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A Little Free Library

Comes To
Baker Demonstration School
Presented by Karrie Fisher, Baker Demonstration School
November 7, 2014
Illinois School Library Media Association Conference

contact: kfisher@bakerdemschool.org
847-425-5800

The Process: Step 1 – Administrative Support


Summer meeting with my Head of School to propose the idea. I went in with my
objectives and goals, including lesson plans and a timeline for the process.
I also went into the meeting with the support of teachers who were willing to play
a part, illustrating the community outreach and collaboration objective of my curriculum
goals.

Costs

 Graph paper – math department


 Wood – recycled scenery from drama department
 Plexiglass - $20.00
 Hardware - $16.00 Home Depot
 House paint -- $12.00 (bought little containers of sample outdoor paint)
Lowe's
 Tools – borrowed from our PE teacher
 Installation – post $8.00 Home Depot, gravel and cement donated, post
hole digger lent by parent
 Registration on Little Free Library website - $35.00
 Books – donated from families
 Postage, letterhead, envelopes - $40.00 (approx)
 Learning experience - priceless

Total Cost: $131.00


The Process: Step 2 - Organization

 Write lesson plan for unit – Global & Community Libraries


 Create jobs for all students to participate
 Find parents to volunteer for committee work
 Determine materials needed and purchase if necessary
 Notify faculty, staff, and maintenance crew

The Process: Step 3 – Teaching Fifth Grade Library Curriculum:


Global & Community Libraries

What is a library?
Where do we find libraries?
How do libraries move?
How do children get books where there are no libraries?

READ: Biblioburro: a true story from Columbia by Jeanette Winter

Provides the inspiration: How can we share books?

Look at libraries around the world. For instance: libraries on camels, little book trucks,
beach libraries, library bikes, book mobiles, etc. There are good historical photographs
of mobile libraries.

The Process: Step 4 – Research & Exploration

Introduce Little Free Libraries by showing photographs of them. Website:


www.littlefreelibrary.org

Give them time to explore the website and browse all the photos of different types of
LFL. They should know ahead of time they will be designing their own LFL, so ask
them to keep in mind things they like about the ones they see.

The Process: Step 5 - Design

 Students begin designing their own Little Free Library on sketch paper
 Introduce students to graph paper and 1:1 ratio (1 square = 1 inch)
 Students create scaled drawing of their design and submit to teacher
 Librarian and building teacher (in my case our PE teacher) look at designs and
create a composite design
Determine Your Little Free Library Needs:

Our LFL Needs


• Hold lots of books
• Different age groups
• Nice Design - pretty
• Two Shelves
• Weatherproof
• Easy access – low for little kids
• Last for a long time

The Process: Step 6 – Create Jobs & Committees


 Designers – All 5th graders will design a LFL and submit for consideration
 Builders – will build the Baker LFL
 Painters -- painted the completed structure with the help of our art teacher
 Photographers – will capture the process of building our LFL
 Newcasters – will report on the news of the LFL
 Videographers – will videotape the newscasters
 Writers – will write stories about the process and post to the LFL blog and letters
to the classrooms
 Installers – will determine the location for installation and oversee the installation
process
 Donation/Selection Committee – write letters to students requesting donations,
and then select the books for the LFL
 Community Outreach Committee – students will communicate with Wilmette
Police Department, design flyer to distribute to neighbors, and oversee mailing.

Most of my students wanted to be on the building or photography committees, so


initially there were disappointed kids. But when they saw they had an important and
integral piece of the action, everyone was fine with what they did to help build our LFL.

It Took a Village: Faculty, Staff & Parent Volunteers

Ask for help!

Job & Committee Assignments


 Students filled out job applications
 Job assignments were made
 Formation of committees according to jobs
The Process: Step 7 – Work Begins

All the committees met with their adult supervisor for one hour per week. We combined
our two 30-minute PE classes on Monday afternoon to make the time.

The writers and bloggers began writing about the process by interviewing kids on other
committees. The photographers took photos of everyone working, including
themselves. The installation committee scoped out places on our property for
placement. The videographers began filming the newscasters interviewing people. The
community outreach committee contacted the Wilmette Police Department (I contacted
first and filled them in, and they agreed to take a call from my student and let them
explain what we were doing. The kids did not know I made the initial contact.) The
donation and selection committee wrote up letters solicitating donations. And of course
the builders began building.

Painters designed the artwork and painted the structure

Unveiling Ceremony -- we covered our installed LFL for an unveiling ceremony that
included all students, teachers, staff, and parents who helped with the process. We
invited all the other classes to join us but no one did.

Each 5th grader picked out a book from a cart of donations to put in the LFL for the first
time.

