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Document No.

GP 12-30
Applicability Group
Date 04 November, 2003

Guidance on Practice for


Lighting and Small Power

GP 12-30

BP GROUP
ENGINEERING TECHNICAL PRACTICES
04 November, 2003 GP 12-30
Guidance on Practice for Lighting and Small Power

Foreword

This is the first issue of Engineering Technical Practice (ETP) GP 12-30. This Guidance on Practice
(GP) is based on parts of heritage documents from the merged BP companies as follows:

Amoco
A EL–LT–00-E Electrical—Lighting—Engineering Specification.
A EL–LT–00-G Electrical—Lighting—Guide.

ARCO
ES 400-89 Electrical - General

BP Chemicals US
CP 17-2-1 Electrical Detail Design and Construction Practice
CP 17-7-1 480 Volt Prefabricated Switchracks

BP GOMDW
1400-20-EL-SP-4000 General Requirements and Installations of Electrical Facilities

BP (Pre-1999)
GS 112-1 Electrical Engineering Specification for Materials and Workmanship
GS 112-8 Guidance for Specification 112-8 Low Voltage Switchgear and Control
Gear
RP 12-13 Electrical Systems and Installations – Cables, Cable Systems and Wiring
RP 12-14 Electrical Systems and Installations – Lighting & Lighting Installations

Copyright  2003, BP Group. All rights reserved. The information contained in this
document is subject to the terms and conditions of the agreement or contract under which
the document was supplied to the recipient’s organization. None of the information
contained in this document shall be disclosed outside the recipient’s own organization
without the prior written permission of Manager, Standards, BP Group, unless the terms of
such agreement or contract expressly allow.

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Guidance on Practice for Lighting and Small Power

Table of Contents
Page
Foreword.......................................................................................................................................... 2
1. Scope...................................................................................................................................... 4
2. Normative references.............................................................................................................. 4
3. Design considerations............................................................................................................. 5
3.1. General........................................................................................................................ 5
3.2. Lighting........................................................................................................................ 6
3.3. Small power................................................................................................................. 6
3.4. Wiring and installation..................................................................................................7
4. Lighting................................................................................................................................... 8
4.1. Indoor lighting............................................................................................................... 8
4.2. Outdoor lighting............................................................................................................ 8
4.3. Emergency lighting.......................................................................................................8
5. Small power............................................................................................................................ 9
5.1. Indoor panelboards and switchracks............................................................................9
5.2. Outdoor panelboards and switchracks.........................................................................9
5.3. Receptacles................................................................................................................. 9
6. Testing................................................................................................................................... 10
7. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) practice.....................................................10
8. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) practice.........................................................10

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04 November, 2003 GP 12-30
Guidance on Practice for Lighting and Small Power

1. Scope

This GP document provides guidance for design and installation of lighting and small power
equipment rated 1000 VAC or less.

2. Normative references

The following normative documents contain requirements that, through reference in this text,
constitute requirements of this technical practice. For dated references, subsequent amendments to, or
revisions of, any of these publications do not apply. However, parties to agreements based on this
technical practice are encouraged to investigate the possibility of applying the most recent editions of
the normative documents indicated below. For undated references, the latest edition of the normative
document referred to applies.

BP
GP 12-05 Guidance on Practice for Transformers
GP 12-15 Guidance on Practice for Wire and Cable
GP 12-25 Guidance on Practice for Earthing/Grounding
GP 12-55 Guidance on Practice for Inspection and Testing of Electrical Systems
GP 12-60 Guidance on Practice for Hazardous Area Electrical Installations

British Standard
BS 5266-1 Emergency Lighting-Part 1: Code of practice for the emergency lighting
of premises other than cinemas and certain other specified premises used
for entertainment

Illumination Engineers Society of North America (IESNA)


IESNA Lighting Handbook (Reference & Application)

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)


IEEE Std 141 Recommended Practice for Electric Power Distribution for Industrial
Plants (Red Book).

International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)


IEC 60309-1 Plugs, socket-outlets and couplers for industrial purposes – Part 1:
General requirements.
IEC 60364-1 Electrical installations of buildings – Part 1: Fundamental principles,
assessment of general characteristics, definitions.
IEC 60364-4-41 Electrical installations of buildings – Part 4-41: Protection for safety –
Protection against electric shock.
IEC 60364-5-52 Electrical installations of buildings – Part 5-52: Selection and erection of
electrical equipment – Wiring systems.
IEC 60364-5-54 Electrical installations of buildings – Part 5-54: Selection and erection of
electrical equipment – Earthing arrangements, protective conductors and
protective bonding conductors.
IEC 60364-5-55 Electrical installations of buildings – Part 5-55: Selection and erection of
electrical equipment – Other equipment.

