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1 - TOXLINE

TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: 1-Bromopropane (CAS No. 106-94-5).


AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - The mathematical model predicted that 1-BP was absorbed by the skin.
Additionally, there was an in vitro dermal penetration study identified
that indicates that 1-BP has the potential for substantial dermal
penetration dependent on type and duration of exposure [Frasch et al.
2011]. A review of the available literature indicates that 1-BP is capable
of inducing a wide array of adverse systemic health effects, including
neurotoxicity, hepatotoxicity, hematotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, and
developmental toxicity, regardless of exposure route [ClinTrials
Bioresearch 1997; Zhao et al. 1999; Ichihara et al. 2000a, 2000b; WIL
Research Laboratory 2001; Wang et al. 2002, 2003; Lee et al. 2005, 2007;
Banu et al. 2007; Fueta et al. 2007]. Although the exact systemic hazards
associated with skin contact and absorption of 1-BP are unknown, 1-BP is
assigned the SK: SYS notation; this notation is based on the recognition
of adverse health effects in test animals exposed via the inhalation,
oral, and subcutaneous injection routes. Although a study using the
EpiDerm human reconstructed epidermis model [Frasch et al. 2011] indicated
that 1-BP is not corrosive to the skin following exposure to 1-BP, two in
vivo tests, conducted with standard methods [Jacobs et al. 1987; Pálovics
2004], provide sufficient evidence that 1-BP is irritating to the skin of
rabbits. Although no human patch tests that evaluated the sensitization
potential of 1-BP were identified, one guinea pig maximization test [Elf
Atochem 1995b] showed that the substance is not a skin sensitizer.
Therefore, on the basis of this assessment, 1-BP is assigned the composite
skin notation SK: SYS-DIR (IRR). Table 3 summarizes the skin designations
for 1-BP from NIOSH and other organizations. The equivalent skin
designation for 1-BP from the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of
Classification and Labelling is Reproductive Category 1B (Presumed human
reproductive toxicant) and Skin Irritation Category 2 (Causes skin
irritation) [European Parliament 2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *1-Bromopropane
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - In vivo studies
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Globally harmonized system(GHS)
KW - Carcinogenicity
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Skin irritants
KW - Mathematical models
KW - Neurotoxicity
KW - Hepatotoxicity
KW - Hermatology
KW - Developmental disorders
KW - Health effects
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 106-94-5
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-187
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health & Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health & Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental & Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100170_a

2 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Trichloroethylene (TCE) (CAS No.
79-01-6).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Although the toxicokinetic studies indicate that TCE has limited dermal
absorption potential, which is supported by the limited available animal
data reporting low acute toxicity in rabbits [Dow Chemical Company 1956;
Smyth et al.1969], case reports, case series, an occupational exposure
study [Bauer and Rabens 1974; Kohlmuller and Kochen 1994; Liu 2009;
Watanabe et al. 2010] and two animal studies [Tang et al. 2008; Yu et al.
2012; Zhang et al. 2015] provide evidence of TCE-induced liver and kidney
dysfunction following subchronic exposures to the substance, and
occupational studies [Gash et al. 2008; Liu 2009; Xu et al. 2009; Al-Griw
et al. 2016] reported neurological effects. These limited human and animal
data provide evidence of its ability to cause systemic toxicity following
subchronic exposure. Results indicate that undiluted TCE is corrosive to
the skin [Dow Chemical Company 1956; Shen et al. 2008]. Evidence of skin
whitening, erythema, and dermatitis in humans [Stewart and Dodd 1964;
Bauer and Rabens 1974; Sato and Nakajima 1978; Wahlberg 1984 a,b; Kezic et
al. 2001; Liu 2009; Xu et al. 2009] and of erythema, edema, and changes in
the epidermis in animals [Kronevi et al. 1981; Anderson et al.1986; Shen
et al. 2008] indicates that TCE is a skin irritant when diluted. Although
the mathematical model predicted TCE to be negative for sensitization,
isolated reports of cases involving humans [Conde- Salazar et al. 1983;
Nakayama et al. 1988] and an epidemiological study [Dai et al. 2009]
suggest that TCE may have sensitizing potential. Positive results from
predictive tests (GPMTs and LLNAs) [Tang et al. 2002, 2008; Yu et al.
2012; Yao et al. 2016] demonstrate that TCE is capable of inducing
dermatitis and liver damage via delayed-type hypersensitivity in guinea
pigs. Therefore, on the basis of these assessments, TCE is assigned a
composite skin notation of SK: SYS-DIR (IRR)-SEN. Table 3 summarizes the
skin hazard designations for TCE previously issued by NIOSH and other
organizations. The equivalent dermal designations for TCE, according to
the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labelling of
Chemicals, are Skin Irritation Category 2 (Hazard Statement: Causes skin
irritation) and Mutagenicity Category 2 (Hazard Statement: Suspected of
causing genetic defects) [European Parliament 2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Trichloroethylene
KW - *Health effects
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - In vivo studies
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Humans
KW - Systematic reviews
KW - Globally harmonized system(GHS)
KW - Carcinogens
KW - Case reports
KW - Liver function
KW - Liver disorders
KW - Kidney function
KW - Kidney disorders
KW - Neurological disorders
KW - Neurological reactions
KW - Skin irritants
KW - Corrosives
KW - Dermatitis
KW - Skin disorders
KW - Mathematical models
KW - Skin sensitivity
KW - Liver damage
KW - Hypersensitivity
KW - genetic factors
KW - Genetic disorders
KW - Mutagenicity
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 79-01-6
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-192
OD - 28
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health & Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health & Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental & Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100175_a

3 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Dichlorvos (CAS No. 62-73-7).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Taken together, the toxicokinetic data [Tos-Luty et al. 1994] and findings
from in vitro studies by Moore et al. [2014a, 2014b], the predictive
mathematical algorithm, acute toxicity studies in animals [Gaines 1969;
Durham et al. 1957], and dermal toxicity and subchronic toxicity studies
in animals [Ali and Abdalla 1992; Durham et al. 1957; Dikshith et al.
1976; Luty et al. 1998; Moriearty et al. 1993] are sufficient to
demonstrate the potential of dichlorvos to be absorbed through the skin
and be systemically toxic, causing diverse effects such as inhibition of
ChE activity, neurotoxicity, histopathological changes in lungs, and
potential fatality following dermal exposure. Although cases of skin
corrosivity were not identified, case reports of irritant contact
dermatitis in humans [Bisby and Simpson 1975; Cronce and Alden 1968;
Mathias 1983] and animals [Breen and Conroy 1971; Fox et al. 1969a,
1969b], as well as evidence of skin irritation in animals [Fujita 1985;
Matsushai et al. 1985; Ueda et al. 1994], provide sufficient evidence that
dilute solutions of dichlorvos are irritating to the skin. Human
diagnostic patch tests conducted on agricultural workers presenting with
contact dermatitis show that dichlorvos has the potential to be a skin
sensitizer [Fujita 1985; Matsushita et al. 1985; Ueda et al. 1994] and a
photosensitizer [Horiuchi and Ando 1978]. Predictive tests in animals (for
example, guinea pig maximization tests) [Fujita 1985; Ueda et al. 1994]
demonstrate that dichlorvos causes skin sensitization. Therefore, on the
basis of these assessments, dichlorvos is assigned a composite skin
notation of SK: SYSDIR (IRR)-SEN. Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard
designations for dichlorvos previously issued by NIOSH and other
organizations. The equivalent dermal designations for dichlorvos,
according to the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for Classification and
Labelling of Chemicals, are Acute Toxicity Category 3 (Hazard statement:
Toxic in contact with the skin) and Skin Sensitization Category 1 (Hazard
statement: May cause an allergic skin reaction) [European Parliament
2008].
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Toxicology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - Dichlorvos
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Skin absorption
KW - Cholinesterase inhibitors
KW - Neurotoxicity
KW - Histopathology
KW - Lung function
KW - Skin irritants
KW - Dermatitis
KW - Sensitizers
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Photosensitivity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 62-73-7
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-134
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health & Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health & Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental & Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102215_a

4 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: 2-Hydroxypropyl acrylate (HPA) (CAS No.
999-61-1).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - No studies that evaluated the dermal absorption of HPA were identified in
humans or animals. However, acute toxicity data [Smyth et al. 1969]
suggest that HPA is dermally absorbed, systemically available, and
potentially fatal. Occupational case reports [Lovell et al. 1985; Kanerva
et al. 1988] and animal data [Smyth et al. 1969; BP Chemicals, Inc. 1981]
demonstrate that HPA is an irritant and corrosive to the skin. Human patch
tests [Lovell et al. 1985; Kanerva et al. 1988, 1992a, b] and guinea pig
maximization tests [Clemmensen 1984] sufficiently demonstrate the skin
sensitization potential of HPA. Therefore, on the basis of these
assessments, HPA is assigned a composite skin notation of SK: SYS
(FATAL)-DIR (COR)-SEN. Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard designations for
HPA previously issued by NIOSH and other organizations. The equivalent
dermal designations for HPA, according to the Globally Harmonized System
(GHS) of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, are Acute Toxicity
Category 3 (Hazard statement: Toxic in contact with the skin), Skin
Corrosion Category 1B (Hazard statement: Causes severe skin burns and eye
damage) and Skin Sensitization Category 1 (Hazard statement: May cause an
allergic skin reaction) [European Parliament 2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *2-Hydroxypropyl acrylate
KW - *Health effects
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - In vivo studies
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Globally harmonized system(GHS)
KW - Carcinogenicity
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Skin irritants
KW - Skin sensitivity
KW - Sensitizers
KW - Case reports
KW - Fatalities
KW - Corrosives
KW - Toxic effects
KW - Toxic materials
KW - Hazardous materials
KW - Allergic dermatitis
KW - Allergic reactions
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 999-61-1
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-188
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health & Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health & Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental & Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100171_a

5 - TOXLINE
TI - Erosion Results of the MISSE 8 Polymers Experiment After 2 Years of Space
Exposure on the International Space Station.
AU - De Groh, K. K.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Banks, B. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Asmar, O. C.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Yi, G. T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Mitchell, G. G.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Guo, A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Sechkar, E. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AB - Polymers and other oxidizable materials on the exterior of spacecraft in
the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment can be eroded due to reaction
with atomic oxygen (AO). Therefore, in order to design durable spacecraft,
it is important to know the LEO AO erosion yield (E(sub y), volume loss
per incident oxygen atom) of materials susceptible to AO reaction. A
spaceflight experiment, called the Polymers Experiment, which contained 42
samples, was developed to determine the effect of solar exposure on the AO
E(sub y) of fluoropolymers flown in ram, wake, or zenith orientations. The
Polymers Experiment was exposed to the LEO space environment on the
exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the Materials
International Space Station Experiment 8 (MISSE 8) mission. The MISSE 8
mission included samples flown in a zenith/nadir orientation for 2.14
years in the MISSE 8 Passive Experiment Container (PEC), and samples flown
in a ram/wake orientation for 2.0 years in the Optical Reflector Materials
Experiment-III (ORMatEIII) tray. The experiment included Kapton H
(Registered Trademark) witness samples for AO fluence determination in
each orientation. This paper provides an overview of the MISSE 8 mission,
a description of the flight experiment with details on the polymers flown,
the characterization techniques used, the AO fluence for each exposure
orientation, and the LEO E(sub y) results. The E(sub y) of Teflon
fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) samples flown in ram, wake, and
zenith orientations have been compared, and the E(sub y) was found to be
highly dependent on orientation and therefore environmental exposure. The
FEP E(sub y) was found to directly correlate with the solar exposure/AO
fluence ratio showing the effect of solar radiation and/or heating due to
solar exposure on FEP erosion. In addition, back-surface carbon painted
FEP (C-FEP) flown in the zenith orientation had a significantly higher
E(sub y) than clear FEP or Al-FEP further indicating that heating has a
significant impact on the erosion of FEP. This experiment provides
valuable LEO flight data on the erosion of Teflon FEP, a commonly used
spacecraft thermal insulation.
KW - *Aerospace environments
KW - *Erosion
KW - *Radiation effects
KW - *Spacecraft design
KW - *Extraterrestrial radiation
KW - *Fluoropolymers
KW - *International space station
KW - *Low earth orbits
KW - *Oxidation resistance
KW - *Oxidizers
KW - *Polymers
KW - *Protective coatings
KW - Durability
KW - Optical materials
KW - Reflectors
KW - Spaceborne experiments
KW - Teflon (trademark)
KW - Thermal insulation
KW - Wakes
KW - Zenith
RN - E-19329
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN38203
RN - NASA/TM-2017-219445
OD - 40
PR - WBS 769347.05.08.25.40.01.02
YR - 2017
PC - 115801001
CT - 54C | Astrophysics
CT - 99 | Chemistry
CT - 84G | Unmanned Spacecraft
CT - 84C | Manned Spacecraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0001792_a

6 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Dimethyl Sulfate (DMS) (CAS No.
77-78-1).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Although limited information was identified on the toxicokinetics and
systemic toxicity of DMS, occupational case reports [Littler and McConnell
1955; Wang et al. 1988; Schettgen et al 2004; Yagami et al. 2009]
supported by the mathematical model prediction demonstrate that DMS is
systemically available and toxic following dermal exposure. DMS is
corrosive at high doses and following prolonged dermal exposure and
irritating at lower concentrations based on human [Littler and McConnell
1955; Wang et al. 1988; Yagami et al. 2009] and animal [Dow 1938; Browning
1965; E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company 1972] studies. Although positive
responses were observed in the murine LLNA test [Ashby et al. 1995] and in
a single human patch test [Yagami et al. 2009], conflicting evidence in
animal studies [Stevens 1967; E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company 1972]
suggests that DMS is not capable of causing immune-mediated responses
(i.e., sensitization) following skin contact and that the positive
responses may be attributable to corrosive properties of the chemical.
Therefore, on the basis of these assessments, DMS is assigned a composite
skin notation of SK: SYS-DIR (COR). Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard
designations for DMS previously issued by NIOSH and other organizations.
The equivalent dermal designations for DMS, according to the Globally
Harmonized System (GHS) of classification and labeling of chemicals, are
Skin Corrosion Category 1B (Causes severe skin burns and eye damage) and
Skin Sensitization Category 1 (May cause an allergic skin reaction)
[European Parliament 2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Dimethyl sulfate
KW - *Health effects
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - In vivo studies
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Humans
KW - Systematic reviews
KW - Globally harmonized system(GHS)
KW - Case reports
KW - Mathematical models
KW - Corrosives
KW - Chemical properties
KW - Carcingenesis bioassay
KW - Chemical burns
KW - Eye damage
KW - Allergic reactions
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 77-78-1
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-189
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health & Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health & Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental & Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100172_a

7 - TOXLINE
TI - 1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE).
Screening-Level Feasibility Assessment and Design Tool in Support of
1,4-Dioxane Remediation by Extreme Soil Vapor Extraction (XSVE).
AU - Hinchee, R.
AD - Department of Defense, Arlington, VA. Environmental Security Technology
Certification Program Office.
AB - XSVE, or extreme soil vapor extraction, is an enhanced form of soil vapor
extraction (SVE) for the remediation of 1,4-dioxane in vadose soils
(Hinchee et al., 2017a and b). HypeVent XSVE for 1,4-Dioxane (HypeVent
XSVE) is a spreadsheet-based tool that runs in Microsoft Excel. It was
developed in anticipation of remediation professionals need for a
screening-level feasibility assessment and design tool for XSVE
applications. HypeVent XSVE facilitates quick exploration of the
best-case performance for 1,4-dioxane removal from soils using the XSVE
technology. HypeVent XSVE was found to adequately describe field XSVE
data (Burris et al., 2017).
KW - Soils
KW - Environmental restoration and remediation
KW - Atmosphere (earth)
KW - Spreadsheet software
KW - User manuals
KW - Estimates
KW - Equations
KW - Hypevent xsve
KW - 1 4-dioxane remediation
KW - Vadose soils
KW - Sve (soil vapor extraction)
KW - Xsve (extreme sve)
KW - Spreadsheet-based tools
KW - Screening-level performance calculations
KW - Upper bound best-case performance estimates
OD - 20
PR - ER-201326
YR - 2017
PC - 111673010
CT - 72F | Statistical Analysis
CT - 62B | Computer Software
CT - 68G | Environmental Health & Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048767_a