Registering Your Little Free Library with www.littlefreelibrary.org

To get your official LFL sign to attach to your structure, you have to pay $35.00. For
that you will get official registration, a sign, and the ability to write your LFL story, attach
photos, and have your GPS coordinates assigned. You're also supporting a small
organization that is rapidly growing!

The Process: Step 8 – Getting the Word Out

We created flyers for the neighbors and mailed them to each house on the block. I
obtained the residents names and addresses from my public library's database
REFERENCE USA. My students addressed the envelops and stuffed them. I took care
of the stamping via our office.

We also created flyers for our parent community asking for book donations. Books
came!

A parent wrote up a press release and sent it to several local newspapers. One of them
picked up the story.

We were also noted in The Reporter -- the Illinois State Library publication. I was
interviewed by someone who put out a request on ISLMA-net.
The Process: Step 9 -- Let Your Little Free Library Have a Life of Its
Owen!

Our LFL is now self-sustaining and requires no maintenance. I have books in waiting,
just in case we need to supplement, but we haven't had to do that yet.

Our LFL sometimes contains adult novels, and I thought about putting up a "Chidlren's
Books Only" sign, but decided not to because the "collection" ebbs and flows quickly.
Also, in the spirit of the Little Free Library philosophy, we want all kinds of people to find
a book in our Little Free Library.
Connecting to the Standards

ISAIL/COMMON CORE
• Standard 1: Reading & Writing
• Access information efficiently and effectively to inquire, think critically, and
gain knowledge
• Reading Informational Text
• Integration of Knowledge and Ideas
• CC.5.RI.7 Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources,
demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a
problem efficiently.
• CC.5.RI.9 Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to
write or speak about the subject knowledgeably.
• Writing
• Research to Build and Present Knowledge
• CC.5.W.7 Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build
knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
• CC.5.W.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant
information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information
in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.
CC.5.W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.

ISBE STANDARDS

Standard 3
• Use information accurately, creatively, and ethically to share knowledge
and to participate collaboratively and productively as a member of a
democratic society

• Writing
• Text Types and Purposes
• CC.5.W.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with
reasons and information.
• CC.5.W.1.a Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an
organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the
writer’s purpose.
• CC.5.W.1.b Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and
details.
• CC.5.W.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey
ideas and information clearly.
• CC.5.W.2.b Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations,
or other information and examples related to the topic.
• CC.5.W.2.e Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information
or explanation presented.
Standard 3
 Use information accurately, creatively, and ethically to share knowledge
and to participate collaboratively and productively as a member of a
democratic society
 Production and Distribution of Writing
 CC.5.W.4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the
 development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
(Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3
above.)
 CC.5.W.5 With guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and
strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a
new approach.(Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of
Language standards 1–3up to and including grade 5 on page 29.)
 CC.5.W.6 With some guidance and support from adults, use technology,
including the Internet, to produce and publish writing as well as to interact and
collaborate with others; demonstrate sufficient command of keyboarding skills to
type a minimum of two pages in a single sitting.
 Research to Build and Present Knowledge
 CC.5.W.7 Conduct short research projects that use several sources to build
knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic.
 CC.5.W.8 Recall relevant information from experiences or gather relevant
information from print and digital sources; summarize or paraphrase information
in notes and finished work, and provide a list of sources.
 CC.5.W.9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis,
reflection, and research.

Art:
STATE GOAL 26: Through creating and performing, understand how works of
art are produced.
A. Understand processes, traditional tools and modern technologies used in the
arts.
B. Apply skills and knowledge necessary to create and perform in one or more of
the arts.

Math:
STATE GOAL 7: Estimate, make and use measurements of objects, quantities
and relationships and determine acceptable levels of accuracy.
A. Measure and compare quantities using appropriate units, instruments and
methods.
B. Estimate measurements and determine acceptable levels of accuracy.
C. Select and use appropriate technology, instruments and formulas to solve
problems, interpret results and communicate findings.
Physical Education:
STATE GOAL 21: Develop skills necessary to become a successful member of
a team by working with others during physical activity.
A. Demonstrate personal responsibility during group physical activities.
B. Demonstrate cooperative skills during structured group activity.
STATE GOAL 24: Promote and enhance health and well-being through the use of
effective communication and decision-making skills
A. Demonstrate procedures for communicating in positive ways, resolving
differences and preventing conflict
B. Apply decision-making skills related to protection and promotion of individual,
family, and community health.
C. Demonstrate skills essential to enhancing health and avoiding dangerous
situations.

Social Studies:
STATE GOAL 18: Understand social systems, with an emphasis on the United
States.
A. Compare characteristics of culture as reflected in language, literature, the arts,
traditions and institutions.
B. Understand the roles and interactions of individuals and groups in society.
C. Understand how social systems form and develop over time.