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SPF 301 – Culture and Schooling

#14927 Room ED250 Tuesday/Thursday 10:30-11:45am

Tempe Campus Spring 2017 3 credits

Dates of classes: January 9, 2017 – April 28, 2017


Instructor: Charles Anthony Ed.D
Email: canthon4@asu.edu
Work Phone: 480-727-5660 Cell: 602-696-0728
Office Hours: By appointment
Office Location: Poly Campus – Santa Catalina Hall, Suite 330-D

Course Information:
This course will concentrate on developing multi-disciplinary understandings of issues related to the
relationships between key cultural processes and products and schooling in contemporary American
society. The course will explore the functions of schooling in society, and how teachers influence and
contribute to these functions. The functions of education include socialization, acculturation, assimilation, and
the transmission and reproduction of culture. These functions always involve contentious issues of taste and
style, ethics, morals and values. In order to understand those contentious issues, key concepts will be used as
tools to reflect on school structure, functions and practices.

The iTeachAZ Professional Program Retention and Continuation Policy states that a grade of "C" or better is
needed in all education courses to be eligible as a student in good standing
(http://education.asu.edu/webfm_send/39).

Enrollment in field experience is a co-requisite for this course and your Field experience component needs to
match age range for your program (1-8 placement)

Catalog Description
This course is for the professional teacher preparation program. This course is an overview of the cultural,
social, and political milieus in which formal schooling takes place in the United States.

Course Format
This course is a face to face lecture format. The primary learning intent of this course is to facilitate your
exploration of culture and schooling in a way that is personally meaningful to you. We will provide the basic
framework for the course, but what you learn and how much you learn will depend on the choices you make
during each class period and in your independent reading and projects. Your enrollment in the course indicates
your acceptance of the course expectations and requirements as outlined in this syllabus. Please see your

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Division of Teacher Preparation
instructor after class, make an appointment, or contact his/her by phone or e-mail if you have any questions or
concerns in regards to the expectations for this course.

Required Course Texts, Materials and Resources


Required Text
Black Ants and Buddhists by Mary Cowhey
Supplemental Text
All additional readings, materials and resources to enhance the learning experiences as a supplemental source
will be provided in Blackboard listed as ‘Supplemental Materials’.

Additional required readings provided in Blackboard


 All readings will be available on ASU Blackboard Course Management Website at
http://myasucourses.asu.edu (All ASU students have FREE access to this web resource)
 IDEAL subscription, which can be obtained from https://www.ideal.azed.gov/ (All ASU students have
FREE access to this web resource after account is created). This subscription will remain with you
throughout your education and teaching career.

Required Materials
 Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Internet resource – Tk20 via the web: Tk20 CampusTools is a
comprehensive online data management system that enables you to participate and manage your
academic activities in this class, throughout your college experience and beyond. There is a one-time
only, non-refundable subscription fee for Tk20. You can purchase the program online at
http://mytc.asu.edu/tk20-system.
o You may also purchase a Tk20 Student Access Kit from the ASU Bookstore, which may have a
higher price, although purchasing there will allow you to receive requisite compensation from
financial aid, if eligible.
 Children’s Literature (can be purchased, checked out at the library, or borrowed)
 ASU Google Account
 Pink, yellow and blue highlighters
 APA guidelines. APA formatting is required for all written assignments

Provided Materials
 ASU Blackboard Course Management Website at http://myasucourses.asu.edu (All ASU
students have FREE access to this web resource)
 In-class materials related to activities conducting during class time

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Student Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course the student should be able to:

Student Learning Outcomes InTASC Standard ISTE Standards ISTE-S (Student Standards)
Understand the social, economical, political and cultural 2(j), 2(k), 2(m), 7(i), 1(b), 4(d)
functions of schooling in the United States 9(i), 9(m), 10(l), 10(m)
Understand how schools contribute to the production and 2(j), 2(k), 2(m), 7(i), 4(a), 4(d), 5(a)
re-production of social, economical, political, and cultural 9(i), 9(m), 10(l), 10(m)
structures and values in society
Understand how concepts such as race, ethnicity, sex, 2(j), 2(k), 2(m), 7(i), 3(d) 1(a), 2(a)
and class relate to teaching and learning in schools 9(i), 9(m), 10(l), 10(m)
Understand the processes of socialization and 1(d), 1(e), 1(g), 1(h), 5(a), 5(c) 1(a), 2(a)
enculturation related to schooling 1(j), 1(k), 2(g), 2(i), 2(j),
2(k), 2(m), 2(n), 2(o),
3(k), 3(n), 3(q), 3(r),
7(i), 7(n), 8(k), 8(p),
8(q), 8(s), 9(i), 9(m),
10(l), 10(m)
Explain why teaching is not value neutral 2(j), 2(k), 2(m), 7(i), 1(a), 3(c)
9(i), 9(m), 10(l), 10(m)
Explain what they believe is the purpose of education; 2(j), 2(k), 2(m), 7(i), 4(d), 5(d)
what kinds of adults they hope to mold; and what kind of 9(i), 9(m), 10(l), 10(m),
society they wish to create by means of the educational 10(p), 10(q), 10(r),
system 10(s), 10(t)
Articulate what they believe to be their roles and 10(l), 10(m), 10(p), 1d, 5(d)
responsibilities as teachers 10(q), 10(r), 10(s), 10(t)
Justify the intended and unintended consequences of 2(g), 2(i), 2(j), 2(k), 1(c), 1(d), 3(b)
their teaching 2(m), 2(n), 2(o), 7(i),
9(i), 9(m), 10(l), 10(m)
Reflect on how their experiences as students and 2(g), 2(i), 2(j), 2(k), 2(a), 2(b), 2(c), 2(d), 1(a), 1(c), 1(d), 2(a), 3(c)
teachers influence their teaching practices 2(m), 2(n), 2(o), 7(i), 4(b), 5(b)
9(i), 9(m), 10(l), 10(m)
Use theoretically based concepts as tools to analyze 2(g), 2(i), 2(j), 2(k), 2c 1(a), 1(c), 1(d), 2(a), 3(c)
teaching and learning processes explain how their social 2(m), 2(n), 2(o), 7(i),
identities influence their teaching 9(i), 9(m), 10(l), 10(m)

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InTASC Standards: http://www.ccsso.org/Documents/2011/InTASC_Model_Core_Teaching_Standards_2011.pdf

ISTE Standards: http://www.iste.org/standards/standards-for-teachers.

*PSA - Professional Standards Assessed may include (according to course content):

 Council for Exceptional Children (CEC): http://www.cec.sped.org/Standards/Special-Educator-Professional-Preparation.