8 - TOXLINE
TI - Therapeutic Strategies against Cyclin E1-Amplified Ovarian Cancers.
AU - Zhang, R.
AD - Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia. Wistar Inst.
AB - For Aim 1, we demonstrated 1)The HSP90-inhibitors 17-AAG and AT13387 has
single agent activity against CCNE1-amplifiedcell lines;
2)HSP90-inhibition down regulates homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair
and down regulates expression of HR pathway genes; 3)The HSP90-inhibitor
AT13387 synergizes with platinum against CCNE1-amplified cell lines. For
Aim 2, we demonstrated 1)FOXM1 is necessary for the survival of CCNE1
amplified epithelial ovarian cancer cells.2)FOXM1 interacts with Rb in
CCNE1 amplified epithelial ovarian cancer cells. 3)Characterized small
molecule inhibitor that disrupts the interaction between FOXM1 and Rb in
CCNE1 amplified epithelial ovarian cancer cells. For Aim 3, we
demonstrated 1) Certain miRNAs including miR-1255b, miR-148b*, and
miR-193b* inhibit HR DNA repair 2)These miRNAs synergize with platinum
against CCNE1-amplified cell lines, that is expression of these miRNAs
sensitizes cells to platinum.
KW - Ovarian cancer
KW - Cancer research
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Gene expression
KW - Cell lines
KW - Epithelial ovarian cancer
KW - Ccne1 amplification
KW - Homologous recombination dna repair
KW - Platinum analogues
KW - Micrornas
KW - Hsp90(heat shock protein 90)
KW - Hsp90 inhibitors
KW - Foxm1(forkhead box protein m1)
KW - Rb(retinoblastoma)
KW - Parp-inhibitors(poly-adp ribose polymerase inhibitors)
OD - 18
YR - 2017
PC - 004363070
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049167_a

9 - TOXLINE
TI - Human Cell Line Activation Test of the Novel Energetics
2,6-pyrazinediamine 3,5-dinitro 1 -oxide (LLM-105) and
2,4,6-trinitro-3-bromoanisole (TNBA).
AU - Reinke, E.
AD - Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AB - TThe energetic and toxicological properties of 2,6-pyrazinediamine
3,5-dinitro-1 -oxide (LLM-105) and 2,4,6-trinitro-3-bromoanisole (TNBA)
are being determined to support an evaluation of LLM-105 and TNBA as
replacements for energetics in current use, such as such as
hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) and trinitrotoluene (TNT).
This study assessed the skin sensitization potential of LLM-105 and TNBA
through the human cell line activation test (h-CLAT), an in vitro approach
to assess dendritic cell activation by chemicals, a critical step in the
induction of a skin allergy. Both compounds induced a positive response in
the assay.
KW - Human cell lines
RN - S.0039820-16
OD - 35
YR - 2017
PC - 000013000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, & Molecular Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042154_a

10 - TOXLINE
TI - Research on Coastal Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops Truncatus), Including a
Photo-Identification Catalog, Following the 2015 Refugio Beach Oil Spill
in Santa Barbara County, California.
AU - Defran, R.
AD - San Diego State Univ., CA.
AU - Weller, D. W.
AD - San Diego State Univ., CA.
AU - Kellar, N. M.
AD - San Diego State Univ., CA.
AU - Chivers, S. J.
AD - San Diego State Univ., CA.
AB - Bottle-nose dolphins are one of the most commonly encountered cetaceans in
the nearshore waters off California and Baja California, Mexico. Two
distinct bottle-nose dolphin ecotypes occur in these waters: a coastal
form that is typically found within 1–2 km of shore (Carretta et al.
1998, Defran and Weller 1999) and an offshore form that is distributed in
deeper waters, typically greater than a few kilometers from shore (Defran
and Weller 1999, Bearzi et al. 2009). Differentiation of these two
eco-types, which are managed as separate stocks by the National Marine
Fisheries Service (Carretta et al. 2015), is supported by morphological
(Walker 1981, Perrin et al. 2011), photographic (Shane 1994) and genetic
data (Lowther-Thieleking et al. 2014). Most dolphins in the coastal
population (i.e., about 65%) can be individually identified by distinctive
patterns of nicks and notches primarily on the trailing edges of their
dorsal fins but also occasionally on the tip and leading edge of the fin.
These notches result mainly from the teeth of con-specifics during
social-sexual or aggressive interactions. Notch patterns remain highly
stable over time and serve as a reliable means of long-term individual
identification. Both shore- and boat-based photo-identification surveys
were completed in the weeks following the RBOS. This report presents
summaries of the boat- and shore-based photo-identification methods and
results. The goal of these analyses was to create a photographic archive
of dolphins known to have been in proximity to the BROS area, to examine
some aspects of their occurrence and residency and to estimate the
proportion of the total population present during the study period.
Because of their potential exposure to oil from the RBOS, documenting
individual dolphins sighted in the area and estimating the time they may
have been in the vicinity was viewed as an important first step in the
assessment of possible long-term effects that oil exposure may have on
their survival.
KW - *Coastal bottlenose dolphins
KW - *Tursiops truncatus
KW - *Photo-Identification Catalog
KW - *Santa Barbara County (California)
KW - Oil spill
KW - *Refugio Beach
KW - *National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
RN - NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-591
OD - 102
YR - 2017
PC - 036379000
CT - 82B | Photographic Techniques & Equipment
CT - 82C | Recording Devices
CT - 98F | Fisheries & Aquaculture
CT - 98E | Animal Husbandry & Veterinary Medicine
CT - 57H | Ecology
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100929_a

11 - TOXLINE
TI - Evaluation and Investigation of Fuel Effects on Gaseous and Particulate
Emissions on Sidi In-Use Vehicles.
AU - Morgan, P.
AD - Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX.
AU - Smith, I.
AD - Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX.
AU - Premnath, V.
AD - Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX.
AU - Kroll, S.
AD - Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX.
AU - Crawford, R.
AD - Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX.
AB - Currently, many manufacturers are producing both naturally aspirated (NA)
and turbo-charged SIDI engines in light-duty vehicles and are meeting both
gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions standards with E0
certification fuel. This project, was conducted by Southwest Research
Institute (SwRI) in order to investigate variations in regulated gaseous,
greenhouse gas, PM and PN emissions from vehicles equipped with SIDI
engines over a range of fuel properties. Project E-94-2 is a continuation
of work completed in CRC Projects E-94-1 and E-94-1a. Eight fuels were
provided for this test program, with variations in the following fuel
properties: octane number represented as the anti-knock index (AKI),
Particulate Matter Index (PMI), and ethanol content (EtOH). The fuels
matrix was selected to represent high and low values for each of these
fuel properties. The AKI ranged from 87.1 to 94.1, the PMI ranged from
1.26 to 2.65, and the ethanol content ranged from 0% to 9.56% by volume.
The target value for the high ethanol content fuel was 9.5%. The test
fleet included twelve modern vehicles equipped with SIDI engines. These
vehicles were deemed representative of the spectrum of models commonly
available in the U.S. based on weight class and engine configuration. PMI
had the strongest effect on particulate emissions, whether measured as
LA92 PN, PM, Phase 1 PM, or EC (see Table ES-2). Increasing PMI from low
(1.3) to high (2.5) was found to nearly double, or more than double, LA92
PM and other measures of particulate emissions. The addition of 9.5%
ethanol (E10) increased particulate emissions by 12 to 57 percent versus
the baseline E0. This effect was clearly observed in three of the four
fuel pairs with matched AKI and PMI, but was generally not seen in the AKI
94 High PMI fuels. Conversely, fuel octane number (AKI) was found to have
no effect on particulate emissions in the entire test fleet or in any of
its subgroups. PMI had no effect on any of the four gaseous pollutants,
with one exception (for THC) that was traced to the performance of an
individual vehicle. Ethanol content at E10 was found to decrease CO
emissions, but increase CO2 emissions by small amounts (0.5-0.8%), in the
subgroup of 4-cylinder NA vehicles, but not in turbocharged vehicles.
Increasing octane from 87 to 94 AKI was found to decrease THC emissions of
the 4-cylinder NA vehicles. No octane effect on THC emissions was seen in
the 4-cylinder turbocharged vehicles. This suggests that in addition to
fuel effects, vehicle hardware design and vehicle-to-vehicle variability
can contribute to overall emissions.
KW - *Spark ignited direct injection (SIDI)
KW - *Ethanol content (EtOH)
KW - Naturally aspirated (NA)
KW - Particulate matter (PM)
KW - Particle number (PN)
KW - Anti-knock index (AKI)
KW - Particulate Matter Index (PMI)
KW - Evaluation
KW - Investigation
KW - Fuel effects
KW - Turbocharged vehicles
RN - CRC-E-94-2
OD - 296
YR - 2017
PC - 014411000
CT - 97K | Fuels
CT - 85 | Transportation
CT - 97B | Energy Use, Supply, & Demand
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 81A | Combustion & Ignition
CT - 81J | Reciprocation & Rotating Combustion Engines
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102232_a

12 - TOXLINE
TI - Investigating the Role of PCM1 and Mib1 in Regulating Ciliogenesis and in
Prostate Cancer.
AU - Wang, L.
AD - New York University New York United States
AB - The purpose of this research is to reveal the relationship between
assembly of the primary cilium and prostate cancer by investigating two
centrosomal proteins, pericentriolar material 1 (PCM1) and Mind bomb 1
(Mib1), and to test the possibility that these proteins can serve as
robust prostate cancer biomarkers and,potentially, targets for drug
discovery. The primary cilium serves as a cellular antenna, and this
organelle inhibits cell proliferation. The loss of this key signaling
organelle was reported in various cancers, including prostate cancer.
Therefore, we hypothesize that the absence of a primary cilium can
potentially trigger cellproliferation and prostate cancer development.
Pericentiolar material 1 is essential for ciliogenesis, and the PCM1 gene
is deleted in ~15% of prostate cancers. Our results indicate that ablation
of pericentriolar material 1 leads to aberrant expression of its
interacting partner, Mind bomb 1, an enzyme that is a negative regulator
of ciliogenesis. Based on these data, we hypothesize that elevated levels
of Mind bomb1 provoked by pericentriolar material 1 depletion in prostate
cancer promote abnormal cell growth and malignancy by preventing the
assembly of cilia. To test this hypothesis, we will investigate the impact
of pericentriolar material 1 deletions in prostate cancer and determine
whether there is a correlation between increased Mind bomb 1, the loss of
cilia, and the stage of prostate tumor progression. Next, we will test
whether pericentriolar material 1 depletion and aberrant levels of Mind
bomb 1 promote prostate cancer development. Finally, we will investigate
whether Mind bomb 1 removal induces ciliogenesis and inhibits growth of
prostate cancer to determine the suitability of Mind bomb 1 as a target of
anti-cancer drugs.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Proteins
KW - Biological markers
KW - Organelles
KW - Inhibition
KW - Ablation
KW - Cell line
KW - Pcm1 (pericentriolar material 1)
KW - Mib1 (mind bomb 1)
KW - Ciliogenesis
KW - Drug discovery
KW - Primary cilium
KW - Cell proliferation
OD - 14
YR - 2017
PC - 800218613
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050228_a

13 - TOXLINE
TI - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) Value Profile: Acetonitrile
(CAS No. 75-05-8).
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Maier, A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Parker, A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Haber, L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Overview of the IDLH Value for Acetonitrile IDLH value: 137 ppm (230
mg/m3). Basis for IDLH value: The mouse LC50 value of 2,693 ppm for a 60
minute exposure to acetonitrile [Willhite 1981] was selected as the basis
for the IDLH value. Duration adjustment resulted in the calculation of a
30-minute equivalent LC50 value of 4,120 ppm. A composite uncertainty
factor of 30 was applied to account for extrapolation from a concentration
that is lethal to animals, animal to human differences, and human
variability, resulting in an IDLH value for acetonitrile of 137 ppm. 1.2
Purpose: This IDLH Value Profile presents (1) a brief summary of technical
data associated with acute inhalation exposures to acetonitrile and (2)
the rationale behind the immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH)
value for acetonitrile. IDLH values are developed on the basis of
scientific rationale and logic outlined in the NIOSH Current Intelligence
Bulletin (CIB) 66: Derivation of Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health
(IDLH) Values [NIOSH 2013]. As described in CIB 66, NIOSH performs
in-depth literature searches to ensure that all relevant data from human
and animal studies with acute exposures to the substance are identified.
Information included in CIB 66 on the literature search includes pertinent
databases, key terms, and guides for evaluating data quality and relevance
for the establishment of an IDLH value. The information that is identified
in the in-depth literature search is evaluated with general considerations
that include description of studies (i.e., species, study protocol,
exposure concentration and duration), health endpoint evaluated, and
critical effect levels (e.g., NOAELs, LOAELs, and LC50 values). For
acetonitrile, the in-depth literature search was conducted through July
2017.
KW - *Acetonitrile
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Toxicology
KW - Animals
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Humans
KW - Lethal concentrations
KW - Chlorine compounds
KW - Nitriles
KW - Organochlorine compounds
KW - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH)
KW - Median lethal dose
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Chemicals
KW - Chemical structure
KW - Chemical properties
KW - Chemical hazards
KW - Chemical safety
KW - Inhalation
KW - Toxic effects
KW - Toxic dose
KW - Toxins
KW - Fatalities
KW - Morbidity rates
KW - Mortality data
KW - Systematic reviews
KW - Respiratory irritants
KW - Lung
KW - Kidneys
KW - Liver
KW - Spleen disorders
KW - Organs
KW - Airborne particles
KW - Pulmonary system
KW - Pulmonary system disorders
KW - Respiratory system disorders
KW - Pathology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - CAS No. 75-05-8
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-203
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57U | Public Health & Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health & Safety
CT - 99 | Chemistry
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 44G | Environmental & Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100184_a

14 - TOXLINE
TI - Curcumin Nanoparticle Therapy for Gulf War Illness.
AU - Shetty, A. K.
AD - The Texas A and M University System College Station United States
AB - The major goal of this project is to examine the efficacy of oral
administration of curcumin (CUR) encapsulated biodegradablepolymer
nanosystems (nCUR) for alleviating cognitive, memory and mood impairments
in a rat model of gulf war illness(GWI). Specific Aim 1 studies involve
quantification of the efficacy of oral administration of different doses
of nCUR for improvingneurogenesis and suppressing inflammation and
oxidative stress in the hippocampus. Specific Aim 2 studies will examine
whetheran apt dose of nCUR treatment (based on Specific Aim 1 studies) is
efficient for alleviating cognitive, memory and mood impairmentsin
GWI-rats, when treatment is commenced at an extended time-point (8-months)
after exposure to GWIR chemicals andstress. During the past year, a set of
experiments related to Specific Aim 1 studies was performed: (1) Exposure
of rats to GWIrelatedchemicals and moderate stress.
OD - 13
YR - 2017
PC - 800222060
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045514_a

15 - TOXLINE
TI - Novel strategies to improve immunomodulation and non invasive clinical
monitoring in VCA.
AU - Pomahac, B.
AD - Brigham and Womens Hospital Boston United States
AB - Safely minimizing the risks associated with vascularized composite
allotransplantation (VCA)is crucial for functional restoration of wounded
warriors. Our overarching goal is enabling functional and aesthetic
restoration to patients with severe, unreconstructable vascularized
composite tissue defects by safe VCA protocols with minimal side effects.
Our specific aims are: (1) Establishing the efficacy of a low-dose IL-2
protocol at enabling minimization of immunosuppression to sirolimus
monotherapy in recipients of VCA.(2) Exploring correlations between
cellular and molecular immunoassays performed in specimens from VCA
recipients (and their donors) with clinical observations of stability and
rejection. In future trials, these assays can be developed into tools that
prospectively predict rejection and tolerance in VCA, and (3) Implementing
next-generation methods to supplement and potentially overcome limitations
of established methods such as histology and ultrasound biomicroscopy
(UBM).We are enrolling 5 subjects for VCA. < 3 months after VCA, once
recipient and allograft are stable, we will administer an IL-2 based
protocol intended to enable minimization of immunosuppression to sirolimus
monotherapy. Afterwards, immunosuppression will be weaned.
KW - Biological therapy
KW - Immunomodulation
KW - Surgical transplantation
KW - Transplants
KW - Immunosuppression
KW - Immunoassay
KW - Rejection
KW - Grafts
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Drug therapy
KW - Vca(vascularized composite allotransplantation)
KW - Interleukin-2
KW - Il-2
KW - Immune modulation
KW - Immune tolerance
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800219812
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045150_a

