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INRODUCTION

In today’s competitive world, an organization’s goal is to increase customer

base and to increase market share and also to achieve customer satisfaction through

high quality, optimum cost and quick delivery. The parameter of the marketing goal is

to satisfy the customers which cannot be compromised upon.

The performance of marketing is based on the satisfaction level of the

customers, every organization should take steps to increase the satisfaction level of the

customers. Therefore many innovative products and marketing strategies are evolved

and implemented to increase the customer base and also to satisfy them. The study is

thus focused on the customer satisfaction level of Big Bazaar and it’s products.

India is the country having the most unorganized retail market which is

expanding. The Indian Retail industry is the largest among all the industries, accounting

for over 10 per cent of the country’s GDP.The Retail industry has come forth as one of

the most dynamic and fast paced industries with several players entering the market.

The vast middle class and the almost untapped retail industry are the key attractive

forces for global retail giants wanting to enter Indian market, which will help Indian

retail industry to grow faster.

Purchasing power of Indian urban consumer is growing and branded, variety,

quality merchandise in categories like food, apparels, mobile, watches etc. are being

widely accepted by urban Indian consumer. Retailers need to take advantage of this

growth by paying more attention to products, competitive pricing, accessability and

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attractive offers that satisfy and delight the customer. Thus customer satisfaction plays

a pivotal role in the success of a hypermarket, supermarket etc.

Studies reveal that it is five times costlier to get a new customer, so customer

retention or repeated purchase by customers should be given more attention. Customer

retention depends on satisfaction level of customer about a product perceived

performance on delivering value relative to a buyer’s expectation. If the products

performance falls short of the customer’s expectations, the buyer is dissatisfied. If

performance exceeds expectation, the buyer is delighted.

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INDUSTRY PROFILE

About Hypermarket

In commerce, a hypermarket is a superstore which combines a supermarket and

a department store. The result is a very large retail facility which carries an enormous

range of products under one roof, including full lines of groceries and general

merchandise. When they are planned, constructed, and executed correctly, a consumer

can ideally satisfy all of their routine weekly shopping needs in one trip.

The format was pioneered by Carrefour upon opening its first such store in 1963

at Sainte-Geneviève-des-Bois, France, In the Americas, the Oshawa group introduced

the first hypermarket in North America near Montreal in 1973.

The first hypermarket was introduced in the United States in 1987. In the late

1980s and early 1990s, the three major discount store chains in the United States—

Wal-Mart, Kmart and Target—started developing discount stores in the hypermarket

format. Wal-Mart introduced Hypermart USA in 1987 and later Wal-Mart Super center,

and Kmart developed Super Kmart. In 1991, Dayton-Hudson Corporation (now Target

Corporation) expanded its Target Greatland discount store chain into Columbus, Ohio,

where it learned that its general merchandise superstores were unable to compete

against the Meijer hypermarket chain. In response, Dayton-Hudson entered the

hypermarket format in 1995 by opening its first SuperTarget store in Omaha, Nebraska.

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List of hypermarkets in Important Countries

France

• Carrefour

• Auchan

• E.Leclerc

• Géant

• Hyper U

Italy

• Auchan

• Carrefour

• Panorama

• Ipercoop

• Interspar (or Iperspar in some towns)

United Kingdom

• Asda

• Tesco

• Sainsbury's

• Morrison's

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United States

• Meijer

• Fred Meyer

• Super Kmart

• SuperTarget

• Bigg's

• Wal-Mart Supercenter

Canada

In Canada, Loblaw's operates the Real Canadian Superstore, Atlantic Superstore

and in Quebec Maxi & Cie. Wal-Mart has been operating stores in Canada since 1994.

However, in 2006, Wal-Mart began building larger stores similar to the

Supercenterformat in the United States. The first three opened in Ancaster, London, and

Stouffville in Ontario, with another 14 projected to open across Canada by the end of

the 2007. A number of existing stores may be expanded to reflect this change, where

space allows.

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PROFILE OF COMPANY

Company Profile-Future Group

Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited, is India’s leading retailer that operates

multiple retail formats in both the value and lifestyle segment of the Indian consumer

market. Headquartered in Mumbai (Bombay), the company operates over 10 million

square feet of retail space, has over 1000 stores across 61 cities in India and employs

over 30,000 people.

The company’s leading formats include Pantaloons, a chain of fashion outlets,

Big Bazaar, a uniquely Indian hypermarket chain, Food Bazaar, a supermarket chain,

blends the look, touch and feel of Indian bazaars with aspects of modern retail like

choice, convenience and quality and Central, a chain of seamless destination malls.

Some of its other formats include, Depot, Shoe Factory, Brand Factory, Blue Sky,

Fashion Station, aLL, Top 10, mBazaar and Star and Sitara.

A subsidiary company, Home Solutions Retail (India) Limited, operates Home

Town, a large-format home solutions store, Collection i, selling home furniture

products and E-Zone focused on catering to the consumer electronics segment.

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Pantaloon Retail was recently awarded the International Retailer of the Year

2007 by the US-based National Retail Federation (NRF) and the Emerging Market

Retailer of the Year 2007 at the World Retail Congress held in Barcelona.

Pantaloon Retail is the flagship company of Future Group, a business group catering to

the entire Indian consumption space.

Future Group is one of the country’s leading business groups present in retail,

asset management, consumer finance, insurance, retail media, retail spaces and

logistics. The group’s flagship company, Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited operates

over 10 million square feet of retail space, has over 1,000 stores and employs over

30,000 people.

Future Group is present in 61 cities and 65 rural locations in India. Some of its

leading retail formats include, Pantaloons, Big Bazaar, Central, Food Bazaar, Home

Town, eZone, Depot, Future Money and online retail format, futurebazaar.com.

Future Group companies includes, Future Capital Holdings, Future Generali

India Indus League Clothing and Galaxy Entertainment that manages Sports Bar, Brew

Bar and Bowling Co. Future Capital Holdings, the group’s financial arm, focuses on

asset management and consumer credit.

The group’s joint venture partners include Italian insurance major, Generali,

French retailer ETAM group, US-based stationary products retailer, Staples Inc and

UK-based Lee Cooper and India-based Talwalkar’s, Blue Foods and Liberty Shoes.

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Future Group’s vision is to, “deliver Everything, Everywhere, Every time to

Every Indian Consumer in the most profitable manner.” The group considers ‘Indian-

ness’ as a core value and its corporate credo is - Rewrite rules, Retain values.

