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Modified Task 4 Assignment 

Fall 2017 MAED 3224 


  
Section A: Context for Learning 
1. Grade level: ​Fourth 

2. How much time is devoted each day to mathematics instruction in your classroom? 

2 hours 

3. Identify any textbook or instructional program the teacher uses for mathematics instruction. 
If a textbook, please provide the title, publisher, and date of publication. 

A countywide google document 

4. From your observations, list other resources (e.g., electronic whiteboard, manipulatives, 
online resources) the teacher uses for mathematics instruction in this class. Provide one 
example of how a resource was used to teach a concept. 

ALEKS on the student’s chromebooks. Each week, the students have a topic goal, typically 5 
topics, to be completed by the end of the week. On monday morning, the teacher would write 
the “ALEKS MVPs” on a small white board at the back of the classroom. The students who 
completed the most topics in the past week were named the MVPs. This created the drive and 
motivation in students to complete more topics than the bare minimum. 

5. From your observations, explain how your teacher makes sure the students learn the 
standard/objectives conceptually giving a specific example. (​ one paragraph) 

The class was focusing on angles and naming triangles based off of their angles. The teacher 
drew triangles on the board and had students label the angles to determine the type of triangle. 
She asked students to share out their answers to check for understanding. The teacher also 
used an oversized protractor to draw angles on the board. This helped the students understand 
how to use their own individual protractors. She would ask quick questions to make sure the 
students were following along such as, “Which numbers do I look at, the top or the bottom? 
Why?” 

6. What did you learn most about teaching mathematics from observing this teacher? (​ one 
paragraph) 

After observing this teacher, I learned that the use of small groups during math instruction is 
beneficial to student growth. The teacher would first give a mini lesson to the entire class, then 
meet with groups that were separated based on level. She met with the lowest group first, then 
the middle group, then the highest group. If the students in a group were not understanding the 
lesson, they would stay and watch the lesson again with the next group. This gave the lowest 
group 3 opportunities to see the lesson if they were not grasping the concept. 

 
Section B: Whole Class Lesson 
Meet with your IMB teacher and decide what you will teach. Make sure your teacher 
understands that your lesson must have a conceptual understanding instruction along with both 
procedural fluency and problem solving components. You teach just one lesson. 
 
1. Describe the Central Focus of your lesson (a description of the important understandings 
and core concepts that students will develop with this lesson). 

Students will develop the understanding that perimeter is the distance around all of the edges of 
a shape. 

2. State the CCSSM Standard and the objective for your whole class lesson. 

CC.4.MD.3 Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical 
problems.  
 
3. Instructional Strategies and Learning Tasks: (summarize the lesson plan components by 
briefly describing the instruction and the learning tasks you used. Include the tasks students will 
solve during the lesson.) (​ one paragraph) 

To begin the lesson, the teacher gives the students the definition of perimeter and a real world 
problem related to the teacher putting ribbon around a bulletin board. The teacher will meet 
with small groups to model different word problem examples such as, “Mrs. T wants to find out 
how much ribbon she needs to go around the bulletin board. The bulletin board is 5 feet long 
and 3 feet wide. How much ribbon will Mrs. T need?” Then the students will be given a 
worksheet with different rectangular perimeter problems. One student from each group will be 
asked to work out how they solved problem 2 on the board. Finally, the students will be given a 
quick word problem exit ticket to check for understanding. 

4. Create a formative assessment that assesses conceptual knowledge, procedural fluency, 


and problem solving. I​ nsert a copy of the assessment with your solutions here. (​ exit ticket used 
for whole group lesson) 

Exit Ticket: Kevin wants to figure out the perimeter of the basketball court. He knows that it is 7 
meters long and 4 meters wide. What is the total perimeter of the basketball court? Please draw 
a picture to show your work. 
 
 
4 Meters 7m + 4m + 7m + 4m = 22 meters 
 
 
7 Meters 
5. Define your evaluation criteria for mastery of the assessment in a rubric. Make sure you 
define separately conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, and problem solving parts of 
this rubric, including the corresponding points. ​Insert this rubric here. ​(how did you grade exit 
ticket) 

Conceptual: 4 points for drawing a picture of the rectangle with labels of lengths 
Procedural Fluency: 3 points for a correct number sentence 
Problem Solving: 3 points for correct answer 
 

  
Section C: Results of Whole Class Assessment 
1. Create a graphic showing class performance of conceptual understanding, procedural 
fluency, and problem solving of the objective. This can be pie charts, tables, bar graph etc. but 
must show performance in each of the above areas separately, according to each student’s 
performance in the formative assessment. (​ provide a table and color code green/yellow/red 
based on mastery) 
 