 National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC):
http://www.naeyc.org/ncate/files/ncate/NAEYC%20Initial%20and%20Advanced%20Standards%2010_2012.pdf.
 National Council on the Social Studies (NCSS): http://downloads.ncss.org/NCSSTeacherStandardsVol1-rev2004.pdf
 National Council for the Teaching of Mathematics (NCTM): http://www.nctm.org
 International Reading Association (IRA): http://www.reading.org/
 Next Generation Science Standards: http://www.nextgenscience.org/next-generation-science-standards
 TESOL: http://www.tesol.org/docs/books/the-revised-tesol-ncate-standards-for-the-recognition-of-initial-tesol-programs-in-p-12-esl-
teacher-education-(2010-pdf).pdf?sfvrsn=2

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Week Topics Readings or Media and Homework Reminders Due prior to start of class
Week 1 & 2 Introduction Read the syllabus and bring to class (can be either a Questions about class,
1/10, 12, hard copy or on a laptop/tablet brought to class). In addition, bring assignments, syllabus
1/17, 19 Syllabus your textbook, Black Ants and Buddhists to class on January 19.
Bring Syllabus (2nd class)
Class Introduction Activities Homework: Bring Book to class on Jan. 19
-Review article: http://anthro.palomar.edu/culture/culture_1.htm
Preflection -Complete My Culture Worksheet / submit to Blackboard by 1/24
-Read Tobin, J., Hsueh, Y., and Karasawa, M. (2009). Preschool in
Culture Discussions three cultures revisited: China, Japan, and the United States.
London: The University of Chicago Press. (pp. 54-64, 96-106,
Black Ants & Buddhists 159-164)
-Read Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 1: Introduction
Intro to Assignments: -Journal #1
 Readings
 My Culture Worksheet
 Journals

Week 3 What is Culture? Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entry # 1
1/24, 26  Defining culture - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 1: Introduction
-Tobin, J., Hsueh, Y., and Karasawa, M. (2009). Preschool in three My Culture Worksheet
Black Ants & Buddhists cultures revisited: China, Japan, and the United States. London:
The University of Chicago Press. (pp. 54-64, 96-106, 159-164) Readings
Culture Comparison
 My Culture Worksheet Homework:
 Making Sense of Culture -Review article: Postman, N. (1995). The end of education:
 Preschool in 3 Cultures Redefining the value of school. Vintage Books: New York.
-Read Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 2: Compassion, Action
and Change
-Journal #2
- Digital Story
 Submit digital Presentation & Reflection Paper to
Blackboard by 11:55 pm on 1/31.
 Bring a copy of your presentation on your laptop or flash
drive to class for small group activity on 2/2.

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Week 4 Cultural Comparison Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entry # 2
1/31, 2/2  Culture in your classroom - Postman, N. (1995). The end of education: Redefining the value
 Digital Story Small Group of school. Vintage Books: New York. Digital Story
Presentations - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 2: Compassion, Action and
Change Readings
Black Ants & Buddhists
Homework:
-Review article: Dewey, J. (1933). Dewey outlines utopian
schools. New York Times, April 23, p. 7
-Find a piece of children’s literature that has a character in which
you can relate to their culture. Read prior to class and bring the
book to class.
-Brainstorm 2-3 examples of how culture is depicted in your
classroom. Visual or written examples are acceptable. Please bring
to class and be prepared to discuss.
- Read Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 3: Routines: A Day in
the Life of the Peace Class
-Journal #3

Week 5 Schooling vs. Education Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entry # 3
2/7, 9  How do you learn? -Dewey, J. (1933). Dewey outlines utopian schools. New York
 Visiting Utopia Times, April 23, p. 7 Children’s Literature Book
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 3: Routines: A Day in the Life NOTE: Must bring actual
Black Ants & Buddhists of the Peace Class book to class
-Find a piece of children’s literature that has a character in which
Culture in Field Placement you can relate to their culture. Read prior to class and bring the 2-3 examples of culture in your
Classrooms – small group book to class. classroom
discussions
Homework: Readings
Children’s Literature -Find and read an Arizona school funding article from the last 12
 Graphic Organizers months in a reliable source. Be prepared to discuss how funding
 Journal Entry #4 in class (or lack of) could impact you as a teacher.
-Summarize your school funding article and its potential impact on
Cultural Product Assignment you as a teacher in an Arizona classroom as part of Journal
–Journal Entry #5
NOTE: You will be adding to Journal #5 after the class discussion
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 4: It Takes a Village to Teach
-Begin working on your cultural product progress check

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Week 6 School Funding & Overrides Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entry # 5
2/14, 16  School Funding Formula -Arizona school funding article from the last 12 months in a reliable
 Know the impact of source. Be prepared to discuss how funding (or lack of) could Readings
overrides impact you as a teacher.
 Making connections to your - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 4: It Takes a Village to Teach
classroom

Black Ants & Buddhists Homework:


- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 5: Talking About Peace
-Journal #6
-Research your legislative district candidates’ stances on education
and policies affecting your classroom.
-Write a 1 page position paper on who’s education agenda you
agree with and why (or why not). NOTE: You will be graded on
your analysis of the candidate’s position, NOT on who you chose.
Submit by 11:55 pm to Blackboard and bring a hard copy to class.

Week 7 Politics and the Classroom Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entry # 6
2/21, 23  Role of policy agendas on - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 5: Talking About Peace
your classroom -Research your legislative district candidates’ stances on education Candidate Position Paper
 Methods for advocating for and policies affecting your classroom.
your students in the political Readings
arena Homework:
Analyzing local candidate -Johnston, N. (1980). The Material Culture of Public School
stances on education Classrooms: The Symbolic Integration of Local Schools and
National Culture. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 11(2),
Black Ants & Buddhists 173-190.
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 6: Learning Through Activism
-Bring in an object or material from your school experience
-Reflect on 1-2 rituals and routines that are in place at your school
placement. How do you the routines and rituals affect the cultural
diversity in your classroom? Why do these rituals and routines
continue to be implemented in our schools and classrooms? What
does this mean for students and teachers of different cultural
backgrounds?
-Journal #7
- Cultural product progress check due next week

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Week 8 Culture in Schools Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal #7
2/28, 3/2  Introduction -Johnston, N. (1980). The Material Culture of Public School
 Enculturation, Classrooms: The Symbolic Integration of Local Schools and Bring in an object or
Acculturation, National Culture. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 11(2), material from your school
Assimilation 173-190. experience
 "Culture of Cute" - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 6: Learning Through Activism
 Ritual and Routine 1-2 field placement
Place in Schools Homework: rituals/routines
-Childress, H. (2006). A subtractive education. The Phi Delta
Black Ants & Buddhists Kappan, 88(2), 104-109. Readings
-Sleeter, C. (2011). The academic and social value of ethnic
Cultural Product Small Group studies: A research review. National Education Association. Cultural Product progress
share-out -Gay, G. (2002). Preparing Culturally Responsive Teaching. check
Journal of Teacher Education 53, 106-114.
-Journal #8
-Research opposing and supportive arguments in favor of your
team’s position for our debate on dual language programs in
Arizona. Prepare bullet points or note cards for 3/14 debate.