16 - TOXLINE
TI - Cancer Risks Associated With Inherited Mutations in Ovarian Cancer
Susceptibility Genes Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2.
AU - Swisher, E.
AD - University of Washington Seattle United States
AB - Ovarian, peritoneal and fallopian tube carcinomas (OC) are the most deadly
of the gynecological cancers. Our data indicate that at least 20 of
unselected OC is hereditary and that 20-25 of inherited mutations occur
in genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2. The large fraction of OC associated
with inherited mutations in a variety of genes provides an important
opportunity to reduce OC mortality. Maximizing the benefit from OC risk
assessment and prevention requires an improved understanding of the
penetrance of OC genes beyond BRCA1/2. Furthermore, minimal data exist
regarding the hereditary component of OC, including BRCA1/2, in non-white
populations. The objective of this study is to define the genetic causes
of hereditary OC in African Americans (AA) as well as the spectrum of
cancers, the age of onset, and the relative risk associated with mutations
in non-BRCA1/2 genes. In year 2, we have enrolled an additional 98 high
risk probands and 8 AA probands with OC for BROCA sequencing of 45 known
or candidate OC genes. We continue to enroll probands and their relatives
to better understand the genetic contribution to ovarian cancer and will
focus on exome sequencing 30 families in year 3.
KW - Ovarian cancer
KW - Drug resistance
KW - Genes
KW - Deoxyribonucleic acids
KW - Mutations
KW - African americans
KW - Hereditary diseases
KW - Sequence analysis
KW - Rucaparib
KW - Phase 2
KW - Dna repair
KW - Homologous recombination
KW - Nhej (nonhomologous end-joining)
KW - Parp (poly adp-ribose polymerase)
KW - Brca1
KW - Brca2
KW - Parp1
KW - Dna (deoxyribonucleic acids)
KW - Oc (ovarian carcinomas)
KW - Cancer susceptibility
KW - Rad51c
KW - Rad51d
KW - Palb2
KW - Brip1
KW - Bard1
KW - Familial
KW - Oc genes
KW - Aa (african americans)
OD - 9
YR - 2017
PC - 800218392
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044794_a

17 - TOXLINE
TI - Functions of Tenascin-C and Integrin alpha9beta1 in Mediating Prostate
Cancer Bone Metastasis.
AU - Rowley, D. R.
AD - Baylor College of Medicine Houston United States
AB - The purpose of this work is to dissect mechanisms responsible for
interactions between integrin a9b1 and tenascin-C that are fundamental in
prostate cancer metastasis to bone. Task1 is to address the role of a9b1
using gene knockdown followed by assessment of pathway activation
downstream of a9b1 and their effects on prostate cancer biology. Following
someinitial difficulties regarding cell viability, Substask 1 of Task 1 is
nearly completed. We have generated a line of VCaP cells with inducible
knockdown of alpha9 integrin. Studies arein progress to generate
additional engineered cell lines for verification and we plan to also
generate stable knockout cell lines using CRISPR/Cas 9 gene editing
technology. Subtask 2studies have been initiated. Substask 1 of Major Task
2 is also completed. Once engineered cell lines are validated and tested,
we will initiate the remaining Subtask 3 of Major Task 1as well as Task 2
studies. This work will advance the field by providing mechanistic data
regarding the role of alpha 9 and tenascin-C in the biology of prostate
cancer bone metastasis.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Metastasis
KW - Cells (biology)
KW - Bones
KW - Tumor cell line
KW - Bone metastasis
KW - Integrin alpha9beta1
KW - Tenascin-c
OD - 25
YR - 2017
PC - 800219091
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048476_a

18 - TOXLINE
TI - Evaluation of Biomarkers Predictive of Benefit from the PD-1 Inhibitor
MK-3475 in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Brain Metastases.
AU - Goldberg, S. B.
AD - Yale University New Haven United States
AB - Immunotherapies inhibiting the Programmed Death-1 (PD-1) axis can result
in dramatic responses and durable benefit in patients with non-small cell
lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the overall response rate is only 20-30 and
there is no clearly-defined biomarker that predicts which patients are
most likely to benefit. Moreover, patients with NSCLC and brain metastases
represent a population for which there are limited treatment options, and
these patients are typically excluded from immunotherapy clinical trials
or require local therapy prior to study enrollment. Therefore we are
conducting a trial of the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in
patients with NSCLC and untreated brain metastases. The objective of this
proposal is to study the immunophenotypic characteristics of primary lung
tumors, brain metastases and extra-cerebral metastases with the goal of
determining the variability across sites, and to study tumor- and
blood-based biomarkers to establish predictors of immunotherapy benefit.
We hypothesize that identifying biomarkers predictive of benefit to
immunotherapy in patients with NSCLC and brain metastases will result in
improved patient outcomes. We have made progress towards these goals in
several areas over the last two years. Over the first year of the grant,
we optimized the assays to be used to study, compiled the cohort of paired
tumor samples, accrued patients with NSCLC and untreated brain metastases
to the clinical trial with pembrolizumab, and obtained both blood and
tumor tissue samples from these patients.
KW - Lung cancer
KW - Immunotherapy
KW - Brain
KW - Metastasis
KW - Biological markers
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Assays
KW - Sampling
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Nsclc (non-small cell lung cancer)
KW - Pd-1 (programmed death-1)
KW - Pd-l1
KW - Brain metastases
KW - Pembrolizumab (mk-3475)
KW - Immunophenotypic characteristics
KW - Primary lung tumors
KW - Extra-cerebral metastases
OD - 14
YR - 2017
PC - 800218293
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044909_a

19 - TOXLINE
TI - Clinical Trial of a Comprehensive Treatment for High Functioning Children
with ASD.
AU - Lopata, C.
AD - Canisius College Buffalo United States
AB - The purpose of this RCT is to test the efficacy of an outpatient
psychosocial treatment (MAXout) on the ASD symptoms and
social-communicative functioning of 7-12 year olds with HFASD. The
treatment targets social/social-communication skills, non-literal language
skills, emotion-decoding skills, and interest expansion. Treatment is
delivered over 18 weeks (two 90 min.sessions/wk.) with each treatment
group consisting of 4 children with HFASD and 2 staff clinicians.
Treatment efficacy is assessed immediately following the 18-week treatment
and 4-6 weeks post-treatment. Following year 2, significant progress has
been made in regard to the major activities/objectives which included: (1)
renewal and completion of the regulatory review;(2) implementation of the
treatment for sampling wave 2; (3) completion of pretest, posttest, and
follow-up measures for sampling wave 2; (4) enrollment of sampling wave 3;
(5) recruitment and training of staff clinicians and research assistants;
(6)implementation of the treatment for sampling wave 3; (7) completion of
pretest, posttest, and follow-up measures for sampling wave 3; (8)
enrollment of sampling wave 4; and (9) recruitment and training of staff
clinicians and research assistants for wave4. Per the SOW, all of these
were completed in year 2.
KW - Autism
KW - Children
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Group therapy
KW - Psychological techniques
KW - Social psychology
KW - Hfasd(high-functioning autism spectrum disorder)
KW - Outpatient treatment
KW - Comprehensive psychosocial treatment
KW - Maxout
KW - Group-based treatment
OD - 28
YR - 2017
PC - 800222045
CT - 57T | Psychiatry
CT - 92B | Psychology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045225_a

20 - TOXLINE
TI - Fundamental Studies of Transient, Atmospheric-Pressure, Small-Scale
Plasmas.
AU - Jiang, C.
AD - University of Southern California Los Angeles United States
AB - Fundamental studies of nanosecond pulsed atmospheric pressure plasmas
including a millimeter He-O2 plasma jet, generated with a concentric
tubular electrode configuration, and micrometer He plasma jet, generated
with a single electrode, were conducted. These studies include
1)temporally and spatially resolved measurements of atomic oxygen ground
state (O3P) in the 2-cm long, 1-mm He-O2 plasma jets using Two-Photon
Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (TALIF); 2) plasma dynamics and
emission spectroscopic comparisons of single-electrode helium microplasma
jets that was excited with 5 ns or 164 ns, 8 kV pulses at 500 Hz.
Applications of the atmospheric pressure plasma jets and jet arrays (e.g.
plasma brush) were explored for surface decontamination against pathogenic
bacteria and biofilms, as well as for treatment of cervical cancer, in
vitro. Other studies involving portable nanosecond pulsed power generation
based gas switches or photoconductive solid state switches,
non-equilibrium surface plasma chemistry and applications were also
conducted.
KW - Plasma jets
KW - Two photon absorption
KW - Laser induced fluorescence
KW - High voltage
KW - Electrodes
KW - Emission spectroscopy
KW - Ground state
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800218426
CT - 99F | Physical &amp; Theoretical Chemistry
CT - 46G | Plasma Physics
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1025348_a

21 - TOXLINE
TI - Respiratory Highlights, 2016 - 2017 Influenza Season (2 October 2016 - 31
September 2017).
AU - Thervil, J.
AD - Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH.
AB - During the 2016-2017 influenza season (2 October 2016 - 30 September
2017), results were finalized for 5,555 specimens from 84 locations. There
were 1,833 specimens positive for influenza (29 A(H1N1)pdm09, 1,352
A(H3N2), one influenza A/not subtyped, 443 B, four dual influenza
coinfections, and four influenza coinfections with other respiratory
pathogens). These results and other respiratory pathogens that were
identified can be found in Table 2 on pages 4 and 5. During the 2016-2017
influenza season, influenza A(H3N2) was the predominant strain. Influenza
activity peaked at Weeks 7 and 8 and the influenza percent positive for
the season was 33 percent. This is the cumulative report for specimens
tested at USAFSAM during the 2016-2017 influenza season.
KW - Influenza
KW - Surveillance
KW - Department of defense
KW - Sentinel sites
KW - Dod(department of defense)
KW - Specimens
KW - Geis(global emerging infections surveillance and response system)
RN - AFRL-SA-WP-FR-2018-0001
OD - 31
YR - 2018
PC - 119989000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047961_a

22 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Acrylic Acid (CAS No. 79-10-7).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Although no studies were identified that fully evaluated potential
systemic effects following repeated or prolonged dermal exposure,
sufficient data were identified from dermal absorption and penetration
studies in animals [Basic Acrylic Monomer Manufacturers 1993; Winter and
Sipes 1993; Black et al. 1995] and acute dermal toxicity studies in
rabbits [Smyth et al. 1962; Carpenter et al. 1974] to show that acrylic
acid has the potential to be absorbed through the skin and is acutely
toxic following dermal exposure. Undiluted acrylic acid [Smyth et al.
1962; Carpenter et al. 1974;] and possibly concentrations greater that 5%
are corrosive to rabbit or rat skin, whereas concentrations up to 5% may
be irritating to the skin [DePass et al. 1984]. Results from skin
sensitization studies suggest that distilled acrylic acid is not likely to
be a skin sensitizer, whereas commercial preparations using methods that
do not include distillation are likely to contain impurities or
polymerization inhibitors that are potential skin sensitizers
[Waegemaekers and van der Walle 1984; IPCS 1997]. Therefore, on the basis
of these assessments, acrylic acid is assigned a composite skin notation
of SK: SYS-DIR (COR). Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard designations for
acrylic acid previously issued by NIOSH and other organizations. The
equivalent dermal designations for acrylic acid, according to the Globally
Harmonized System (GHS) for Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, are
Acute Toxicity Category 4 (Hazard statement: Harmful in contact with the
skin) and Skin Corrosion Category 1A (Hazard statement: Causes severe skin
burns and eye damage) [European Parliament 2008].
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Toxicology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - Acrylic acid
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - Corrosives
KW - Skin irritants
KW - Polymerization
KW - Sensitizers
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 79-10-7
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-133
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102214_a

23 - TOXLINE
TI - Upper Bound Radiation Dose Assessment for Military Personnel at McMurdo
Station, Antarctica, between 1962 and 1979, Revision 2.
AU - Dunavant, J. D.
AD - Leidos, Inc. Reston United States
AU - Chehata, M.
AD - Leidos, Inc. Reston United States
AU - Morris, W. J.
AD - Leidos, Inc. Reston United States
AU - Fairchild, G. J.
AD - Leidos, Inc. Reston United States
AU - Blake, P. K.
AD - Leidos, Inc. Reston United States
AB - U.S. veterans who were assigned at McMurdo Station, Antarctica, from 1962
to1979, have expressed concern that their health may have been affected by
radiological releases from an onsite nuclear power plant. This report
presents the results of the Department of Defense's radiation dose
assessment for McMurdo Station veterans who were not monitored for
occupational radiation exposure. This assessment determined that the
radiation doses were low and the associated probability that disease could
have arisen from these doses is also low. Finally, recommendations are
provided for McMurdo Station veterans, their dependents, the Department of
Veterans Affairs (VA), and the Naval Dosimetry Center regarding the VA
radiogenic disease claims process. Revision 2 corrects a typo in
Equation 2 in Appendix B-1.1 in the original technical report,
DTRA-TR-12-003, dated June 1, 2013. The parameter HD is deleted from the
denominator, which was a typo. All calculations using this equation were
checked and are correctly implemented.
KW - Radiological releases
KW - Nuclear power plant
OD - 129
YR - 2017
PC - 800221490
CT - 77F | Radiation Shielding, Protection, &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1040115_a

24 - TOXLINE
TI - Review and Synthesis of Evidence Regarding Environmental Risks Posed by
Munitions Constituents (MC) in Aquatic Systems.
AU - Lotufo, G. R.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AU - Chappell, M. A.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AU - Price, C. L.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AU - Ballentine, M. L.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AU - Fuentes, A. A.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AU - Bridges, T. S.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AU - George, R. D.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AU - Glisch, E. J.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AU - Carton, G.
AD - Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS.
AB - Underwater military munitions (UWMM) may pose a risk to aquatic
environments because they typically contain munitions constituents (MC)
such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and
hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). If UWMM become corroded or
breaches, the fill material may leak or dissolve into the surrounding
environment, which could potentially adversely affecting affect the
exposed biota. In large part, because of the high cost and complexity
associated with sampling MC at UWMM sites, detailed and reliable
information about MC in water, sediment, and biota is available for only a
few sites, and therefore temporal and spatial uncertainties persist.
Examination of available data indicates that concentrations of MC in water
and sediment were largely below detection or were relatively low (e.g.,
parts per billion), with higher concentrations being highly localized and
typically near a point source. These findings were in accordance with
predictive modeling and with fate studies. Available toxicity data derived
for a variety of freshwater and marine species were compiled and used to
derive interim water quality criteria and protective values derived from
species sensitivity distributions. Toxicity varied widely across a
diversity of MC and species. For most aquatic sites, MC contamination in
sediment and in the water-column presents low risk to the resident biota.
KW - Explosives detection
KW - Environmental protection
KW - Explosive devices
KW - Explosives
KW - Surveys
KW - Aquatic organisms
KW - Chemical analysis
KW - Wildlife
KW - Explosions
KW - Material degradation processes
KW - Unexploded ordnance--environmental aspects
KW - Aquatic habitats
KW - Water--pollution
KW - Pollution--risk assessment
KW - Uwmm(underwater military munitions
KW - Tnt(2
KW - 4
KW - 6-trinitrotoluene)
KW - Rdx(hexahydro-1
KW - 3
KW - 5-trinitro-1
KW - 5-triazine)
KW - Dmm(discarded military munitions)
RN - ERDC/EL-TR-17-17
OD - 254
PR - ER-2341
YR - 2017
PC - 117238000
CT - 47C | Physical &amp; Chemical Oceanography
CT - 79A | Ammunition, Explosives, &amp; Pyrotechnics
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042956_a