Futurebazaar.com is owned and operated by Future Bazaar India Ltd., a subsidiary of

Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited.

Future Group Manifesto

“Future” – the word which signifies optimism, growth, achievement, strength,

beauty, rewards and perfection. Future encourages us to explore areas yet unexplored,

write rules yet unwritten; create new opportunities and new successes. To strive for a

glorious future brings to us our strength, our ability to learn, unlearn and re-learn our

ability to evolve.

We, in Future Group, will not wait for the Future to unfold itself but

create_future_scenarios in the consumer space and facilitate consumption because

consumption is development. Thereby, we will effect socio-economic development for

our customers, employees, shareholders, associates and partners.

Our customers will not just get what they need, but also get them where, how

and when they need. We will not just post satisfactory results, we will write success

stories. We will not just operate efficiently in the Indian economy, we will evolve it.

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We will not just spot trends; we will set trends by marrying our

understanding of the Indian consumer to their needs of tomorrow.

It is this understanding that has helped us succeed. And it is this that will help us

succeed in the Future. We shall keep relearning. And in this process, do just one thing.

Rewrite Rules. Retain Values.

Group Vision

Future Group shall deliver Everything, Everywhere, Every time for Every Indian

Consumer in the most profitable manner.

Group Mission

We share the vision and belief that our customers and stakeholders shall be

served only by creating and executing future scenarios in the consumption space

leading to economic development.

We will be the trendsetters in evolving delivery formats, creating retail realty,

making consumption affordable for all customer segments – for classes and for

masses.

We shall infuse Indian brands with confidence and renewed ambition. We shall

be efficient, cost- conscious and committed to quality in whatever we do.

We shall ensure that our positive attitude, sincerity, humility and united

determination shall be the driving force to make us successful.

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Core Value

• Indianness: confidence in ourselves.

• Leadership: to be a leader, both in thought and business.

• Respect & Humility: to respect every individual and be humble in our conduct.

• Introspection: leading to purposeful thinking.

• Openness: to be open and receptive to new ideas,knowledge and information.

• Valuing and Nurturing Relationships: to build long term relationships.

• Simplicity & Positivity: Simplicity and Positivity in our thought, business.

• Adaptability: to be flexible and adaptable, to meet challenges.

• Flow: to respect and understand the universal laws of nature.

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Company Timeline

Major Milestones

1987 Company incorporated as Manz Wear Pvt Ltd,Launch of Pantaloons

trouser,India’s first formal trouser brand.

1991 Launch of BARE,the Indian jeans brand.

1992 Initial Public Offer (IPO) was made in the month of May.

1993 The Pantaloon Shoppe-exclusive menswear store in franchisee format

launched across the nation. The company starts the distribution of branded garments

through multi-brand retail outlets across the nation.

1994 John Miller-Formal shirt brand launched.

1997 Pantaloons-India’s family store launched in Kolkata.

2001 Big Bazaar-India’s first hypermarket chain launched.

2002 Food Bazaar-the supermarket chain launched.

2004 Central-India’s first seamless mall launched in Bangalore.

2005 Fashion Station-the popular fashion chain is launched.

2006 Future Capital holdings launched.

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Big Bazaar

Big Bazaar is a chain of department stores in India, currently with 92 stores. It is

owned by the Pantaloon Retail India Ltd, Future Group. It works on the same economy

model as Wal-Mart and has considerable success in many Indian cities and small

towns.

The goods are supplied from the Bangalore branch of Big Bazaar. The Big

Bazaar, Chennai branch consists of 200 employees. It has 19 departments.

The functional areas in Big Bazaar are Human resource, marketing, IT, admin,

commercial, tailoring and logistics.

The departments are given below.

1. Medicine bazaar (thulasi)

2. NBD(glasses,watches,car accessories,helmet,cosmetics)

3. Mobile bazaar

4. Men’s wear

5. Women’s wear

6. Kids wear

7. Foot wear

8. Luggages

9. Electronics bazaar

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10. Furniture

11. Home linen& Home décor

12. Depot

13. Crockery

14. Utensils

15. Future money

16. Plastics

17. Toys

18. Food Bazaar

19. Customer service desk

The sales persons working there are well trained to serve the customers. They

are getting promotion as team leader for their best performance with increase in salary

and incentives are also given. Employee discount cards are given to every employee for

their purchasing in Big Bazaar.The idea was pioneered by entrepreneur Kishore Biyani,

the CEO of Future Group.

It is the biggest and the fastest growing chain of department store and aims to

have 150 by June 2009 and 350 stores by the end of year 2010. Currently Big Bazaar

stores are located only in India. Big Bazaar is not just another hypermarket. It caters to

every need of a family. Where Big Bazaar scores over other stores is its value for

money proposition for the Indian consumers.

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At Big Bazaar, we can get the best products at the best prices - that’s what they

guarantee. With the ever increasing array of private labels, it has opened the doors into

the world of fashion and general merchandise including home furnishings, utensils,

crockery, cutlery, sports goods and much more at prices that will surprise you. And this

is just the beginning. Big Bazaar plans to add much more to complete your shopping

experience.

Many Big Bazaar stores have a grocery department and vegetable section called

the Food Bazaar. Big Bazaar stores in Metros have a gaming area and kids' play area

for entertainment. These have proven to be very popular as a hang-out area for people

of all age groups.

Lines of Business

• E-tailing

• Food

• Books/music

• Fashion

• Telecom/IT

• Home/electronics

• General merchandise

• Leisure/entertainment

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Board of Directors

Kishore Biyani is the Managing Director of Pantaloon Retail (India) Limited

and the Group Chief Executive Officer of Future Group. He has led Pantaloon

Retail’s emergence as the India’s leading retailer operating multiple retail formats

that now cater to almost the consumption basket of a large section of Indian

consumers.

Kishore Biyani led the company’s foray into organized retail with the opening

up of the Pantaloons family store in 1997. This was followed in 2001 with the launch

of Big Bazaar, a uniquely Indian hypermarket format that democratized shopping in

India. It blends the look, touch and feel of Indian bazaars with aspects of modern retail

like choice, convenience and quality. This was followed by a number of other formats

including Food Bazaar, Central and Home Town.

The year, 2006 marked the evolution of Future Group, that brought together the

multiple initiatives taken by group companies in the areas of Retail, Brands, Space,

Capital, Logistics and Media. Kishore Biyani advocates ‘Indianness’ as the core value

driving the group. The group’s corporate credo is ‘Rewrite Rules, Retain Values.’

