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Each year, 300-500 million people become ill with malaria and several million

die.""200-300 children die from malaria each hour."malaria.org/

Malarial parasite in monocyte. PHIL#1365

PHIL #1662: Anopheles gambiae


PHIL ID# 1354: Anopheles gambiae mosquito, CDC
mosquito, CDC

"Malaria is the world's most debilitating disease affecting hundreds of millions of


people in endemic areas. In Africa, Plasmodium falciparum is the most common ..."
jhsph.edu/Departments/MMI/Faculty/Shiff/malaria.html
Chapter 83, Malaria
Textbook of Medical Microbiology
gsbs.utmb.edu/microbook/ch083.htm
"Fortunately, the most common type of malaria is the P. falciparum strain that has no
relapsing phase ...P. vivax, ovale, or malariae can infect the liver and persist in a
dormant state for months, or even up to several years, after exposure."
healthlink.mcw.edu/content/article/907368749.html
"Diagnosis: Plasmodium falciparum This is a malignant malaria and its cyclic
paroxysms occur every 36 to 48 hours. Plasmodium falciparium rates second in
prevalence and is chiefly a tropical species. Clinically, P. falciparum infections are the
most serious of the four. ..." Read more about Plasmodium falciparum and see excellent
diagnostic images as well at:
http://www.uu.edu/class/malaria/Falcip.htm
PHIL ID# 366 P. falciparum rings in erythrocytes. 1962

PHIL ID# 612 P. falciparum rings in erythrocytes. 1971


PHIL ID# 1372 P. falciparum microgametocyte, erythocyte with "bib." 1973

PHIL ID# 1373 P. falciparum, macrogametocyte. 1973

"Diagnosis: Plasmodium malariae This is a quartan malaria since its cyclic paroxysms
occur every 72 hours. Plasmodium malariae ranks third in prevalence, but has a
widespread distribution. ..." Read more about Plasmodium malariae and see excellent
diagnostic images as well at:
http://www.uu.edu/class/malaria/Malariae.htm
Chapter 83, Malaria
Textbook of Medical Microbiology
http://gsbs.utmb.edu/microbook/ch083.htm
PHIL ID# 639 P. malariae band form trophozoite. 1972

PHIL ID# 1415 P. malariae compact old trophozoite. 1973


PHIL ID# 1416 P. malariae old immature schizont. 1973

PHIL ID# 1417 P. malariae young immature schizont. 1973

"Diagnosis: Plasmodium ovale This is ovale malaria and its cyclic paroxysms occur
every 48 hours. Plasmodium ovale is the rarest of the four species and is apparently
more restricted in distribution. However, it is common in the West African countries of
Ghana, Liberia, and Nigeria and in neighboring areas. ..." Read more about
Plasmodium ovale and see excellent diagnostic images as well at:
http://www.uu.edu/class/malaria/Ovale.htm
Chapter 83, Malaria
Textbook of Medical Microbiology
http://gsbs.utmb.edu/microbook/ch083.htm
PHIL ID# 1369 P. ovale rings, doubly infected erythocyte. 1973

PHIL ID# 1370 P. ovale, young ring. 1973


PHIL ID# 1371 P. ovale. growing trophozoite with "ring" nucleus. 1973

PHIL ID# 1455 P. ovale microgametocyte. 1973

"Diagnosis: Plasmodium vivax This is a tertian malaria since its cyclic paroxysms occur
every 48 hours. Plasmodium vivax may cause relapses years later because of secondary
exoerythrocytic cycles. P. vivax is perhaps the most prevalent of the four and is the
species most frequently encountered in temperate zones." Read more about
Plasmodium vivax and see excellent diagnostic images as well at:
http://www.uu.edu/class/malaria/Vivax.htm
Chapter 83, Malaria
Textbook of Medical Microbiology
http://gsbs.utmb.edu/microbook/ch083.htm
PHIL ID# 631 P. vivax macrogametocyte in blood smear. 1970

PHIL ID# 1365 P. vivax microgametocyte. 1973


PHIL ID# 640 P. vivax mature schizont. Cluster of 15 merozoites. 1972

PHIL ID# 641 P. vivax trophozoites. 1972


PHIL ID# 1362 P. vivax mature trophozoite. 1973

PHIL ID# 1454 P. vivax, erythocyte with two rings. 1974


CDC MALARIA
The CDC Malaria resource web page:
cdc.gov/ncidod/dpd/parasites/malaria/default.htm
Identification and Diagnosis of Parasites of Public Health Concern, Malaria:
"Ring form," "trophozoite," "gametocyte," "schizont," well defined.
dpd.cdc.gov/dpdx/HTML/Malaria.htm
Comparison of Plasmodium Species Which Cause Human Malaria:
dpd.cdc.gov/dpdx/HTML/Frames/M-R/Malaria/body_malariadiagfind2.htm

Chaing Mai University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Parasitology, Excellent


images of malarial parasite forms, including both common and rarely seen
stages.medicine.cmu.ac.th/dept/parasite/mala.htm

P. malariae rosette
"Malaria," Author Lar Fuortes, University of Iowa.
public-health.uiowa.edu/fuortes/63260/malaria1/index.htm
Chapter 83, Malaria
Textbook of Medical Microbiology
*Complete coverage of the subject. Great diagrams. Good comparative photo of all
stages of all four species together in one image. And much more.
gsbs.utmb.edu/microbook/ch083.htm
The Parasitology Images List - Protozoa
life.sci.qut.edu.au/LIFESCI/darben/protozoa.htm
Global Networking Against Malaria
"Our Mission is to facilitate the development and implementation of solutions to the
health, economic and social problems caused by malaria. Each year, 300-500 million
people become ill with malaria and several million die." malaria.org/ Scientific
Information links: malaria.org/scientificinfo.html

Relapsing Malaria. The Medical College of Wisconsin explains how malaria


symptoms may manifest themselves months after a person has traveled to an (endemic)
area.
"Fortunately, the most common type of malaria is the P. falciparum strain that has no
relapsing phase ...P. vivax, ovale, or malariae can infect the liver and persist in a
dormant state for months, or even up to several years, after exposure."
healthlink.mcw.edu/content/article/907368749.html
Malarone: New Malaria Medication With Fewer Side-effects
"Malarone is a newly released medication for prevention and treatment of chloroquine-
resistant forms of malaria, including cerebral malaria caused by Plasmodium
falciparum. Studies have shown Malarone to be 98% effective in prevention of malaria
which is as effective as mefloquine or doxycycline. Maralone interferes, "with different
pathways in the biosynthesis of pyrimidines that are the building blocks of nucleic acids
involved in DNA structure. Thus, the agents block malaria replication both inside and
outside the red blood cell."
Medical College of Wisconsin, Healthlink healthlink.mcw.edu/article/979237802.html
WHO/TDR Database
Information resource for scientists working in malaria research. It contains a wide
variety of information ranging from sequences to conference news.
wehi.edu.au/MalDB-www/who.html
Photos of Plasmodium wehi.edu.au/MalDB-www/photos.htm
GIS based malaria surveillance system: malaria-tn.org/
Malaria and infectious diseases in Africa chez.com/malaria/
*Images of Plasmodium from Public Health Image Library.
Content provider, CDC/Dr. Mae Melvin, 1962-1974.
Enter search terms vivax, ovale, falciparum, malariae to access and view all
images.phil.cdc.gov/