25 - TOXLINE
TI - Phase I safety and immunogenicity trial of rVSVG ZEBOV GP vaccine in
adults and children in Lambarn, Gabon.
AU - Hooper, J.
AD - USAMRIID Ft Detrick United States
AB - The Western African Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) Public Health Emergency of
International Concern ended in June 2016, [1] after infecting
approximately 28,650 individuals of whom 11,323 died [2, 3]. Global
commitment led to landmarks in vaccine development against EVD with two
candidates out of 15 being tested worldwide in phase 1-3 clinical trials
[4]. A live-attenuated recombinant vaccine consisting of the vesicular
stomatitis virus, strain Indiana (VSV) with the gene for the Kikwit95
Zaire Ebolavirus glycoprotein (ZEBOV-GP) replacing the VSV glycoprotein
(G) was one selected for accelerated clinical development. In European and
African populations, a VSV-EBola CONsortium (VEBCON) carried out parallel
dose-escalation phase I trials of the rVSV-ZEBOV candidate vaccine in
Germany (NCT02283099), Kenya (NCT02296983), and Gabon (PACTR2014000089322)
and a double-blind phase 1/2 randomized, controlled trial (RCT) in
Switzerland (NCT02287480). Two phase 3 trials are evaluating
KW - Immunogenicity
OD - 41
PR - 18836631
YR - 2017
PC - 800220848
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1035624_a

26 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer.
AU - Gleave, M.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AB - The goal of this project was to develop a novel means to inhibit prostate
cancer development and progression.The development of Siah1/2 inhibitors
to the ubiquitin ligase Siah1/2 was advanced by the ability to develop
aSiah1/2 inhibitory peptide that effectively inhibits Siah1/2 activity,
which was found to effectively attenuate thegrowth of prostate cancer
tumors in vivo when transplanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into the
prostate site.The assessment of the Siah1/2 inhibitory reagents was
performed in vitro, in cultures and in genetic models ofmouse as in human
PDX tumors in our lab as by the Partnering PIs, Drs. Martin Gleave and
Neil Bhowmick at thetwo respective sites. Most of my labs attention was
given to the development and assessment of small moleculeinhibitors to
Siah2 as a mean to complement the work performed with the inhibitory
peptide. The goal has been tosecure the first-in-class inhibitor of the
ubiquitin ligase that can be used in vivo for the inhibition of prostate
cancer.
KW - Metastatic prostate cancer
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 110835000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047319_a

27 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2015-0147-3266, January 2017.
Evaluation of Exposures and Respiratory Health at a Coffee Processing
Facility.
AU - Fechter-Leggett, E. D.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Boylstein, R. J.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Stanton, M. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - In August 2015, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
(NIOSH) received a management request for a health hazard evaluation at a
coffee processing facility. The request expressed concern about exposure
to diacetyl (2,3-butanedione) during coffee roasting, grinding, and
flavoring. In February 2016, we conducted a ventilation assessment, an
industrial hygiene survey, and a medical survey. The industrial hygiene
survey consisted of the collection of air samples and bulk samples of
coffee and flavorings for the analysis of diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and
2,3-hexanedione. Continuous monitoring instruments were used to monitor
total volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide,
temperature, and relative humidity in specific areas and during tasks. The
medical survey consisted of breathing tests and a questionnaire covering
medical and work histories. Overall, average air levels of diacetyl,
2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione were not elevated. We identified
specific work tasks that resulted in higher air concentrations of diacetyl
and 2,3-pentanedione than other tasks. Specifically, packaging and
flavoring tasks were associated with the highest levels of diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione. Some employees reported respiratory symptoms or
diagnoses and/or had abnormal lung function tests. We recommend using
engineering and administrative controls as a precautionary approach to
limit employees’ exposures and establishing a medical monitoring
program.
KW - Food additives
KW - Volatile organic compounds (VOC)
KW - Indoor environmental quality (IEQ)
KW - Indoor air quality (IAQ)
KW - Indoor environments
KW - Temperature measurement
KW - Relative humidity
KW - Respiratory diseases
KW - Respiratory system disorders
KW - Lung diseases
KW - Food processing workers
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2015-0147-3266
OD - 54
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101411_a

28 - TOXLINE
TI - Acute and Subacute Inhalation Toxicity Study in Rats Exposed to
Pyrotechnically-Disseminated M18 Red Smoke.
AU - Crouse, L. C.
AD - Army Public Health Center Aberdeen United States
AU - Bazar, M. A.
AD - Army Public Health Center Aberdeen United States
AU - Crouse, C. L.
AD - Army Public Health Center Aberdeen United States
AU - Januszkiewicz, A.
AD - Army Public Health Center Aberdeen United States
AB - This toxicology study was conducted to provide toxicity data relevant to
the exposure in rats to test atmospheres of pyrotechnically disseminated
M18 red smoke. Acute nose-only inhalation exposure to an average
atmospheric concentration of 1.92 mg/L red smoke for 30 minutes did not
induce mortality in male and female rats. Subacute (2-week) nose-only
inhalation exposure to average atmospheric concentrations of 0, 0.1, 0.5,
and 1.5 mg/L red smoke for 30 minutes/day did not result in any mortality
or significant clinical signs at any exposure level. Test article-related
histopathological findings were primarily observed in the anterior regions
of the nose in male and female rats at all exposure levels. Increased
incidence of nasal mucosal degeneration was identified as the critical
endpoint in this study and was used to derive BMDL10 of 0.351 and 0.054
mg/L for male and female rats, respectively. Red smoke-induced
histopathological findings at the 1.5 mg/L exposure level exhibited a
regression of injury following a 4-week recovery period.
KW - Toxicity
RN - S.0036333-15
OD - 403
YR - 2017
PC - 800221197
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1032285_a

29 - TOXLINE
TI - Early Recognition of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy Through FDDNP PET
Imaging.
AU - Bernick, C.
AD - Cleveland Clinic Foundation, OH.
AB - 1. The PET biomarker, F-FDDNP
(2-(1-{6-[(2-[F-18]fluoroethyl(methyl)amino]-2-naphthyl}ethylidene)
malononitrile) [FDDNP] has shown sensitivity for in vivo detection of tau
in addition to -sheet-containing brain amyloid neuroaggregates. Tau
protein in a characteristic distribution is felt to be the cardinal
pathologic feature of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy. This project will
examine whether FDDNP PET imaging correlates with, and/or can predict,
decline in cognitive function in those exposed to cumulative head trauma.
KW - Brain injuries
KW - Positron emission tomography
KW - Chronic encephalopathy
KW - Blast injuries
KW - Head injuries
KW - Cte(chronic traumatic encephalopathy)
KW - Pet(positron emission tomography)
KW - Tau
OD - 9
YR - 2017
PC - 006482000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047642_a

30 - TOXLINE
TI - JPL Neptune Radiation Model (NMOD).
AU - Garrett, H.
AD - California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena. Jet Propulsion Lab.
AU - Evans, R.
AD - California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena. Jet Propulsion Lab.
AB - The objective of this study is the development of a comprehensive
radiation model of the Neptunian environment for JPL mission planning. The
ultimate goal is to provide a description of the high-energy electron and
proton environments and the magnetic field at Neptune that can be used for
engineering design. The JPL Neptune Radiation Model (NMOD) models the
high-energy electrons and protons between 0.025 MeV and 5 MeV based on the
California Institute of Technology's Cosmic Ray Subsystem and the Applied
Physics Laboratory's Low Energy Charged Particle Detector on Voyager 2. As
in previous JPL radiation models, the form of the Neptunian model is based
on magnetic field coordinates and requires a conversion from spacecraft
coordinates to Neptunian-centered magnetic "B-L" coordinates. Two types of
magnetic field models have been developed for Neptune: 1) simple "offset,
tilted dipoles" (OTD), and 2) a complex, multi-pole expansion model
("O8"). A review of the existing data on Neptune and a search of the NASA
Planetary Data System (PDS) were completed to obtain the most current
descriptions of the Neptunian high-energy particle environment. These data
were fit in terms of the O8 B-L coordinates to develop the electron and
proton flux models. The flux predictions of the new model were used to
estimate the total ionizing dose (TID) rate along the Neptunian equator,
meridional flux contours for the electrons and protons, and for flux and
dose comparisons with the other radiation belts in the Solar System.
KW - *Neptune (planet)
KW - *Electron radiation
KW - *Mission planning
KW - *Electrons
KW - *Protons
KW - *Magnetic fields
KW - *Voyager 2 spacecraft
KW - *Pitch (inclination)
KW - Flyby missions
KW - Flux (rate)
KW - Radiation belts
RN - JPL-Publ-17-2
OD - 58
PR - Proj. PEMOPS
PR - Task 5.5130.06
PR - WBS PEMOPS-5.5130.06
YR - 2017
PC - 005100151
CT - 54C | Astrophysics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0006886_a

31 - TOXLINE
TI - Design of the STAR-X Telescope.
AU - Saha, T. T.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Zhang, W. W.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - McClelland, R. S.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AB - Top-level science goals of the Survey and Time-domain Astrophysical
Research eXplorer (STAR-X) include: investigations of most violent
explosions in the universe, study of growth of black holes across cosmic
time and mass scale, and measure how structure formation heats majority of
baryons in the universe. To meet these goals, the field-of-view of the
telescope should be about 1 square-degree, the angular resolution should
be 5 arc-seconds or below across large part of the field-of-view. The
on-axis effective area at 1 KeV should be about 2,000 sq cm. Payload cost
and launch considerations limit the outer diameter, focal length, and mass
to 1.3 meters, 5 meters, and 250 kilograms, respectively. Telescope design
is based on a segmented meta-shell approach we have developed at Goddard
Space Flight Center for the STAR-X telescope. The telescope shells are
divided into 30-degree segments. Individual telescopes and meta-shells are
nested inside each other to meet the effective area requirements in 0.5 -
6.0 KeV range. We consider Wolter-Schwarzschild, and
Modified-Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope designs as basic building blocks
of the nested STAR-X telescope. These designs offer an excellent
resolution over a large field of views. Nested telescopes are vulnerable
to stray light problems. We have designed a multi-component baffle system
to eliminate direct and single-reflection light paths inside the
telescopes. Large number of internal and external baffle vane structures
are required to prevent stray rays from reaching the focal plane. We have
developed a simple ray-trace based tool to determine the dimensions and
locations of the baffles. In this paper, we present the results of our
trade studies, baffle design studies, and optical performance analyses of
the STAR-X telescope.
KW - *Optical equipment
KW - *X ray telescopes
KW - *Design analysis
KW - *X ray optics
KW - *Field of view
KW - Baffles
KW - Light scattering
KW - Mirrors
KW - Focal plane devices
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN43179-2
OD - 17
YR - 2017
PC - 800203019
CT - 46C | Optics &amp; Lasers
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007514_a

32 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeting Neutrophil Protease-Mediated Degradation of Tsp-1 to Induce
Metastatic Dormancy.
AU - Mittal, V.
AD - Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY.
AB - External pre-existing inflammation in the lungs is linked to increased
incidence of metastasis. Inflammation-mediated by bacterial infection or
cigarette smoke enhanced pulmonary metastasis from breast cancer in humans
and mice. Similarly, autoimmune arthritis, characterized by increased
recruitment of inflammatory neutrophils and macrophages in the lungs was
associated with increased breast cancer metastasis to the lungs. Despite
this compelling link between inflammation and metastasis, the mechanisms
by which inflammation contributes to tumor outgrowth in distant metastatic
organs have remained underexplored. We believe that targeting
inflammation-mediated metastasis has tremendous potential in the treatment
of high-risk breast cancer patients. Overarching challenges. Breast cancer
affects more than 1.7 million individuals a year worldwide, with
approximately 500,000 deaths. Importantly, > 90% of this mortality is a
consequence of metastatic disease that is resistant to adjuvant therapies.
Despite this clinical significance, there is a conspicuous lack of a
single FDA approved molecularly targeted anti-metastatic therapy. Hence,
there is an urgent medical need to develop new targeted anti-metastatic
therapeutic approaches. However, a lack of mechanistic understanding by
which tumor cell colonize and outgrow in distant metastatic organs, has
been a major impediment to the development of an effective anti-metastatic
therapy. Hypothesis /Objective. We hypothesize that intervention against
inflammation-driven neutrophil elastase (NE)/Cathepsin G
(CG)-Thrombospondin-1 (Tsp-1) axis can be developed into an
anti-metastatic therapy in breast cancer.
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Metastasis
KW - Lipopolysaccharides
KW - Bone marrow
KW - Inflammation. lung cancer
KW - Macrophages
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Inhibition
KW - Peptides
KW - Tnbc (triple negative breast cancer)
KW - Tsp-1 (thrombospondin 1)
KW - Cg (cathepsin g)
KW - Bone marrow transplantation
KW - Ne (neutrophil elastase)
KW - Sivelestat
KW - Inflammation-mediated metastasis
KW - Ne cg-tsp-1 axis
KW - Dwlpk peptides
KW - Metastases
KW - Metastatic dormancy
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 000607000
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049267_a

33 - TOXLINE
TI - Propulsion Powertrain Real-Time Simulation Using Hardware-in-the-Loop
(HIL) for Aircraft Electric Propulsion System.
AU - Choi, B. B.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Brown, G. V.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AB - It is essential to design a propulsion powertrain real-time simulator
using the hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) system that emulates an electrified
aircraft propulsion (EAP) systems power grid. This simulator would enable
us to facilitate in-depth understanding of the system principles, to
validate system model analysis and performance prediction, and to
demonstrate the proof-of-concept of the EAP electrical system. This paper
describes how subscale electrical machines with their controllers can
mimic the power components in an EAP powertrain. In particular, three
powertrain emulations are presented to mimic 1) a gas turbo-=shaft engine
driving a generator, consisting of two permanent magnet (PM) motors with
brushless motor drives, coupled by a shaft, 2) a motor driving a
propulsive fan, and 3) a turbo-shaft engine driven fan (turbofan engine)
operation. As a first step towards the demonstration, experimental dynamic
characterization of the two motor drive systems, coupled by a mechanical
shaft, were performed. The previously developed analytical motor models1
were then replaced with the experimental motor models to perform the
real-time demonstration in the predefined flight path profiles. This
technique can convert the plain motor system into a unique EAP power grid
emulator that enables rapid analysis and real-time simulation performance
using hardware-in-the-loop (HIL).
KW - *Electric propulsion
KW - *Real time operation
KW - *Propulsion system configurations
KW - *Propulsion system performance
KW - *Hardware-in-the-loop simulation
KW - *Controllers
KW - Computerized simulation
KW - Propulsion
KW - Simulators
KW - Shafts (machine elements)
KW - Performance prediction
KW - Turbofan engines
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN43712
OD - 12
PR - WBS 081876.02.03.05.02.02
YR - 2017
PC - 115801001
CT - 51C | Aircraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0008460_a