Kishore Biyani was awarded the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year 2006

in the Services Sector and the Lakshmipat Singhania - IIM Lucknow Young Business

Leader Award by Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh in 2006.

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He was also awarded the CNBC First Generation Entrepreneur of the Year

2006.Kishore Biyani was born in August, 1961 and is married to Sangita and they have

two daughters. He recently authored a book, ‘It Happened In India’ that captures his

entrepreneurial journey and the growth of modern retailing in India.

Mr.Gopikishan Biyani-Wholetime Director

Mr.Rakesh Biyani-Wholetime Director

Mr.Ved Prakash Arya-Director

Mr.Shailesh Haribhakti-Independent Director

Mr.S.Doreswamy-Independent Director

Dr.D.O.Koshy-Independent Director

Ms.Anju Poddar-Independent Director

Ms.Bala Deshpande-Independent Director

Mr.Anil Harish-Independent Director

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Affiliate Companies

Home Solutions Retail (India) Ltd

Future Brands Ltd

Future Media (India) Ltd

Future Logistic Solutions Ltd

Convergem Communication (India) Ltd

Pantaloon Food Product (India) Ltd

Future Knowledge Services Ltd

Future Capital Holdings Ltd

Future Generali India Insurance Company Ltd

Future Generali India Life Insurance Company Ltd

Future Bazaar India Ltd

Weavette Textiles Ltd

Staples Future Office Products Pvt Ltd

Alpha Future Airport Retail Pvt Ltd

Pan India Foods Solutions Pvt Ltd

Talwalkars Pantaloons Fitness Pvt Ltd

Joint Venture With Axiom Telecom LLC,UAE

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Awards and Recognition

2008

The Reid & Taylor Awards For Retail Excellence 2008

• Retail Leadership Award: Kishore Biyani

• Retail Best Employer of the Year: Future Group

• Retailer of The Year: Home Products and Office Improvements: HomeTown

The Reid & Taylor Awards for Retail Excellence are an important feature of the

Asia Retail Congress - Asia’s single most important global platform to promote world-

class retail practices - and are aimed at honouring the best, in Asian Retail scenario.

India played host to Asia Retail Congress 2008.

Coca-Cola Golden Spoon Awards 2008

• Most Admired Food & Grocery Retail Visionary of the Year: Kishore Biyani

• Most Admired Food & Grocery Retailer of the Year – Supermarkets: Food

Bazaar

• Most Admired Food & Grocery Retailer of the Year - Hypermarkets: Big

Bazaar

• Most Admired Retailer of the Year - Dynamic Growth in Network Expansion

across Food, Beverages & Grocery: Future Group

• Most Admired Food & Grocery Retailer of the Year - Consumer's Choice: Big

Bazaar

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The Coca-Cola Golden Spoon Awards 2008, were given away for the first time

as a culmination of the ‘Food Forum India 2008’ – a two day convention which saw the

participation of leading brands, retailers & retail support organizations from across the

globe. The awards were presented to honour enterprise, innovation and achievement in

the food retailing business as a benchmark of excellence.

2007

Images Retail Awards

• Most Admired Retail Face Of the Year: Kishore Biyani

• Most Admired Retailer Of the Year: Food and Grocery; Food bazaar.

• Most Admired Retailer Of the Year: Home and Office improvement;

Hometown

• Most Admired Retail Company Of the Year: Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.

National Retail Federation Awards

• International Retailer for the Year 2007- Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.

World Retail Congress Awards

• Emerging Market Retailer for the Year 2007- Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.

Hewitt Best Employers 2007

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• Best Employers In India (Rank 14th)- Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.

PC World Indian Website Awards

• Best Indian Website in the Shopping Category-Futurebazaar.com

Reader’s Digest Trusted Brands Platinum Awards

• Trusted Brands Platinum Award (Supermarket Category)-Big Bazaar

2006

Retail Asia Pacific Top 500 Awards

• Asia Pacific Best of the Best Retailers- Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.

• Best Retailer in India- Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.

Asia money Awards

• Best Managed Company in India (Mid-Cap) - Pantaloon Retail (India) Ltd.

Ernst and Young Entrepreneur Of the Year Award

• Ernst and Young Entrepreneur Of the Year (Services)-Kishore Biyani

CNBC Indian Business Leaders Awards

• The First Generation Entrepreneur of the Year -Kishore Biyani

Lakshmipat Singhania-IIM,Lucknow National Leadership Awards

• Young Business Leader-Kishore Biyani

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Images Retail Awards

• Best Value Retail Store-Big Bazaar

• Best Retail Destination-Big Bazaar

• Best Food and Grocery Store-Food Bazaar

Reader’s Digest Awards

• Platinum Trusted Brands Award- Big Bazaar

CNBC Awaaz Consumer Awards

• Most Preferred Large Food & Grocery Supermarket-Big Bazaar

Reid & Taylor Awards for Retail Excellence

• Retail Entrepreneur of the Year-Kishore Biyani

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REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Customer Satisfaction

Customer satisfaction depends on a product perceived performance on

delivering value relative to a buyer’s expectation. If the products performance falls

short of the customer’s expectations, the buyer is dissatisfied. If performance exceeds

expectation, the buyer is delighted. Customer satisfaction is seen as a key performance

indicator within business and is part of the four perspectives of a Balanced Scorecard.

Outstanding marketing companies go out of their way to keep their customers

satisfied. Satisfied customers make repeat purchases, and they tell others about their

good experiences with the product. Therefore many marketing strategies are evolved

and implemented to increase the customer base and also to satisfy them. The key is to

match customer expectations with company performance. Smart companies aim to

delight customers by promising only what they can deliver, then delivering more than

they promise.

“Satisfaction is a function of perceived performance and expectation. If the

performance falls short of expectations the customer is dissatisfied. If the performance

matches the expectation, the customer is highly satisfied or delighted.”

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Measuring Customer Satisfaction

Organizations are increasingly interested in retaining existing customers while

targeting non-customers; measuring customer satisfaction provides an indication of

how successful the organization is at providing products and/or services to the

marketplace.

Customer satisfaction is an ambiguous and abstract concept and the actual

manifestation of the state of satisfaction will vary from person to person and

product/service to product/service. The state of satisfaction depends on a number of

both psychological and physical variables which correlate with satisfaction behaviours

such as return and recommend rate.

The level of satisfaction can also vary depending on other options the customer

may have and other products against which the customer can compare the

organization’s products. Because satisfaction is basically a psychological state, care

should be taken in the effort of quantitative measurement. Customer satisfaction is seen

as a key performance indicator in business.