Week 9/10 Ethnic Studies Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entry # 8
3/5-12  Debate -Childress, H. (2006). A subtractive education. The Phi Delta
(Spring  Twitter Discussions Kappan, 88(2), 104-109. Preparation for debate
Break) -Sleeter, C. (2011). The academic and social value of ethnic
3/14, 16 Hidden Curriculum studies: A research review. National Education Association. Readings
 Reading Discussion -Gay, G. (2002). Preparing Culturally Responsive Teaching.
 What kind of students? Journal of Teacher Education 53, 106-114.
-Research on debate topic
Lesson Plan Analysis Overview
Homework:
-Journal #9 on in-class debate and social media in the classroom
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 7: Teaching History So
Children Will Care
-Anyon, Jean (1980). Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of
Work. Journal of Education, 161 (1), 67-92.
-http://www.thinkingarizona.com/2013/11/arizona-students-edge-
upward/
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-1vmvNuO0E
http://youtu.be/1tPQ-xOLSSE
-Journal #10
-Select a lesson plan to analyze (will review expectations in class
on 3/21)

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Week 11 Hidden Curriculum Read/watch prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entries #9 and # 10
3/21, 23  Cultural Reproduction -Anyon, Jean (1980). Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of
 Social/Cultural Capitol Work. Journal of Education, 161 (1), 67-92. Readings
-http://www.thinkingarizona.com/2013/11/arizona-students-edge-
Making Connections: upward/ Select and bring a lesson plan
- Achievement Gap  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n-1vmvNuO0E to analyze
http://youtu.be/1tPQ-xOLSSE
Lesson Plan Analysis - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 7: Teaching History So
Children Will Care
Black Ants & Buddhists
Homework:
-McDermott, R. & Varenne, H. (1995). Culture as disability.
Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 26, 323-348.
-Find an example of hidden curriculum in your school. Be prepared
to share out your example with the class.
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 8: Nurturing History
Detectives
-Journal #11
Lesson Plan Analysis due 11:55pm on 3/27
Week 12 Culture as Disability Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entries # 11
3/28, 30  Eye of the Beholder -McDermott, R. & Varenne, H. (1995). Culture as disability.
 The Butterfly Circus Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 26, 323-348. Lesson Plan Analysis
 How Culture Disables - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 8: Nurturing History
 Model Example: English Detectives Readings
Language Learners in
Arizona Homework:
-Spiegel, A. East Meets West. September 2 2013, NPR.
Add to Journal #11 -Moll, C. M., Pmanti, C., Neff, D., Gonzalez, N. (1992).
Funds of Knowledge for Teaching: Using a Qualitative Approach
Lesson Plan share-out to Connect Homes and Classrooms. Theory in Practice 31(2),
132-141
Black Ants & Buddhists - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 9: Seeing Ourselves and Our
Families Through Students’ Eyes
-Journal #12
-Bring to class 1-3 sample test questions (Galileo, sample AIMS,
AZMerit, AZELLA, etc.). Be prepared to discuss any hidden bias.
- Continue working on Cultural Product

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Week 13 What Counts as Knowledge? Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entry # 12
4/4, 6  Testing and Bias -Spiegel, A. East Meets West. September 2 2013, NPR.
-Moll, C. M., Pmanti, C., Neff, D., Gonzalez, N. (1992). Readings
Funds of Knowledge Funds of Knowledge for Teaching: Using a Qualitative Approach
 Meeting their needs to Connect Homes and Classrooms. Theory in Practice 31(2),
132-141
Cultural Product Gallery Walk - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 9: Seeing Ourselves and Our
Guidelines Families Through Students’ Eyes

Black Ants & Buddhists Homework:


-Kaomea, J. (2009). Indigenous Studies in the Elementary
Signature Assignment Outline Curriculum: A Cautionary Hawaiian Example. Anthropology and
Education, 36(1), 24-42. Doi: 10.1525/aeq.2005.36.1.024
-Vetter, A. (2010). “Cause I’m a G": Identity work of a lesbian teen
in language arts. Journal of adolescent and adult literacy, 54(2),
98-108
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 10: Responding When
Tragedy Enters the Classroom
-Journal #13
-Cultural Product and Analysis
-Bring Full Journal to class next week
Week 14 Cultural Conflict Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Journal entry #13
4/11, 13  Being Critical- The -Kaomea, J. (2009). Indigenous Studies in the Elementary
Teacher's Role Curriculum: A Cautionary Hawaiian Example. Anthropology and Readings
Application: Good Will Education, 36(1), 24-42. Doi: 10.1525/aeq.2005.36.1.024
Hunting -Vetter, A. (2010). “Cause I’m a G": Identity work of a lesbian teen **Cultural Product and Analysis
 Pop Culture & Your in language arts. Journal of adolescent and adult literacy, 54(2), Due**
Classroom 98-108
 Round Robin - Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 10: Responding When Bring full journal to class for
 Who Matters? Tragedy Enters the Classroom signature assignment outline
 Holidays in-class work
 Teach, Don't Preach. Homework:
-Banks, James A. and Michelle Tucker. Multiculturalism’s Five
Cultural Product Gallery Walk Dimensions. NEA Today Online.
-Villegas, A., & Tamaras, L. (2002). Preparing culturally responsive
Black Ants & Buddhists teachers: Rethinking the curriculum. Journal of Teacher Education,
53(1), 20-32.
Signature Assignment Outline/ -Explore The Equity Alliance at ASU webpage:
Rough Draft Peer Discussion www.equityallianceatasu.org
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 11: Building Trust
-Prepare rough draft of Signature Assignment. Bring materials/draft
to class April 18th.
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Week 15 Multiculturalism Read prior to class and come prepared to discuss: Read articles for 11/24
4/18, 20  Multiculturalism vs. -Banks, James A. and Michelle Tucker. Multiculturalism’s Five
Pluralism Dimensions. NEA Today Online. Signature Assignment Draft for
 What does it look like? -Villegas, A., & Tamaras, L. (2002). Preparing culturally responsive peer-editing due 4/18
 Multicultural Critique teachers: Rethinking the curriculum. Journal of Teacher Education,
 What is CRT? 53(1), 20-32. Signature Assignment draft
-Explore The Equity Alliance at ASU webpage: upload (after peer-editing) due
Black Ants & Buddhists www.equityallianceatasu.org 4/20
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 11: Building Trust with
Peer Editing Families and Weathering Controversy

Homework:
-Signature Assignment rough draft must be uploaded to
Blackboard by midnight 4/20 after reviewing peer-review feedback
for instructor review/feedback.
- Black Ants and Buddhists Chapter 12: Going Against the Grain

Week 16 Summative Activities Black Ants and Buddhists Final Discussion Signature Assignment TK20
4/25, 27  Comparing Solutions Submission
 Who would you hire? Cultural Product Design Presentations Due 4/29 by Midnight

Evaluations

NOTE: Tentative Course Schedule subject to changes. All changes will be noted in Blackboard and shared in class.

