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This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin,
This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin,
This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin,
This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin,
This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin,
This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin,
This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin,
This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin,

This year’s first-place photo winners, clockwise from top left: Feature Photo, The Stand, Emily Elconin, “Finding Her Way Back;” Scenic Photo, New York Horse Magazine, Wells Horton, “May 25 White-Throated Sparrow;” Sports Photo, The Citizen, Kevin Rivoli, “The Rainbow Lacrosse Game;” a selection from the Photo Essay, New York Horse Maga- zine, Michael Davis, “Making the Cut;” and Portrait, New York Horse Magazine, Michael Buchinger, “Gray Rider.”

President’s message

What would our Press Club forebears think of the current media environment?

BY JoSH CRaDDuCK SyracuSe PreSS club PreSident

Welcome to the 40th annual Syracuse Press Club Profes- sional Recognition Awards and Scholarship Dinner. It’d be difficult for Press Club founders Gene Cowan, Joe Porcello, Ned Ryan and Morgan Redmore to understand what news is like now — How do you tell a story with Snapchat? How do you monetize your live-stream? But surely they’d be excited by the possibilities. As our history goes: It was mid-April 1951. Members of the Syracuse Chapter of Sigma Delta Chi met at the former Merchant Bank on South Warren Street. However, because only four had shown up, they adjourned and headed to the Waldorf Cafeteria (now the Amos Building). Over coffee, Cowen, Ryan, Redmore and Porcello discussed the principal problem with the Syracuse SDX Chapter. What would they do about a dispute with national headquarters over a bill? Syracuse said it did not owe anything! Almost at the same time, Cowen and Redmore suggested the same solution: Start

their own club. The Syracuse Press Club was born at that moment. That was over 67 years ago. Much has changed. Back then, phones were for calling sources. Now a whole story can be told on one. Film was spliced. Royal Deluxe typewriters were a hit in the type- writer city.

Regardless of the way in which our viewers, listeners and readers get our prod- uct, there is still something very basic about what we do. We still

call our sources on the phone. We still have the police scanners blaring. Journalists are working as hard as ever here in CNY to produce high-quality news, information and entertainment. Our job is to educate and inform even if those in govern- ment toss us aside as “fake news” and call us the “enemy of the people.” Now, more than ever, us local journalists must remind ourselves of why we got into this business and continue to fight the good fight.

got into this business and continue to fight the good fight. Josh Cradduck Hundreds and hundreds

Josh Cradduck

Hundreds and hundreds of entries were submitted this year and judged from volunteers across the nation. They selected first- and second-place winners in competitions that include TV, radio, print, online, multi-media and college journalism categories. We are honored to put on this ceremony tonight but we can- not do it without your continued support. It’s our 40th year or- ganizing this banquet, and it gets harder as each year passes. We need you. We need your attendance at the social activities, panels and forums for journalists that we’ve held over the past year. We need you to help make the Club a more dynamic and relevant organization in this rapidly-changing world. Join! Get involved. Vote when the board elections come up. Read the newsletter. Submit your company news. Check our website for our membership form, shoot us an e-mail. Hunt one of the board members down tonight. You’ll be welcomed with open arms. Thank you for attending tonight’s 40th annual banquet. Congratulations to all of the winners!

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CLUB AWARD WINNERS

CLUB AWARD WINNERS

CLUB AWARD WINNERS

selwyn Kershaw Professional standards award winner

SaRaH MoSES BuCKSHoT

Syracuse.com/The Post-Standard

Sarah Moses Buckshot will accept the 2018 Selwyn Kershaw Professional Stan- dards Award, which the Syracuse Press

