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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

Individual Teaching Philosophy: First Draft

I recognise my teaching philosophy to be continuing to develop. My teaching philosophy Commented [RH1]: What will influence your philosophy?
Will it continue to develop as teacher?
embodies to create a learning environment that will exhibit inquiry-based and social-
emotional learning. My philosophy of education aims to scaffold children to be lifelong
learners. I strongly value creating an environment that every child is respected and supported. Commented [RH2]: How will you scaffold children?
Provide examples
Commented [RH3]: Elaborate what a respected and
I strongly value learning to be child-centred, enabling children to be actively involved in the supported environment would look like.

learning process, in addition to drawing on connections of real-life contexts. I aim to Commented [RH4]: What theories can you draw on to
support this?
incorporate real-life experiences and learning to promote children to become lifelong
learners, beyond the classroom. I will draw on what children learn in the natural environment
and real-world contexts, and further scaffold these experiences within the classroom. Commented [RH5]: Expand on how you will bring the
natural environment/ real-world contexts into the
Therefore, one of the practices in which this will be shown is through the implementation of classroom.

both indoor and outdoor learning, supporting the catering of different learning styles. I value Commented [RH6]: Make connections to learning
theories.
children to be individuals with varying needs, that when engrossed in a nurturing and safe
environment can attain their full potential.

I strongly believe each child should be included and supported in a learning environment that
caters for individual ability, interests and learning styles. I value the importance that the
classroom should be diversified to ensure each child is engaged to learn within an inclusive
learning environment. My teaching philosophy continues to be shaped by inquiry-based
learning, I will support each child to be a leader of their learning. I will develop learning
experiences to be inquiry based, engaging children to focus on their interests and to be
immersed in fruitful learning experiences that adhere to each child’s strengths and abilities. Commented [RH7]: Explain the emotional-social
development from inquiry learning.

Within my teaching philosophy I will indorse the importance of children’ social emotional
skills and development. I strongly appreciate how children’s learning success is influenced by
the social skills and emotional wellbeing of the child. Therefore, I aim to maintain and
continue to develop a learning environment that supports children’s self-
awareness/management, respectful and positive relationships, skills to cope in challenging
contexts and decision making. My philosophy as a professional teacher, I will continually
Commented [RH8]: Provide examples of how this may be.
expand my professional development. In collaboration with children, colleagues, parents,
Commented [RH9]: Your teaching philosophy continues
families and the communities I will continue to shape my teaching to be best practice. to be expanded and will develop as you grow as a
professional teacher. By unpacking how you will implement
strategies and theories within the classroom will provide
clear examples and visible vision.

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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

Research Paper
Behind every effective teacher lies beneath a set of educational beliefs, values and attitudes
that sequentially form their teaching philosophy and practice. A clear and concise teaching
philosophy provides insight of how learning theories, teaching strategies and professional
experience has shaped individual teaching practice (McGraw, 2008). A teaching philosophy
envisions to implement best practice by drawing on knowledge, research and experiences.
Teachers are significant figures within the classroom, school and community, empowered to
educate the future generation. Through the planning, implementation and evaluation of
teaching and learning, teachers form an image of the educational experience they envision to
deliver. This research paper will discuss how the examination and incorporation of learning
theories and approaches can improve teaching practice and support a child’s academic
success.

A quality teacher recognises and caters for various learning abilities, needs and styles.
Supported by Strong, Silver & Perini (2001) the acknowledgement of the diverse learning
styles within a classroom is essential to cater for and support each child’s learning success.
Differentiation aims to capitalise on individual children’s growth and success by identifying
where the child is at and scaffolding the learning process. Tomlinson (2005) articulates
learning success is achieved best when the teacher is adaptable of differences in interests,
learning styles and abilities. Supported by Hall (2002), differentiation shapes the learning
experience to cater for diversity within the classroom, enabling each child to learn and
develop accordingly to their strengths, needs and capabilities. The multiple intelligences
theory develop by Howard Gardner, draws on a range of curriculum and instructional
strategies to address differentiation. The multiple intelligences theory enacts the recognition
that learning success will occur within an inclusive learning environment that is supportive of
children’s strengths, abilities and needs. (Reynold, 2009). By catering for a range of learning
styles, abilities and needs within the classroom, enables teachers to successfully meet the
needs of all children.