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Course Assignments
Assignment and Description Due Date Indicators Score/Points

Introducing and Reinforcing Standards

Blackboard and Class Participation Each session ISTE-T 1(a), 1(c), 1(d), 3(c) 20%

Various reading reflections, activities to support topic discussions ISTE-S 2(a)


and in-class hands-on activities will support course objectives and
will be assigned in class. Course Objectives: 1-10

Digital Story 2/1/2016 InTASC 1(g), 2(g), 2(j), 14%


2(k), 3(i), 4(k), 4(m), 4(o),
Utilizing a program such as Power Point, Prezi or any digital 7(i), 8(k), 8(t), 9(i), 9(m)
presentation tool, and using only 8-10 images, create a digital
story/narrative of your culture. You will also write a 2-3 page paper ISTE-T 1(a), 2(a)
explaining how your images represent your culture and in what ISTE-S 2©
way you are a part of that culture. You will need to reference our Course Objectives:
in-class topics and readings as part of your reflection. You will be 3,4,9,10
presenting your digital story to a small group in class. Be sure to
attach your presentation with your paper upon submission to
Blackboard.

Cultural Product Design (Progress Check) 2/29/2016 InTASC 2(m), 2(o), 4(j), 2%
4(q), 5(j)
You will write a minimum of 1 page paper explaining your plan for
the Creative Application of Topics assignment. You will also need Course Objectives: 1-10
to show your progress on this assignment throughout course.

Lesson Plan Analysis Due 3/28 InTASC 1(g), 2(g), 2(j), 14%
2(k), 3(i), 4(k), 4(m), 4(o),
Choose a lesson plan about any topic that is relevant to your future 4(p) 4(q), 7(i), 8(k), 8(p),
plans as a teacher. Consider using one of your mentor teacher’s 8(q) 8(t), 9(i), 9(m), 10(q)
existing lessons. Write a 2-3 page paper analyzing and reflecting
on this lesson as it relates to the topics we have covered in class. Course Objectives:
Be sure to attach your lesson plan upon submission to Blackboard. 3,7,9,10

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Cultural Product Design Due 4/11 InTASC 3(q), 5(r), 9(m), 20%
9(n), 10(l), 10(m), 10(p),
In this assignment, you will synthesize topics and ideas covered in 10(q), 10(r), 10(s), 10(t
this class and apply them to a product of your own design for your
future classroom. This assignment is designed to have you reflect Course Objectives: 1-10
upon and present your understanding of course topics in a format
you feel best demonstrates your ideas. You will design and create
your own product to demonstrate your understanding of between
three and five class topics and how they relate to your teaching
and learning experiences. The goal is to design a cultural product
that you could introduce in a lesson or unit with your future
scholars.

Signature Assignment Assessing Mastery of Standards

Signature Assignment 4/29/2018 InTASC 1(e), 1(g), 1(j), 30%


1(k), 2(g), 2(j), 2(k), 2(m),
In this paper you are asked to consider the type of teacher you 2(n), 2(o), 3(a), 3(k), 3(p),
intend to be. In your journal, you will have different theories and 3(r), 5(r), 7(i), 7(n), 9(i),
concepts (“lenses”) to help you think through different schooling 9(m), 10(l), 10(m), 10(q)
scenarios, the purposes of education, what kinds of adults you Course Objectives: 1-10
hope we will produce, the kind of society you wish to create by
means of the educational system, how you intend to bring about
the results you desire, and what your role and responsibilities will
be as a teacher.

Grading Scale
A 93%-100%
B 85%-92%
C 77%-84%
D 69%-76%
E 69% and below

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Assignments and Grades:
The purpose of assignments in this class is twofold:

1) For you to develop and establish personal understandings and connections to the course content.

2) For you to demonstrate your understandings of class content to me.

When I grade your assignments, I will interpret, understand, and evaluate every assignment that you submit according to the assigned criteria and
rubrics. Be very clear and specific with what you mean or intend to convey.

Assignment Details

You may only use each essay you write ONE TIME. The same paper MAY NOT be submitted for multiple assignments.

Assignments will be graded on both content and language usage. All assignments should be checked for spelling, sentence construction,
grammatical errors, and clarity. In other words, you are responsible for editing your papers before submitting them.

All submitted written assignments should be titled, dated, and of college quality and appearance. Assignments must be typed in 12-point font Times
New Roman, double-spaced with one inch by one inch borders and submitted in Blackboard before the specified time and date.

All major assignments are due at 11:55 pm on the due date unless otherwise noted.

All Reading Guided Questions, Summaries, and Journals are due prior to start of class on their due date.

Save all assignments as:

 Last name, First Initial . Title of Assignment


 Example: Gullickson, E. Essay #1

Use APA formatting. The following website can help you format your courses correctly:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/10/

Be sure to REFER to our in class readings/content when appropriate. This is a good academic habit to develop, as well as a way to demonstrate
how you are making connections between your understanding and the class topics.

There are rubrics available for every major assignment in this course. Please read the rubrics carefully, as they will clearly explain grading criteria
for each major assignment.

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Division of Teacher Preparation
You are responsible for keeping track of your grades in our class. It is also your responsibility to check and comply with assignment due dates as
they arise in the detailed schedule. All assignments should be completed and submitted on or before due dates to receive a grade for this course.
Any changes for an incomplete will take place in the following semester, upon initiation by the student.

Attendance
Due to the interactive nature of this class, your participation and attendance is expected and required. We will cover material and participate in
activities and discussions that enhance and expand upon the content in our readings. If you miss these interactive elements, you will be missing
important parts of the class.

In each class, in-class points will be available (through different activities) for your in-class participation. These points are part of your overall
participation grade. These points CANNOT be made up for missing class regardless of the reason.

Absences do not excuse late papers or major assignments.

If you know AHEAD of time about missing a class, please contact me as soon as possible so we can discuss the issue.

Two or more absences is considered excessive and may result in you being dropped from the class.

Two tardies equal an absence and may have an impact on your grade and/or result in being dropped from the class (see excessive
absences).

Daily Preparation, Participation, and Engagement (20%, approx. 200 pts)

Due: Dates Vary

It is extremely important that you prepare for each of our meetings by following the syllabus and Blackboard content folders and completing the
readings indicted therein. Our class is going to be as great as we all make it. If we extend a lot of thought, care, effort, and consideration to our
work and to our peers, we will experience great returns. I anticipate remarkable writing, thinking, debate, and overall scholarly contributions from
every one of you. I sincerely hope that you will all contribute to our class in positive ways every time we get together.

