous with group settings, given the high level of emotional arousal, vicari-
ous learning, support, and opportunities to practice new behaviors and receive constructive feedback. This expe-
riential workshop will focus on the challenges and practical dimensions of leading brief group experiences, espe-
cially with regard to making the changes last. Opportunities will be provided to learn and practice new skills and
structures, adapting the strategies to a variety of settings and leadership styles.
Educational Objectives: 1) Increase range of strategies and structures working with brief therapy groups. 2)
Practice new skills applied to a variety of contexts and clinical specialties. 3) Explore personal/clinical
strengthes and weaknesses as a leader.

Page 34 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


Workshops 34-44 Saturday
Saturday--December 8
WS 39 THE ART OF PERSUASION: GRAND BALLROOM B
CHANGING THE MIND ON OCD
Reid Wilson, PhD
Persuading OCD clients to adopt a new frame of reference is the therapist's primary task. Altering perception--
not adding technique--helps them change directions, because belief always trumps exposure practice. Partici-
pants will learn a persuasive strategy--built out of whole cloth within the first session--that will frame the entire
treatment protocol.
Educational Objectives: 1) Explain the two primary, though dysfunctional, objectives of clients with obsessive-
compulsive disorder. 2) Defend the importance of altering perception, as opposed to utilizing technique, to help
clients with OCD. 3) Describe and utilize a persuasive strategy to frame the treatment protocol for OCD.

WS 40 THE LIFE FOCUS COMMUNITY IMPERIAL BALLROOM B


Erving Polster, PhD
The purpose is to transpose office therapy into communal application. Personal change is fundamenal to psy-
chotherapy but life focus is its instrumentality, often overshadowed. These groups will prioritize it, seeking to
portray life. The groups may be large and life-long. Dr Polster will provide conceptual innovations, representative
exercises and live communal illustration.
Educational Objectives: 1) Apply principles of therapeutic practice beyond the office into communal settings.
2) Create exercises appropriate to the life focus needs of people in the group. 3) Name and explore the psycho-
logical themes that drive people’s lives.

WS 41 MATING IN CAPTIVITY: PLAZA B


RECONCILING ATTACHMENT, SECURITY AND EROTIC DESIRE IN COUPLES
Esther Perel, MA, LMFT
Based on Perel’s bestseller, Mating in Captivity, this bold take on intimacy and sex grapples with the obstacles
and anxieties that arise when our quest for secure love conflicts with our pursuit of passion. We will tackle eroti-
cism as a quality of aliveness and vitality in relationships extending far beyond mere sexuality, and consider how
the need for secure attachment and closeness can co-exist with the quest for individuality and freedom.
Educational Objectives: 1) Learn innovative strategies to reconcile the need for safety and stability with the
need for separateness and passion. 2) Discover how our emotional history translates itself into our erotic blue-
print. 3) Learn how love and desire relate, but also conflict.

WS 42 TREATING ANXIOUS CHILDREN AND FAMILIES: IMPERIAL BALLROOM A


BRIEF, SUCCESSFUL AND FUN
Lynn Lyons, MSW
Families dealing with anxiety are often locked into cognitive and behavioral patterns that are rigid, overwhelm-
ing, and controlling. This workshop provides tools and interventions to interrupt the predictable elements of anxi-
ety, help parents shift out of their anxious behavior, and teach families a plan to handle the process of worry.
Educational Objectives: 1) List three homework assignments to give anxious families. 2) Describe three ways
that families strengthen anxious patterns. 3) Describe the difference between content and process when treat-
ing anxiety.

WS 43 STAGES OF CHANGE: YOSEMITE A


TAILORING THE TREATMENT METHOD AND THE THERAPY RELATIONSHIP TO THE INDIVIDUAL CLIENT
John Norcross, PhD, ABPP
Backed by 30 years of research, this workshop provides demonstrably effective methods for adapting the treat-
ment method and the therapy relationship to the patient’s stage of change. You will learn to rapidly assess the
stages of change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, and maintenance) and then to match
processes of change specific to that stage. “Doing the right thing at the right time” is the key to efficient change.
This workshop features focused lectures, clinical examples, practice exercises, interactive discussions, and
participants' own case material.
Educational Objectives: 1) Assess reliably a client’s stage of change within one minute. 2) Implement evidence-
based change processes according to the stage of change. 2) Tailor your therapeutic relationship to the patient's
stage of change.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 35
Saturday
Saturday--December 8 Workshops 34– 44
WS 44 BETRAYED: FRANCISCAN CD
HELPING COUPLES TO HEAL FROM INFIDELITY
Michele Weiner-Davis, MSW, LCSW
If you work with couples, you’re no stranger to infidelity. And because healing from infidelity is challenging, it be-
hooves us to have a clear roadmap of the territory. In this workshop, we’ll go over an array of post-affair issues,
including ways to deal with intense emotions, whether to discuss the details of the betrayal, how to begin rebuild-
ing trust in the aftermath of the discovery, whether to have clinical ultimatums about ending affairs, how to han-
dle setbacks, and how to deal with residual feelings for the affair partner. We’ll explore a step-by-step treatment
plan and discuss how to tailor it to each couple’s unique needs. You’ll learn methods for overcoming the most
common therapeutic impasses—hopelessness engendered by setbacks, debates about the value of discussing
the affair, and ongoing dishonesty. You’ll discover the nuances involved in deciding how much disclosure is best
for each couple and gain a greater understanding of the spiraling, zigzag nature of recovery. By the time you
leave, you’ll know how to coach couples through a structured healing process that’s flexible and adaptable.
Educational Objectives: l) Review what both the unfaithful and betrayed spouse must do to heal from infidelity.
2) Discuss & practice what to do when disclosure is made during an individual session. 3) Name and discuss
methods for overcoming the most common impasses in helping couples heal from infidelity

Please be considerate of others. Do not use


cell phones, and please turn off your cell
phone ringers during sessions.