34 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer.
AU - Bhowmick, N.
AD - Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA.
AB - The goal of this project was to develop a novel means to inhibit prostate
cancer development and progression.The development of Siah1/2 inhibitors
to the ubiquitin ligase Siah1/2 was advanced by the ability to develop
aSiah1/2 inhibitory peptide that effectively inhibits Siah1/2 activity,
which was found to effectively attenuate thegrowth of prostate cancer
tumors in vivo when transplanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into the
prostate site.The assessment of the Siah1/2 inhibitory reagents was
performed in vitro, in cultures and in genetic models ofmouse as in human
PDX tumors in our lab as by the Partnering PIs, Drs. Martin Gleave and
Neil Bhowmick at thetwo respective sites. Most of my labs attention was
given to the development and assessment of small moleculeinhibitors to
Siah2 as a mean to complement the work performed with the inhibitory
peptide. The goal has been tosecure the first-in-class inhibitor of the
ubiquitin ligase that can be used in vivo for the inhibition of prostate
cancer.
KW - Metastatic prostate cancer
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 005753000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047324_a
35 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2016-0003-3299, November 2017.
Evaluation of Exposures and Respiratory Health at a Coffee Roasting and
Packaging Facility and Attached Retail Cafe.
AU - LeBouf, R. F.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Martin, S. B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Stanton, M. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Mugford, C.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Bailey, R. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - In October 2015, the Health Hazard Evaluation Program of the National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health received a request from the
management of a coffee roasting and packaging facility with an attached
café regarding concerns about exposures to and health effects from
diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione during coffee roasting and grinding. In
March 2016, we conducted an industrial hygiene survey, ventilation
assessment, and medical survey at the facility. The industrial hygiene
survey consisted of collecting personal breathing zone and area air
samples for alpha-diketones (diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and
2,3-hexanedione). Bulk samples of whole bean and ground roasted coffee
were collected to evaluate the potential for emission of diacetyl,
2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione. We used continuous monitoring
instruments to measure total volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide,
carbon dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity in specific areas and
during tasks. We also conducted a ventilation assessment in the
production, café, and office areas. The medical survey consisted of a
health questionnaire and breathing tests. Three of 20 personal full-shift
samples exceeded the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
recommended exposure limit for diacetyl of 5 parts per billion in the
production area including a roaster operator (5.8 parts per billion), one
production employee (5.9 parts per billion), and the production manager
(5.1 parts per billion). Fullshift air concentrations of diacetyl were
below this exposure limit for personal and area air samples collected in
office areas and the attached retail café. Full-shift air concentrations
of 2,3-pentanedione were below the National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health recommended exposure limit of 9.3 parts per billion for
both personal and area air samples collected in the production area,
office areas, and attached retail café. Through task-based sampling, we
identified specific work tasks that resulted in elevated diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione air concentrations. Specifically, grinding roasted coffee
beans resulted in two separate peak exposures to diacetyl (maximum 65.9
parts per billion) and 2,3-pentanedione (maximum 39.6 parts billion).
Scooping roasted beans by hand from a roasted bean storage bin also had
elevated peak exposures with maximum exposures of 151 parts per billion
diacetyl and 182 parts per billion 2,3-pentanedione. Nose and eye symptoms
were the most commonly reported symptoms. Wheezing was the most commonly
reported lower respiratory symptom; 1.7 times as many employees as
expected reported this symptom than in the U.S. population with a similar
demographic distribution. One participant had severe airways obstruction
and possible small airways abnormality on oscillometry, both improved
after bronchodilator. Four other participants had abnormalities on
oscillomtery but normal spirometry. One participant had high exhaled
nitric oxide, a marker of allergic airways inflammation. We recommend
increasing dilution ventilation and/or installing local exhaust
ventilation. We also recommend administrative controls such as
modification of work practices, training employees about work-place
hazards, and instituting a medical monitoring program to identify any
employees who may be developing work-related lung disease (e.g., asthma,
obliterative bronchiolitis) and to help management prioritize
interventions to prevent occupational lung disease.
KW - *Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
KW - *Food processing workers
KW - *Industrial hygiene
KW - Coffee workers
KW - Food handlers
KW - Food processing
KW - Food processing industry
KW - Food additives
KW - Organic dusts
KW - Ventilation systems
KW - Relative humidity
KW - Respiratory systems disorders
KW - Respiratory diseases
KW - Lung
KW - Lung disease
KW - Lung disorders
KW - Diacetyl
KW - Carbon monoxide
KW - Carbon dioxide
KW - Air sampling
KW - Workplace monitoring
KW - Health surveys
KW - Medical surveys
KW - Questionnaires
KW - Breathing
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Exposure limits
KW - Mucous membranes
KW - Pulmonary system disorders
KW - Airway resistance
KW - Training
KW - Intervention
KW - Environmental control equipment
KW - Exhaust ventilation
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2016-0003-3299
OD - 58
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57M | Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, &amp; Rehabilitation
CT - 41G | Quality Control &amp; Reliability
CT - 41I | Job Environment
CT - 98H | Food Technology
CT - 92A | Job Training &amp; Career Development
CT - 68 | Environmental Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100577_a

36 - TOXLINE
TI - Tier 3 Certification Fuel Impacts Test Program, December 2017.
AB - EPA adopted a new set of “Tier 3” fuel and motor vehicle emission
standards in 2014 to reduce air pollution.1 The Tier 3 emission standards
include changes to several properties of emission test fuel to make it
more representative of in-use fuel, and some of these changes are expected
to affect emissions and fuel economy. Among the property changes as
specified in Section 3.1 below, the property changes of interest for
greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel economy included total aromatics,
aromatics distribution and ethanol content. This test program was
initiated to compare Tier 2 certification fuel, the fuel on which the
Phase 1 and Phase 2 GHG and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE)
standards were established for light-duty and heavy duty-vehicles, with
the new Tier 3 certification fuel from the Tier 3 program. The program
results will be used as a basis for test procedure adjustments to ensure
consistent stringency of GHG and fuel economy standards as vehicle
certification makes the transition to Tier 3 test fuel.
KW - *Tier 3 Certification
KW - *Fuel Impacts Test Program
KW - Emission standards
KW - Fuel economy standards
KW - Test procedures
KW - Greenhouse Gases Program
KW - Aromatics effects
KW - *Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE)
RN - EPA/420/R-17/011
OD - 52
YR - 2017
PC - 031287300
CT - 85 | Transportation
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
CT - 97G | Policies, Regulations &amp; Studies
CT - 97K | Fuels
CT - 97L | Engine Studies, Energy Related
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100897_a

37 - TOXLINE
TI - Optical Design of the STAR-X Telescope.
AU - Saha, T. T.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Zhang, W. W.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - McClelland, R. S.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AB - Top-level science goals of the Survey and Time-domain Astrophysical
Research eXplorer (STAR-X) include: investigations of most violent
explosions in the universe, study of growth of black holes across cosmic
time and mass scale, and measure how structure formation heats majority of
baryons in the universe. To meet these goals, the field-of-view of the
telescope should be about 1 square-degree, the angular resolution should
be 5 arc-seconds or below across large part of the field-of-view. The
on-axis effective area at 1 KeV should be about 2,000 sq cm. Payload cost
and launch considerations limit the outer diameter, focal length, and mass
to 1.3 meters, 5 meters, and 250 kilograms, respectively. Telescope design
is based on a segmented meta-shell approach we have developed at Goddard
Space Flight Center for the STAR-X telescope. The telescope shells are
divided into 30-degree segments. Individual telescopes and meta-shells are
nested inside each other to meet the effective area requirements in 0.5 -
6.0 KeV range. We consider Wolter-Schwarzschild, and
Modified-Wolter-Schwarzschild telescope designs as basic building blocks
of the nested STAR-X telescope. These designs offer an excellent
resolution over a large field of views. Nested telescopes are vulnerable
to stray light problems. We have designed a multi-component baffle system
to eliminate direct and single-reflection light paths inside the
telescopes. Large number of internal and external baffle vane structures
are required to prevent stray rays from reaching the focal plane. We have
developed a simple ray-trace based tool to determine the dimensions and
locations of the baffles. In this paper, we present the results of our
trade studies, baffle design studies, and optical performance analyses of
the STAR-X telescope.
KW - *Optical equipment
KW - *X ray telescopes
KW - *Design analysis
KW - *Field of view
KW - *Spaceborne telescopes
KW - *X ray optics
KW - Baffles
KW - Mirrors
KW - Light scattering
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN43179-1
OD - 10
YR - 2017
PC - 800203019
CT - 46C | Optics &amp; Lasers
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007513_a

38 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeting GPR30 in Abiraterone- and MDV3100 Resistant Prostate Cancer.
AU - Lam, H.
AD - University of Washington Seattle United States
AB - Little information is available on the novel treatment for abiraterone
(Abi)- and MDV3100 (MDV)-resistant disease. G protein-coupled receptor
30(GPR30) is a seven-transmembrane estrogen receptor and activation by its
specific agonist G-1 inhibited growth in multiple castration-resistant
prostate cancer (CRPC) xenograft models that were resistant to the
first-generation androgen deprivation therapy. More importantly, GPR30 is
an androgen-repressed target and its expression increased in clinical CRPC
when compared to primary prostate cancer. Here, we showed that G-1
significantly inhibited the growth and extended the progression-free
survival of patient-derived xenograft models that are sensitive (LuCaP
136CR,P=0.046) or minimally responsive to Abi and MDV (LuCaP 35CR,
P=0.005). Interesting, no survival benefit was observed with G-1 when
these mice had been pre-treated with Abi or MDV. However, G-1 delayed the
development of Abi resistance in the Abi-sensitive LuCaP 136CR, suggesting
a defined window for the G-1 therapy. Together with our previous findings,
G-1 invariably inhibited 5 models of CRPC, independent oftheir sensitivity
to Abi or MDV. No adverse side effect of G-1 was detected in these
preclinical studies. Clinically, GPR30 expression was detectedin > 90
of CRPC metastases, whereas 80 showed a moderate to high expression
level. In rapid autopsy patients who were treated with Abiand/or MDV,
GPR30 was highly expressed in both lung and bone metastases. The high
level of GPR30 in CRPC receiving Abi and MDV highlights the potential in
effective G-1 therapy on CRPC patients either in combination with Abi, or
on CRPC that is minimally responsive to Abiand MDV.
KW - Biological factors
KW - Genetics
KW - Antineoplastic agents
KW - Gene expression
KW - Growth factors
KW - Peptides
KW - Tissues
KW - Therapy
KW - Body weight
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Proteins
KW - Cell physiological processes
KW - Drug resistance
KW - Abiraterone
KW - Mdv3100
KW - Gpr30
KW - Estrogen receptor
KW - G-1
KW - Patient derived xenografts
KW - Treatment resistance
KW - Castration-resistant prostate cancer
OD - 56
YR - 2017
PC - 800218392
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049938_a

39 - TOXLINE
TI - Role of the Interferon-Gamma-Jak/STAT Pathway in Rheumatoid Arthritis.
AU - Bridges, S. J. L.
AD - Alabama Univ., Birmingham.
AB - Type I (IFN-) and type II (IFN-) interferons are important mediators of
autoimmunity. Our group recently showed a strong association of IFN-
receptor 1 (Ifngr1) expression and of IFN- receptor 2 (Ifngr2) expression
in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with the presence of RA and
its radiographic severity, respectively (Arthritis Rheumatol. 2015
67:1165). IL-2 has essential regulatory function in inflammatory diseases
and is considered as a potential therapy for autoimmune disease. We tested
the hypothesis that RA is associated with alterations in IFN- and IL-2
STAT signaling within certain subsets of PBMCs. We used a high-definition
phospho-flow approach to evaluate the activation of STAT1, STAT3 and STAT5
after IFN- or IL-2stimulation. We analyzed PBMCs from 37 RA patients and
12 healthy controls (HC) for activation of STATs in specific CD4and CD8 T
cells subpopulations, B cells and monocytes. We found that IFN- induced
STAT1 activation was significantly greater in RA nave, central memory, Tfh
and Treg subsets of CD4 T cell populations compared to HC (p < 0.05).
IL-2 very efficiently activated STAT5 in all T and B cell populations in
RA and HC. The activation of STAT5 in RA was significantly greater than HC
in only one population: effector memory CD4 T cells (p < 0.01). Our
studies revealed the presence of a STAT5phosphatase in RA T cell subsets
that likely counteracts IL-2 regulator activity and contribute to the
pathogenesis of RA.
KW - Arthritis
KW - Joint diseases
KW - Autoimmunity
KW - Interferon
KW - Therapeutics
KW - T lymphocyte subsets
KW - Cell signaling
KW - Interferon-gamma
KW - Stat1
KW - Stat3
KW - Stat5
KW - Interleukin-2
OD - 18
YR - 2017
PC - 001198000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047486_a

40 - TOXLINE
TI - Development of Pain Endpoint Models for Use in Prostate Cancer Clinical
Trials and Drug Approval.
AU - Basch, E.
AD - North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill.
AU - Bennett, A.
AD - North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill.
AB - OBJECTIVE: The objective of this work is to establish standard methods for
measuring pain palliation and pain progression in prostate cancer clinical
trials that are feasible, methodologically rigorous, and meet regulatory
requirements for drug approval and labeling. The primary aim of this award
is to conduct an observational longitudinal study in men with
castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer receiving docetaxel-based
chemotherapy, in order to establish key design elements of a pain endpoint
model which can be used in pivotal trials. SUMMARY: We report the
following progress: (1) the study designed to address Aim 1 is accruing
patients at all four sites; (2) a manuscript resulting from the work
described in Aim 2 has been published in the journal European Urology,
titled: Effects of Cabozantinib on Pain and Narcotic Use in Patients with
Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer: Results from a Phase 2 Nonrandomized
Expansion Cohort and (3) the manuscript resulting from work described in
Aim 3 has been published by the journal Cancer, titled: Pain Palliation
Measurement in Cancer Clinical Trials: The US Food and Drug Administration
Perspective. Both manuscripts have been attached to annual report
submitted to Department of Defenses in November 2015.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Drug therapy
KW - Pain
KW - Resistance(biology)
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Oncology
KW - Metastatic castrate resistant prostate cancer
KW - Fda
KW - Study endpoints
OD - 13
YR - 2017
PC - 045592000
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1041645_a

41 - TOXLINE
TI - Acute and Delayed Systemic Treatment with Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Agonists
to Prevent or Treat/Reverse Osteoporosis in a Mouse Model of SCI.
AU - Grill, R. J.
AD - University Of Mississippi Medical Center Jackson United States
AB - The overall goal of this project is to determine whether a selective
agonist for the cannabinoid-2 receptor, when systemically delivered, can
prevent the onset of osteoporosis in mice when delivered during the acute
phase of spinal cord injury or restore bone density when delivery is
delayed until the late, chronic period of injury. During this first year,
we have focused on aim 1; testing a range of CB2 agonist concentrations,
delivered early but over a maximum of 40 days (longest time group). While
we are still assessing bone densities (post-mortem), we noted that both
the low and high doses of CB2 agonist appear to elicit neuropathic
pain-like symptoms, resulting in the required early euthanasia of those
subjects. As a result, we are focusing on the mid-range dose for all
subsequent experiments. We have also begun Aim 2 by performing the spinal
transection surgeries. These animals will require a 3 month period (to
induce chronic stage) before initiation of CB2 agonist treatment.
KW - Spinal cord
KW - Spinal injuries
KW - Bone diseases
KW - Pain
KW - Spinal cord injury
KW - Osteoporosis
KW - Neuropathic pain
KW - Bone density
KW - Acute
KW - Chronic
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800220104
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050249_a