Participation Grades will be determined by a number of activities:

1) In-class activities (vary by day/class);

2) Guided Reading Questions;


SPF301 – Spring 2017 – Page 15
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3) Summaries and Reflections;

4) Active participation during classes (speaking, contributing, being prepared); and

5) Miscellaneous homework/updates/etc.

Guided Reading Questions:

Each reading is accompanied by Guided Reading Questions. Each set of questions can be found under the appropriate folder in Blackboard
corresponding with each reading. You may work on the questions multiple times, but the finished version is due at 8:55 am on the day of class. Do
NOT e-mail me your guided reading responses. Guided reading question homework should be uploaded/submitted to the appropriate assignment
in the content folder in Blackboard.

Preparation expectations:

To be prepared for class each day:

1) Follow the detailed schedule below and the content folders on Blackboard to be prepared for class thoroughly each day.
2) Be prepared to ask and answer questions, to share ideas, and to be fully present and involved during the times that we meet.
3) Engage in and complete in-class assignments to the very best of your ability.
4) Listen to your peers.
5) Respond thoughtfully and respectfully to your peers.

Digital Storytelling: What is your Culture? (14%, 150 pts)

Utilizing a program such as Power Point, Prezi or another digital presentation too and using only 8-10 images, create a digital story/narrative of your
culture. You will also write a 2-3 page paper explaining how your images represent your culture and in what way you are a part of that culture. You
will need to reference our in-class topics and readings as part of your reflection. You will be presenting your digital story to a small group in class.
Be sure to attach your presentation with your paper upon submission to Blackboard.

Digital Storytelling Rubric:


CRITERION A B C D-E

50 points 50 – 45 pts 44- 40 pts 39 – 35 pts 34-0 pts

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Digital Story Digital story is well Digital story is Digital story Digital story does not show
Content and developed and critically generally loosely any thoughtfulness and the
evidence of reflects on the thoughtful, but incorporates the information presented is thin
sources concepts presented in the concepts concepts and lacks any degree of
the course. Provides presented need presented in the reflection.
an easy to understand strengthening. course, but the
picture of the chosen Does not clearly information
culture. present a presented seems
specific culture. undeveloped.

Confusing
presentation of a
culture, or
presentation of
multiple cultures.

25 points 25-22 pts 21-20 pts 19 – 17 pts 16 – 0 pts

Quality of Concepts are clearly Concepts are Concepts lack Concepts and terms are not
Content and defined and have mostly defined clear definition defined and paper does not
Information strong supporting and have some and the have any supporting quotes
quotes from readings supporting supporting from readings and lectures.
and/or lectures. Course quotes from quotes from There is no attempt to
themes are well readings and readings and connect the supplemental
connected to the lectures. Course lectures are not material (videos, external
supplemental materials themes are well connected. readings, etc.) and class
(videos, external generally There is an discussion.
readings, etc.) and connected to the attempt to
class discussions supplemental connect course
materials themes to the
(videos, external supplemental
readings, etc.), materials
class (videos, external

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discussions. readings, etc.),
class
discussions, but
is very minimal
and unclear.

20 points 20 – 18 pts 17 – 16 pts 15 – 14 pts 13 – 0 pts

Overall Response clearly Response Response Response does not reflect an


Understanding of reflects a strong reflects an makes minimal understanding of concepts
concepts and understanding of the adequate effort to reflect and theories discussed in the
theories concepts and theories understanding of an readings and in class.
discussed in the the concepts and understanding of
readings and in class. theories the concepts and
discussed in the theories
readings and in discussed
class. readings and in
class.

20 points 20 – 18 pts 17 – 16 pts 15 – 14 pts 13 – 0 pts

Self Reflection Paper provides a clear Paper provides Paper provides a Paper does not provide a
reflection on the an adequate minimal reflection on the concepts
concepts covered in reflection on the reflection on the covered in class.
class. concepts concepts
covered in class. covered in class.

15 points 15 – 14 pts 13 – 12 pts 11 – 10 pts 9 – 0 pts

Mechanics/ Paper is well Paper is mostly Paper is not very Paper is not organized at all.
Organization of organized. Paper is well organized. well organized, Paper is not written according
paper grammatically correct, Paper contains but there is to any standards and is
proofread for spelling minor grammar evidence of mostly ungrammatical and full
errors, and correctly and spelling some of spelling errors. Paper does

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Division of Teacher Preparation
cites any sources that errors, and organization. not cite sources that are used
are referenced. generally Paper contains in the paper.
correctly cites many grammar
sources that are and spelling
referenced. errors and/or
incorrectly cites
sources that are
referenced.

20 points 20 – 18 pts 17 – 16 pts 15 – 14 pts 13 – 0 pts

Project Met all requirements: Missing 1-2 Missing 2-3 Missing 4 or more
requirements requirements requirements
 8-10 images requirements
 Presentation
given in class
 text is limited
 deals with
student's own
culture

Lesson Plan Analysis Paper (14%, 150 pts)

Choose a lesson plan about any topic that is relevant to your future plans as a teacher. Consider using one of your mentor teacher’s existing
lessons. Write a 2-3 page paper analyzing and reflecting on this lesson as it relates to the topics we have covered in class. Be sure to attach your
lesson plan upon submission to Blackboard.

Lesson Plan Analysis Rubric:

CRITERION A B C D-E

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35 points 35 – 32 pts 31 – 28 pts 27 – 25 pts 24 – 0 pts

Quality of Concepts are Concepts are Concepts lack Concepts and terms are not
Content and clearly defined mostly defined clear definition defined and paper does not
Information and have strong and have some and the have any supporting quotes
supporting supporting supporting from readings and lectures.
quotes from quotes from quotes from There is no attempt to
readings and/or readings and readings and connect the supplemental
lectures. Course lectures. Course lectures are not material (videos, external
themes are well themes are well connected. readings, etc.) and class
connected to the generally There is an discussion.
supplemental connected to the attempt to
materials supplemental connect course
(videos, external materials themes to the
readings, etc.) (videos, external supplemental
and class readings, etc.), materials
discussions class (videos, external
discussions. readings, etc.),
class
discussions, but
is very minimal
and unclear.

35 points 35 – 32 pts 31 – 28 pts 27 – 25 pts 24 – 0 pts

Overall Response clearly Response Response Response does not reflect an


Understanding of reflects a strong reflects an makes minimal understanding of concepts
concepts and understanding of adequate effort to reflect and theories discussed in the
theories the concepts and understanding of an readings and in class.
theories the concepts and understanding of
discussed in the theories the concepts and
readings and in discussed in the theories
class. readings and in discussed
class. readings and in

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Division of Teacher Preparation
class.