Club presents to individuals whose high standards in journalism serve as an inspi- ration to others. Sarah always wanted to be a newspa- per journalist in Syracuse. She grew up in

a family that read The Post-Standard in

the morning and The Herald-Journal at night. Sarah graduated from Onondaga Central School District and Syracuse University’s Newhouse School of Public Communica- tions. During her senior year of college, Sarah was known as “the super intern” at The Post-Standard. After graduation, she spent a year reporting for Indian Country Today before taking a job as a copy editor for The Post-Standard. After a year and a half, Sarah started reporting and went on to cover a wide swath of beats: courts, schools, town gov- ernments, neighborhoods, Destiny USA, the New York State Lottery and the On- ondaga Nation. She currently covers crime and breaking news in Upstate New York, and has worked for The Post-Standard and Syracuse.com for nearly 11 years. Former colleague Sean Kirst, a long-

time Syracuse columnist, told the press club that Sarah “defines the notion of pro- fessional standards.” “Sarah’s skills, built on bottomless empa- thy — and displayed in her fine human in- terest writing — are apparent enough, such

as her passionate coverage of Julian Ross, the

Oswego child whose passing reverberated across the region, after his long struggle with a devastating cancer,” wrote Kirst. As a Haudenosaunee journalist, Sarah has also gracefully shouldered the responsibility of bringing vital perspectives to hundreds

of news stories about Onondaga Nation and

other Central New York communities.

Onondaga Nation and other Central New York communities. “There is a critical need for under- standing

“There is a critical need for under- standing between those worlds,” Kirst wrote. “Sarah handled it by gently and courageously negotiating the differences between cultures — often deeply rooted in philosophy or belief — and managing to write important, meaningful and interpre- tative stories with an understanding few other journalists could provide. She has stayed true to two cultures, to her profes- sion, to her subjects and to the truth.” Sarah also works as a youth educator for Onondaga Hill Presbyterian Church and served in the Leadership Greater Syracuse Class of 2015. In her newsroom, she in- spires and trains younger reporters to seek out sources and check facts with determi- nation and persistence. Sarah thanks her parents, Raymond and Shirley Moses, for always supporting and encouraging her to follow her dreams. She also thanks her husband, Jonathan Buckshot, for always listening to her at the end of a hard day.

a. Brohmann roth newComer award winner

SEaN MaRTiNELLi

WSYR-TV

Sean Martinelli of NewsChannel 9 is this year’s recipient of the A. Brohmann Roth Newcomer Award. Martinelli joined the Syracuse station after a year at Utica’s WUTR. He earned his broadcast and digital journalism de- gree from Syracuse University in 2015. This year, Syracuse Press Club’s new- comer of the year Martinelli takes home an SPC award with Jack Estabrook for his eye-opening piece “Stranger Danger,” a look at how local children react to un- known adults on the playground. He also received a 2018 Emmy nomination for video journalism. Apart from his journalistic pursuits, Martinelli founded and continues to fa- cilitate Syracuse University’s SOULscape, held in the Adirondacks several times a year. He serves on SU’s “Generation Or- ange” young alumni leadership council. Martinelli, whose hometown is Pough- keepsie, has loved television and news for most of his life. He said he hopes as a sto- ryteller to “share moments that capture the best of the human spirit.”

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interested in becoming a member of the syra- cuse Press Club?

Signing up is easy!

Just find one of the board members tonight or check out our website at syracusepressclub.org.

oPPoSiTE PaGE: The second place winners in this year’s photo contest, clockwise from top: Portrait, The Stand, Michael Santiago, “They Wear Blue;” Scenic Photo, New York Horse Magazine, Wells Horton, “Forgotten;” a selection from the win- ning Photo Essay, upstate Medical university, Robert Mescavage, Susan Keeter, Jim Howe and Leah Caldwell, “Brains against Brain Tumors;” Sports Photo, Sec- ond place: The Stand, Nick Lisi, “Winning Shot;” and Feature Photo, John Berry, “He Calls Himself Lucky: Kidney Cancer Survivor’s advice: Don’t ignore Possible Symptoms.”