Student  Conceptual  Procedural  Problem Solving  Total (10 pts)x 
Understanding  Fluency (3 pts)  (3 pts) 
(4 pts) 

A  4  3  2  9 

B  0  0  3  3 

C  0  2  2  4 

D  4  3  3  10 

E  4  3  3  10 

F  4  3  2  9 

G  4  3  3  10 

H  4  0  3  7 

I  4  3  2  9 

J  1  1  0  2 

K  4  3  3  10 

L  4  3  2  9 

M  4  3  2  9 
N  4  3  2  9 

O  4  3  2  9 

P  4  3  3  10 
 
 
2. Describe common error patterns in each of the areas of patterns of learning - conceptual 
understanding, and procedural fluency. Refer to the graphic to support your discussion. ​(3 
separate paragraphs, one per each pattern of learning) 
 
For conceptual understanding, the student’s misconceptions was that perimeter was the 
“distance” around the four sides of the shape. One student did not draw an image and the 
number sentence reflected the misunderstanding. Another student drew blocks instead of one 
whole rectangle. Some students only labeled 2 sides of the rectangle. The conceptual 
challenge is that the perimeter is each distance from each side is added together to get the total 
distance around the shape. 
For procedural fluency, the misconception was that by multiplying one side by two and 
doubling the answer you could get the distance around the shape. For example, the side lengths 
were 4 meters and 7 meters. The student multiplied 4x2 and then doubled the answer instead of 
multiplying 7x2 as well and adding the sums. It is possible to multiply each side by two and add 
the two sums together to get the perimeter. A few AIG students brought this way of problem 
solving up, but ended up confusing some of their peers in the class who tried to use the strategy 
instead of adding all of the sides together. 
For problem solving, half of the students lost a point because they did not add a unit to 
the end of their answer. This shows there is a misconception to the students that perimeter is a 
length or distance, therefore needs a unit. The real life world problem asked to find the 
perimeter of a basketball court and without the unit it is only a number, so it could be 22 feet 
instead of 22 meters. The teacher has stressed the importance of units for perimeter, so the 
topic was addressed even though the students were not explicitly reminded in the exit ticket to 
write the unit. 
Note:​ Patterns of learning include ​both ​quantitative and qualitative patterns (or consistencies) for different 
groups of students or individuals. Quantitative patterns indicate in a numerical way the information 
understood from the assessment (e.g., 10 out of 15 students or 20% of the students). Qualitative patterns 
include descriptions of understandings, misunderstandings, partial understandings, and/or developmental 
approximations and/or attempts at a solution related to a concept or a skill that could explain the quantitative 
patterns. 
For example, if the majority of students (quantitative) in a class ordered unit fractions from least to greatest as 
1​/​2, 1​/3
​ , 1​/​4, 1​/5
​ , the students’ error shows that they believe that the smaller the denominator, the smaller the 
fraction and they have a mathematical misunderstanding related to the value of fractional parts (qualitative). 
For example, if a student error occurs in a subtraction problem then the underlying mathematical 
understanding may include trading or regrouping, meaning of subtraction, and/or subtraction as the inverse of 
addition. You start with the quantity of students who made the specific mistake and you continue with the 
quality of the mistake in terms of the mathematical misconception. 
 
 
3. Scan and insert here the copies of​ 2 students​ first work samples as follows. Choose the 
most representative examples from the whole class assessment (​no student names​). Then, 
analyze each student’s misconceptions. 
 
Student 1 Mathematics Work Sample (​ student struggles with conceptual understanding) 
(one paragraph) 

 
This student (Student C) struggles with conceptual understanding because instead of drawing 
one rectangle and labeling the side lengths, she drew individual rectangles and added them all 
together. This shows that she does not fully understand the concept that perimeter is the 
length of each side added together. She was aware that it was not only 7+4=11, but her picture 
shows she does not know why she adds another 7 and 4 together for the other side lengths of 
the rectangle. 
 