Page 36 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
You’ve got options!
You can attend any 1 of 5 all-day, in-depth courses—
or any 3 out of 30 short courses. Your choice!
7:30 AM REGISTRATION YOSEMITE FOYER

8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
C1 TREATING DEPRESSION EXPERIENTIALLY: GRAND BALLROOM B
HYPNOSIS AND MINDFULNESS AS THERAPEUTIC CONTEXTS
Michael D. Yapko, PhD
The cutting edge of rapidly expanding scientific evidence highlights that the more we learn about the biol-
ogy of depression, the more important psychology and social experiences become in shaping recovery on
all levels. Participants will learn to utilize therapy as a social process that can teach clients skills experien-
tially in order to reduce and even prevent depression. Interventions involving skill building homework as-
signments, and experiential methods of hypnosis and mindfulness will be considered in depth through
group hypnosis and at least one skill-building exercise. Hypnosis in particular holds great therapeutic poten-
tial for its emphasis on empowering and activating some of the most disempowered people there are,
namely people suffering the ravages of depression.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe what we know about depression and pharmaceuticals, in light of new neu-
roscientific evidence. 2) List reasons why depression isn’t fated by brain chemistry, genes, diet or personal
weakness and how interpersonal relationships can be the solution. 3) Discuss how to reduce the “depression
inheritance” of children and address the social context of depression. 4) Design active and experiential treat-
ments for specific aspects of depression. 5)Utilize the power of expectations in shaping experience for the treat-
ment of depression. 6) Utilize experiential processes like mindfulness and hypnosis as vehicles for skill building

C2 PASSION, VITALITY AND INTIMACY: GRAND BALLROOM A


INTEGRATING ATTACHMENT, DIFFERENTIATION AND NEUROSCIENCE
Ellyn Bader, PhD
Many partners crave intimacy or demand it, yet they fear the involvement that makes intimacy possible.
Learn to use attachment theory, differentiation theory and neuroscience principles to lead your couples
out of pain. Create sustained change with challenging issues such as infidelity, ongoing hostility, narcis-
sism and pervasive conflict avoidance. Videotapes and clinical case examples will be used throughout
the workshop.
Educational Objectives: 1) Integrate core principles from attachment theory, differentiation theory and
neuroscience into couples therapy. 2) Recognize 5 ineffective coping strategies partner’s use and uncover
underlying vulnerability. 3) Use a 4 step process for rapidly repairing relationship ruptures. 4) Review the develop-
mental sequence by which empathy develops. 5) Intervene in common communication patterns that invite dis-
tance, lies and betrayal. 6) Understand the role of the limbic system in inhibiting relationship growth.

C3 HARNESSING MINDFULNESS: TAILORING THE PRACTICE TO THE PROBLEM FRANCISCAN CD


Ronald Siegel, PsyD
Mindfulness-based psychotherapy is the most popular new treatment approach in the last decade—and for
good reason. Mindfulness practices hold great promise both for our own personal development and as
remarkably powerful tools to augment virtually every form of psychotherapy. Mindfulness is not, however,
a one-size-fits-all remedy. In this workshop you’ll learn how mindfulness practices work to alleviate psycho-
logical distress, and how to creatively tailor them to meet the needs of diverse people and conditions.
We’ll examine how to use mindfulness practices to help resolve disorders such as anxiety, depression, and
stress-related medical problems, while enriching and enlivening therapeutic work.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe the three core elements of mindfulness practice. 2) Identify common
denominators in psychological difficulties. 3) Specify how mindfulness practices can be tailored to the needs of
particular types of clients. 4) Describe the core attitude toward experience found in depression and how mindful-
ness practice can help to transform it. 5) Indicate the mechanisms that maintain anxiety disorders and how
these can be altered using mindfulness practice. 6) Specify the core dynamic of chronic back pain and other
psychophysiological disorders, and how mindfulness practice can help in its relief.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 37
SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
C4 FINDING FREEDOM FROM PAIN: PLAZA A
SOLVING THE COMPLEX PUZZLE OF TRAUMA AND PAIN
Peter Levine, PhD, & Maggie Phillips, PhD
The incidence of persistent and chronic pain conditions have become a public
health crisis with more people suffering from chronic pain than from diabetes, can-
cer, and heart disease combined. The cost of suffering (human and financial) is
huge and in part results from the fact that pain is so complex—ranging far beyond
the intersection of neural transmission and sensory experience. The puzzle of pain
involves a complicated labyrinth of emotions, sensations, culture, individual experi-
ence, genetics, spiritual meaning, as well as habitual physiological reactions. This
workshop presents both the art and science of working with the resources of the
body to reverse the effects of physical, emotional, and trauma related pain. From
our many years of experience, we have found that the one factor that has not been sufficiently considered in the
war on pain is the role of unresolved trauma that is held in the body. We will present a multi-level approach to
the treatment of pain and trauma including: ways to work with trauma that may have caused the pain through
accident, injury, disease or other overwhelming events; discovering how persistent emotional and physical pain
become traumatizing in and of themselves; working with unresolved trauma that predates the pain condition
that becomes triggered by the current pain problem; exploring how early childhood trauma, perinatal stress, and
attachment trauma become barriers to healing and how to help resolve these residual patterns. We will demon-
strate skills of emotional and sensate self-regulation, body awareness, work with pendulum rhythms, somatic
resourcing, expansion of innate resilience, and how to recognize and break free of the posttraumatic pain trap.
You will also learn strategies for dealing effectively with dissociation; anxiety, fear, and panic; helplessness and
hopelessness; and anger, rage, and irritability that are often associated with pain. Opportunity to consult with us
about specific pain conditions including fibromyalgia, migraines, chronic regional pain, and back, neck and
shoulder pain will also be provided.
Educational Objectives: 1) Identify 5 types of trauma involved in the treatment of pain. 2) Practice two self-
regulation skills that can help with physical, emotional, and trauma-related pain. 3) Practice two techniques to
work with various reactions related to fight, flight, and freeze responses that maintain chronic pain. 4) Practice
two strategies to shift bracing and constriction patterns in the body that contribute to pain.