35 points 35 – 32 pts 31 – 28 pts 27 – 25 pts 24 – 0 pts

Self Reflection Paper provides a Paper provides Paper provides a Paper does not provide a
clear reflection an adequate minimal reflection on the concepts
on the concepts reflection on the reflection on the covered in class.
covered in class. concepts concepts
covered in class. covered in class.

15 points 15 – 14 pts 13 – 12 pts 11 – 10 pts 9 – 0 pts

Mechanics/ Paper is well Paper is mostly Paper is not very Paper is not organized at all.
Organization of organized. Paper well organized. well organized, Paper is not written according
paper is grammatically Paper contains but there is to any standards and is
correct, minor grammar evidence of mostly ungrammatical and full
proofread for and spelling some of spelling errors. Paper does
spelling errors, errors, and organization. not cite sources that are used
and correctly generally Paper contains in the paper.
cites any correctly cites many grammar
sources that are sources that are and spelling
referenced. referenced. errors and/or
incorrectly cites
sources that are
referenced.

30 points 30 – 27 pts 26 – 24 pts 23 – 21 pts 20 – 0 pts

Project Met all Missing 1-2 Missing 2-3 Missing 4 or more


requirements requirements requirements requirements
requirements

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Cultural Product Design (20%, 200 pts)

In this assignment, you will synthesize topics and ideas covered in this class and apply them to a product of your own design for your future
classroom. This assignment is designed to have you reflect upon and present your understanding of course topics in a format you feel best
demonstrates your ideas. You will design and create your own product to demonstrate your understanding of between three and five class topics
and how they relate to your teaching and learning experiences. The goal is to design a cultural product that you could introduce in a lesson or unit
with your future scholars.

Examples of possible products can include (but are not limited to): writing a short story, composing a song, creating an art work, altering a
book, or writing a short play.

You will also write a 2-3 page paper reflecting upon your project. In your reflection you will explain the meaning of your product and how it relates to
the course topics and readings. Finally, you will present your product to the class. The act of reflecting upon your understanding, transforming that
knowledge and presenting in an alternative format (for example, transforming your ideas from a written or in class discussion to a visual
representation of those ideas) will help you to remember and internalize the concepts. Finally, you will prepare a 4 sentence summary of your
project to display with your product through a class gallery walk.

CRITERION A B C E

75 points 75 – 68 pts 67- 60 pts 59-53 pts 52-0 pts

Cultural Product Content of paper Content of paper Content of paper Content of paper does not
Paper Content is well is generally loosely show any thoughtfulness and
developed. thoughtful, but incorporates the the information presented is
Concepts are the concepts concepts thin and lacks any degree of
well defined. presented need presented in the reflection. Concepts are not
strengthening. course, but the defined or incorrect definitions
Concepts are information have been presented.
mostly designed. presented seems
undeveloped.
Concepts lack
clear definition.

25 points 25-22 pts 21-20 pts 19 – 17 pts 16 – 0 pts

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Division of Teacher Preparation
Quality of Concepts have Concepts have Concepts and the Paper does not have any
supporting strong supporting some supporting supporting supporting quotes from
evidence in quotes from quotes from quotes from readings and lectures. There
paper. readings and/or readings and readings and is no attempt to connect the
lectures. Course lectures. Course lectures are not supplemental material (videos,
themes are well themes are well connected. external readings, etc.) and
connected to the generally There is an class discussion.
supplemental connected to the attempt to
materials (videos, supplemental connect course
external materials (videos, themes to the
readings, etc.) external supplemental
and class readings, etc.), materials (videos,
discussions class external
discussions. readings, etc.),
class
discussions, but
is very minimal
and unclear.

10 points 10-9 pts 8 pts 7 pts 6- 0 pts

Self Reflection Paper provides a Paper provides Paper provides a Paper does not provide a
clear reflection an adequate minimal reflection reflection on the concepts
on the concepts reflection on the on the concepts covered in class.
covered in class. concepts covered covered in class.
in class.

10 points 10-9 pts 8 pts 7 pts 6- 0 pts

Mechanics/ Paper is well Paper is mostly Paper is not very Paper is not organized at all.
Organization of organized. Paper well organized. well organized, Paper is not written according
paper is grammatically Paper contains but there is to any standards and is mostly
correct, minor grammar evidence of some ungrammatical and full of
proofread for and spelling organization. spelling errors. Paper does not
spelling errors, errors, and Paper contains cite sources that are used in

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Division of Teacher Preparation
and correctly generally many grammar the paper.
cites any sources correctly cites and spelling
that are sources that are errors and/or
referenced. referenced. incorrectly cites
sources that are
referenced.

80 points 80 – 72 pts 71- 64 pts 63-56 pts 55-0 pts

Cultural Product Product Product is Product is vague Product is not appropriate for
appropriateness, demonstrates a generally and unclear, class, shows no reflection or
and content. high level of thoughtful and shows limited understanding of class
thoughtfulness mostly reflects reflection and concepts.
and clearly concepts and shows
reflects concepts shows understanding of
and shows understanding of concepts and
understanding of ideas from class. ideas from class.
ideas from class.

Cultural Product Design Progress Check (2%, 20 pts)

You will write a minimum of 1 page paper explaining your plan for the Creative Application of Topics assignment. You will also need to show your
progress on this assignment. You will be able to turn in any additional in-progress aspect of your Creative Application of Topics assignment that
you would like feedback on.

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Division of Teacher Preparation
Signature Assignment
The signature assignment is an assignment that is submitted electronically in Tk20 providing direct evidence of
student achievement and progress towards a specific outcome, or group of outcomes. The electronic
submission of the signature assignment in Tk20 serves two purposes; the signature assignment is intended to
assess important skills, abilities, and identifies areas of strength and challenge, which instructors use to
evaluate student progress. It also serves as a college data collection and storage site that is required by the
Department of Education. All students seeking certification are REQUIRED to upload and submit their
signature assignment in Tk20 for evaluation. Students must pass the signature assignment to pass the course.
For information, please see https://education.asu.edu/tk20-user-guides.

Signature Assignment (30%, 300 pts)

In this paper you are asked to consider the type of teacher you intend to be. In your journal, you will have
different theories and concepts (“lenses”) to help you think through different schooling scenarios, the purposes
of education, what kinds of adults you hope we will produce, the kind of society you wish to create by means of
the educational system, how you intend to bring about the results you desire, and what your role and
responsibilities will be as a teacher.

Describe the kind of a teacher you will be based on the readings and discussions from class. Explain what you
believe is the purpose of education, what it means to be an educated person, what you will teach, how you will
teach it, and how you will evaluate it. Describe what you think is important and why. Regardless of the
position you take, present reasons (justification) for your position. Have your thoughts about education and
what kind of teacher you want to be changed over the course of the semester (as evidenced in your journal
entries)? Give at least 3 concrete examples to clarify and support your position whenever you can. Your
paper should be at least five (5) pages in length, though you may write more if you want. These five (5) pages
do not include your journals. You should have at least 3 strong supporting quotes from the texts or
supplemental materials, and you must also use APA style when using and listing references.

