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RPG-STYLEACTIONSFORNECROMUNDAANDINQ28

BY ROSS BRIMSTONE | TALESOFTHEAARONORIUM.COM

BY ROSS BRIMSTONE | TALESOFTHEAARONORIUM.COM What I’ve set out to do is create rules for common

What I’ve set out to do is create rules for common non-combat interactions that you might find in common roleplaying games like D&D. I also wanted to stick to the principles of new Necromunda and all the rest of GW’s recent games, and keep them fast, easy, and intuitive.

The one major caveat to these rules is that they are presented with the understanding that players are using

them as an aid to storytelling, rather than

a combat bonus or something to

immediately one-up your opponent. They don’t do anything, mechanically speaking. They use characteristic checks to inform players about how a character might respond to an interaction with an unpredictable outcome, but it is up to the players to fill the shoes of their characters and act as their characters would in the situation.

Obviously, these are made to work in N17, so if you’re playing a version of Inq28 with some other rules, you might need to tweak them if you want to use them.

I’ve created four new actions that can be performed in the Action Phase in addition to the regular actions available in the N17 rulebook. To facilitate these rules, there is a new type of check called an ‘opposed characteristic check’.

OPPOSED CHARACTERISTICS CHECKS

To make an opposed characteristic check, both players make a standard characteristic check for the characteristic listed in the chosen action. A player wins the opposed check if they pass their characteristic check and if they beat their opponent’s score. If neither player passes their characteristic check, there is no

effect. If the result is a draw, the player with the higher base characteristic wins.

If

the characteristics are the same, there

is

no effect.

ACTIONS

In the actions below, I allow for a model to choose a group of models to target. They may be trying to influence a gang,

or a pair of characters, for example. In this instance you should either choose the characteristic of the leader of the group, or use an average or majority

value, as is appropriate to the group. You will also notice there is no range stipulated for these actions. Use common sense in this regard. If the character is speaking over a tannoy, he might be able

to target several characters spread out

over a wide area, whereas if they have only their speaking voice their range may be limited to 6″ or less.

You may also want to apply modifiers to

the opposed roll for either or both parties.

A Space Marine would not be easily

intimidated by a mere mortal, who suffers

a -1 modifier, whereas an angry mob

could be readily persuaded by a fiery demagogue, who would gain a +2 to their roll.

These actions may be performed by Active fighters. If players agree, they could be used by Pinned or Engaged fighters in appropriate circumstances; a frantic “Don’t shoot!” in the middle of a fire fight, or a tirade of enraging taunts during a frenetic melee.

PERSUASION (BASIC)

Choose a target model or group of models and make an opposed Leadership check against them. The loser is swayed by the winner’s persuasive words, and should act accordingly until something happens that would cause them to question their

decision. For example: Inquisitor Glavian

is trying to persuade some native

underhivers to lead him to a hidden dome. He wins the opposed roll, and so the hivers acquiesce. When they later realise that he intends to destroy the archeotech within, they quickly abandon him.

DECEIVE (BASIC)

Choose a target model or group of models and make an opposed Cool check against them. The loser is fooled by the winner’s deception, and should act accordingly until something happens that would reveal the deception. For example:

Rogue Trader Kell is trying to convince Interrogator Vorrus that he is not armed. He makes a successful Deceive action, and so Vorrus must act as though Kell is not armed. Next turn, Kell shoots at Vorrus, and so the deception is broken and Vorrus may return fire.

INTIMIDATE (BASIC)

Choose a target model or group of models and make an opposed Willpower check against them. The loser is intimidated by the winner’s word or actions, and should act accordingly until something happens that would dispel the intimidation. For example: Sergeant Hassan tries to intimidate a Chaos ritualist by pointing his weapon at him, but he loses the opposed check, and so is cowed by the ritualist’s boasts that the dark gods will soon be summoned. When the ritual fails however, Sergeant Hassan’s bravery returns, and he may act normally.

PERFORMANCE (BASIC)

Choose a target model or group of models and make an opposed

Intelligence check against them. The

loser is suitably impressed by the winner’s performance, and should act accordingly until something happens that would cause them to disregard the performance. For example: Governor Karios gives a powerful speech to his subjects. He wins the opposed roll, and so impresses the local populace. But when it is later revealed that Karios has been embezzling mining profits to line his own pockets, he quickly loses favour with the mob.

As you’ve no doubt noticed, I’ve create an action to correspond with each of the “mental” stats available in N17, so that whatever kind of character you create, they should have a chance at at least one of the actions. But that of course depends on who they try to pull it on! With the opposed characteristic check, a character may well end up suffering at the hands of their own action. Trying to reason with a charging ogryn probably won’t go the way a character expects, no matter how eloquent they are!

EXPANDING THESE RULES

If you wanted to use these rules for more of a straight wargame like regular Necromunda, you could replace the “act accordingly” clause with a direct buff or limitation applied to the winner or loser. For example, you might decide that the winner of an Intimidate action counts as having the Fearsome skill when targeted by the loser.

I also toyed with the idea of having psychic powers as ways to apply modifiers to checks, but that’s a whole other thing. Psychic powers have been introduced with the Genestealer Cult- ists and Chaos Cultist gang lists, and they act much in the way skills do. So you could come up with a ‘dread gaze’ psychic power/skill that gives a bonus to the Intimidate action, or a ‘mind scan’ power that imposes a negative modifier on a character trying to use the Deceive action.

action, or a ‘mind scan’ power that imposes a negative modifier on a character trying to