C5 MYTHIC YOGA: UNION SQUARE 19-20


CREATIVE TRANSFORMATIONS THROUGH BODY AND MIND
Kathryn Rossi, PhD, RYT-500
Is personal enlightenment really possible? Can we creatively experience our own transformational
stories via yoga? We propose Erickson's naturalistic–utilization therapy and Rossi's 4-stage creative
process are consistent with yoga's ancient science of self-inquiry, mental dexterity and Buddha’s Four
Noble truths. In this workshop we will have an opportunity to experience the stories of ancient yoga
and self-transformation as presented in our new book, Creating Consciousness: How Therapists can
Facilitate Wonder, Wisdom, Beauty, & Truth. We will practice gentle hatha yoga for all fitness levels
and volunteers will share their current life transitions. Please bring your yoga mat if you have one.
Educational Objectives: 1) List the four stages of the 4-Stage Creative Process. (Curiosity, Incubation,
Aha!, Realization). 2) List three outcomes of hatha yoga practice (physical health, emotional release,
and creating a new narrative of our own). 3) List three ways neuroscience facilitates brain
growth. (Novelty, Enrichment & Exercise).

11:30 AM-12:45 PM LUNCH BREAK

1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
C 1 – Treating Depression Experientially: Hypnosis and Mindfulness as Therapeutic Contexts (Continued)
C 2 – Passion, Vitality and Intimacy: Integrating Attachment, Differentiation and Neuroscience (Continued)
C 3 – Harnessing Mindfulness: Tailoring the Practice to the Problem (Continued)
C 4 – Finding Freedom from Pain: Solving the Complex Puzzle of Trauma and Pain (Continued)
C 5 – Mythic Yoga: Creative Transformations through Body and Mind (Continued)

Page 38 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
29--38
Or… Short Courses 29
8:30 AM - 11:30 AM
SC 29 EVERLASTING HEROES MASON AB
Christine Guilloux, DESS
Subject, patient, client, therapist, teacher, trainer, supervisor, supervised, all of us are shaped from an essence,
the stuff we are made of, the hero within. This workshop will offer then ways to utilize our ever lasting heroes, our
models in our therapeutic goals for inner change and help the patient build from the hero within himself/herself.
Educational Objectives: 1) Utilize our models of heroes, our deep metaphors as resources for inner change. 2)
Define how to use those heroes, those metaphors in our therapeutic goals.

SC 30 MINDFULNESS, TRAUMA, AND TRANCE: TAYLOR AB


ERICKSONIAN BRIEF SOLUTIONS: A MIND/BODY APPROACH
Ronald Alexander, PhD
This course will address the rapid treatment of trauma by utilizing both Mindfulness practice and Ericksonian
orientation. The course will highlight Milton Erickson’s use of storytelling, metaphor and rapid trance induction
as well as the use of mindfulness practice for framing, re-framing and de-framing the immediate reorganization
of transforming somatic-affective experience into new healing rhythms in the body. These methods allow the
body to open healthier pathways for new somatic recoveries. We will also emphasize the use of naturalistic hyp-
notic trance, guided mindfulness practice, and healing metaphors for generating new therapeutic skills in mind-
body healing therapies.
Educational Objectives: 1) Apply two styles of trance for rapid induction: a) Naturalistic and b) Guided Mindful-
ness-Outcome focused. 2) Utilize new clinical skills for tracking, pacing and reframing trauma into new pathways
for healing and resolution. 3) Study creative metaphors for moving from symptom to solution. 4) Apply the princi-
ple of Mindstrength to rapidly and quickly overcome trauma and shift the mind-body process.

SC 31 SUSTAINING PASSION AND LONGEVITY IN LIFE UNION SQUARE 15


USING MEDICAL AND LONGEVITY RESEARCH AND THEORIES IN BRIEF THERAPY
Eva Long, PhD
This is a fast-paced, proven successful workshop on how professionals will help patients and clients utilizing the
current adult development research/best practices in meaningful work/self-renewal with practical implementation
ideas. This session will focus on the importance of 1) creating a life’s purpose, 2) optimism, 3) a circle of friends, 4)
managing loss, and letting go while connecting the dots on some of the most significant medical and longevity re-
search.
Educational Objectives: 1) Demonstrate how to help patients/clients of any age sustain passion for lifelong
learning while providing a climate for change and modeling lifelong learning. 2) Understand phases of Adult De-
velopment and self-renewal using transition and change as resources to create more life passion and meaning.
3) Using Aging and Medical science research/best practices in addressing the future programs of the growing
population of lifelong learners who are young seniors or older adults.