Journals

(Graded for completion during term, graded as part of signature assignment)

You will begin keeping a journal starting on the first week of class.

Each journal entry will be completed in a Word Doc prior to start of class on the due date. Will be graded for
completion only.

The journal will be submitted as part of the signature assignment for a grade. Each week’s entry must be
thoughtful and substantive, related to the topic discussed for that week, and should address the following
questions:

 What did you take away from the readings/discussion?


 What are you aiming at as a teacher?
 How has what you learned this week influenced what you are aiming at as a teacher and how you will
teach?

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Division of Teacher Preparation
This journal will function as your ongoing documentation of your thoughts about what you are learning and you
should use it to write the second part of the final paper. Utilize the journal as a place to make connections
between the concepts we discuss in class and what you are seeing in your placement site. You can also use
the journal to jot down any comments, thoughts, feelings, and opinions about what we learn each week.
Reference the in-class lectures, readings, videos, activities, and discussions.

The journal entries must be handed in as the first part of the signature assignment.

***Passing the Signature Assignment is a requirement for passing this course.***

Performance InTASC 5 4 3 2 1
Approaching
Standard Exemplary Highly Proficient Unsatisfactory
Proficient
Proficient

Paper 5(r), 7(i), Paper is well Paper is Paper is Paper is Paper does not
Content and 9(m), developed thoughtful generally vague and show any
evidence of 10(l), and critically and analyzes thoughtful, has limited thoughtfulness
sources 10(m), reflects on the content but the critical and the
10(q) the content presented in information reflection on information
presented in the course. presented the presented is
the course. Response seems information thin and lacks
Response contains at undeveloped. presented in any degree of
contains at least 2 The paper the course. reflection.
least 3 personal may make There is an Discussion of
personal examples. limited, attempt to the content is
examples. superficial connect rudimentary
connections personal and lacks
between examples, depth. There is
class but the no connection
readings and attempt is to personal
supplemental vague. experience.
materials, Response
and may contains no
contain few personal
novel ideas. examples.
Response
contains at
least 1
personal
example.

Quality of 5(r), 7(i), Concepts Concepts and Concepts and Concepts and Concepts and
Content and 7(n), and terms terms are terms are terms are terms are
Information 10(l), are clearly mostly superficially present but missing and

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Division of Teacher Preparation
10(m), defined and defined and defined and incorrectly paper does not
10(q) have at least have some the defined or not have any
3 strong (at least 2) supporting present at all. supporting
supporting supporting quotes from Supporting quotes from
quotes from quotes from readings and quotes from readings and
readings readings and lectures are readings and lectures. There
and/or lectures. not well lectures are is no attempt to
lectures. Course connected. used connect the
Course themes are There is an incorrectly or supplemental
themes are generally attempt to not present at material
well connected to connect all. There are (videos,
connected to the course superficial external
the supplemental themes to the connections readings, etc.)
supplementa materials supplemental to the and class
l materials (videos, materials supplemental discussion.
(videos, external (videos, materials
external readings, external (videos,
readings, etc.), and readings, external
etc.) and class etc.), class readings,
class discussions. discussions, etc.) and
discussions but very class
minimal and discussions.
unclear.

Overall 1(e), 1(g), Response Response Response Response Response does


Understandi 1(j), 1(k), demonstrate demonstrates demonstrates makes a not
ng of course 2(g), 2(j), s a thorough an adequate a limited vague effort demonstrate an
themes and 2(k), understandi understandin effort to to understand understanding
theories 2(m), ng of course g of course reflect an course of course
2(n), 2(o), themes and themes and understandin themes and themes and
3(a), 3(k), theories theories g of course theories theories
3(p), 3(r), discussed in discussed in themes and discussed in discussed in
10(l), the the readings. theories the readings. the readings.
10(m), readings. discussed in
10(q) the readings.

Self 9(i), 9(m) Paper Paper Paper Paper Paper does not
Reflection provides provides provides provides provide a
thorough adequate limited self- vague self- reflection on the
self- self-reflection reflection on reflection on concepts
reflection on on the the concepts the concepts covered in
the concepts concepts covered in covered in class.
covered in covered in class. class.
class. class.

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Mechanics/ Paper is well Paper is Paper is not Paper is not Paper is not
Organization organized. mostly well very well organized organized at all.
of paper Paper is organized. organized, and shows Paper is not
grammaticall Paper but there is little attention written
y correct, contains evidence of to according to
proofread for minor some grammatical any standards
spelling grammar and organization. and and is mostly
errors, and spelling Paper proofreading ungrammatical
correctly errors, and contains errors. and full of
cites all generally many Sources are spelling errors.
sources that correctly cites grammar and not cited Paper does not
are sources that spelling properly or at cite sources
referenced. are errors and/or all. that are used in
referenced. incorrectly the paper.
cites sources
that are
referenced.

Journal All journal Most journal Some journal Few journal Few or no
Entries articles are articles are articles are entries are journal articles
included and included and included but included and are included,
reflected reflected are not present a and lack any
upon. upon. reflected vague depth of
upon reflection. reflection.
adequately.

Total Score 35

Grade

Clinical Experience Implementation Description


Students will observe various aspects of the classroom experience for participation and major assignments
throughout the course. These experiences will be shared out and discussed in class to support course
objectives and growth as a future teacher. A clinical experience is required for this course.

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Division of Teacher Preparation
Course/Instructor Evaluation
The course/instructor evaluation for this course will be conducted online 7-10 days before the last official day of
classes of each semester or summer session. Response(s) to the course/instructor are anonymous and will
not be returned to your instructor until after grades have been submitted. The use of a course/instructor
evaluation is an important process that allows our college to (1) help faculty improve their instruction, (2) help
administrators evaluate instructional quality, (3) ensure high standards of teaching, and (4) ultimately improve
instruction and student learning over time. Completion of the evaluation is not required for you to pass this
class and will not affect your grade, but your cooperation and participation in this process is critical. About two
weeks before the class finishes, watch for an e-mail with "ASU Course/Instructor Evaluation" in the subject
heading. The email will be sent to your official ASU e-mail address, so make sure ASU has your current email
address on file. You can check this online at the following URL: http://www.asu.edu/emailsignup.

University/Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College Policies


Professional Behavior (this section is only necessary for initial certification students)
It is expected that students exhibit professional behavior inside the classroom, during intern
placements, and working with other students outside of the class on assignments related to this class in
addition to behavior in the classroom on ASU’s campus. If at any time your behavior is ‘unprofessional’,
the instructor may refer the student to the Director of the Office of Student Services (OSS) for the
development of a Professional Improvement Plan (PIP). https://education.asu.edu/student-forms-
policies.