Brodeur defined ten ‘Quality Values’ which influence satisfaction behaviour,

further expanded by Berry and known as the ten domains of satisfaction.

These ten domains of satisfaction include:

• Quality Environment

• Value Interdepartmental team work

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• Timeliness Front line service behaviours

• Efficiency Commitment to the customer

• Ease of access Innovation

These factors are emphasized for continuous improvement and organizational

change measurement and are most often utilized to develop the architecture for

satisfaction measurement as an integrated model.

The usual measure of customer satisfaction involves a survey with a set of

statements using a Likert Technique or scale. Customer satisfaction can help the

business achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. It’s about understands the way a

customer feels after purchasing a product or service and, in particular, whether or not

that product or service meet the customer’s expectations.

Customers primarily form their expectations through past purchasing

experiences, word of mouth from family, friends and colleagues and information

delivered through marketing activities, such as advertising or public relations. If the

customer’s expectation isn’t met, they will be dissatisfied and it’s very likely they will

tell others about their experience.

Why Customer Satisfaction is Important

Customer satisfaction is becoming an important area of competition. A high level of

satisfaction can deliver many benefits, including;

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• Loyalty: a highly satisfied customer is a loyal customer.

• Repeat purchase: a highly satisfied customer buys more products.

• Referrals: a highly satisfied customer tells their family and friends about the

product or service.

• Retention: a highly satisfied customer is less likely to switch brands.

• Reduced costs: a highly satisfied customer costs less to serve than a new

customer.

• Premium prices: a highly satisfied customer is willing to pay more for the

product or service.

Customer Satisfaction Research

Satisfaction surveys are an important method for collecting information about

how the customers think and feel the brand, product or service. A satisfaction survey

can help us to understand the expectations of the customers, determine whether the

customers believe the product, brand or service, determine whether meeting those

expectations, identify new customer requirements or trends in the market and determine

what areas of the business need investment.

A good customer satisfaction survey will also help us to understand the causes

of dissatisfaction among the customers. Once identified, these issues will be able to

implement new practices to improve customer satisfaction.

Many businesses systematically measure customer satisfaction through

independent surveys, feedback forms, mystery shopping and focus groups. Some third

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party surveys also compare the customer satisfaction of major competitors, which

allows companies to benchmark themselves in their relevant sector. Measuring

customer satisfaction doesn’t have to be expensive. It can be as simple as preparing a

short feedback form or conducting a brief telephone interview that asks the customer to

rate the product or service on a number of criteria.

Indicators of Customer Satisfaction

An important indicator of customer satisfaction is the customer retention rate.

To calculate the customer retention rate, we will need to capture data about the total

number of customers and the .number of customers switching brands. If we track this

information over time, we will be able to see whether we are improving the customer

retention and satisfaction.

Another tool has been introduced in Australia is the Net Promoter Scores, which

provide a new metric for measuring customer loyalty. The Net Promoter Scores ask one

simple question about whether a customer would recommend a product or service to a

friend or colleague. This question has been identified as the ultimate determinant of

customer satisfaction or loyalty.

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RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Research Methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It

is a careful investigation or inquiry specially done through search for new facts in any

branch of knowledge.

Field of Study

According to the topic, the researcher focused his study on Big Bazaar as the

target group.Big Bazaar is a chain of department stores in India, currently with 92

stores. It is owned by the Pantaloon Retail India Ltd, Future Group. It works on the

same economy model as Wal-Mart and has considerable success in many Indian cities

and small towns.

Pilot study

In research, it is considered to do some field observations and as such the

researcher may undertake some sort of preliminary survey or it is called as pilot study.

The researcher went to Big Bazaar to see whether the company is suitable for the study.

The researcher selected a topic which will be suitable for future reference .The guide

also accepted to do the research and said that he will guide the researcher.

Research Design

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The researcher used descriptive research design for the research study.

Descriptive design means concerned with the research studies with a focus on

describing the characteristics of a group or individual or situation. Research design is

an arrangement of condition for collection and analysis of data in a manner that aims to

combine relevant the research purpose with economy in procedure.

Research Instrument

Research tools employed for meeting the objective of the study were both open

ended and closed ended questions. All the chapters of the study will be different in

which it gives new information.

Sampling Plan

It is not possible to collect information from the whole universe, the

researcher resorted to sampling method. “Sample” is that portion of the universe of

population, which is selected as the representative for the purpose of the study. It is a

known fact, that smaller the sample size higher will be the statistical error. Hence

optimum size of “300” is chosen. Probability Random sampling is applied to take

samples from the customers.

Sample Area

In this study, sample size is restricted to 300 respondents in Chennai.

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Sample Unit

Sample units are the customers of Big Bazaar.

Data Collection

With the prior permission of the head of the institution, the researcher meets

the respondents who are freely able to answer. First of all a rapport is created with the

respondents by clearly informing them the nature and objectives of the study. The

respondents are asked to take his/her own time and doubt if any, regarding questions

are clarified.In order to gather relevant and correct data, the respondents are given

assurance that the data gathered are highly confidential in nature and are purely for the

purpose of research study.

Sources of Data

There are two types of data sources

• Primary data

• Secondary data

Primary Data

Primary data are those which are collected fresh and for the first time and this

happen to be original Eg: - questionnaire. The primary data was collected through

questionnaire from the customers of the company.

Secondary Data

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Secondary data are those which have already been collected by someone else

which have already been passed through the statistical process..Eg:-books.websites.The

secondary data were collected through books, websites which were related to the topic.

The topic was mainly about customer satisfaction.

Statistical Tools Used

• Simple Percentage Analysis Method

• Chi square test

• Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)

• Spearman’s coefficient of correlation (or) Rank Correlation

• Weighted Average Analysis

• Perceptual Mapping

Period of Study

The study was conducted for a period nearly three months, i.e., from January

2009 to March 2009 at the works of the Company. The assistance of the managers of

the company was taken to spare the respondents to answer the questionnaire. The

company extended full help and support.

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OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY

Primary objective:

• To study the customer satisfaction level among the customers of Big Bazaar.

Secondary Objectives:

• To study the demographics of customers in Big Bazaar.

• To find the rating of 4 Ps of marketing by customers.

• To identify which promotional offer benefits customers the most.

• To find the overall satisfaction level of customers.

• To give suitable suggestions to improve customer’s satisfaction in Big Bazaar.