SC 32 SUBLIMINAL THERAPY: EFFECTING CHANGE UNION SQUARE 16


Edwin Yager, PhD
Subliminal Therapy is an innovative and easily-learned, psychodynamic technique for use in clinical settings.
The theory, rationale and application are presented in this workshop, including compelling data on efficacy as
derived from patient-completed, pre- and post-treatment inventories. The workshop addresses application of ST
to both psychological and psychogenic medical problems.
Educational Objectives: 1) Establish objective communication with extra-conscious process in identifiable ways.
2) Utilize that communication to uncover the causes of psychogenic problems.

SC 33 BRIEF REALITY THERAPY: PRESENT, ACCOUNTABLE, AND SOLUTION-FOCUSED UNION SQUARE 14


Robert Wubbolding, EdD
Simulated role-play demonstrations, the focus of this session, illustrate the practical use of the WDEP system of
reality therapy. Client self-evaluation, the core of reality therapy, as well as the incorporation of several Erick-
sonian principles such as utilization, are highlighted. Participants will gain information about research studies
validating the use of reality therapy as well as practical and innovative ideas immediately useful on the job.
Handouts suitable for photocopying will be provided.
Educational Objectives: 1) List four motivators for human behavior. 2) Describe how two Ericksonian principles
interface with the WDEP system. 3) Critique a summary of two research studies validating reality therapy.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 39
SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
SC 34 UNPLUGGING FROM THE OUTSIDE IN: UNION SQUARE 17-18
BRIEF STRATEGIC HYPNOTHERAPY WITH OLDER ADOLESCENTS
AND YOUNG ADULTS (Ages 16-25)
Tobi Goldfus, LCSW-C BCD
With a plugged-in 24/7 cyberspace that demands and creates instantaneous response to internet and social
networking, many young people have difficulty understanding self-regulation and present a lack of self-
awareness and modulation. This workshop proposes a tailored strategic approach toward utilizing the natural
creativity and novelty that young people have embedded in their development make-up but often have limited
access toward using their inner resources. Experiential and specific ways to elicit responsiveness and enhance
“down regulation” will be explored.
Educational Objectives: 1) Apply induction tailored for this age group. 2) Utilize client resistance as a gateway for
creativity. 3) Plan and implement internal and external post hypnotic cues for therapeutic goals.

SC 35 AN INTEGRATIVE AND CREATIVE APPROACH WORKING YOSEMITE A


WITH COUPLES ACHIEVING LASTING SOLUTIONS
Bruce Gregory, PhD and Birgitta Gregory, PhD
This short course will focus on the treatment of couples from the perspectives of symptoms, rigid, dysfunctional
behavior patterns, and narcissistic defenses. An integrative approach utilizing creativity and humor will be pre-
sented, incorporating CBT, psychodynamic, Ericksonian, Jungian and existential perspectives. Validation, se-
quencing, containment and questions that facilitate accountability will be highlighted in the context of empower-
ing clients on a variety of levels.
Educational Objectives: 1) List three ways creativity and humor can be utilized in the treatment of narcissistic
defenses in couples. 2) List three ways to combine validation, sequencing, redirection, and the utilization of op-
posites in the transformation of narcissistic defenses in the treatment of couples.

SC 36 NEW PERSPECTIVES AND HEALING FOR BORDERLINES: YOSEMITE C


A BRIEF THERAPY INTERVENTION FOR LASTING CHANGE
John Lentz, DMin
This radical new approach for Borderline Personality Disorder utilizes strength based approaches that work, are
respectful and brief. Combining clinical practice, communication theory and hypnotic principles this approach
helps Borderlines feel safe and respected, while they change. Utilizing Borderline intuition, and insight it offers
a way for them to gently alter their interpretations so that they can relate effectively and safely. You will like your
new skills. This workshop comes from the author’s newest book.
Educational Objectives: 1) Receive new methods of helping Borderlines be less vulnerable that can be sus-
tained. 2) Receive new method of helping Borderlines interpret the world in a respectful manner that is self and
other respectful.

SC 37 THE POWER OF ANIMAL METAPHORS AND POWELL AB


ANIMAL-ASSISTED THERAPY IN BRIEF PSYCHOTHERAPY
Dale Klein-Kennedy, MA, and Karen Wall, MA
Animal metaphors are used as a part of our everyday vocabulary describing relationships, personal characteris-
tics, etc. Metaphor in the presence of the work with the animal takes on a new and deeper meaning. This
presentation will demonstrate the powerful use of animals and animal metaphors in brief psychotherapy.
Through examples and discussion of the work, attendees will develop an understanding of ATT (animal-assisted
therapy) and will participate in a live demonstration of AAT.
Educational Objectives: 1) Identify at least two appropriate uses of animal metaphors in therapy. 2) Define
“animal metaphor” as it applies to psychotherapy. 3) List three reasons why the use of animals can shorten the
number of sessions needed to achieve a positive therapeutic outcome.