Attendance and Participation


Attendance and in-class participation in extremely important to successfully completing this
course. More than two absences may result in being dropped from the course. Two tardies
equal an absence.

Late and Missing Assignments


Major assignments will be dropped one letter grade for each day it is late. Being absent does
not excuse late assignments. Daily/weekly assignments can be turned in up to one week late
for 50% credit. In-class activity/participation points cannot be made up.

Academic Integrity/Plagiarism
The ASU Student Handbook contains the following information: “The highest standards of academic
integrity are expected of all students. The failure of any student to meet these standards may result in
suspension or expulsion from the university and/or other sanctions as specified in the academic
integrity policies of the individual academic unit. Violations of academic integrity include, but are not
limited to, cheating, fabricating, tampering, plagiarizing, or facilitating such activities. The university and
unit academic integrity policies are available from the Office of the Executive Vice President and
Provost of the University and from the Deans of the individual academic units.”

The rest of the code, which consists of several pages, is available at the following URL:
http://students.asu.edu/srr/code.

Dependent upon instructor’s discretion, penalties for plagiarism range from loss of points on plagiarized

SPF301 – Spring 2017 – Page 29


Division of Teacher Preparation
assignment to student receiving an E for the course.

Disability Accommodations for Students


Students who feel they may need a disability accommodation(s) in class must provide documentation
from the Disability Resource Center (Downtown campus UCB 160, Polytechnic campus Sutton Hall
240, Tempe campus Matthews Center, or West campus UCB 130) to the class instructor verifying the
need for an accommodation and the type of accommodation that is appropriate. Students who need
accommodations for a disability should contact DRC as early as possible (i.e. before the beginning of
the semester) to assure appropriate accommodations can be provided. It is the student’s responsibility
to make the first contact with the DRC. https://eoss.asu.edu/drc

Religious Accommodations for Students


Students who need to be absent from class due to the observance of a religious holiday or participate
in required religious functions must notify the faculty member in writing as far in advance of the
holiday/obligation as possible. Students will need to identify the specific holiday or obligatory function to
the faculty member. Students will not be penalized for missing class due to religious obligations/holiday
observance. The student should contact the class instructor to make arrangements for making up
tests/assignments within a reasonable time. http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd304-04.html

Military Personnel Statement


A student who is a member of the National Guard, Reserve, or other U.S. Armed Forces branch and is
unable to complete classes because of military activation may request a complete or partial
administrative unrestricted withdrawal or incomplete depending on the timing of the activation. For
information, please see http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/usi/usi201-18.html.

Harassment Prohibited
ASU policy prohibits harassment on the basis of race, sex, gender identity, age, religion, national origin,
disability, sexual orientation, Vietnam era veteran status and other protected veteran status. Violations
of this policy may result in disciplinary action, including termination of employees or expulsion of
students. Contact Student Life (Downtown campus- 522 N. Central Ave., Post Office Room 247, 480-
496-4111; Polytechnic campus- Administration building suite 102, 480-727-1060; Tempe campus-
Student Services Building room 263, 480-965-6547; or the West campus- UCB 301, 602-543-8152) if
you feel another student is harassing you based on any of the factors above. Contact Equal
Opportunity/Affirmative Action (EO/AA) at 480-965-5057 if you feel an ASU employee is harassing you
based on any of the factors above. http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd401.html.

Grade Appeals
The professional responsibility for assigning grades is vested in the instructor of the course, and
requires the careful application of professional judgment. A student wishing to appeal a grade must first
meet with the instructor who assigned the grade to try to resolve the dispute. The process for grade
appeals is set forth for the undergraduate and graduate programs are available at
https://education.asu.edu/student-forms-policies

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Division of Teacher Preparation
Cell Phone Policy
Cell phones must be turned off and out-of-sight during class time. If you are awaiting an
emergency call you must get permission to have the cell phone out (and in silent mode) prior to
class starting.

Electronic Communication
Acceptable use of university computers, internet and electronic communications can be found in the
Student Code of Conduct (http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/usi/usi104-01.html ) and in the University’s
Computer, Internet, and Electronic Communications Policy
(http://www.asu.edu/aad/manuals/acd/acd125.html).

Technological Services and Support


The Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College encourages students to make use of technological services
available through ASU to make their learning experience more efficient. Students with personal laptop
computers or netbooks can connect wirelessly to the Internet and to printing services on all four
campuses and some school sites. The following support services are available to support student
computing needs.

 Student Purchases:
o Discounted pricing for students purchasing laptop or desktop computers is available at
through the ASU bookstore or online.
(http://www.bkstr.com/arizonastatestore/shop/technology)
 ASU Campus Classroom Connectivity:
o In-class use of laptops is encouraged by the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. In
cases where students need to make presentations during class, most classrooms have
the capability of allowing laptops to connect to classroom projectors. Mac laptops may
require an adaptor. For collaborative work, social networking tools are provided to ASU
students through a Google partnership, including Google docs, spreadsheets,
presentations, forms, and sites. (https://docs.google.com/a/asu.edu/#all)
 Hardware and Software Support:
o ASU 1:1 Technology Studios provide support to students on all four campuses for
hardware, software, operating systems, security, networking, etc.
(https://ucc.asu.edu/techstudio/)
o MyApps provides free software tools including free virus scan software, online
applications, and information about discounted software for purchase.
(https://webapp3.asu.edu/myapps/)

ASU Writing Centers


One Center, Many Places: The Writing Center, located on all four ASU campuses and online, offers
free tutoring for all enrolled students.

All writers—all ASU undergraduate or graduate students—can benefit from visiting the Writing Center
to:

• explore, plan, and develop ideas;


• organize and structure a paper;

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• integrate and cite sources; and
• write, revise, edit, and proofread.

For more information about ASU’s Writing Centers, including how to make an appointment, please visit
our website at https://tutoring.asu.edu/writing-centers.

SI (Supplemental Instruction)
SI seeks to help students process material presented in class through group facilitated discussion led
by a trained peer (SI Leader) who has already successfully completed the course. More information will
be available on Blackboard under the SI Study Group. Students can receive tutoring for various
courses through University Academic Success Programs (UASP). Refer to our website:
https://tutoring.asu.edu.

Tutoring
Tutoring is available on all ASU campuses and Online for a variety of courses in small groups on a
walk-in/drop-in basis. Appointments are not taken. For a full list of sites and courses, visit
https://tutoring.asu.edu.

Title IX

Title IX is a federal law that provides that no person be excluded on the basis of sex from participation
in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or
activity. Both Title IX and university policy make clear that sexual violence and harassment based on
sex is prohibited. An individual who believes they have been subjected to sexual violence or harassed
on the basis of sex can seek support, including counseling and academic support, from the
university. If you or someone you know has been harassed on the basis of sex or sexually assaulted,
you can find information and resources at http://sexualviolenceprevention.asu.edu/faqs/students.

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