42 - TOXLINE
TI - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) Value Profile: Nitrogen
Dioxide (CAS No. 10102-44-0).
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Maier, A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Parker, A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Haber, L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Overview of the IDLH Value for Nitrogen Dioxide IDLH value: 13 ppm (24
mg/m3). Basis for IDLH value: The IDLH value for nitrogen dioxide is based
on a LOAEL of 30 ppm for respiratory irritation and severe cough in
volunteers following a 70 minute exposure [Henschler et al. 1960].
Duration adjustment resulted in the calculation of a 30-minute equivalent
LOAEL of 38 ppm. A composite uncertainty factor of 3 was applied to
account for human variability yielding an IDLH value 13 ppm for nitrogen
dioxide. 1.2 Purpose This IDLH Value Profile presents (1) a brief summary
of technical data associated with acute inhalation exposures to nitrogen
dioxide and (2) the rationale behind the immediately dangerous to life or
health (IDLH) value for nitrogen dioxide. IDLH values are developed on the
basis of scientific rationale and logic outlined in the NIOSH Current
Intelligence Bulletin (CIB) 66: Derivation of Immediately Dangerous to
Life or Health (IDLH) Values [NIOSH 2013]. As described in CIB 66, NIOSH
performs in-depth literature searches to ensure that all relevant data
from human and animal studies with acute exposures to the substance are
identified. Information included in CIB 66 on the literature search
includes pertinent databases, key terms, and guides for evaluating data
quality and relevance for the establishment of an IDLH value. The
information that is identified in the in-depth literature search is
evaluated with general considerations that include description of studies
(i.e., species, study protocol, exposure concentration and duration),
health endpoint evaluated, and critical effect levels (e.g., NOAELs,
LOAELs, and LC50 values). For nitrogen dioxide, the in-depth literature
search was conducted through July 2017.
KW - *Nitrogen dioxide
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Health efects
KW - Respiratory irritants
KW - Respiratory function
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH)
KW - Current intelligence bulletins
KW - Heat effects
KW - Health hazards
KW - Irritants
KW - Humans
KW - Animals
KW - Mucous membranes
KW - Pulmonary system
KW - Pulmonary system disorders
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Toxic effects
KW - Toxins
KW - Nitrogen oxides
KW - Inorganic gases
KW - Nitrogen peroxide
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - CAS No. 10102-44-0
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-202
OD - 26
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 99 | Chemistry
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100183_a

43 - TOXLINE
TI - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) Value Profile:
Methacrylonitrile (CAS No. 126-98-7).
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Maier, A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Parker, A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Haber, L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Overview of the IDLH Value for Methacrylonitrile IDLH value: 4.0 ppm (11
mg/m3). Basis for IDLH value: Among the acute lethality studies, mice and
rabbits appear to be the most sensitive species. The LC50 values in mice
and rabbits were 36 and 37 ppm, respectively for a 4-hour exposure
[Pozzani et al. 1968]. In the same study, no deaths or clinical signs were
reported in mice or rabbits exposed to 19.7 ppm for 4-hours, indicating a
steep concentration-response curve. The NOAEL of 19.7 ppm after duration
adjustment yields a 30-minute equivalent concentration of 39 ppm. An
uncertainty factor of 10 was applied to account for a steep-dose response
relationship, animal to human differences, and human variability resulting
in an IDLH value of 4.0 ppm. 1.2 Purpose: This IDLH Value Profile presents
(1) a brief summary of technical data associated with acute inhalation
exposures to methacrylonitrile and (2) the rationale behind the
immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) value for
methacrylonitrile. IDLH values are developed on the basis of the
scientific rationale and logic outlined in the NIOSH Current Intelligence
Bulletin (CIB) 66: Derivation of Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health
(IDLH) Values [NIOSH 2013]. As described in CIB 66, NIOSH performs
in-depth literature searches to ensure that all relevant data from human
and animal studies with acute exposures to the substance are identified.
Information included in CIB 66 on the literature search includes pertinent
databases, key terms, and guides for evaluating data quality and relevance
for the establishment of an IDLH value. The information that is identified
in the in-depth literature search is evaluated with general considerations
that include description of studies (i.e., species, study protocol,
exposure concentration and duration), health endpoint evaluated, and
critical effect levels (e.g., NOAELs, LOAELs, and LC50 values). For
methacrylonitrile, the in-depth literature search was conducted through
July 2017.
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Methacrylonitrile
KW - *Toxicology
KW - Respiratory irritants
KW - Respiratory function
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH)
KW - Current intelligence bulletins
KW - Health hazards
KW - Irritants
KW - Humans
KW - Animals
KW - Pulmonary system
KW - Pulmonary system disorders
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Toxic effects
KW - Toxins
KW - Lethal concentrations
KW - Nitriles
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - CAS No. 126-98-7
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-204
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 99 | Chemistry
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100185_a

44 - TOXLINE
TI -Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer.
AU -Ronai, Z.
AD -Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AB -The goal of this project was to develop a novel means to inhibit prostate
cancer development and progression.The development of Siah1/2 inhibitors
to the ubiquitin ligase Siah1/2 was advanced by the ability to develop
aSiah1/2 inhibitory peptide that effectively inhibits Siah1/2 activity,
which was found to effectively attenuate thegrowth of prostate cancer
tumors in vivo when transplanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into the
prostate site.The assessment of the Siah1/2 inhibitory reagents was
performed in vitro, in cultures and in genetic models ofmouse as in human
PDX tumors in our lab as by the Partnering PIs, Drs. Martin Gleave and
Neil Bhowmick at thetwo respective sites. Most of my labs attention was
given to the development and assessment of small moleculeinhibitors to
Siah2 as a mean to complement the work performed with the inhibitory
peptide. The goal has been tosecure the first-in-class inhibitor of the
ubiquitin ligase that can be used in vivo for the inhibition of prostate
cancer.
KW - Metastatic prostate cancer
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 110835000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047323_a

45 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2015-0082-3287, August 2017.
Evaluation of Exposures and Respiratory Health at a Coffee Roasting and
Packaging Facility.
AU - LeBouf, R. F.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Martin, S. B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Mugford, C.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Stanton, M. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Bailey, R. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - In April 2014, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health’s Health Hazard Evaluation Program received a request from the
management of a coffee roasting and packaging facility with 26 employees
regarding concerns about exposures to and health effects from diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione during coffee roasting and grinding. In July 2015, we
conducted the initial industrial hygiene survey and ventilation assessment
at the facility. The industrial hygiene survey consisted of collecting
personal breathing zone and area air samples for alpha-diketones (i.e.,
diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione) and dust. Bulk samples of
whole bean and ground roasted coffee were collected to evaluate the
potential for emission of diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione.
We used continuous monitoring instruments to measure total volatile
organic compounds, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, temperature, and
relative humidity in specific areas and during tasks. We also conducted a
ventilation assessment in the production and office areas and held brief
individual interviews with employees. Two interim reports with
recommendations were sent to the company following our first visit. In
March 2016, we conducted a second industrial hygiene survey, a second
ventilation assessment, and a medical evaluation of employees. The
industrial hygiene survey included the collection of air and bulk samples
for diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione. We used continuous
monitoring instruments to measure total volatile organic compounds, carbon
monoxide, and carbon dioxide in specific areas and during specific work
tasks. The medical survey consisted of a health questionnaire and
breathing tests. Overall, time-weighted average air concentrations of
diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione were consistently higher during our second
industrial hygiene survey in March 2016. During our second visit, the
production area exhaust fan was off, the bay doors were closed, and more
coffee was processed, which likely contributed to the higher
concentrations. Ten of the 49 full-shift samples collected during the two
surveys exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit for diacetyl of 5
parts per billion, with a maximum concentration of 8.4 parts per billion.
We identified jobs where some work tasks resulted in relatively higher air
concentrations of diacetyl than other tasks. Specifically, grinding
roasted coffee beans, blending roasted coffee beans by hand, and weighing
and packaging roasted coffee were associated with higher diacetyl levels.
Overall, the most commonly reported symptoms were associated with mucous
membranes, specifically the eyes, nose, and sinuses. Some production
employees reported their mucous membrane symptoms were caused or
aggravated by green coffee dust or chaff, roasted coffee, or ground coffee
dust. Wheezing or whistling in the chest was the most commonly reported
lower respiratory symptom, and was four times higher than that expected
when compared to the U.S. population of the same age, race/ethnicity, sex,
and cigarette smoking distribution. One participant had abnormal
spirometry not thought to represent flavoring-related lung disease and one
participant had high exhaled nitric oxide, a marker of allergic airways
inflammation. We recommend operating the exhaust fan and make-up air
system in the production space during occupancy, installing local exhaust
ventilation, and training employees about workplace hazards. We also
recommend a medical monitoring program to identify any employees who may
be developing work-related lung disease (e.g., asthma, obliterative
bronchiolitis) and to help management prioritize interventions to prevent
occupational lung disease.
KW - *Food handlers
KW - *Food processing industry
KW - *Respiratory diseases
KW - Volatile organic compounds (VOC)
KW - Food processing
KW - Food processing workers
KW - Food additives
KW - Organic dusts
KW - Ventilation systems
KW - Relative humidity
KW - Respiratory system disorders
KW - Lung
KW - Lung disease
KW - Lung disorders
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2015-0082-3287
OD - 67
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 98H | Food Technology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100070_a

46 - TOXLINE
TI - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) Value Profile:
Chloroacetonitrile (CAS No. 107-14-2).
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Maier, A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Parker, A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Haber, L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Overview of the IDLH Value for Chloroacetonitrile: IDLH value: 14 ppm (23
mg/m3). Basis for IDLH value: No inhalation exposure data were located for
chloroacetonitrile. Therefore, acetonitrile is used as a surrogate, as the
effects and mode of action are similar; however, acetonitrile is less
potent. The mouse LC50 value of 2,693 ppm for a 60 minute exposure to
acetonitrile (Willhite 1981) was selected as the basis for the IDLH value.
Duration adjustment resulted in the calculation of a 30-minute equivalent
LC50 value of 4,120 ppm. An uncertainty factor of 30 was applied to
account for extrapolation from a concentration that is lethal to animals,
animal to human differences, and human variability, resulting in an IDLH
value for acetonitrile of 137 ppm. Available data (Lewis 1996; NAS 2014)
indicate that chloroacetonitrile is 10 times more toxic than acetonitrile.
A modifying factor of 10 is applied to the IDLH value to account for the
greater potency of chloroacetonitrile compared to the potency of the
surrogate, acetonitrile, resulting in an IDLH value of 14 ppm. This IDLH
Value Profile presents (1) a brief summary of technical data associated
with acute inhalation exposures to chloroacetonitrile and (2) the
rationale behind the immediately dangerous to life or health (IDLH) value
for chloroacetonitrile. IDLH values are developed on the basis of
scientific rationale and logic outlined in the NIOSH Current Intelligence
Bulletin (CIB) 66: Derivation of Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health
(IDLH) Values [NIOSH 2013]. As described in CIB 66, NIOSH performs
in-depth literature searches to ensure that all relevant data from human
and animal studies with acute exposures to the substance are identified.
Information included in CIB 66 on the literature search includes pertinent
databases, key terms, and guides for evaluating data quality and relevance
for the establishment of an IDLH value. The information that is identified
in the in-depth literature search is evaluated with general considerations
that include description of studies (i.e., species, study protocol,
exposure concentration and duration), health endpoint evaluated, and
critical effect levels (e.g., NOAELs, LOAELs, and LC50 values). For
chloroacetonitrile, the in-depth literature search was conducted through
July 2017.
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Chloroacetonitrile
KW - Acetonitrile
KW - Chlorine compounds
KW - Nitriles
KW - Organochlorine compounds
KW - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH)
KW - Median lethal dose
KW - Lethal concentrations
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Chemicals
KW - Chemical structure
KW - Chemical properties
KW - Chemical hazards
KW - Chemical safety
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animals
KW - Humans
KW - Inhalation
KW - Toxic effects
KW - Toxic dose
KW - Toxins
KW - Fatalities
KW - Morbidity rates
KW - Mortality data
KW - Systematic reviews
KW - Respiratory irritants
KW - Lung
KW - Kidneys
KW - Liver
KW - Spleen disorders
KW - Organs
KW - Airborne particles
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - CAS No. 107-14-2
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-201
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 99 | Chemistry
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100181_a

47 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeting the S1P Axis and Development of a Novel Therapy for Obesity
Related Triple Negative Breast Cancer.
AU - Spiegel, S.
AD - Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond.
AB - The majority of breast tumors express the estrogen receptor (ER), which
plays important roles in breast cancer pathogenesis and progression, and
hormonal therapies, such as tamoxifen, are the first line of adjuvant
therapy (1, 2). Unfortunately, half of these patients will ultimately fail
therapy due to de novo or acquired resistance. Moreover, patients with ER,
progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2
(HER2, also known as ErbB-2) triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), which
is aggressive with high recurrence, metastatic, and mortality rates (3),
do not respond to hormonal therapies and have limited treatment options.
Epidemiological and clinical studies indicate that obesity, which is now
endemic, increases breast cancer risk and is associated with worse
prognosis (4), which may be due in part to the high frequency of TNBC and
ineffectual hormonal therapy (5). However, the links between obesity and
breast cancer are not understood and is the focus of our study. As
hormonal therapy is so effective with relatively few side effects, the
possibility of reversing hormonal unresponsiveness is an appealing
treatment approach. Our study will lead to novel therapies that will
overcome the overarching challenges of developing safe and effective drugs
for treating obesity-promoted cancers and TNBC and will identify the
bioactive sphingolipid metabolite, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), produced
by sphingosine kinases (SphK1 and SphK2), as a critical factor that links
obesity and chronic inflammation to drive breast cancer growth and
metastasis.
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Lymphatic system
KW - Bone marrow cells
KW - Chemotherapy
KW - Leukocytes
KW - Epithelial cells
KW - Stem cells
KW - Gene expression
KW - Lymphocytes
KW - Metastasis
KW - Inflammation
KW - Obesity
KW - Kinases
KW - Estrogens
KW - Sphingosine-1-phosphate
KW - Sphingosine kinase
KW - Fty720 (fingolimod
KW - Gilenya)
KW - Triple negative breast cancer
KW - Histone deacetylase
KW - Tamoxifen resistance
OD - 54
YR - 2017
PC - 026805000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042639_a

48 - TOXLINE
TI - Advanced Development of Gamma-Tocotrienol as a Radiation Countermeasure.
AU - Singh, V. K.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine,
Rockville, MD.
AB - During the second year of the project, we completed all analyses for the
pharmacokinetic study with gamma-tocotrienol (GT3) in four NHPs.
Specifically, we completed subtask 3, 4, and 5 of major task 1 and 2. PK
analysis of GT3 serum revealed results consistent with that with a
previous PK study conducted in the PIs lab with GT3 of DTRA project. In
addition, subtask 1 of major task 3 was completed during this reporting
period. We collected and analyzed samples for complete blood counts, blood
biochemistry, cytokine profile, citrulline, flow cytometric phenotyping of
hematopoietic cells and gastrointestinal studies. We have completed one
cohort of subtask 2 and anticipate to begin a second cohort of NHPs in
order to complete subtask 2 in the very near future. Overall, project is
progressing well.
KW - Pharmacokinetics
KW - Countermeasures
KW - Sampling
KW - Blood chemistry
KW - Cytokines
KW - Hematopoietic cells
KW - Biological markers
KW - Growth factors
KW - Gastrointestinal diseases
KW - Vitamin e
KW - Assays
KW - Vital signs
KW - Histology
KW - Intestines
KW - Gt3 (gamma-tocotrienol)
KW - Radiation countermeasures
KW - Pk (pharmacokinetics)
KW - Endothelial cells
KW - Hematopoietic syndromes
KW - Radioprotector
KW - Tocol
KW - Drf (dose reduction factor)
KW - Skin irritation
KW - Tm (thrombomodulin)
KW - Cbc (complete blood count)
KW - D-dimer analysis
KW - Tm analysis
KW - Calprotectin analysis
KW - Citrulline analysis
KW - Micronuclei analysis
KW - Intestinal histology
OD - 56
PR - JW140032
YR - 2017
PC - 101149000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57V | Radiobiology
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043825_a

49 - TOXLINE
TI - Low Temperature Power Coating (LTPC) Phase 2 Laboratory Test Plan and
Procedures for PACAF (Rev D).
AB - The intent of this laboratory test plan / Experimental Test Plan (ETP) is
to provide comprehensive evaluation procedures to evaluate performance of
the LTPC formulations for UV and MIC resistance. At end of this task,
three best performing LTPC formulations will be down-selected for
beachfront testing. Key objectives: 1) An evaluation of the five
reformulated LTPCs with UV and MIC resistance additives for AGE
application against the current wet coating stack-up identified in
Technical Order (TO) 35-1-3 and the Control LTPC. 2) Panel testing at
Battelle and subcontracted testing laboratories that includes salt fog,
adhesion, weatherability, and chip resistance testing. 3) Accelerated MIC
testing to quantitatively assess biocidal effectiveness using ASTM
E2180-07 to confirm the presence of antimicrobial activity on COTS LTPC
panels.
KW - Corrosion
KW - Volatile organic compounds
KW - Air pollutants
KW - Hazardous wastes
KW - Hentzens crosslink
KW - Ltpc(low temperature power coating)
KW - Aerospace ground equipment
KW - Mic(microbial induced corrosion)
KW - Mic(microbial influenced corrosion)
KW - Voc(volatile organic compounds)
KW - Hap(hazardous air pollutant)
KW - Uv(ultraviolet)
OD - 14
YR - 2018
PC - 800222276
CT - 99D | Basic &amp; Synthetic Chemistry
CT - 41I | Job Environment
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048817_a