PhiliP a. hoffman President’s award for Best news sourCe winner

DavE BuLLaRD

New York State Fair

Dave Bullard will accept the Syracuse Press Club’s 2018 award for News Source of the Year, after a long, diverse career working in radio journalism, TV, public relations, advertising and finally, govern- ment. Dave, a graduate of Hannibal Central Schools and Penn State, landed his cur- rent gig in 2013 as the Great New York State Fair’s assistant public information officer and marketing/PR manager. “There are a lot of communications professionals that can do one or two things very well, but Dave Bullard is the total package,” said the Fair’s acting director Troy Waffner. “He can write, edit, do voi- ceovers, go on camera, and always sees the big picture in everything he does.” Dave grew up in Granby in Oswego County and worked summer jobs at the grocery store, the former Nestle chocolate plant and picking up trash for the city of Fulton. “These jobs kept me humble,” he said. Dave’s communications career took off in 1979 when he started as a radio anchor and reporter at WMAJ/WXLR in State College, Pennsylvania. On the day Presi- dent Ronald Reagan was shot, Dave an- chored for four hours non-stop.

Reagan was shot, Dave an- chored for four hours non-stop. “I can still recite the details

“I can still recite the details of the shooting,” he said. Dave continued as a reporter and pro- ducer in Syracuse TV and radio through 1994, with years at 62WHEN and WTVH. “I dropped off a tape at WHEN on my way home from college one weekend and met the news director — a guy named Bill

Carey, who looked nothing like his voice,” Dave said. “Not long after, he hired me and my real education in journalism be- gan.” Carey then became the executive pro- ducer at Channel 5, where Dave bounced between reporting (his preference) and producing (management’s preference). He was the line producer of the show the night after Pan Am 103 crashed, the show that won the first Emmy ever given to a Syracuse TV station. “Bill Carey really was the guy who

made that broadcast work,” he said. “I got to work with Ron Curtis, still The Gold Standard.” Dave left TV after the sale to Granite Broadcasting. He co-founded a new busi- ness called FultonDailyNews.com (now Oswego County Today) with three part- ners, and served as managing editor until

2013.

While running the site, Dave also ac- cepted an offer to go to WSYR radio as a part-time anchor. A few weeks later, they offered him the news director job. “It was a brief time — just three years or so — but that team remains absurdly close all this time later.” Though the 2000s, Dave went on to

work as the web development manager for WWNY TV, news director for WRVO Public Media and assignment editor for WSYR-TV. He was still at NewsChannel 9’s as- signment desk when the state approached him with a new job. He started working at the Fair in 2013 and still crafts the Fair’s messages and stories today. “I get to be part of throwing a party for a million people and get to work with a team of people who execute the impos- sible every year,” Dave said. “We’re the spare parts of state government, the Island of Misfit Toys. But it works and I haven’t dreaded a single day of going to work. I get to keep learning, which is my favorite thing in the world next to a plate of spare ribs, mashed potatoes and peas.” Troy Waffner called Dave one of the key contributors to the Fair’s turnaround:

“There is no one more deserving of an award for News Source of the Year.” Dave married his hero, Lynn, a first- grade teacher in Hannibal. They have two sons — Daniel, 28, an EMT in Fulton, and Scott, 25, an officer with the SUNY Oswego Police Department. Dave and Lynn also serve at the pleasure of their cat, Cleo.

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Bill Carey Journalist of the year award winner

SaMaNTHa HouSE

Syracuse.com/The Post-Standard

Samantha House is a Liverpool native and 2011 graduate of the journalism school at St. Bonaventure University. She is a cur- rently a crime reporter with Syracuse.com/ The Post-Standard. In her early morning role, Samantha is often the first reporter on duty every day and is responsible for reporting on breaking news across Central New York. At the same time, she balances that commitment to breaking news with masterful feature writing, including her story of a deaf, autistic Chenango County boy allegedly killed by his adoptive par- ents that won a 2017 Syracuse Press Club Professional Recognition Award for best news feature/series. Prior to joining the Post-Standard in June 2015, she covered crime, courts and county government at The Citizen in Au- burn. During her three and a half years at The Citizen, Samantha won several Associ- ated Press and New York News Publishers awards for her coverage of domestic vio- lence and the heroin epidemic. In college, she interned for the Syracuse New Times and Salamanca Press and served as associate editor of The Bona Venture, St. Bonaventure’s student-run newspaper. Samantha has always wanted to be a writer — particularly a teller of true sto- ries. She is passionate about helping people share their stories, whether it’s someone

helping people share their stories, whether it’s someone trying to ensure that a murdered child is

trying to ensure that a murdered child is remembered, or someone who ran out of a burning building and lived to tell Saman- tha the tale. When she’s not busy covering the cops, courts and mayhem of Central New York, Samantha is an amateur photographer and professional photographer of her cat, Mishka. Samantha lives in Cortland.