SC 38 BUILDING CULTURES OF EXCELLENCE: SUTTER AB


STRATEGIES TO IMPROVE THERAPEUTIC OUTCOMES IN AGENCIES
Bob Bertolino, PhD
Some agencies consistently achieve better clinical outcomes. The benefits of higher-performing agencies in-
clude greater accountability, improved resource management, briefer treatment duration, decreased client drop-
out, and increased staff retention. Participants in this workshop will first learn about key research findings that
form the building blocks of sustainable “cultures of excellence.” Next, specific strategies including brief and time
-sensitive interventions, client feedback, and monitoring of individual and program outcomes will be described.
Educational Objectives: Describe three key principles of high-performing agencies. 2) Describe two strategies to
immediately improve the benefit of services in agency settings.

Page 40 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
39--48
Short Courses 39
10:15 AM - 11:45 AM
SC 39 NIGHTLY NAPPING IS NOT ENOUGH UNION SQUARE 14
Deborah Beckman, MS
Late night commercials promise to recapture a full night’s sleep. Still, we’re chronically sleep deprived, catching
little more than midnight naps. Chasing “whys” distracts and delays reestablishing healthy sleep. Rebuilding the
how-to’s of healthy sleep is crucial to reestablishing resilience. This protocol goes beyond good sleep hygiene
and gadgets by prioritizing the physiology of sleep with components of clients’ presenting complaint(s). Clinical
demonstration, case applications and discussion provide opportunities to develop specific interventions.
Educational Objectives: 1) Assess clients’ language for relevant sleep-related language. 2) Describe three points
during typical sleep cycles for strategic intervention. 3) Apply the provided trance script protocol to address sev-
eral combinations of clients’’ disturbed sleep and presenting complain. 4) Discuss the clinical demonstration in
terms of the elements of the protocol.

SC 40 BRIEF PSYCHOTHERAPY FOR CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS UNION SQUARE 15


FACING SERIOUS SITUATIONS
Maria Escalante de Smith, MA
When children and teenagers face serious problems they experience a variety of feelings and emotions. Brief
Therapy techniques can help them find solutions and explore new alternatives within a short time. Short inter-
ventions, such as brief trances and conversational hypnosis will be demonstrated. Utilization of individual’s
resources, likes, and favorite activities will also be discussed as brief therapy tools will be used during therapy.
Participants will be able to explore how other approaches such as Narrative Therapy can enhance and embellish
Ericksonian approaches.
Educational Objectives: 1) Discuss emotional situations children go through when they face serious family prob-
lems such as divorce and violence. 2) Demonstrate how Brief Therapy approaches can help during these crises
and list at least four exercises that can be used during brief interventions. 3) Explain how Brief Ericksonian inter-
ventions can be used for alleviating painful emotions. 4) Demonstrate how the use of other approaches such as
Narrative Therapy can enhance Ericksonian techniques.

SC 41 HOW CULTURE IMPACTS COMMUNICATION UNION SQUARE 17-18


Sherri Reynolds, MA, MFT
Participants will identify and analyze culture using 10 dimensions to break through communication barriers.
Participants will learn to assess their own and their clients’ cultural styles of communication. Participants will
also learn to apply specific techniques to facilitate more effective communication with clients, allowing them to
establish lasting trust and develop a deeper relationship with clients from diverse cultures.
Educational Objectives: 1) Explain the 10 dimensions of culture and communication. 2) Analyze and type their
own culture using the 10 dimensions. 3) Identify the ways that culture has impacted their communication with
their clients in the past. 4) Assess using these dimensions on a Culture and Communication Worksheet. 5) Apply
specific techniques to communicate more effectively with diverse clients.

SC 42 EMOTION-FOCUSED HYPNOTHERAPY FOR COPING WITH PAIN YOSEMITE A


Jeffrey Feldman, PhD
This short course will introduce a treatment approach that targets the affective dimension of pain. The emotion
specific wording and elicitation of positive state dependent learning can be used in a brief therapy approach
whether or not patients' feelings of anger, sadness, or anxiety are associated with physical pain.
Educational Objectives: 1) Use a heart-focused self-hypnotic technique for themselves and their patients. 2)
Identify words associated with the most commonly presenting emotions of anger/irritability, sadness/
depression, and anxiety/fear. 3) Identify five potential sources of positive state dependent learning to utilize in
modifying affect.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 41
SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
SC 43 HOW TO BECOME SMART ENOUGH TO KNOW WHEN TO STOP THINKING: YOSEMITE C
A BRIEF ERICKSONIAN APPROACH TO LASTING SOLUTIONS
Joseph Dowling, MS, LPC
Milton H. Erickson, MD, understood that “the conscious (thinking) mind doesn’t do much of anything of much
significance…while the unconscious mind is an infinite storehouse of dreams, potentials, and solutions…” This
workshop will teach a brief, solution-focused, strategic, and hypnotic approach to anxiety-related disorders. In-
tellectualizing, analyzing, self-criticizing, WHY-ing and WHAT-IF-ing clients will be targeted as participants learn to
employ Ericksonian interventions including solution-focused questions, strategic task assignments, and formal/
conversational hypnosis via live demonstration, experiential exercise, and case studies.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe how the symptomology of anxiety can be utilized to access the healing en-
ergy of the unconscious mind. 2) Describe how to create brief, Ericksonian, lasting solutions in the treatment of
anxiety-related disorders.
SC 44 BRIEF THERAPY WITH SINGLE MOTHERS: THE TRANSFORMATIONAL ALCHEMY OF METAPHOR TAYLOR AB
Bette Freedson, MSW
Therapists working with single mothers often hear stories of abandonment, disempowerment, loneliness, hope-
lessness, victimization, rage and unrelenting stress. Disturbing perceptions and emotions such as these, and the
distorted interpretations that result, may rigidify into psychic schemas comprised of patterns of dysfunctional
reacting and compromised coping. Identifying negative schemas, and harnessing the mind’s powerful potential to
transform them, will be the dual focus of this course. Participants will explore the way in which the quiet mind,
combined with the evocative and rhythmic language of hypnosis, can fuel a subconscious shift from confusion to
clarity. Participants will experience the way in which sympathetic identification with transformed metaphors,
drawn from the substance of personal stories, can fuel an alchemical shift that decreases stress, increases ego
strength, and paves the way to inner peace.
Educational Objectives: 1) List three elements of psychic schemas that affect the way single mothers experience
and cope with life. 2) Describe two adaptable and effective tools for facilitating an alchemical shift that can
transform confusion into clarity, and negative emotions into wisdom. 3) Given a patient, describe how to experi-
entially explore the way in which sympathetic identification with new metaphors can assist in creating psychic
schemas that decrease stress, increase functioning, and lead to inner peace.