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IEC 60439-2 Low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies – Part 2: Particular


requirements for busbar trunking systems (busways).
IEC 60439-5 Low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies – Part 5: Particular
requirements for assemblies intended to be installed outdoors in public
places – Cable distribution cabinets (CDCs) for power distribution in
networks.
IEC 60529 Degrees of protection provided by enclosures (IP code).
IEC 60598-2 Luminaries-Part 2: Particular Requirements-All Parts

International Standards Organization (ISO)


ISO 8995 Lighting of indoor work places

National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)


NEMA PB 1 Panelboards
NEMA 250 Enclosures for Electrical Equipment (1000 Volts Maximum)
NEMA Guide to Emergency Lighting.

National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA)


NFPA 70 National Electrical Code (NEC)

Process Industry Practices (PIP)


PIP ELCGL01 Electrical Design Criteria

3. Design considerations

3.1. General
Lighting and small power equipment should be designed and installed in accordance with the
following:
a. Dry type transformers for lighting and small power should be designed and installed in
accordance with GP 12-05 and the following:
1. Dry type transformers should be Delta primary, Wye (Star) secondary, 3-phase, 4-wire
systems.
2. Transformer winding should be compound filled/encapsulated and have metal
enclosure suitable for wall or rack mounting. Ventilated transformers should be used
only in clean indoor atmospheres and non-ventilated transformers to be used in all
other locations.
3. Initial design load of transformers should not exceed 75% of the transformer’s rated
capacity.
4. Taps on transformers should be set so that the no-load secondary voltage is as close as
possible but does not exceed rated nameplate voltage of user-connected equipment.
5. Power for transformers should be supplied from switchracks, or motor control centres
and protected by a thermal magnetic circuit breaker.
b. Wire and cable for lighting and small power should be designed and installed in
accordance with GP 12-15.
c. Earthing (grounding) for lighting and small power should be designed and installed in
accordance with GP 12-25.

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d. Lighting and small power installations in hazardous areas should be designed and installed
in accordance with GP 12-60.

3.2. Lighting
a. Lighting systems should be designed in accordance with the IES Lighting Handbook or
equivalent nationally recognized lighting design guide
b. Lighting for instrument boards located in control rooms should be designed to illuminate
the face of instruments, without glare.
c. Lighting fixtures should be spaced to provide:
1. Optimum illumination for aisles.
2. Illumination levels adequate for safe completion of tasks performed in that working
area.
3. Uniform illumination to minimize shadows.
d. Service for lighting, receptacles, and instrumentation should be provided from separate
dedicated panelboards.
e. Lighting circuits should be provided with an integral earth (ground) wire.
f. Locations, elevations and types of fixtures should be noted on site plot plans along with
conduit routings for outdoor lighting.
g. Lighting fixtures should be designed and installed in accordance with the following:
1. Fixtures should be earthed (grounded).
2. Branch circuit wire rated no less than 90°C should be used to connect high intensity
discharge or incandescent lighting fixtures. Wire with higher temperature ratings
should be used when specified by lighting manufacturer.
3. Lighting fixtures for gauges (such as liquid level) requiring special illumination
should be local mounted type with local switch.
4. Instrument panels should be illuminated by rapid start fluorescent fixtures with
holophane control lens, or owner approved fixtures.
5. Lighting fixtures should be cleaned of dirt and debris upon completion of installation
and protected from damage during remainder of construction period.
6. Wall mount fixtures that do not utilize rear cable entry should be plugged during
installation.
7. Dimmer controls or indirect lighting should be considered for areas where glare may
be a problem.
8. Selection of high output or very high output should be based on the watts/lumen
required.
9. Lights on walkways should not be more than 2,4 m (8 ft) above the walkway.
10. Fixtures mounted at or below 2 m (6,6 ft) should be completed with safety guard.
11. Fixtures for use in hazardous areas should be certified by an Internationally
Recognized Testing Laboratory and should carry appropriate certification labels (see
GP 12-60).

3.3. Small power


a. Panelboard/switchboard feeder circuits should be 3-phase, 4-wire, at the low voltage
appropriate for a given site.