devesty-williams sCholarshiP winner

CoLLEEN FERGuSoN

Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications

Colleen Ferguson, the recipient of the

2018

DeVesty-Williams Scholarship, is a

2015

graduate of Marcellus High School

and studies newspaper and online jour- nalism at Syracuse University’s S.I. New- house School of Public Communications. She is also pursuing a degree in Spanish and hopes to travel the world one day, both as a journalist and explorer. Ferguson en- joys telling stories that shine a spotlight on underrepresented groups and expose her to new ideas. She began her undergraduate studies at SUNY Purchase, where she received the SUNY Chancellor’s Scholar-Athlete Award in 2016 after her freshman swim season. Ferguson also served as the manag- ing editor of Purchase’s student news pub- lication before transferring to SU. She’s since found her way to The Daily Orange, first as a digital copy chief and then as feature editor, although she says she is mostly known at 744 Ostrom Ave. for being loud and talking really fast. After graduation, she’s hoping to join the Peace Corps before spending a career reporting. When she’s not hanging out with The DO staff or chasing her next story, you can find her cooking a meal for friends, hugging her golden retriever or at the nearest pool — if she’s not swimming herself, she’s coaching or lifeguarding. The Syracuse Press Club awards the

coaching or lifeguarding. The Syracuse Press Club awards the $2000 scholarship each year to a full-time

$2000 scholarship each year to a full-time undergraduate student, who is studying print, broadcast or digital journalism at a college or university in the 21-county Syracuse Press Club service area. A com- mittee of journalism professionals evaluate applicants on their academic achievement, involvement in extracurricular activities, media samples, professional references and a personal philosophy statement.

Meet the press club

President: Josh Cradduck 1st VP: Sarah Hall 2nd VP: Katrina Tulloch 3rd VP: Patrick Lohmann Secretary: Julie McMahon Treasurer: Jacob Pucci

Scholarship Coordinator: Michael Riecke Membership Coordinator: Charles Mc- Chesney Directors: Laura Bailey, Michael Riecke, Charles McChesney

Thank you to our sponsors!

Michael Riecke, Charles McChesney Thank you to our sponsors! 116 Marlborough Rd., Syracuse, NY 13206 Printable
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from tonight? Email Herm Card at hermcard4444@gmail.com. Credits The Syracuse Press Club thanks: Judges: Los

Credits

The Syracuse Press Club thanks:

Judges: Los Angeles Press Club, Florida Press Club, Press Club of Western Pennsylvania, Milwau- kee Press Club, Cleveland Press Club, San Diego Press Club, New Orleans Press Club, John Soto- mayor awards coordinator: Sarah Hall, Eagle Newspapers

Program Production: Sarah Hall, Eagle Newspapers Program Printing: Eagle Newspa- pers awards Dinner Hosts: Molly Mat- tot, CNY Central, and Chris Baker, Syracuse.com/The Post-Standard awards Dinner Photos: Herm Card audio/visual Presentation: Patrick Lohmann and Michael Riecke

SyracuSe PreSS club, May 5, 2018

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syraCuse Press CluB wall of distinCtion honoree