SC 45 ERICKSONIAN PRINCIPLES FOR HELPING STEPFAMILIES BLEND MASON AB


Dale Bertram, PhD and Michael Rankin, MA, LMFT
By using Ericksonian Methods of utilizing resistance, working with dissociation, and altering its consciousness,
we can help a step-family to change its trance and the family can become atrue blended family. Step-families
can learn to play together, work together, and support one another.
Educational Objectives: 1) List three ways in which Ericksonian Methods can help step-families become blended
families, truly attached to one another supporting, cooperating, and secure with one another. 2) Describe how
using resistance can be helpful in creating attachments with step-family members in becoming a blended family.

SC 46 BRIEF THERAPY FOR THE FINAL STAGES OF LIFE UNION SQUARE 16


Lindasue Marshall, MSW
Brief therapy principals and methods that assess how the patient sees the problem, their beliefs and values about
life and death, then intervene with tasks, reframing, and metaphor can provide rapid lasting transformation for
patients with terminal illness. The therapist’s ability to help deal both directly and indirectly with the last stages of
life can help terminal patients move from a fear based position to live meaningful final chapters of their lives.
Educational Objectives: 1) List at least two metaphors and reframes to bypass unconscious resistance and as-
sist terminally ill patients and their families in moving into a “living” mode rather than a “dying” mode. 2) Ana-
lyze the effect that the therapist’s belief systems can play into dealing with the issues of death and dying.

SC 47 IS IT THE TALKING THAT CURES? POWELL AB


AN EXPLORATION OF THE ROLE OF SILENCE AND WORDS IN THE CLINICAL ENCOUNTER
Susan Pinco, PhD
Explore the role that silence plays in the hypnotic and clinical process. Our journey will begin with a discussion of
structured and unstructured silence, how both are manifested, and potentially utilized. It continues with an overview
of research related to silence in psychotherapy as well as findings in neuroscience that help explain why silence is a
key ingredient in effective trance-formational processes. Attendees will engage in exercises that are designed to
expand their awareness of the pivotal role that silence plays in healing and in so doing facilitate the conscious de-
velopment of strategic interventions that utilize silence hypnotically to address a wide range of clinical issues.
Educational Objectives: 1) Differentiate between structured and unstructured silence and demonstrate two ways
to utilize structured silence in the hypnotic process. 2) Explain how silence can be used to promote relationship
both between therapist and client and within the client system and identify the techniques that can be utilized to
facilitate this process.

Page 42 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
SC 48 CHANGING INDIVIDUAL SYSTEMS IN ORDER TO OBTAIN LASTING SOLUTIONS: SUTTER AB
THREE BRIEF STRATEGIC TECHNIQUES
Fabio Leonardi, Psychology, and Gerry Grassi, Psychology
Lasting solutions imply a second order change, which is a change of one’s own identity system. Basing on strate-
gic-constructivist tradition, we developed three techniques. The first one aims to re-frame identity systems char-
acterized by feelings of inadequacy and social inhibition. The second one aims to change identity systems char-
acterized by feelings of victimization. The third one is used with subjects who feels dependent on others.
Educational Objectives: 1) Explain why lasting solution implies second order changing. 2) Utilize specific brief
therapy techniques to treat patients characterized by feelings of inadequacy, social inhibition, and extreme sen-
sitivity to negative evaluation. 3) Utilize specific brief therapy techniques to treat patients characterized by feel-
ings of hopelessness, helplessness, and victimization. 4) Utilize specific brief therapy techniques to treat pa-
tients who feel to be blocked in a relationship or to be depend on someone. 5) Discuss the therapeutic implica-
tion of using these techniques in clinical practice.

11:45 AM-1:00 PM LUNCH BREAK

49--59
Short Courses 49
1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
SC 49 MILTON ERICKSON AND PATRICK CARNES: MASON AB
COMPARING AND CONTRASTING THE WORK OF TWO LEADERS
Roxanna Erickson-Klein, PhD, and Pennie Johnson, MA
This course will look at the work of two charismatic leaders, each of who made a substantial impact to psycho-
therapy practiced today. Commonalities and differences will be explored, and the relevance of their work will be
discussed. Ideology, strategies, and principles of treatment will be compared and contrasted.
Educational objectives: 1)Compare psychotherapeutic methodology of Patrick Carnes and Milton Erickson. 2)
List three similarities in the therapeutic approaches of these two leaders. 3)List three differences in the strate-
gies of these two leaders

SC 50 PATTERN DISRUPTION RIGHT OUT OF THE GATE TAYLOR AB


Cheryl Bell-Gadsby, MA, RCC, and Kathleen Donaghy, PhD, PC
This session will demonstrate the efficient and strategic use of energy and trancework in shifting clients’’ resis-
tance into movement and resolution of conflict. Case examples will be provided to illustrate application of our
approach with a couple, a mother and daughter, and with adolescent girls. We will conclude with a demonstra-
tion and discussion.
Educational objectives: 1) Identify two hypnotic approaches to shift clients’ mindset to heighten and activate the
mind/body connection for desired change. 2) Demonstrate the strategic use of energy and trancework in shift-
ing resistance and conflict into a more fluid state.