Student 2 Mathematics Work Sample (​ student struggles with procedural fluency or problem 
solving) 
(one paragraph)  

 
​This student (Student B) struggles with procedural fluency because the student tried to multiply 
the sides together instead of adding. He multiplied the first side by 2 to get the distance of both 
sides together. This gave him 4x2=8 and then added 8+8. He should have multiplied the 
second side length by 2 to get 14 and then added 14+8 to get a final answer of 22 meters. 
Somehow, the student still got 22, but that could have been from looking at peers papers. 
Section D: Plan for Re-Engagement 
Assessment results are irrelevant if you do not act on them. Thus, you are to create a plan to 
use the results you described in Part C. You do not have to actually re-engage the students but 
you must show that you understand what to do with these results. Thus, based on the 
assessment results you described above, group each of your students into one of these groups:  
Group 1 - re-engage for conceptual 
Group 2 - re-engage for procedural  
Group 3 - re-engage for problem solving 
Group 4 - mastery/ready to move on 
 
1. Describe the number of students you will have in each of these groups. (Note: if a child 
performed poorly in multiple parts of the assessment, that child will start in the conceptual 
group) 
Group 1: Students B, C, J 
Group 2: Student H 
Group 3: Students A, F, I, L, M, N, O 
Group 4: Students D, E, G, K, P 
  
2. Plan to re-engage for conceptual understanding. 
a. Describe your re-engagement lesson for this group (objective from CCSSM, learning 
tasks, strategies, materials, assessment). (​ one paragraph) 
CC.4.MD.3 Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical 
problems.  
To re-engage this group, I will give the students more real world problems with simple numbers 
1-10. I will give the students toothpicks so they are able to create rectangles out of those 
toothpicks and connect that the number of toothpicks is the distance or perimeter around the 
shape. For example, if the problem is a rectangle that is 3 by 5, the students will make the 
length of the rectangle 3 toothpicks and the width 5 toothpicks. The students will then be asked 
to draw and label the rectangle on their own paper and solve the problem. 
b. Explain why you believe this re-engagement lesson will be effective based on the 
error patterns you found in the data. Score here will be based on how well you describe 
the connection to the re-engagement lesson and the error patterns found, effective use 
of materials, and sound methodology. (​ 1-2 sentences) 
I believe this will help students conceptual understanding because they have to create the whole 
rectangle with concrete materials. This means they are able to manipulate the lengths and 
widths of the rectangles to understand all sides make up the perimeter. 
c. Explain how you will reassess for mastery of the concept. ​(exit ticket) 
To assess their understanding I will ask students to draw and solve, “Teddy has a toy box that 
is 6 feet long and 2 feet wide. What is the perimeter of Teddy’s toy box? Draw a picture to 
support your answer.” 
 
Choose to do either 3a OR 3b: 
 
3a. Plan to Re-engage for procedural understanding. 
a. Describe your re-engagement lesson for this group (objective from CCSSM, learning 
tasks, strategies, materials, assessment). (​ one paragraph) 
CC.4.MD.3 Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles in real world and mathematical 
problems.  
To re-engage students for procedural understanding, I will provide real world word problems 
with a number sentence scaffold underneath. This will look like ____+____+____+____=____. This 
will get the students comfortable with adding all four sides of the rectangle together instead of 
only adding two sides of the rectangle together. 
b. Explain why you believe this re-engagement lesson will be effective based on the 
error patterns you found in the data. Score here will be based on how well you describe 
the connection to the re-engagement lesson and the error patterns found, effective use 
of materials, and sound methodology. (​ 1-2 sentences) 
I believe this will help students understand that perimeter requires all of the sides to be added 
together even if only two of the side lengths are given because they have the scaffold for the 
number sentence. 
c. Explain how you will reassess for mastery of the concept. ​(exit ticket) 
To assess mastery I will give a real world word problem without the number sentence scaffold, 
“Sally has a garden that is 3 yards long and 7 yards wide. What is the perimeter of Sally’s 
garden?” 
  
3b. Plan to Re-engage for problem solving. 
a. Describe your re-engagement lesson for this group (objective from CCSSM, learning 
tasks, strategies, materials, assessment). (​ one paragraph) 
b. Explain why you believe this re-engagement lesson will be effective based on the 
error patterns you found in the data. Score here will be based on how well you describe 
the connection to the re-engagement lesson and the error patterns found, effective use 
of materials, and sound methodology. (​ 1-2 sentences) 
c. Explain how you will reassess for mastery of the concept. ​(exit ticket) 
 
  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Scoring Rubric 
  Possible 
Points 

Section A: Context for Learning    


A1  1 
A2  1 
A3  1 
A4  5 
A5  5 
A6  5 

Section B: Whole Class Lesson    


B1  1 
B2  1 
B3  10 
B4  8 
B5  10 

Section C: Results of whole class assessment    


C1  10 
C2  14 
C3  6 

Section D: Plan for re-engagement    


D1  2 
D2  10 
D3a or D3b  10 

Total of all scores:   100