DaN CuMMiNGS

WSYR-TV

Born and raised in southern Cayuga County, the broad- casting bug hit Dan Cummings early. He grew up hearing the sounds of 62-WHEN radio over the speakers on the school bus during his daily commutes. Soon thereafter, he would visit his brother at Cornell who worked at the local radio station. Those early morning bus rides, along with visits to his brother, helped open up a whole new world for Dan. His brush with greatness in broadcasting came ear- ly. It was 40 years ago this spring. He was working a shift at WTKO radio in Ithaca when the phone rang. On the other end was then-competitor Bill Carey. At that time he was news director of 62-WHEN, not yet the local news legend and Syracuse Press Club Wall of Distinc- tion member. The conversation helped change the course of Dan’s life and career. Bill offered him a job and Dan accepted. It was the start of a long friendship and launched Dan into the “big leagues.” He would go onto to work for Bill for a number of years. He was honing his craft, learning what worked and what didn’t. He, of course, always had to make sure he didn’t indent his copy on the yellow canary paper. Dan later recalled that Bill would often tap his shoulder and say, in his trademark deep voice: “Dan, we don’t indent here.” Cummings eventually left radio to attend Cornell Uni- versity and earn his master’s degree, but his time outside of news was short-lived. He took an assignment editor opening at 62-WHEN radio when Bill called a second time in 1983. However, he would leave radio for good a year later, to join the news team at WIXT-TV NewsChannel 9 in Syra- cuse. He hasn’t turned back. His time at WIXT (now WSYR-TV) was not limited to reporting on the streets or anchoring from the desk on Bridge Street. Dan would go onto become assistant news director and news director, guiding the newsroom through the daily slog of news, sports and weather in the

through the daily slog of news, sports and weather in the late 1980s. Dan also helped

late 1980s. Dan also helped guide the careers of many up-and- comers, not the least of which is another Syracuse televi- sion legend and Syracuse Press Club Wall of Distinction honoree. Ron Lombard at one time served as Dan’s assis- tant news director, and was promoted to the news director role in 1991. A swap on the management chart put Dan back on the anchor desk with the managing editor title. It was Dan who pushed for Ron to take the top job. “Dan is the consummate professional, and always has been,” said Lombard, currently news director at Spectrum News. “Beyond his obvious on air skill and amazing news judgment he’s a journalist of the highest character and ethics. Having a veteran like Dan as a leader in our mar- ket for nearly four decades raised the bar for of us all who followed him.”

Dan is currently the co-anchor of the The Morning News and hosts Newsmakers, Newschannel 9’s weekly public affairs show. He was recently was honored in 2013 with a regional Edward R. Murrow award for best news documentary for “Saints Among Us,” which told the stories of Saints Mari- anne Cope and Kateri Tekakwitha. Dan has been honored with the Syracuse Press Club’s Professional Standards Award, along with numerous oth- er awards during his 40-year career in broadcasting. Cummings now joins his mentor and former boss Bill Carey on the Wall of Distinction. Not bad for that kid from southern Cayuga County just listening to the news on that bus ride to school. Dan currently lives in Syracuse with his wife Danielle and their two children.

KATE FARAH THORNTON JADRAN JENNIFER DAN SANDERS CUMMINGS WEEKDAYS | 4:30AM
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Winners of the 2017 Syracuse Press Club Professional Recognition Awards

radio

Spot News

First place: WAER-FM, Chris Bolt, “Syracuse Climate March attracts 1000, for Climate Change Actions, Against Trump Policies” Second place: WRVO-FM, Payne Horning, “Gover- nor Declares State of Emergency in Counties along Lake Ontario as Flooding Begins”

News Feature

First place: WRVO-FM, Tom Magnarelli, “How I-81 divided Syracuse and why opinions are divided on how to replace it” Second place: WRVO-FM, Payne Horning, “Replica Columbus ships draw thousands of people -- and a few protestors -- to Oswego Harbor”

“Human interest” Feature

First place: WAER-FM, Chris Bolt and Tom Honan, “Songwriter Jimmy Webb & Glen Campbell’s Fam- ily Remember Music, Struggle with Alzheimer’s” Second place: WAER-FM, Chris Bolt, “WAER Takes EV on a Road Trip to See How Long-range All- Electric Might Fit Your Lifestyle”

Sports Story

First place: WAER-FM, Maura Sheridan, “Paving the Road” Second place: WAER-FM, Meredith Kava, “From the Marines to the Syracuse Sidelines”