SC 51 EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF CHRONIC ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION POWELL AB


WITH ESSENTIAL NEUROBIOLOGICAL COMMUNICATION
Bart Walsh, MSW
Learn how to access deep levels of mind-body functioning for remission of chronic anxiety and depression. Es-
sential neurobiological communication (ENBC) incorporates a form of body language known as ideomotor signal-
ing. Affected individuals learn to fully manage these chronic conditions. Resolve past emotion using a non-
invasive protocol integrating a progressive ratification sequence for grounding emotional adjustments in
thought, perception and behavior.
Educational objectives: 1) Explain the use of ideomotor questioning in resolving emotional experience. 2) De-
scribe a method for accessing and quelling the source of chronic anxiety and depression.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 43
SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
SC 52 ENHANCING RESILIENCY IN SHORT TERM CARE: YOSEMITE A
INTEGRATING THE SOCIAL, EMOTIONAL, CULTURAL, AND EXISTENTIAL FACTORS TOGETHER
Naji Abi-Hashem, PhD
This presentation will explore the major themes, dimensions, and conceptualizations of resiliency from commu-
nal, psychosocial, cultural, and spiritual perspectives. We will discuss how to mobilize resiliency within the
framework of time‐limited soul care and use the dynamic interaction among heritages, norms, traditions, and
values, to further coping, surviving, and thriving. We will argue that resiliency, is not only a psycho‐emotional and
individualistic potential ability, but also a collective resource and faculty, stored in the community. Thus, resil-
iency is a clear function of culture, foundational identity, and generational wisdom.
Educational objectives: 1) Compare a few basic and complex definitions of resiliency. 2) List several social foun-
dations and cultural mediators of resiliency and discuss three major obstacles to the study of resilience. 3) Iden-
tify four psychosocial integrators and list four types of cultural resiliencies.

SC 53 WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOUR PATIENT IS NOT EXPECTING LOMBARD


Helen Adrienne, LCSW
The number of those who are struggling with infertility in the United States is 7.3 million and growing. If you
have not yet encountered this in your practice, you are likely to sooner or later. Working effectively with this
highly stressed population requires awareness of the unique profile of patients suffering with the unmet longing
for a baby. This workshop will be an opportunity for you to gather the understanding you need in order to attune
yourself to the challenges these men, women and couples face and to learn brief therapy, mind/body interven-
tions that will make a difference. Infertility is also a state of mind. Learn how you can adapt the skills you will
develop to other people in your practice who are infertile in other ways in their life.
Educational Objectives: 1) Construct a protocol for ego strengthening in the face of the devastating diagnosis of
infertility. 2) List and be able to utilize three mind/body coping skills that can serve to reverse the physiology of
stress. 3) Identify two ways that you can adapt a larger understanding of infertility to other patients in your practice.

SC 54 LOVE AND INTENTION: SUTTER AB


IMPROVING STRATEGIC OUTCOMES
Michael Munion, MA
This workshop provides a framework for assessing clients along two important dimensions that impact thera-
peutic outcome: motivation and sense of agency (one’s perception of their ability to create change in their own
lives). This assessment fosters interventions that enhance the capacity for strategic interventions to be truly
brief and solution focused. The participants in this workshop will have the opportunity to observe and practice
this approach.
Educational objectives: 1) Assess and enhance clients’ motivation for change. 2) Demonstrate a technique to
help clarify and improve therapeutic outcome.

SC 55 KEEPING NATURE IN ERICKSONIAN THERAPY UNION SQUARE 15


Sheldon Cohen, MD
The theme of nature/environment appears repeated in Erickson’s lectures, writings, and recollections of those
who know him. This presentation will enhance our appreciation of the importance of nature in therapy and en-
hance our ability to impart the concept to patients. The author will share the techniques, conscious and uncon-
scious, that he uses with patients. Attendees will do likewise.
Educational objectives: 1) List three things about the therapist’s office that impart the importance of bringing
nature into therapy. 3) List four things you can do in your practice to help patients be more cognizant of the envi-
ronment.

SC 56 SHORT QUESTION/LASTING IMPACT UNION SQUARE 17-18


Richard Landis, PhD
Erickson often saw the presenting symptom as the patient’s solution to a problem that might not be immediately
evident. By identifying the core problem that the patient was trying to solve with his symptoms, Erickson was
able to create appealingly simple solutions that produced lasting changes. This short course teaches therapists
how to view symptoms in the Ericksonian mindset to find brief but lasting solutions.
Educational Objectives: 1) Differentiate “Why” from “What” questions. 2) Redefine a patient’s problem through
the Erickson lens. 3) Convert the “What” question into brief intervention.