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RESEARCH PROBLEM

Organizations are increasingly interested in retaining existing customers while

targeting non-customers; measuring customer satisfaction provides an indication of

how successful the organization is at providing products and/or services to the

marketplace. In the present scenario of slowdown, cost cutting and increasing cost of

rental, customers have cut down on their purchase of products and services. So it

becomes necessary for retailers to identify the taste and preference of customers, their

level of satisfaction on various aspects of the products etc.

Big Bazaar having variety of low cost products and several promotional offers,

a study on customer satisfaction enables them to decide whether to introduce a new

product, cut the cost or retain a promotional offer and also decide on their expenditure

in sourcing products and creating offers.

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NEED FOR THE STUDY

Big Bazaar, the flagship company of Pantaloon Retail India Ltd, owned by

Future Group has several varieties of products, innovative and exciting promotional

offers and a strong customer base of different age group. So it is necessary to study the

consumer’s perception of the products and seek their feedback or suggestion for

improvement.

This study is aimed at studying the satisfaction level of customers on various

factors like attributes, promotional offers, price of products, overall satisfaction level

and what is their frequency of visit to various sections. Such a study can help the

company devise new marketing strategies, study the demographics of customers, get a

view of customer’s purchasing pattern and be competitive in the market.

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SCOPE OF THE STUDY

• The study was aimed at measuring the customer’s satisfaction level through

well designed questionnaires.

• The study may help the company to devise new marketing strategies.

• To know the customer’s rating of 4Ps of marketing in the hypermarket.

• The study will also help the company to know about the demographics of the

customers and their respective choices.

• To know the customer’s view and factors that attracts them to purchase from the

hypermarket.

• The study will help the company to identify it’s pitfalls and also improve them.

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LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY

• The survey was limited only to the customers of Big Bazaar outlet at T.Nagar,

Chennai.

• A sample size of only 300 respondents could be taken.

• Time is the major limiting factor as the available time for survey was only three

months.

• The accuracy of the findings is trusted by the accuracy of the statistical tools

used for analysis.

• Few respondents were reluctant while answering the questions due to their busy

schedule.

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ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

Analysis and interpretation plays a vital role in every research. This chapter

clearly represents the data and statistical analysis with the help of tables and diagrams

to interpret the data logically in order to bring about the main findings based on that

suggestions could be made.

Analysis is not complete without interpretation, interpretation cannot proceed

without analysis and both are mutually interdependent. It is the task to make use of

interpretation as the tool to find out a link or a position of the study in whole analytical

frame work. The following statistical tools are used for analysis;

• Simple Percentage Analysis Method

• Chi square test

• Analysis of Variance (ANOVA)

• Spearman’s coefficient of correlation (or) Rank Correlation

• Weighted Average Analysis

• Perceptual Mapping

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Table 1

Classification based on gender

Gender No. Of Respondents Percentage

Males 186 62

Females 114 38

37
Inference

From the above table it is clear that 62% of respondents were male and 38% of

respondents were female.

Chart 1

N o . O f R e s p o n d e n ts

38 %

M a le s
F em a le s

62 %

38
Table 2

Classification based on Age and Occupation

Occupation/Age 11-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50 and Total


in years above
Student 16 17 0 0 0 33

Professional 0 55 44 32 31 162

Self employed 0 12 15 20 4 51

Homemaker 0 8 12 0 19 39

Others 0 0 4 4 7 15

Total 16 92 75 56 61 300

39
Inference

From the above table it is clear that there are 16 respondents in the age group 11-19, 92

respondents in the age group 20-29, 75 respondents in the age group 30-39, 56

respondents in the age group 40-49 and 61 respondents in the age group 50 and above.

Chart 2

C la s s ific a tio n b a s e d o n A g e a n d O c c u p a tio n

60

50
S tudent
40
P ro fe s s io n a l
30 S e lf e m p lo y e d
H om em ak er
20
O th e rs
10

0
1 1 to 1 9 2 0 -2 9 3 0 -3 9 4 0 -4 9 5 0 a n d a b o ve

40
Table 3

Classification based on Age and Frequency of Visit

Age/Frequency Once in a Once in a Once in a Once in 3


of visit week fortnight month months Total

11-19 0 0 12 4 16

20-29 16 7 59 8 90

30-39 15 16 20 24 75

40-49 4 8 32 12 56

50 and above 0 8 23 32 63

Total 35 39 146 80 300

41
Inference

From the above table it is clear that 35 respondents visit once in a week, 39 respondents

visit once in a fortnight, 146 respondents visit once in a month, 80 respondents visit once

in 3 months.

Chart 3

70

60

50
O n c e in a w ee k
40
O n c e in a fo rtn igh t

30 O n c e in a m o n th
O n c e in 3 m o n th s
20

10

0
1 1 to 1 9 20 -29 3 0-3 9 4 0 -4 9 5 0 a nd ab o ve

42
Table 4

Classification based on Income level

Monthly Income No. of Respondents Percentage


<Rs.9000 15 5
Rs.9001-18000 82 27

Rs.18001-27000 43 14

>Rs.27000 80 27

No Income 80 27

Total 300 100

43
Inference

From the above table it is clear that 27% of respondents have salary between Rs.9001-

18000, 14% of respondents have salary between Rs.18001-27000, 27% of respondents

have salary above R.27000, 27% of respondents have no salary, 5% of respondents

have salary less than Rs.9000 and 27% have no income.

Chart 4

C la s s ific a tio n b a s e d o n In c o m e le v e l

30

25

20

15 P erc ent

10

0
< R s .9000 R s .9001-18000
R s .18001-27000> R s .27000 N o Inc om e

44
Table 5

Classification based on Income level and Sex

Male Percentage Female Percentage


Monthly Income/Sex Total
<Rs.9000 4 2 11 10 15

Rs.9001-18000 62 33 20 17 82

Rs.18001-27000 20 11 23 21 43

>Rs.27000 76 41 4 3 80

No Income 24 13 56 49 80

Total 186 100 114 100 300

45
Inference

From the above table it is clear that 2% male and 10% female have salary less than

Rs.9000 per month, 33% male and 17% female have salary between Rs.9001-18000 per

month, 11% male and 21% female have salary between Rs.18001-27000 per month,

41% male and 3% female have salary above R.27000 per month and 13% male and

49% female have no income.