Sports Show

First place: WAER-FM, Sean Salisbury, Evan Stock- ton, Jake Marsh and Maura Sheridan, “Count- down to Tip-off: Pregame for Syracuse v. Kansas Basketball” Second place: WAER-FM, Sean Salisbury, Evan Stockton, Noah Eagle and Tyler Aki, “Countdown to Kickoff: Pregame for Syracuse v. Clemson Football

Special Program

First place: WAER-FM, Kevin Kloss, Chris Bolt, Elizabeth Tosi and Joe Lee, “City Limits: A Poverty Project Panel Discussion” Second place: WAER-FM, Chris Bolt, “Central New York Unknown Underground”

daily Print media

investigative Story/Series

First place: The Post-Standard, Elizabeth Doran, “Off-Duty Sheriff’s Deputy Crashes and Flees from Accident Scene” Second place: The Cortland Standard, Nick Gra- ziano, “A Different Picture”

News Feature/Series

First place: The Post-Standard, Samantha House, “JR’s last chance: Autistic boy’s search for a real home ends in grisly death” Second place: The Citizen, Megan Blarr, “Decades later, women file sex abuse complaints in Cayuga County, push for law changes”

“Human interest” Feature/Series

First place: The Palladium-Times, Seth Wallace, “Honor Flight to D.C. Salutes Oswego Veteran for His Service” Second place: The Post-Standard, Julie McMahon, “Final Axe Falls on Fowler High, Syracuse’s Forgot- ten Kids: ‘Set Up from the Giddy-up’”

Sports Story

First place: The Post-Standard, Stephen Bailey, “Decorated Syracuse Football LB Zaire Franklin Driven by Deaths of Mother, Grandmother” Second place: The Post-Standard, Christopher Carlson, “Dick MacPherson Won Over Syracuse with Winning Football, Kindness, Down-Home Charm”

non-daily Print media

News Feature/Series

First place: Syracuse New Times, Bill DeLapp and Michael Davis, “Her Story” Second place: The Stand, Jasmine Gomez, “Afford- able Homes: Buyers Purchase Vacant Properties and Restore Them to Usable Form”

“Human interest” Feature/Series

First place: The Catholic Sun, Tom Maguire, “How Can a Kid Do This?” Second place: The Stand, Katelyn Faubel, “Where Are They Now? South Sider’s equestrian dream from childhood is being realized”

Sports Story

First place: Syracuse New Times, Matt Michael and Michael Davis, “SU Basketball Series” Second place: The Stand, David Onoue, “An un- likely friendship opens opportunities for homeless community”

magaZine

Best Magazine

First place: New York Horse Magazine, Janis Barth and Darren Sanefski Second place: Homegrown, David Tyler, Jennifer Wing, Sean Haney and Ashley Casey

all Print

Spot News

First place: The Cortland Standard, Kevin Conlon, Robert Creenan and Todd R. McAdam, “It Came Fast and Furious” Second place: The Cortland Standard, Robert Creenan, Kevin Conlon, Nick Graziano and Cath- erine Wilde, “Time to Put It Together”

Column

First place: Syracuse New Times, Luke Parsnow, “Statewide Casino Expansion Could Be A Risky Bet” Second place: The Reporter, Rabbi Rachel Esser- man, “Privileged Advice”

Front Page Design

First place: Syracuse New Times, Greg Minix Second place: The Catholic Sun, Willie Putmon

Editorial

First place: The Post-Standard, Marie Morelli, “Congress Should Close Supreme Court’s Corrup- tion Loophole.” Second place: Baldwinsville Messenger, Ashley Casey, “Lysander Should Control Its Meetings, Not the Media”

Critique

First place: The Citizen, David Wilcox, “Merry-Go- Round’s ‘Parade’ a Beautiful Show About Ugly Subjects” Second place: The Post-Standard, Katrina Tulloch, “Like a Rusty, Trusty Car, The Beach Boys Take Time to Rev Up”

Feature Photo

First place: The Stand, Emily Elconin, “Finding Her Way Back” Second place: Upstate Medical University, John Berry, “He Calls Himself Lucky: Kidney Cancer Sur- vivor’s Advice: Don’t Ignore Possible Symptoms”