50 - TOXLINE
TI - Tier 3 Certification Fuel Impacts Test Program, January 2018.
AB - EPA adopted a new set of “Tier 3” fuel and motor vehicle emission
standards in 2014 to reduce air pollution. The Tier 3 emission standards
include changes to several properties of emission test fuel to make it
more representative of in-use fuel, and some nof these changes are
expected to affect emissions and fuel economy. Among the property changes
as specified in Section 3.1 below, the property changes of interest for
greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and fuel economy included total aromatics,
aromatics distribution and ethanol content. This test program was
initiated to compare Tier 2 certification fuel, the fuel on which the
Phase 1 and Phase 2 GHG and Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE)
standards were established for light-duty and heavy duty-vehicles, with
the new Tier 3 certification fuel from the Tier 3 program. The program
results will be used as a basis for test procedure adjustments to ensure
consistent stringency of GHG and fuel economy standards as vehicle
certification makes the transition to Tier 3 test fuel.
KW - *Fuel Impacts Test Program
KW - *Heavy duty-vehicles
KW - Certification
KW - Motor vehicle emission standards
KW - Fuel Economy (FE)
KW - Greenhouse gas (GHG)
KW - Air pollution reductions
KW - *Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE)
RN - EPA/420/R-18/004
OD - 52
YR - 2017
PC - 031287300
CT - 85 | Transportation
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
CT - 97G | Policies, Regulations &amp; Studies
CT - 97K | Fuels
CT - 97L | Engine Studies, Energy Related
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100900_a

51 - TOXLINE
TI - Rescuing Our Warriors from Chronic Pain: A Battlefield-to-Nondeployment
Means to Prevent Opioid-induced Amplification of Neuropathic Pain from
Traumatic Injury.
AU - Watkins, L. R.
AD - COLORADO UNIV AT BOULDER BOULDER United States
AU - Grace, P. M.
AD - COLORADO UNIV AT BOULDER BOULDER United States
AU - Fulgham, S. M.
AD - COLORADO UNIV AT BOULDER BOULDER United States
AB - Based on our preliminary data and a thorough review of the available
scientific/clinical literature to date, we hypothesize that: (a) Trauma
and opioids combine to amplify the intensity and duration of
trauma-induced chronic pain. (b) This combined exposure to trauma plus
opioids amplifies the creation and release of endogenous danger signals in
spinal cord that create enduring release of TLR4 stimulatory substances as
a consequence of cell stress/damage/death, leading to amplified trauma
induced chronic pain. Objective 1. Define the response to opioids commonly
used for acute pain management, when these are administered early after
trauma, prior to development of neuropathic pain Objective 2. Define the
response to opioids and non-opioids commonly used for neuropathic pain
management, when these treatments are administered later after trauma,
after development of neuropathic pain Objective 3. Define whether the
deleterious effects on neuropathic pain observed in Aims 1 and 2 can be
prevented by targeting TLR4 andP2X7Objective 4. Define whether the
deleterious effects of analgesics, and positive effects of co-administered
TLR4/P2X7 antagonists, extend beyond neuropathic pain to other indices of
disability
KW - Pain management
KW - Analgesics
KW - Military personnel
KW - Active duty
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Chronic pain
KW - Opioid analgesics
KW - Non-opioid analgesics
KW - Toll-like receptor 4
KW - Cci(chronic constriction injury)
OD - 40
YR - 2017
PC - 800221501
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
CT - 74 | Military Sciences
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045555_a

52 - TOXLINE
TI - Phase 1 Trial of an Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor plus Stereotactic Ablative
Radiotherapy in Patients with Inoperable Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung
Cancer.
AU - Kelly, K.
AD - University of California, Davis Davis United States
AU - Monjazeb, A.
AD - University of California, Davis Davis United States
AU - Daly, M.
AD - University of California, Davis Davis United States
AU - Eastham, D.
AD - University of California, Davis Davis United States
AB - This clinical trial is the first to evaluate the synergy between
radiation, a well-known immune modulator, with the novel immune checkpoint
inhibitor MPDL3280A (atezolizumab) in early stage inoperable non-small
cell lung cancer. The trial is comprised of a traditional 3 3 phase I
design followed by a dose expansion. We have enrolled 3 patients into dose
level 1.Two patients have completed the entire treatment plan and 1
patient is in the 9-week dose limiting time period. The regimen has been
well tolerated with no dose limiting toxicities observed in the first two
patients. One patient had a partial response and the other patient has
stable disease. Interestingly patient 1 had tumor shrinkage after two
cycles of low dose MPDL3280A without the radiation. The trial continues as
planned.
KW - Lung cancer
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Metastasis
KW - Immunotherapy
KW - Radiotherapy
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Tumor cell line
KW - Immune system
KW - Stage i inoperable non-small cell lung cancer
KW - Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy
KW - Immune checkpoint inhibitors
KW - Mpdl3280a atezolizumab
OD - 10
YR - 2017
PC - 800218348
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046524_a

53 - TOXLINE
TI - Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Diffusion in Environmental Barrier
Coating Materials.
AU - Good, B.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AB - Ceramic Matrix Components (CMC) components for use in turbine engines
offer a number of advantages compared with current practice. However, such
components are subject to degradation through a variety of mechanisms. In
particular, in the hot environment inside a turbine in operation a
considerable amount of water vapor is present, and this can lead to
corrosion and recession. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) systems that
limit the amount of oxygen and water reaching the component are required
to reduce this degradation and extend component life. A number of
silicate-based materials are under consideration for use in such coating
systems, including Yttterbium and Yttrium di- and monosilicates. In this
work, we present results of kinetic Monte Carlo computer simulations of
oxygen diffusion in Yttrium disilicate, and compare with previous work on
Yttterbium disilicate. Coatings may also exhibit cracking, and the cracks
can provide a direct path for oxygen to reach the component. There is
typically a bond coat between the coating and component surface, but the
bond coat material is generally chosen for properties other than low
oxygen diffusivity. Nevertheless, the degree to which the bond coat can
inhibit oxygen diffusion is of interest, as it may form the final defense
against oxygen impingement on the component. We have therefore performed
similar simulations of oxygen diffusion through HfSiO4, a proposed bond
coat material.
KW - *Monte carlo method
KW - *Diffusion
KW - *Barrier layers
KW - *Protective coatings
KW - *Ceramic matrix composites
KW - *Computerized simulation
KW - *Degradation
KW - *Oxygen
KW - *Corrosion
KW - Cracks
KW - Silicates
KW - Surface reactions
KW - Turbine engines
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN38738
OD - 20
PR - WBS 109492.02.03.02.02.02
YR - 2017
PC - 115801001
CT - 46D | Solid State Physics
CT - 71 | Materials Sciences
CT - 51C | Aircraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0005219_a

54 - TOXLINE
TI - Recommended Community Noise Model Enhancements to Improve Prediction of
Helicopter Activity Impacts. Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP)
Research Results Digest 24.
AB - Sound land use planning requires accurate predictions of the acoustic
signatures at noise-sensitive receiver points and methods for interpreting
the effect of acoustic signatures on public health, safety, and welfare.
Historically, the study of noise impacts from aviation has been focused on
fixed-wing aircraft, while the complexity of helicopter and new-technology
rotary-wing aircraft has not been given adequate attention.The FAA
Integrated Noise Model (INM) is currently the agency’s required tool for
NEPA-related studies and FAR Part 150 studies. The Heliport Noise Model
Version 2.2 was recently incorporated into INM Version 7.0 with a
helicopter noise database collected through both FAA and manufacturer
certification measurements. Currently, the FAA is incorporating INM, along
with emission and fuel burn calculation methodologies, into the Aviation
Environmental Design Tool (AEDT). The fixed-wing aircraft noise prediction
techniques employed in INM/AEDT rely on the widely accepted methodologies
described in documents such as SAE International’s SAE-AIR-1845 and the
European Civil Aviation Conference’s Document 29. However, in contrast
to guidance related to fixed-wing aircraft, there is no peer-reviewed
guidance document describing an integrated modeling technique for the
prediction of helicopter noise.Research is needed to document current
practice, improve modeling methods, and provide guidance for using
INM/AEDT to predict helicopter noise.
KW - *Airport information
KW - *Airport practices
KW - Airport administrators
KW - Computational methodology
KW - Helicopter Activity
KW - Noise analysis
KW - *Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP)
KW - *National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP)
KW - *Integrated Noise Model (INM)
RN - ACRP 02-44-1
OD - 6
YR - 2017
PC - 044780010
CT - 51C | Aircraft
CT - 70B | Management Practice
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 51E | Avionics
CT - 68B | Noise Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100487_a

55 - TOXLINE
TI - VHF SoOp (Signal of Opportunity) Technology Demonstration for Soil
Moisture Measurement Using Microwave Hydraulic Boom Truck Platform.
AU - Joseph, A. T.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Deshpande, M.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - O'Neill, P. E.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -Miles, L.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AB -A goal of this research is to test deployable VHF antennas for 6U Cubesat
platforms to enable validation of root zone soil moisture (RZSM)
estimation algorithms for signal of opportunity (SoOp) remote sensing over
the 240-270 MHz frequency band. The proposed work provides a strong
foundation for establishing a technology development path for maturing a
global direct surface soil moisture (SM) and RZSM measurement system over
a variety of land covers. Knowledge of RZSM up to a depth of 1 meter and
surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter on a global scale, at a spatial
resolution of 1-10 km through moderate-to-heavy vegetation, is critical to
understanding global water resources and the vertical moisture gradient in
the Earths surface layer which controls moisture interactions between the
soil, vegetation, and atmosphere. Current observations of surface SM from
space by L-band radiometers (1.4 GHz) and radars (1.26 GHz) are limited to
measurements of surface SM up to a depth of 0.05 meter through moderate
amounts of vegetation. This limitation is mainly due to the inability of
L-band signals to penetrate through dense vegetation and deep into the
soil column. Satellite observations of the surface moisture conditions are
coupled to sophisticated models which extrapolate the surface SM into the
root zone, thus providing an indirect estimate rather than a direct
measurement of RZSM. To overcome this limitation, low-frequency airborne
radars operating at 435 MHz and 118 MHz have been investigated, since
these lower frequencies should penetrate denser vegetation and respond to
conditions deeper in the soil.
KW - *Very high frequencies
KW - *Satellite antennas
KW - *Soil moisture
KW - *Algorithms
KW - *Remote sensing
KW - *Surface properties
KW - *Microwaves
KW - *Depth
KW - Spatial resolution
KW - Vegetation
KW - Small scientific satellites
KW - Booms (equipment)
KW - Technology assessment
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN42310
OD - 5
YR - 2017
PC - 013129000
CT - 48 | Natural Resources &amp; Earth Sciences
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0004545_a

56 - TOXLINE
TI - National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA): Second Decade in Review,
2006-2016.
AU - Felknor, S. A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Fletcher Williams, D.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Soderholm, S. C.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - At the end of each decade of the National Occupational Research Agenda
(NORA), NIOSH reviews the contributions of the decade toward improving the
occupational safety and health of workers and transferring new knowledge
into practice. This review was designed to assess the contributions across
three main domains during the second decade: (1) research, (2) sector
programs, and (3) partnerships and Research to Practice (r2p). Within each
domain, NIOSH assessed the activities, effectiveness, outcomes, and
impact. This report includes two documents: the NORA Second Decade in
Review Report, and the Sector and Cross-Sector Program Supplement. Purpose
and Scope: The review of the second decade of NORA was guided by a
multidisciplinary team at NIOSH and was designed to assess the overall
investment, approach, and impact of the decade. The review set about to
answer three fundamental questions: 1. What did we do? (Activities and
Outputs) 2. How well did we do it? (Effectiveness) 3. What were the
outcomes and impacts? (Outcomes and Impact) This review informs funding
agencies, stakeholder groups, policy makers, employers and employees, and
other occupational safety and health organizations and thought leaders.
The results of this review will also shape the next decade of NORA by
sharing lessons learned and building on the many successes and impacts of
the second decade.
KW - *Occupational Health Programs
KW - *Information dissemination
KW - Occupational safety programs
KW - Occupational safety and health
KW - Safety research
KW - Medical research
KW - Technology transfer
KW - Cross-Sector Research Programs
KW - Partnership
KW - *National Occupational Research Agenda(NORA)
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-146
OD - 120
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57M | Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, &amp; Rehabilitation
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102704_a

57 - TOXLINE
TI - Intense Ion Pulses for Radiation Effects Research.
AU - Schenkel, T.
AD - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA.
AU - Seidl, P. A.
AD - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA.
AU - Ludewigt, B. A.
AD - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA.
AU - Friedman, A.
AD - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA.
AU - Barnard, J. J.
AD - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA.
AB - A new facility for providing intense, short ion pulses has become
available atthe Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The novel induction
acceleratorcan deliver a few nanosecond long pulses of 1.2 MeV light ions
such as helium,deuterium and protons. For helium ion beams focused into a
~2 mm FWHMdiameter spot, a charge per pulse of 20 nC corresponds to an ion
fluence perpulse of ~3 .1012 ions/cm2 and a dose per pulse to the target
on the order of 1MGy(Si). The short pulse length and the very high ion
fluence could providenew opportunities such as the observation of the
time-resolved multi-scaledynamics of radiation-induced effects. High 1 MeV
neutron energy equivalentdamage to silicon rates corresponding to ~1015
neutrons/cm2/ns may enable thecharacterization of transient radiation
effects and nuclear survivability testingof electronics components.
KW - Ion Pulses
KW - Radiation effects
OD - 5
YR - 2017
PC - 112182000
CT - 77F | Radiation Shielding, Protection, &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044800_a

58 - TOXLINE
TI - Wood Stork Use of Roadway Corridor Features in South Florida, Summary.
AU - Gawlik, D. E.
AD - Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton.
AB - In this project, Florida Atlantic University researchers collected field
data on wood stork behavior that can help FDOT develop plans to protect
this threatened species. The researchers sought information in three
areas: (1) which roadway features attract storks and which do not; (2)
what potential stork food supply do the features produce; and (3) what
portion of the available food is consumed by storks. A deeper
understanding of these three issues would allow refinement of the
calculations that are used to estimate the impact of construction
activities on stork populations. Field work was conducted in South Florida
from February 2014 to May 2016.
KW - *Roadway corridor features
KW - *Stormwater pond
KW - *South Florida
KW - Wood stork
KW - Canal
KW - Swale
KW - Summary
KW - Construction activities
KW - Threatened species
RN - BDV27-977-02-SUMMARY
OD - 1
YR - 2017
PC - 017313000
CT - 48B | Natural Resource Management
CT - 48G | Hydrology &amp; Limnology
CT - 50C | Construction Equipment, Materials, &amp; Supplies
CT - 98F | Fisheries &amp; Aquaculture
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102624_a