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b. Panelboards should be installed indoors or in unclassified and environmentally controlled


areas.
c. Panelboards and switchboards should be supplied with copper bus.
d. Neutral buses should be sized for connection of every branch circuit requiring a neutral
conductor. Neutrals of each separately derived system should be earthed (grounded) at only
one point in the system.
e. Panelboards and switchboards should utilize bolt-on breakers.
f. Two-pole circuit breakers should be used for single-phase (line-to-line) circuits.
Use of two mechanically-linked single-pole circuit breakers for single-phase (line-
to-line) circuits is not recommended.
g. Circuit breakers and switches should be supplied with permanently mounted padlocking
facilities, providing means to lock circuit breakers and switches in de-energized position.
h. Breakers should be fully rated for specified interrupting rating of panelboard or
switchboard. Series rated circuit breakers are not acceptable.
i. Branch circuits loading should not exceed 80% of rating of branch circuit protective device
rating.
j. Panelboards and switchboards should be provided with 20% spares circuit position.
Approximately 50% of the spares circuit positions should be provided with circuit
protective devices. Remaining positions should be provided with necessary facilities that
require only the addition of the circuit protective device for future use.

3.4. Wiring and installation


Wiring and installation requirements should be the following:
a. Wiring for 3-phase, 4-wire lighting and small power should not be circuited using a
common neutral.
b. Single-phase (line-to-neutral) branch circuits should be supplied with a 3 core cable to
provide phase, neutral and earthing (grounding) conductors.
c. The minimum size of neutral conductor shall equal the phase conductors.
d. Fixtures and receptacles should be earthed (grounded).
e. Maximum size lighting conduit should be 40 mm (1 1/2 inch) and minimum size should be
20 mm (3/4 inch).
f. Minimum conductor size should be selected based on the estimated standing load and the
sub-circuit voltage drop permitted by the appropriate installation standard (NFPA 70 or
IEC 60364).
g. Fixture hangers, approved for the specific area classification, should be used for pendent
fixtures.
h. Supports from building structure should be adequate to hold at least twice the weight of the
fixture.
i. Straps and hangers should be heavy-duty malleable iron or steel.
j. Surface outlet boxes (to which fixtures are attached) and pull boxes should be fastened to
structure independently of conduit system supports.

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4. Lighting

4.1. Indoor lighting


a. Indoor lighting should be controlled by individual wall switches and/or occupancy sensors
in each room or area..
b. Lighting switches should, in general, be placed between 1,8 m (6 ft) and 1,2 m (4 ft) above
the finished floor or grade.
c. General control room area and offices should be illuminated with fluorescent fixtures with
holophane control lens, or other BP approved lenses.
d. Stem-mounted fluorescent fixtures should be supported by feeder stems in accordance with
manufacturers’ recommended practice with sliding, clamp-type hangers for supports.
e. Indoor lighting circuits should be separate from outdoor lighting circuits.

4.2. Outdoor lighting

4.2.1. General
Outdoor lighting should be controlled by light sensitive (photo electric) switches aimed in a
north direction and supervised with hand-off-auto switch.

4.2.2. Area lighting


a. Area lighting fixtures should be marine rated and listed for installation in hazardous area.
b. Area lighting should be general-purpose HPS fixtures, operated on L-N single-phase
voltage.
c. High-pressure sodium (HPS) ballasts should be constant wattage, high power factor/rapid
start type.
d. Fixtures should be mounted to permanent structure only and should be designed to
withstand required weather conditions without swaying or vibration of the assembly.

4.2.3. Flood lighting


a. Floodlighting should be general-purpose HPS fixtures, 400 watt or higher, operated on L-L
single phase voltage.
b. Fixtures capable of being repositioned, such as floodlights should utilize bronze armoured
shipboard cable for the final portion of the electrical circuit.
c. Installation of general area flood lighting should be outside of classified areas.
d. Flood lighting fixtures should have lens to prevent hot material from falling.

4.3. Emergency lighting


a. Emergency lighting should be designed to provide illumination for safe egress from
operating areas in the event of power failure.
b. Emergency lighting should be provided for critical rooms, control rooms, large electrical
substations, critical instruments, safety eye wash/showers, safety equipment locations,
laboratories, clinics and other areas where lighting failure might create safety hazards or
may disrupt operations.
c. Emergency lighting and receptacle circuits should be powered from dedicated emergency
sources such as UPS or emergency generator sets with automatic transfer switches to
alternate sources. Portion of the emergency lighting should either have self-contained
battery powered lamps to provide transitional emergency lighting or powered from a
central emergency battery bank supply.
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d. Emergency exit lights should be specified for emergency exits and should be powered
from emergency power source.
e. For areas without standby generation, separate battery-powered incandescent units or
integral emergency battery packs should be specified for selected fluorescent and/or
incandescent fixtures should be provided.
f. Emergency lighting feeders should be separated as widely as practical from any essential
or normal lighting feeders serving the same area.