Chart 5

C la s s ific a tio n b a s e d o n M o n th ly In c o m e a n d S e x

50
45
40
35
30
25 M a le P e rc e n t a g e
20
F e m a le P e rc e n t a g e
15
10
5
0
< R s . 9 0 0 0R s . 9 0 0 1 -R s . 1 8 0 0 1>-R s . 2 7 0 0N0o In c o m e
18000 27000

46
Table 6

Classification based on Visit to various Sections

Section/Visit Always Sometimes Rarely Total


Crockery,Plastics,Linen 67 114 119 300
Men's section 90 100 110 300
Ladies and Kids 111 74 115 300
Food bazaar 182 76 42 300
Furniture bazaar 16 47 237 300
Mobiles and Watches 11 32 257 300

Chart 6

47
Visit to various Sections

Mobiles and Watches

Furniture bazaar

Food bazaar Always


Sometimes
Ladies and Kids Rarely

Men's section

Crockery,Plastics,Linen

0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350

Inference

From the above table it is clear that mobiles and watches section is the rarest visited

section,86%,always visited section is food bazaar,61% and highest percentage of

sometimes visited section is crockery and plastics,38%.

Table 7

Customer opinion on Pricing

Pricing No. of Respondents Percentage


16 5
Very High
31 10
High
181 61
Medium
72 24
Low
300 100
Total

48
Inference

From the above table it is clear that 5% of respondents feel that the pricing is very high,

10% of respondents feel that the pricing is high, 61% of respondents feel that the

pricing is medium and 24% of respondents feel that the pricing is low.

Chart 7

49
C u sto m er o p in io n o n P ricin g

70

60

50

40
P erc entage
30

20

10

0
V ery High High M edium Low

Table 8

50
Analysis on whether Price of products are Low compared to other

Retailers

Low Price No. of Respondents Percentage

Yes 138 46

No 162 54

Total 300 100

Inference

51
From the above table it is clear that 46% of respondents feel that the pricing is low

compared to other retailers and 54% of respondents feel that the pricing is not low

compared to other retailers.

Chart 8

Analysis on whether Price of products are Low compared to


other retailers

46%
Yes
No
54%

52
Table 9

Rating of Customer service

No. of respondents Percentage


Customer service
19 6
Very Good
158 53
Good
91 31
Average
16 5
Poor
16 5
Very poor
300 100
Total

Inference

53
From the above table it is clear that 6% of respondents feel that the customer service is

very good, 53% of respondents feel that the customer service is good, 31% of

respondents feel that the customer service is average and 5% of respondents feel that

the customer service is poor and very poor.

Chart 9

Rating of Customer service

60

50

40

30 Percentage

20

10

0
Very Good Good Average Poor Very poor

54
Table 10

Analysis on whether Price of products are proportional to Quality

Products proportional to No. of respondents Percentage


Quality
56 19
Strongly agree
217 72
Agree
23 7
Disagree
4 2
Strongly disagree
300 100
Total

Inference

55
From the above table it is clear that 19% of respondents strongly agree,72% of
respondents agree,7% of respondents disagree and 2% of respondents strongly disagree
that price of the product are proportional to quality.

Chart 10

Analysis on w hether Price of the products are proportional to


Quality

80
70
60
50
40
Percentage
30
20
10
0
Strongly agree Agree D is agree Strongly dis agree

56
Table 11

Utilization of Promotional Offers

Promotional Offers Yes Percentage No Percentage


Monthly savings 252
bazaar 48 16 84
116 184
Big Day 39 61
124 176
Exchange Offer 41 59
88 212
Wednesday Bazaar 29 71

Inference

57
From the above table it is clear that 16% of respondents have utilized Monthly savings

bazaar offer,39% of respondents have utilized Big Day offer,41% of respondents have

utilized Exchange offer and 29% of respondents have utilized Wednesday bazaar offer.

Chart 11

U tiliz ation of P rom otion al offers

90
80
70
60 M onthly s avings baz aar
50 B ig Day
40 E x c hange O ffer
30 W ednes day B az aar
20
10
0
Y es P erc entage No P erc entage

58
Table 12

Frequency of visit to various sections during Big Day offer

Big Day
Sections Always Sometimes Rarely users

Food bazaar 72 40 4 116

Crockery,Plastics,Linen 28 52 36 116

Men’s section 28 44 44 116

Ladies and Kids 68 28 20 116

Furniture bazaar 12 12 92 116

Mobiles and Watches 8 12 96 116

Inference

59
From the above table it is clear that 62% of respondents visit Food Bazaar always

during Big Day and 82% of respondents rarely visit mobiles, watches section during

Big Day.

Table 13

Classification based on Occupation and Satisfaction level

Highly Highly
Occupation/Rating satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied dissatisfied Total
Student 0 28 4 0 0 32
Professional 4 129 28 0 0 161
Self employed 4 31 12 4 0 51
Homemaker 4 24 8 4 0 40
Others 4 4 4 0 4 16
Total 16 216 56 8 4 300

Inference

60
From the above table it is clear that 80% of professionals, 60% of homemakers, 88% of

students and 61% of self employed respondents are satisfied with the performance of

Big Bazaar.

Chart 12

C la s s ific a tio n b a s e d o n O c c u p a tio n a n d S a tis fa c tio n le v e l

140
120
100 H igh ly s atis fie d
S a tis fie d
80
N e u tra l
60
D is s a tis fie d
40 H igh ly d is s a tis fie d
20
0
S tu de n t P ro fe s s ion a l S elf H o m e m a k er O th e rs
e m p lo y ed

61
Chi Square Test-1

Null Hypothesis-H0: There is no significant relationship between gender and overall

satisfaction level.

Alternate Hypothesis-H1: There is significant relationship between gender and overall

satisfaction level.

Table 14

Gender Vs Overall Satisfaction level

Highly Highly
Gender Satisfied Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied dissatisfied Total

Male 8 116 44 8 10 186

Female 8 83 12 5 6 114

Total 16 199 56 13 16 300

62
Calculation

Observed Expected O(i)-E(i) [[O(i)-E(i)]²]/E(i)


frequency O(i) frequency E(i)
8 9.92 -1.92 0.3716
8 6.08 1.92 0.6063
116 123.38 -7.38 0.4414
83 75.62 7.38 0.7202
44 34.72 9.28 2.4803
12 21.28 -9.28 4.0469
8 8.06 -0.06 0.0004
5 4.94 0.06 0.0007
10 9.92 0.08 0.0006
6 6.08 -0.08 0.0010
TOTAL 8.6694

Calculated value = Σ [[O (i)-E(i)]²]/E(i)

= 8.6694

Level of Significance = 5%

Degree of freedom = (R-1)(C-1)

= (2-1)(5-1)

=4

χ² = 9.488 at 5% level of significance

63
Inference

As the calculated value is less than table value null hypothesis H0 is accepted. There is

no significant relationship between the gender and and overall satisfaction level.