Sports Photo

First place: The Citizen, Kevin Rivoli, “The Rain- bow Lacrosse Game” Second place: The Stand, Nick Lisi, “Winning Shot”

Scenic Photo

First place: New York Horse Magazine, Wells Hor- ton, “May 25 White-Throated Sparrow” Second place: New York Horse Magazine, Wells Horton, “Forgotten”

Portrait

First place: New York Horse Magazine, Michael Buchinger, “Gray Rider” Second place: The Stand, Michael Santiago, “They Wear Blue”

Photo Essay

First place: New York Horse Magazine, Michael Davis, “Making the Cut” Second place: Upstate Medical University, Robert Mescavage, Susan Keeter, Jim Howe and Leah Caldwell, “Brains Against Brain Tumors”

Graphic illustration

First place: Upstate Medical University, Amber Smith, Susan Keeter and Bill Mueller, “Stetho- scopes” Second place: Eagle Newspapers, Sarah Hall, “Go- ing Solar in New York”

television

Spot News:

First place: CNY Central, Michael Benny, Justine Marschner, “Missing Florida Teen Winds Up in Syracuse” Second place: CNY Central, Brett Hall, “Shooting Near Elementary School Frightens Parents”

investigative Story/Series

First place: WSYR-TV, Tammy Palmer, Tom Cun- ningham, Bill Goldschmidt and Scott Irving, “Holbrook Tree Man Investigation” Second place: WBNG-TV, Chloe Vincente, “What’s In Your Water?”

News Feature/Series

First place: WSYR-TV, Sean Martinelli, Jack Estabrook, Sabrina Betts and Bob Driscoll, “Stranger Danger: How did local kids react when approached by a stranger looking to lure them away?” Second place: WSYR-TV, Tammy Palmer and Scott

Irving, “Not for Rent”

“Human interest” Feature/Series

First place: WWNY-TV, Jeff Nelson, “Stories from the Scene” Second place: WWNY-TV, Amanda Corna, “A Cheer for Keslie”

Sports Story

First place: WSYR-TV, Steve Infanti, “Two and the Win” Second place: WETM-TV, Andy Malnoske, “Forever 44: Waverly’s Paul Girolamo”

Sports Show

First place: WSYR-TV, Steve Infanti, Sal Maneen and Mario Sacco, “Orange Nation” Second place: Spectrum News, Staff, “First and Ten”

Regularly Scheduled Sportscast

First place: CNY Central, Matt Hauswirth, Niko Tamurian and Matt Landers, “Syracuse drops Duke with dramatic buzzer beater” Second place: CNY Central, Niko Tamurian and Matt Hauswirth, “Syracuse meets its match in Miami”

Special Program

First place: WSYR-TV, Carrie Lazarus, Mark Folsom, Jack Estabrook and Jim LaManna, “Extraordinary People and Places of Central New York with Carrie Lazarus” Second place: WSYR- TV, Dan Cummings, Jack Estabrook and Olivia Ugino. “Honor Flight: The Journey Continues”

Photo Essay

First place: Spectrum News, Mike Kuehner, “Grown in New York” Second place: Spectrum News, Ben Augustine, “Raven Haven Says Farewell to Founder”

video Journalism

First place: Spectrum News, Tom Walters Second place: CNY Central, Alex Resila

Regularly Scheduled Local Newscast

First place: WWNY-TV, Jeff Cole, Cindy Habeeb and 7 News Staff, “6 p.m. Oct. 30, 2017” Second place: WSYR-TV, Staff, “NewsChannel 9 Weekend at 11 July 1, 2017”

Best Weathercast

First place: WSYR-TV, Kate Thornton, “Forecast First Dec. 22, 2017” Second place: CNY Central, Peter Hall, “December Snowstorm”

online Journalism

Breaking News

First place: urbancny.com, Ken Jackson, “Price Rite Vs. Nojaim’s Supermarket: Is There a Civil War Between Neighborhoods?” Second place: urbancny.com, Ken Jackson, “Urban CNY Special Report: How the Ben Walsh Campaign Won the Syracuse Mayoral Election”

Multimedia Story

First place: Spectrum News, Staff, “April the Giraffe Coverage” Second place: cnycentral.com, Brett Hall, “Tear It Down or Fix It Up?”