5. Small power

5.1. Indoor panelboards and switchracks


a. Indoor panelboard and switchboard enclosures should be IP42 in accordance with
IEC 60529 (NEMA 1 in accordance with NEMA 250) surface mount construction as
appropriate.
b. Panelboards should be supplied with a directory holder, consisting of metal frame, heavy
clear plastic cover and removable directory mounted on inside of the door. Directories
should be neatly typed or stamped and completely identify circuit and corresponding
services for use by operating personnel. Switchboard overcurrent devices should be
individually labelled.

5.2. Outdoor panelboards and switchracks


a. Outdoor panelboards in hazardous areas should be housed in IP68/IP66 enclosures in
accordance with IEC 60529 (7/4X enclosures in accordance with NEMA 250) made of
fibreglass, copper-free aluminium, or stainless steel.
b. Panelboards should be centrally located in relation to the loads served.

5.3. Receptacles
Receptacles should be designed and installed in accordance with the following:
a. Receptacles for use in hazardous areas should be certified by an Internationally
Recognized Testing Laboratory and should carry appropriate certification labels (see GP
12-60).
b. Receptacles located in wash down areas or in other wet areas should be equipped with
weatherproof covers and boxes.
c. Receptacles should be centrally located to provide ease of use for maintenance and
operations.
d. Outdoor convenience and welding receptacles should be, Zone 2 (Division 2), factory
sealed, circuit-breaking type, with interlock to prevent removal of plug while energized.
Receptacles should not be placed in Zone 0 or Zone 1 (Division 1) areas.
e. Branch circuit supplying welding plug receptacles should serve no other equipment.
Receptacles should be arranged in groups of not more than four outlets per circuit. Number
of outlets on a circuit would determine the minimum cable size to be used.
f. Welding outlets should be located within 30 m (100 ft) of any structure or area in which
welding is to be done.
g. Outlet and switch boxes located outdoors should be IP66 enclosures in accordance with
IEC 60529 (4X enclosures in accordance with NEMA 250) made of a corrosion resistant
material such as fibreglass, copper-free aluminium, or stainless steel.

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6. Testing

New equipment for lighting and small power should be tested and inspected in accordance with
GP 12-55.

7. International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) practice

a. Panelboards, switchracks and busways should be designed and installed in accordance with
applicable parts of IEC 60364-1, IEC 60439-2, IEC 60439-5, and IEC 60529.
b. Indoor lighting should be designed and installed in accordance with ISO 8995.
c. Lighting fixtures should be designed and installed in accordance with applicable parts of
IEC 60364-5-55 section 559 and applicable parts of IEC 60598-2.
d. Receptacles should be designed and installed in accordance with applicable parts of
IEC 60309-1 and IEC 60364-4-41.
e. Residual current devices should be used with receptacles in accordance with
IEC-60364-4-41 clause 412.5.as a measure against electric shock to personnel
f. Wiring and installation should be in accordance with applicable parts of IEC 60364-1,
IEC 60364-5-52, and IEC 60364-5-54.
g. Emergency lighting should be designed and installed in accordance with BS 5266 or
equivalent nationally recognize practice and IEC-60598-2-22

8. American National Standards Institute (ANSI) practice

a. Lighting and power receptacles should conform to PIP ELCGL01 sections 9 and 10.
b. Energy-effective industrial lighting system design should be in accordance with
IEEE Std 141 section 14.8.2 (system approach for energy-effective lighting), section 14.8.3
(energy-saving lighting techniques), and section 14.8.4 (lighting controls).
c. Panelboards, switchracks and busways should be designed and installed in accordance with
NFPA 70 articles 364 and 384, NEMA PB 1 sections 2 and 3, IEEE Std 141 sections 11
and 13.
d. Lighting fixtures should be designed and installed in accordance with applicable
requirements of NFPA 70 article 410 and IEEE Std 141 section 14.8.
e. Emergency lighting should be designed and installed in accordance with NEMA Guide to
Emergency Lighting and the IESNA Lighting Handbook Chapter 29.
f. Receptacles should be designed and installed in accordance with NFPA 70 articles 210 and
220.
g. Ground-fault circuit interrupter devices should be used with receptacles in accordance with
NFPA 70 to protect personnel against electric shock
h. Wiring and installation should conform to NFPA 70 chapter 2 and 3 and NEMA PB 1
section 4.
i. Panelboards used for lighting and small power should be tested and inspected in
accordance with NEMA PB 1 section 5.

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