64
Chi Square Test-2

Null Hypothesis-H0: There is no significant relationship between salary of the

respondents and frequency of visit.

Alternate Hypothesis-H1: There is significant relationship between salary of the

respondents and frequency of visit.

Table 15

Salary Vs Frequency of Visit

Salary < Once in a fortnight > Once in a month Total

<Rs.9000 7 8 15

Rs.9001-18000 19 63 82

Rs.18001-27000 20 23 43

>Rs.27000 20 60 80

No Income 8 72 80

Total 74 226 300

65
Calculation

Observed Expected O(i)-E(i) [[O(i)-E(i)]²]/E(i)


frequency O(i) frequency E(i)
7 3.7 3.3 2.9432
19 20.22 -1.22 0.0736
20 10.60 9.4 8.3358
20 19.73 0.27 0.0036
8 19.73 -11.73 6.9737
8 11.3 -3.3 0.9637
63 61.77 1.23 0.0244
23 32.39 -9.39 2.7222
60 60.26 -0.26 0.0011
72 60.26 11.74 2.2872
TOTAL 24.3285

Calculated value = Σ [[O (i)-E(i)]²]/E(i)

= 24.3285

Level of Significance = 5%

Degree of freedom = (R-1)(C-1)

= (5-1)(2-1)

=4

χ² = 9.488 at 5% level of significance

Inference

As the calculated value is greater than table value alternative hypothesis H1 is accepted.

There is significant relationship between salary of the respondents and frequency of

visit.

66
Anova

Null Hypothesis-H0: There is no significant relationship between age and satisfaction

level.

Alternate Hypothesis-H1: There is significant relationship between age and

satisfaction level.

Table 16

Age Vs Satisfaction level

Highly Satisfied Neutral Dissatisfied Highly Total


Age/Satisfaction satisfied dissatisfied
level
0 12 4 0 0
11-19 yrs 16
0 78 8 4 0
20-29 yrs 90
4 43 20 4 4
30-39 yrs 75
8 40 8 0 0
40-49 yrs 56
4 43 16 0 0
50 yrs and above 63
16 216 56 8 4
Total 300

67
Calculation

Correction Factor = T2 / N = (300)2 / 25 = 3600

Sum of squares between samples = ∑ (Tj)²/nj – (T)²/n

= (50128/5)-3600

= 6425.6

Sum of squares within samples = ∑ X²ij-∑(Tj)²/nj

= (12470)-10025.6

= 2444.4

Source of Sum of Degrees of Mean F-ratio

variable Squares(SS) Freedom Square(MS)


SS between 6425.6 (5-1) = 4 1606.4 13.14

samples
SS within 2444.4 (25-5) = 20 122.22

samples
Total 8870 (25-1) = 24

Calculated value = 13.14

Level of Significance = 5%

Table value = 2.87

Inference

As the calculated value is greater than table value, alternative hypothesis H1 is

accepted. There is significant relationship between age and satisfaction level of

respondents.

Rank Correlation

68
Table 17

Rank Correlation of 4Ps between Male and Female customers

Male (Weighted Female(Weighte


4Ps Avg value) Rank d Avg value Rank

Product 3.11 1 3.13 1

Price 2.3 3 2.47 2

Place 2.43 2 2.2 3

Promotion 2.15 4 2.19 4

Calculation

Male

Weighted
Rank 1 Rank 2 Rank 3 Rank 4 Total Average
Product 95*4 36*3 36*2 19*1 579/186 3.11
Price 20*4 60*3 62*2 44*1 428/186 2.3
Place 40*4 55*3 36*2 55*1 452/186 2.43
Promotion 31*4 35*3 52*2 68*1 401/186 2.15

Female

69
Weighted
Rank 1 Rank 2 Rank 3 Rank 4 Total Average
Product 51*4 35*3 20*2 8*1 357/114 3.13
Price 27*4 12*3 63*2 12*1 292/114 2.47
Place 24*4 27*3 11*2 52*1 251/114 2.2
Promotion 12*4 40*3 20*2 42*1 250/114 2.19

Male (Avg Female(Avg


4Ps value) Rank value) Rank d Σd²

Product 3.11 1 3.13 1 0 0

Price 2.3 3 2.47 2 1 1

Place 2.43 2 2.2 3 1 1

Promotion 2.15 4 2.19 4 0 0

Total 2

Σd² = 2

n= 4

Spearman’s coefficient of correlation = 1- (6Σd²/n(n²-1))

Spearman’s coefficient of correlation = 1- (6Σd²/n(n²-1))

70
= 1- ((6*2)/4(4²-1))

= 0.8

Spearman’s coefficient of correlation, r = 0.8

Inference

From the above calculation it is clear that there is a positive correlation between ranks

given by male and female customers to the 4Ps.

Weighted Average

71
Table 18

Weighted Average of Attributes

Attributes Weighted Average


Variety 2.9
Quality 2.96
Brands 2.44
Availability 2.6
Display 2.97

Calculation

Very Weighted
Attribute/Rating good Good Average Poor Total average
Variety 34*4 203*3 63*2 0 871/300 2.9
Quality 40*4 209*3 51*2 0 889/300 2.96
Brands 8*4 116*3 176*2 0 732/300 2.44
Availability 31*4 142*3 103*2 24*1 780/300 2.6
Display 51*4 198*3 43*2 8*1 892/300 2.97

W e ig h t a g e o f A t t r ib u t e s

3 .5 2 .9 6 2 .9 7
2 .9
Inference 3 2 .6
2 .4 4
Respondents2have
. 5 weighed display attribute the maximum 2.97 and brands attribute the
minimum 2.44.2
S e r ie s 1
1 .5 Chart 13
1
0 .5
72
0
Perceptual Mapping

73
Table 19

Perceptual Mapping-Weightage of Variety and Quality Vs Age group

Age/Attribute Variety Quality

11-19 yrs 2 2.25

20-29 yrs 2.06 2.01

30-39 yrs 1.84 1.73

40-49 yrs 1.85 2.14

50 yrs and above 1.76 1.93

Calculation

74
Variety

Very Weighted
Age/Rating Good Good Average Total Average
11-19 yrs 0*3 16*2 0*1 32/16 2
14*3 68*2 8*1 186/90
20-29 yrs 2.06

30-39 yrs 12*3 39*2 24*1 138/75 1.84


40-49 yrs 0*3 48*2 8*1 104/56 1.85
50 yrs and
8*3 32*2 23*1 111/63
above 1.76

Quality

Weighted
Very Good Average Total Average
Age/Rating Good
11-19 yrs 4*3 12*2 0*1 36/16 2.25
20-29 yrs 16*3 59*2 15*1 181/90 2.01
30-39 yrs 4*3 47*2 24*1 130/75 1.73
40-49 yrs 8*3 48*2 0*1 120/56 2.14
50 yrs and
8*3 43*2 12*1 122/63
above 1.93

Inference

Maximum respondents in the age group 20-29 have rated both quality and variety as the

best.