An effective teacher acknowledges the importance of supporting children’s social and


emotional learning to promote positive and successful learning experiences. Recognising
each individual child’s learning profile and scaffolding their learning appropriately can
support children to attain academic learning success, improve motivation and confidence

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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

towards learning (Green, 1999). Developing children’s social emotional wellbeing within the
learning process supports a child to identify and manage their emotions, build positive
relationships with others, empathy towards others and being responsible of their decision
making and behaviour Leatherman & Niemeyer (2005). Supporting children’s social
emotional learning builds on their self-esteem and self-awareness. Leatherman & Niemeyer
(2005) states an inclusive environment captivates children to build on their self-esteem and
confidence to take risks in their learning and opportunities for learning success. Upholding
children’s wellbeing through positive social emotional learning children will continue to
develop their confidence, enabling children to participate in challenging learning experiences
to further extend their knowledge. Drawing on Vygotsky (1978), the zone of proximal
development immerses children to continuously challenge their learning, by implementing
differentiation each child is catered for specifically on their abilities. Furthermore, the teacher
as a facilitator of learning can scaffold students when necessitated, enabling children to be
challenged slightly above their current level of knowledge. Through the provision of co-
constructed knowledge of the teacher and child, learning success can be attained through their
cognitive development.

The teacher as a facilitator of child’s learning can support children to be active and leaders of
their learning. Supported by the social constructivists approach, to view children as active
constructors of their learning, not merely passive receivers of knowledge (Palmer, 2005).
Engaging children in the learning process, guided by the teacher enables children to become
actively involved in the expression of ideas, views and making connections to real life
contexts beyond the classroom (Black, 2006). The incorporation of real life contexts and
example within learning enables children to make connection to prior knowledge and
experiences. The notion of children being active participants of their learning draws on the
constructivists theory of learning shaped by Vygotsky (1978). Vygotsky heavily draws on the
recognition learning occurs within a wider social context, therefore the importance of
empowering children to become actively involved citizens and lifelong learners (Atweh,
2013). Babcock (2011) & Lerin (2006) highlight providing children with an active
involvement in their learning, increases levels of engagement, motivation and demonstrates
increased academic success. It is important to provide children with a unique learning
experience that engages them to become active participants, scaffolding children to be
lifelong learners and active citizens.

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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

Inquiry-based learning supports children to become critical thinkers and leaders of their
learning developing skills and knowledge to be life-long learners. Drawing on Dewey (1933)
emerges the importance of children to engage in real-world, practical learning experiences
that can display their knowledge through collaboration and imagination. Further emphasising
the significance of children being able to think and communicate their own thoughts, learning
and ideas. Influenced by the constructivists approach, engaging children within inquiry-based
learning the notion of ‘learning by doing’ (Dewey, 1933). The constructivists theory shapes
inquiry-based learning identifying effective learning experiences to build on a child’s prior
knowledge enabling the opportunity to make connection, promoting self-directed active
learners who take part in authentic and collaborative learning experiences.

It is imperative that teachers provide children with learning experiences that are unique to
each individual child, to support academic success and the promotion of life long learners
within society. Through drawing on the constructivists approach engage each individual child
to immerse in learner-lead, self-directed and inquiry-based learning. In turn, enabling
children to build on their knowledge and skills to become lifelong learners and active
citizens. By catering for a range of learning styles, abilities and needs within the classroom,
enables teachers to successfully meet the needs of all children. Supporting children’s social
emotional learning and development promotes self-efficacy and self-esteem enabling each
individual child to attain the confidence to take risks and delve into enriched learning
experiences. Therefore, through the creation of an inclusive learning environment for each
individual child to participate in diverse learning experiences, empowers positive social-
emotional development and in turn leads to academic success and lifelong learning.

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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

Individual Teaching Philosophy: Second Draft

I acknowledge my teaching philosophy to be continually developing as I continue to build


and expand my identity as a professional teacher. My teaching philosophy has been
developed with the goal to empower and motivate each child to reach their fullest potential.
My teaching philosophy embodies to create a learning environment that will exhibit inquiry-
based and social-emotional learning. My philosophy of education aims to scaffold children to
be lifelong learners, through the incorporation of learning experiences that draw on individual
children’s strengths, interests and real-life experiences. I strongly value creating an
environment that every child is respected and supported. A respected learning environment
begins with the acknowledgement that every child is different, inclusive of a child’s abilities,
strength, weaknesses and socio-cultural background. Moreover, a supported learning
environment provides opportunities for each child to succeed by catering for the diversity of
learning abilities and needs.

My teaching philosophy has been shaped by the constructivists approach. I strongly value
learning to be child-centred, enabling children to be actively involved in the learning process,
in addition to drawing on connections of real-life contexts. I aim to incorporate real-life
experiences and learning to promote children to become lifelong learners, beyond the
classroom. I will draw on what children learn in the natural environment and scaffold these
experiences within the classroom. This will enable children to build on their individuality and
autonomy through the construction of new information and prior knowledges and
experiences. Therefore, one of the practices in which this will be shown is through the
implementation of a range of learning experiences that draw on a range of learning styles thus
reflecting differentiation and the notion of individuality of each child, informed by the
multiple intelligences theory. I believe this advocates for my beliefs and provides children
with a sense of citizenship and an inclusive learning environment. I value children to be
individuals with varying needs, that when engrossed in a nurturing and safe environment can
attain their full potential.