Page 44 CONTINUING EDUCATION INFORMATION - Page 9


SUPER Sunday
Sunday--December 9
SC 57 F FOOTPRINTINGS: NINE COLORS, INFINITE POSSIBILITIES UNION SQUARE 16
Susan Dowell, LCSW, BCD
Footprintings is a new three dimensional treatment model. In this work, nine different color sets of Footprintings
become tools for a patient to bookmark, diagram, track and explore internal experience and shifting states of
consciousness, as they are experienced in the Present Moment. When a patient chooses color Footprintings to
represent an aspect of self-experience, positions these Footprintings on the ground and then stands in them,
the postural shifts , body experience, and shifting perspectives and associations unfolding from this position-
ing can lead to valuable insights, learning opportunities and new perspectives. This three dimensional approach
offers patients both the direct opportunity to learn more about the unique process of internal communication
between Self-States and the concrete tools for reorganizing, repairing and forging new and supportive internal
alliances. In this workshop, we will offer an introduction to the theory and practice of Footprintings. Attendees
will then have a chance to observe and/or participate in a three-dimensional practicum.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe two ways Footprintings can be used to deepen our understanding of Self-
States as they exist in Present Moment experience. 2) Describe one way Footprintings can enhance internal
communication between Self States. 3) Discuss one way that Footprintings can be used for repairing and forging
new internal relationships between Self-States.

SC 58 STORYPLAY® THERAPY: YOSEMITE C


GEMS OF CHANGE FOR ACCESSING AND UTILIZING
INNER RESOURCES FOR HEALING CHILDHOOD TRAUMA
Joyce Mills, PhD
This experiential workshop will present an essential element of StoryPlay®, an Ericksonian, resiliency-based,
indirective process of Play Therapy that focuses upon how to identify, access and utilize inner resources, skills,
and gifts as invaluable “gems” to move us beyond diagnosis and effect transformational change for children and
adolescents who have experienced trauma and adversity.
Educational Objectives: 1) Access and utilize Inner Resources of a child or adolescent during the first session. 2)
Learn two StoryCrafts for experiential healing.

SC 59 MAKING THE MOST OF ONE HOUR: UNION SQUARE 14


WALK-IN COUNSELING SERVICES
Arnold Slive, PhD
Walk-in counseling services allow clinets to attend a session of therapy without waiting for an appointment.
Many are seen for only one session. Research consistently indicates that “one” is the modal number of ses-
sions for all models of therapy and that single sessions are highly effective. This workshop describes therapy,
research, strategies, and techniques for making single sessions, whether planned or not, as effective as possi-
ble. Emphasis will be on the application of these principles in a variety of walk-in services.
Educational Objectives: 1) Utilize interviewing strategies that promote single session change. 2) Apply single
session principles in a walk-in clinic. 3) Plan walk-in services in private practice and agency settings.

BriefTherapyConference.com Page 45
POST-CONFERENCE
Monday-December 10
8:00 AM REGISTRATION

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
PLAZA B
MC 1 Brief Therapy Master Class
BRIEF THERAPY: EXPERIENTIAL APPROACHES COMBINING GESTALT AND HYPNOSIS
JEFFREY ZEIG, PHD AND ERVING POLSTER, PHD
Gestalt therapy and Ericksonian hypnotherapy are experiential methods of change. In combination they can be
synergistic. Psychotherapy is best when clients have first-hand experience of an alive therapeutic process. Such
dynamic empowering experiences pave the way for dynamic understandings. Drs. Polster and Zeig will engage
with each other and participants to examine commonalities and differences in their work in this engaging all-day
workshop.
Educational Objectives: 1) Describe the synergy between Gestalt Therapy and Ericksonian Hypnotherapy. 2) List
at least two commonalities and two differences between Gestalt Therapy and Ericksonian Hypnotherapy.

12:00-1:30 PM LUNCH BREAK

1:30 PM - 4:30 PM

MC 2 Brief Therapy Master Class (cont’d) PLAZA B

Page 46
BriefTherapyConference.com Page 47
THE MILTON H. ERICKSON FOUNDATION
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April 18
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STEPHEN TERRY JANIS ABRAHMS MICHELE JEFFREY


PORGES REAL SPRING WEINER-DAVIS ZEIG

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The Three Cs: Using Spirituality in Couples Therapy
Love in The 21st Century
(Even with Non-Religious and Non-Spiritual Clients)
Caring for an Aging Partner or Parent
The New Rules of Marriage: A Passionate Approach to
Guerrilla Divorce Busting Couples and Couples Therapy
From Conversation to Connection: The "New" Infidelity: Affairs in Cyberspace
The Language of Intimacy
It Takes One to Tango:
When Society Loses Control: Couples Therapy with One Spouse
Attachment, Trauma and a Developmental Process of
Affairs:
Couple and Family Addiction and Recovery
A Step-By-Step Program for Healing from Infidelity
His Porn, Her Pain:
Reel Love: A Five-Step Model for Successful Couples
Working with Couples When Pornography is an Issue
Therapy through the Lens of the Movies
I Don’t Want to Talk About It:
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After Your Affair: Don't Ask Me to Forgive You!
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KEYNOTE SPEAKERS STATE OF THE ART FACULTY
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2013
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Stephen Gilligan
INVITED KEYNOTES Steven Hayes
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Daniel Amen Kay Redfield Jamison
Paul Ekman Sue Johnson
Michael Gazzaniga Jack Kornfield
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SPECIAL GUEST *Peter Levine
James Foley Scott Miller
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PRIMARY FACULTY Bill O’Hanlon
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Cloé Madanes Michael Yapko
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