Chart 14

75
Perceptual Mapping-Weightage of Variety and Quality Vs Age group

FINDINGS

76
Demographic Findings

 Majority of the respondents are males (62%) followed by females(38%)

 Maximum respondents have salary above Rs.27000 per month (27%).

 Respondents in the age group 20-29 are maximum (30.6%).

 More than half of the respondents are professionals (54%).

Specific Findings

 70% of respondents have said that the qualities of the products are good.

 More than half of the respondents (54%) feel that price of products in Big

Bazaar are not low compared to other retailers.

 More than half of the respondents (59%) have said that the brands in the shop

are average.

 Exchange offer is the maximum utilized promotional offer ( 41%).

 Monthly savings bazaar offer is the minimum utilized promotional

offer;majority of respondents have not utilized (84%).

 Respondents have weighed display attribute the maximum 2.97 and brands

attribute the minimum 2.44.

 More than half of the respondents (53%) feel the customer service is good and

only 5% feel it is very poor.

 54% of respondents feel that price of products are not low compared to other

retailers.

 84% of respondents are not aware of the Monthly Savings Bazaar offer.

77
 72% of the respondents are satisfied with the overall performance of the shop.

 There is significant relationship between gender and overall satisfaction level.

 There is significant relationship between age and overall satisfaction level.

 Respondents have given more weight age to Product compared to other Ps of

the 4Ps.

 Many feel that the Parking facility has to be improved.

 Maximum respondents have visited the Food bazaar section during Big Day

offer.

78
SUGGESTIONS

 27% of the respondents are high income people, so parking facility has to be

improved.

 Must conduct comparative study on the price of various products with

competitors and work on pricing.

 Brands of various products have to be improved, rather than local brands.

 There is a need to create awareness about the various promotional offers

through effective advertisements and in store announcements.

 Beneficial offers should be introduced for customers.

 As 34% of respondents feel that the availability is average, proper stocking of

products should be done.

 Restrooms and crèches can be provided to attract customers.

 Gift vouchers and coupons may be provided for attracting customers.

 Variety of products in ‘Ladies, kids section’ has to be improved.

79
Conclusion

From the study it was found that 72% of the respondents are satisfied with the

overall performance of Big Bazaar taking into consideration several factors. On the

utilization of various offers, the awareness and information of certain offers are less

among the customers. So promotional activities need to be improved through in store

announcements, newspapers widely read by respondents etc.

Customer also feel that the brands and availability of the products are weak,

which has to be improved in a big way

80
BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books

1. C.R.Kothari ‘Research Methodology Methods and Techniques’, Revised 2nd

Edition, New Age International Publishers, 2004.

2. Philip Kotler,’Marketing Management’, Revised Edition, Prentice Hall of India,

New Delhi, 2006.

3. Philip Kotler and Kevin Lane Keller,’ Marketing Management’, Dorling

Kinersley (India) Pvt Ltd, 2007.

4. Ravi Shanker,’Services Marketing’, Excel Books, New Delhi, 2002.

Websites

1. www.bigbazaar.com

2. www.pantaloon.com

3. www.workforce.com

81
QUESTIONNAIRE

Dear Respondents,

I am Mathews George studying in Velammal College of Management

and Computer Studies, doing MBA. I am doing research project on “A study on

customer satisfaction in Big Bazaar, Chennai during January to March 2010”.The

following questionnaire is a very important step towards my academic career. I request

your fullest co-operation in answering these questions.

I assure you that all the below information disclosed by you will be kept

confidential.

1. Name:

2. Sex: a) Male b) Female

3. Age:

a) <10 years b) 11-19 years c) 20-29 years d) 30-39 years e) 40-49 years

f) 50 years and above

4. Occupation:

a) Student b) Professional c) Self employed d) Homemaker e) Others

82
5. Monthly Income:

a) <Rs.9000 b) Rs.9001-18000 c) Rs.18001-27000 d) > Rs.27000.

6. Education:

a) 10th b) 12th c) UG d) PG e) Others

7. Area of Residence:

8. How often do you visit Pondy Bazaar-Big Bazaar?

a) Once in a week b) Once in a fortnight c) Once in a month d) Once in 3 months

9. Please tick the following based on your frequency of visit.

Always Sometimes Rarely


Crockery, plastic, linen
Men’s section
Ladies/kid’s section
Food bazaar
Furniture bazaar
Mobiles,watches,e-goods

10. Please rate the following.

Very Good Good Average Poor

83
Variety
Quality
Brands
Availability
Display

11. How do you feel about the pricing in Pondy Bazaar-Big bazaar?

a) Very High b) High c) Medium d) Low e) Very Low

Please specify:______________________________________________________________

12. Are the price of products in Pondy Bazaar-Big bazaar lower compared to other retailers?

a) Yes b) No

13. Are the price of products proportional to quality of the products?

a) Strongly agree b) Agree c) Disagree d) Strongly disagree

14. Please tick the following based on your experience.

Very Good Good Average Poor


Parking facility
In-store convenience

(Mobility, Space)
Ambience
Proximity

84
15. How do you rate the customer service in the shop?

a) Very Good b) Good c) Average d) Poor e) Very Poor

16. Have you utilized any of the following promotional offers?

Yes No
Monthly Savings Bazaar
Big Day
Exchange offer
Wednesday Bazaar

17. Please rank the following 4Ps (1, 2, 3, and 4)

Rank
Product (Quality,variety,Brand)
Pricing
Place (Reachability,Convenience)
Promotion (Offers, Discounts)

18. How satisfied are you with the overall performance of Pondy Bazaar-Big bazaar?

a) Highly satisfied b) Satisfied c) Neutral d) Dissatisfied e) Highly dissatisfied

85
19. Suggestions for improvement, if any

___________________________________________________________________________

86