I strongly believe each child should be included and supported in a learning environment that
caters for individual ability, interests and learning styles. I value the importance that the
classroom should be diversified to illustrate each child is engaged to learn within an inclusive
learning environment. My teaching philosophy continues to be shaped by inquiry-based

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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

learning, I will support each child to be a leader of their learning. I will develop learning
experiences to be inquiry based, engaging children to focus on their interests and to be
immersed in fruitful learning experiences that adhere to each child’s strengths and abilities.
Hence, children will build their self-esteem and confidence through learning success. Within
my teaching philosophy I value through confidence building and engaging learning supports
risk taking and the growth of critical thinking. As a teacher, drawing a focus to develop every
child’s learning styles and identifying the importance of supporting and scaffolding
children’s learning to facilitate social emotional learning and development.

Within my teaching philosophy I will indorse the importance of children’ social emotional
skills and development. I strongly appreciate how children’s learning success is influenced by
the social skills and emotional wellbeing of the child. Therefore, I aim to maintain and
continue to develop a learning environment that supports children’s self-
awareness/management, respectful and positive relationships, skills to cope in challenging
contexts and decision making. My philosophy as a professional teacher, I will continually
expand my professional development through the reflection and revision of my teaching
practices. In collaboration with children, colleagues, parents, families and the communities I
will continue to shape my teaching to be best practice.

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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

Critical Reflection

Reflecting on my initial teaching philosophy and the revision process of researching and
refining my philosophy has elucidated my mission as a teacher and envision of how this will
be demonstrated within the classroom. Within my first draft, my philosophy explores
teaching approaches and learning theories that I have been inspired by, however there was a
absence of depth as I lacked to elaborate on how I would illustrate this within the classroom.
Sharing my teaching philosophy with peers provided a valuable source of feedback, an
example of this was the suggestion to elaborate on how teaching strategies and approaches
will be shown within the classroom. It was an important learning curve to recognise the
importance of being explicit of how this will be achieved, merely listing the teaching
approaches and strategies to a third party lacks vision and how this will support children’s
learning success. In addition to drawing on research findings, educational and learning
theorists to refine my teaching philosophy engrossed my values and beliefs to be supported
by recognised sources. Furthermore, unpacking my teaching philosophy revealed the
connection between the teaching strategies and styles that I defined my philosophy to be. I
have refined my philosophy of teaching to be influenced by the multiple intelligences theory
inclusively providing for the range of children’s abilities, in addition to the constructivists
approach and enabling children to become supported and respected lifelong learners. In
addition to, drawing on Vygotsky and the learner-centred approach, focusing on the teacher
as a facilitator to scaffold children and guide them to overcome challenges and extend their
knowledge.

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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

References

Atweh, B. (2013). Beyond Student Centred Learning: Towards Socially Response-able


Mathematics Education. Retrieved from:
http://oneworldripples.com/uploads/3/2/1/3/3213041/keynote_address_colombia_atw
eh.pdf

Babcock, B. J. (2011). Student voice: a study of the impact of increased student voice on
student perception of learning environment. Doctorate of Education dissertation.
Olivet Nazarene.

Black, R. (2007). Crossing the bridge: overcoming entrenched disadvantage through student-
centred learning, Australian Education Foundation.

Dewey, J. (1933). How We Think: A restatement of the relation of reflective thinking to the
educative process. Boston: D.C. Heath.

Green, F. R. (1999). Brain and learning research: Implications for meeting the needs of
diverse learners. Education, 119(4), 682-688.

Hall, T. (2002). Differentiated Instruction. Effective Classroom Practices Report. National


Center on Accessing the General Curriculum, CAST, U.S. Office of Special
Education Programs. [Online]
http://www.cast.org/ncac/classroompractice/cpractice02.doc [15 May 2005].

Leatherman, J. & Niemeyer, J. (2005). ‘Teacher’s attitudes towards inclusion: Factors


influencing classroom practice’. Journal of Early Childhood Teacher Education, 26
(1), 23–36.

Leren, T. H. (2006). The importance of student voice. International Journal of Leadership


in Education: Theory and Practice, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 363–367, doi:
10.1080/13603120600895502

McGraw, J. (2008). Philosophy of education. Retrieved from


http://www.mheducation.co.uk/openup/chapters/9780335226702.pdf

Reynolds, R. (2009). Teaching Studies of Society and Environment in the Primary School.
South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

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Rebecca Hind EDFD462: Assignment One S00171803

Palmer, D. (2005). A motivational view of constructivist-informed teaching. International


Journal of Science Education, 27(15), 1853-1881

Strong, R. W., Silver, H. F., & Perini, M. J. (2001). Making students as important as
standards. Educational Leadership, 59 (3), 56-61.

Tomlinson, C. A. (2005). Grading and differentiation: Paradox or good practice? Theory into
Practice, 44(3), 262-269.

Westwood, P. (2008). What teachers need to know about teaching methods. Camberwell,
VIC: ACER Press.

Vygotsky, L. S. (1978). Mind in society. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

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