News Website

First place: waer.org, Chris Bolt, Kevin Kloss and Joe Lee, “City Limits: A Poverty Project website of WAER Public Media” Second place: Syracuse.com, John Lammers

Blog

First place: urbancny.com, Ken Jackson, “The Hall Monitor”

Second place: Syracuse.com, Jacob Pucci, “Best of CNY”

Photos & Graphics

First place: WRVO-FM online, Tom Magnarelli, “Immigration activists and Trump supporters in Syracuse spar over deportations” Second place: urbancny.com, Ken Jackson, “The Westcott Street Massacre”

Best use of Social Media By an orga- nization

First place: Syracuse.com, “Syracuse mayoral election live videos” Second place: cnycentral.com, “Tornado touches down in Vernon Downs”

Best use of Social Media By an indi- vidual

First place: Brent Axe Second place: @SyracuseHistory

student Contest

Best Radio News Story

First place: 92 WICB, Peter Champelli, “Com- munity Activists Plan to Address Discrimination Incidents at Cornell” Second place: NCC News, Tyler Aki, “Young Rap- pers Trying to Change Chicago’s Violent Image”

Best Print News Story

First place: Utica College, Kaitlyn Tambasco, “’Segregated’ Photos Cause Uproar on Campus” Second place: Daily Orange, Jordan Muller, “’Out of Options’”

Best Television News Story

First place: NCC News, Jamie Weiss, “A Survivor’s Story” Second place: ICTV, Jack Sears, Michael Pyskaty, Vaughn Golden and Riley Ludwig, “Tompkins County Mental Health Clinic Investigation”

Best Radio Sports Story

First place: NCC News, Jonah Karp, “The Male Cheerleader Stereotype vs. Reality” Second place: NCC News, Jonathon Hoppe, “Two Sports, No Problem”

Best Print Sports Story

First place: Daily Orange, “Power Move” Second place: The Dolphin, “Le Moyne College Athletics Leads the Way in Closing the Gender Gap in the Northeast-10”

Best Television Sports Story

First place: NCC News, Chris Venzon, “’Armstrong’:

A Purpose Worthy of a Pursuit” Second place: NCC News, Elissa Candiotti, “Peyton Sefick is Kicking Out Doubt and Scoring Big”

Best Radio Feature Story

First place: NCC News, James Groh, “The Laws You Didn’t Realize You Were Breaking” Second place: SUNY Oswego, Erin Meyer, “In 2017, Payphones Still Haven’t Hung Up”

Best Print Feature Story

First place: Utica College, Kyle Riecker, “A Bridge Collapse, Ballgame and Bravery Remembered” Second place: The Daily Orange, Sam Ogozalek, “1,264 Miles”

Best Television Feature Story

First place: NCC News, Michael Lehr, “Can Man Chases One Million Cans” Second place: SUNY Oswego, Alex Peck, “Oswego State Jazz Ensemble Welcomes Pro Jazz Drummer”

Best Multimedia Story

First place: The Newshouse, Staff, “City Blocks” Second place: The Newshouse, Staff, “They Wear Blue”

In Memoriam

Syracuse Press Club remembers

Irving “Irv” W. Lane Jr. Josephine Haddock Olympia Ukrainec Usher Neil Driscoll James R. Schwanke Donald Lee Edwards Louis Joseph “Chuck” Agresti Walter “Wally” Melnick Kevin Schenk Arthur Woldt Linda Marlowe Seeber Bonnie Beth Derby Joan L. Briggs Ashton

Tamara K. Clark Barbara S. Frear Megan Perfield Ladd Michele Kelly Izaak “Jack” Overdyk Catharine Ann Nevin Chu Robert H. “Sukosh” Fearon III Joan (Kimberly) Kahler M. Louise Ratkoski John P. Mackey Roland H. Allen, Jr. Michael Wheeler Milmoe Don Dauer

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Lakeland

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Winery

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