You are on page 1of 4

The

Metastasization of
Mandatory Arbitration
Kenneth M. Piper Lecture
Chicago‐Kent College of Law
April 10, 2018

Catherine Ruckelshaus
General Counsel
National Employment Law Project
cruckelshaus@nelp.org

Why Should We Care: 3 Reasons

(1) It’s bad for workers.

(2) It’s bad for law‐abiding companies.

(3) It’s bad for our economy. 

1
It’s bad for workers.

• It’s rigged: company picks the arbitrator and pays for the 
proceeding; it’s a repeat player. 

• It’s secret: no transparency, no public reporting before or 
after. 

• It’s one‐by‐one: class and collective waivers effectively bar 
claims, especially for low‐wage workers. 

• Empirically, workers who do get to arbitration get less.

It’s bad for law‐abiding employers.

• Competition and the race‐to‐the‐bottom: 
everyone’s doing it. 

• No common‐law understanding of rule of law and 
corporate behavior.  

• Business plans hard to develop in lawless 
environment. 

2
It’s bad for our economy and communities.

• Billions lost every year in wage theft takes money away 
from local economies. 

• Millions of lost payroll taxes and insurance premiums paid 
to federal, state and local governments. 

• Lack of employer accountability means that rule of law 
doesn’t mean anything and safety nets and baseline 
protections fail.  

Forced arbitration = claim suppression.

 Professor Cindy Estlund’s research shows 
98% of claims brought in court are not 
brought in arbitration.

 315,000‐722,000 individual workplace claims 
lost in “black hole”. 

 This results in employer exculpation and 
judicial abdication. 

3
Bright spots?
• Legislative fix needed at the federal level. (See 
legislative round‐up in the materials).

• Epic Systems trio of cases any day now. 

• States and cities are very limited in what they can 
enact, but that hasn’t stopped proposals. 

• #MeToo movement has generated bipartisan 
interest. 

National Employment Law Project


75 Maiden Lane, Suite 601
New York, NY 10038

212‐285‐3025 tel  
www.nelp.org

©2015 National Employment Law Project. This presentation is covered by the 
Creative Commons “Attribution‐NonCommercial‐NoDerivatives” license fee.