59 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2015-0163-3298, November 2017.
Evaluation of Exposures and Respiratory Health at a Coffee Roasting and
Packaging Facility.
AU - Nettt, R. J.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Hawley, B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - In September 2015, the Health Hazard Evaluation Program of the National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request
from the management of a coffee roasting and packaging facility regarding
concerns about exposures to and health effects from diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione during coffee roasting, grinding, and packaging. In June
2016, we conducted a ventilation assessment, an industrial hygiene survey,
and a medical survey. The industrial hygiene survey consisted of the
collection of air samples and bulk samples of coffee for the analysis of
diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione. Continuous monitoring
instruments were used to monitor total volatile organic compounds, carbon
monoxide, carbon dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity in specific
areas and during tasks. We also measured levels of carbon monoxide in
employees' exhaled breath. The medical survey consisted of a health
questionnaire and breathing tests. Overall, time-weighted average air
levels of diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione were elevated
for employees performing duties near the roaster and grinder. Seven of the
10 personal full-shift air samples were above the NIOSH recommended
exposure limit for diacetyl of 5 parts per billion, and five of the 10
full-shift air samples were above the recommended exposure limit for
2,3-pentanedione. All personal air samples with diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione concentrations above the recommended exposure limits were
collected on employees with primary job duties in the production area.
High full-shift and task-based diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione exposure
measurements were observed on employees that ground coffee. We observed
high instantaneous levels of diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione during
grinding. Carbon monoxide and total volatile organic compound levels near
the grinder increased sharply when an employee ground roasted beans for
5-pound bags of coffee. Carbon dioxide levels were low throughout most of
the facility. Mucous membrane symptoms, specifically eye, nose, and sinus
symptoms, were the most commonly reported symptoms. Wheezing or whistling
in the chest was the most commonly reported lower respiratory symptom, and
was about two times as common as expected compared with the US population
of the same age, race/ethnicity, sex, and cigarette smoking distribution.
One of the 15 participants had abnormal spirometry. We recommend a
combination of engineering and administrative controls to minimize
employee exposures. We also recommend a medical monitoring program to
identify any employees who might be developing work-related lung disease
(e.g., asthma, obliterative bronchiolitis) and to help management
prioritize interventions to prevent occupational lung disease.
KW - *Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
KW - *Food processing industry
KW - *Respiratory systems disorders
KW - Coffee workers
KW - Food handlers
KW - Food processing
KW - Food processing workers
KW - Food additives
KW - Organic dusts
KW - Ventilation systems
KW - Relative humidity
KW - Respiratory diseases
KW - Lung
KW - Lung disease
KW - Lung disorders
KW - Diacetyl
KW - Carbon monoxide
KW - Carbon dioxide
KW - Industrial hygiene
KW - Air sampling
KW - Workplace monitoring
KW - Health surveys
KW - Medical surveys
KW - Questionnaires
KW - Breathing
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Exposure limits
KW - Mucous membranes
KW - Pulmonary system disorders
KW - Airway resistance
KW - Training
KW - Intervention
KW - Environmental control equipment
KW - Exhaust ventilation
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2015-0163-3298
OD - 54
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 68E | Pesticides Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 57M | Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, &amp; Rehabilitation
CT - 98H | Food Technology
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100576_a

60 - TOXLINE
TI - Association Between Molecular Markers in Colorectal Sessile Serrated
Polyps and Colorectal Cancer Risk.
AU - Burnett-Hartman, A.
AD - Kaiser Foundation Research Institute Oakland United States
AB - The objective of this study is to identify histologic characteristics and
molecular markers associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer
in patients with sessile serrated colorectal polyps (SSPs). The projects
specific aims are as follows: 1) Estimate the risk of colorectal cancer or
advanced polyps in patients who have SSPs with cytological dysplasia
compared to patients with SSPs that lack cytological dysplasia; and 2)
Evaluate if the risk of incident colorectal cancer or advanced polyps
varies according to methylation markers in SSPs. The following progress
was made during years 1 and 2: Human Subjects approval was obtained from
all institutions, SSPs with subsequent colorectal neoplasia and interval
cancers were identified, the pathology review form and protocol were
finalized, assays for methylation markers were optimized, tissue slide and
block pulling and the standard pathology reviews were completed, data
cleaning of the pathology review data was finished and analyses of these
data begun, tissue sectioning was completed on 85 of samples, and DNA
extraction was completed on 60 of samples. Also, Dr. Burnett-Hartman
participated in regular career development opportunities, including
attending clinical research seminars, presenting at national and local
research meetings, and continued to connect with new clinical partners at
Kaiser Permanente Colorado. Dr. Burnett-Hartman also maintained regular
meetings with mentors and collaborators at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer
Research Center, the University of Washington, and Kaisers Institute for
Health Research.
KW - Colon cancer
KW - Methylation
KW - Histology
KW - Risk
KW - Dysplasia
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Deoxyribonucleic acids
KW - Cancer screening
KW - Genes
KW - Colorectal polyps
KW - Ssp (sessile serrated polyps)
KW - Colorectal cancer
KW - Molecular markers
KW - Cytological dysplasia
KW - Dna (deoxyribonucleic acids)
KW - Dna methylation
KW - Cimp (cpg island methylator phenotype)
KW - Mlh1
KW - Mgmt
KW - Bmp3
OD - 26
YR - 2017
PC - 800222024
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044774_a

61 - TOXLINE
TI - Altered Innate Immunity Confers Staphylococcus aureus resistance in
O-Glycosylation Deficient Caenorhabditis elegans bus Mutants.
AU - Cipollo, J. F.
AD - USAMRIID Frederick United States
AU - Rahman, M. M.
AD - USAMRIID Frederick United States
AU - Ghosh, S. K.
AD - USAMRIID Frederick United States
AU - Bond, M. R.
AD - USAMRIID Frederick United States
AU - Uccelletti, D.
AD - USAMRIID Frederick United States
AU - Hanover, J. A.
AD - USAMRIID Frederick United States
AU - Jankowska, E.
AD - USAMRIID Frederick United States
AB - The Caenorhabditis elegans bus mutants (bacterial unswollen) were isolated
by their altered response to the nematode pathogen Microbacterium
nematophilum. The bus-2, bus-4 and bus-17 mutants are resistant to
infection by this bacterium and to infection by human pathogens Yersinia
pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Here we extend that list to
Staphylococcus aureus. The bus-2, bus-4 and bus-17 mutants each harbors a
defect in a different glycosyltransferase involved in O-glycosylation. Our
previous glycomics analysis of the reference strains revealed significant
O-glycosylation defects. To further investigate the nature of bus mutant
pathogen resistance, we examined gene expression for all three mutants and
identified four distinct areas of dysregulation: 1) N- and
O-glycosylation; 2) innate immune response; 3) protein folding and editing
control; and 4) cuticle structure. Increased gene expression of innate
immune system components previously seen in response to pathogenic Gram
positive bacteria was observed across these strains even in un-infected
conditions. A subset of these genes was further upregulated during
infection with S. aureus including the abu/pqn components of the
non-canonical unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. RNAi experiments
demonstrate that up-regulation of abu/pqn genes are required for
resistance to S. aureus. The overall shift in expression in these four
areas leads to better fitness to respond to pathogenic challenge by S.
aureus. This work demonstrates a genetic link between O-glycosylation and
expression of key components of the innate immune response.
KW - Staphylococcus
RN - TR-17-033
OD - 47
YR - 2017
PC - 800218535
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57K | Microbiology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1025653_a

62 - TOXLINE
TI - Development of Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for SiC/SiC Ceramic
Matrix Composites: Path Toward 2700 F Temperature Capability and Beyond.
AU - Zhu, D.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Harder, B.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Hurst, J. B.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Good, B.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Costa, G.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Bhatt, R. T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Fox, D. S.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AB - Advanced environmental barrier coating systems for SiC-SiC Ceramic Matrix
Composite (CMC) turbine and combustor hot section components are currently
being developed to meet future turbine engine emission and performance
goals. One of the significant coating development challenges is to achieve
prime-reliant environmental barrier coating systems to meet the future
2700F EBC-CMC temperature stability and environmental durability
requirements. This presentation will emphasize recent NASA environmental
barrier coating system testing and down-selects, particularly the
development path and properties towards 2700-3000F durability goals by
using NASA hafnium-hafnia-rare earth-silicon-silicate composition EBC
systems for the SiC-SiC CMC turbine component applications. Advanced
hafnium-based compositions for enabling next generation EBC and CMCs
capabilities towards ultra-high temperature ceramic coating systems will
also be briefly mentioned.
KW - *Ceramic coatings
KW - *Ceramic matrix composites
KW - *Composite structures
KW - *Durability
KW - *High temperature
KW - *Microstructure
KW - *Protective coatings
KW - Barrier layers
KW - Oxidation resistance
KW - Rare earth alloys
KW - Silicon
KW - Turbine engines
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN38729
OD - 24
PR - WBS 109492.02.03.02.02.02
YR - 2017
PC - 115801001
CT - 71F | Composite Materials
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0005218_a

63 - TOXLINE
TI - Testosterone Combined with Electrical Stimulation and Standing: Effect on
Muscle and Bone.
AU - Forrest, G. F.
AD - Kessler Foundation, West Orange, NJ.
AB - The study is a prospective, randomized, double blinded, controlled,
multi-site clinical trial to determine the efficacy of a tri-combination
intervention to improve musculoskeletal gains in men with subacute to
chronic SCI with low circulating testosterone levels. Participants will be
enrolled at Kessler Foundation (KF), the University of Louisville-Frazier
Rehab (UoL), the James J. Peters VA Medical Center (JJPVAMC). During year
2 the Study Team (Drs. Forrest, Bauman, and Harkema) established a new
partnership with a pharmaceutical company (AbbVie) to supply Drug and
Placebo for all potential study participants. During Year 2, all FDA
requirements were satisfied for the acquisition of the IND number for all
sites. The drug/placebo has been manufactured and shipped to the Kessler
site (10/23/16). Kessler, JPVAMC and UoL received HRPO approval 8/18/16,
9/1/16 and UoL HRPO approval (3/17/17) respectively. In Year 3 JPVAMC, and
UoL received training for drug/placebo and electrical stimulation
intervention at Kessler on 11/16/16 and UoL (1/17/171/18/17),
respectively. Data is entered into ITW database as per grant procedures
and SOW. All three sites started screening and enrollment. To date,
Kessler, UoL and JJPMVMC have prescreened 68 individuals, screened
consented onsite 18, 3 are currently screening, 2 have completed 5 months
intervention phase, one is currently training. Two are in follow-up of
phase of protocol.
KW - Atrophy
KW - Muscles
KW - Spinal cord
KW - Spinal injuries
KW - Testosterone
KW - Placebos
KW - Electric stimulation therapy
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Musculoskeletal physiology
KW - Magnetic resonance imaging
KW - Osteoporosis
KW - Sci (spinal cord injuries)
KW - Muscle atrophy
KW - Multi muscle electrical stimulation
KW - Dynamic standing protocol
KW - Tri-combination intense therapeutic training
KW - Muscle volume
KW - Mri (magnetic resonance imaging)
KW - Bmd (bone mineral density)
KW - Qct scans
KW - Metabolic bone markers
KW - Subacute sci
KW - Chronic sci
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 120578000
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043147_a

64 - TOXLINE
TI - Contact Transfer of VX from Contaminated Grass onto Army Combat Uniform.
AU - Haley, M. V.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AU - Checkai, R. T.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AU - Simini, M.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AU - Lawrence, R. J.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AU - Busch, M. W.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AB - Toxicological investigations have shown that exposure to surfaces
contaminated with chemical warfare agents (CWAs) can present a contact
hazard. Previously, we developed standardized protocols for determining
contact transfer (exposure) of agent from contaminated soils onto Army
Combat Boot soles and Army Combat Uniforms (ACUs). We adapted those
protocols to determine the direct contact transfer of CWA from
contaminated leaf surfaces onto ACU swatches. Grass leaves (Echinochloa
crus-galli) from intact, living plants were individually contaminated with
1 L of O-ethyl-S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothioate (VX).
Post-dissemination, leaves were removed, and three layers of ACU were
placed atop each contaminated leaf, so that the bottom ACU layer was in
direct contact with the VX-contaminated leaf surface. The ACU layers were
covered with a Plexiglas disk (0.6 cm thick 9.8 cm diameter) to equally
distribute the force resulting from central placement of a standard mass
atop the disk. Total proportions of VX transferred from contaminated
leaves to ACU at 0.017 (1 min), 0.25, 0.5, 1, and 4 h post-dissemination
were approximately 71, 5, 0.8, 0.3, and 0.1 , respectively, of the VX
disseminated per leaf. Trace amounts of VX were detected in the third
layers of ACU at times 0.017 and 0.25 h post-dissemination.
KW - Liquid chromatography
KW - Chemical warfare agents
KW - Environmental protection
KW - Mass spectrometry
KW - Chromatography
KW - Electrospray ionization
KW - Exposure(general)
KW - Radioactive comination
KW - Army personnel
KW - Combat operations
KW - Uniforms
KW - Contact transfer
KW - Foliage
KW - Barnyard grass
KW - Echinochloa crus-galli
KW - Army combat uniform (acu)
KW - Vx
KW - O-ethyl-s-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methyl phosphonothiolate
RN - ECBC-TR-1429
OD - 30
PR - WBS R.0013813.81.4
YR - 2017
PC - 115823000
CT - 74D | Chemical, Biological, &amp; Radiological Warfare
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1024863_a

65 - TOXLINE
TI - Epigenetic Therapy of Hematopoietic Malignancies: Novel Approaches for
Tissue-Specific and Global Inhibition of EZH2 Enzymatic Activities.
AU - Wang, G.
AD - University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Chapel Hill United States
AB - Direct sequencing of hematopoietic cancers identified gain-of-function
mutations of EZH2, the gene encoding the enzymatic subunit of Polycomb
Repressive Complex-2 (PRC2), among ~10% germ-center B-cell lymphomas. EZH2
silences gene expression through catalysis of methylation of histone H3
lysine 27. However, the currently available EZH2-specific inhibitors are
ineffective for treating EZH2-wildtype lymphomas. Novel therapeutics needs
to be developed. We found overexpression of PHF19, a PRC2-associated
cofactor, is common among B-cell derived malignancies. During this funding
period, we have made significant progress in testing our central
hypothesis is that, overexpression of PHF19 confers oncogenicity to
lymphoma by either enhancing enzymatic activities or chromatin association
of PRC2 complexes; in addition, we have evaluated the pan PRC2 inhibitor
as a novel means for blockade of unwanted PRC2 hyperactivities among blood
cancers including B-cell malignancies.
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Methylation
KW - Epigenetics
KW - Lymphomas
KW - Enzymes
KW - Gene expression
KW - Mutations
KW - Enzyme inhibitors
KW - Hematopoietic cancer
KW - Prc2 (polycomb repressive complex-2)
KW - Histone methylation
KW - Ezh2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2)
KW - Kmt6a (lysine methyltransferase 6a)
KW - Ezh1 (enhancer of zeste homolog 1)
KW - Kmt6b (lysine methyltransferase 6b)
KW - Phf19
OD - 125
YR - 2017
PC - 800222332
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049941_a

66 - TOXLINE
TI - MATILDA Version 2: Rough Earth TIALD Model for Laser Probabilistic Risk
Assessment in Hilly Terrain - Part I.
AU - Kennedy, P.
AD - Air Force Research Laboratory, 711th Human Performance Wing JBSA Fort Sam
Houston
AU - Flemming, B. K.
AD - Air Force Research Laboratory, 711th Human Performance Wing JBSA Fort Sam
Houston
AU - Huantes, D. F.
AD - Air Force Research Laboratory, 711th Human Performance Wing JBSA Fort Sam
Houston
AU - Flower, M. D.
AD - Air Force Research Laboratory, 711th Human Performance Wing JBSA Fort Sam
Houston
AB - Over the past 15 years, the United Kingdom (UK) Ministry of Defence (MoD)
and the United States (US) Air Force Research Laboratory(AFRL) have
collaborated to develop a US-UK laser range safety tool, the Military
Advanced Technology Integrated Laser hazarD Assessment(MATILDA) tool.
MATILDA uses Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) techniques to perform
laser safety and hazard analysis in support of airborne laser designator
use during test and training exercises on military ranges. The initial
MATILDA tool, MATILDA PRO Version-1.6.1,was based on the 2007 PRA model
developed to perform range safety clearances for the UK Thermal Imaging
Airborne Laser Designator (TIALD) system. The 2007 TIALD model was an
approximation that assumed flat terrain on the range (Smooth Earth TIALD
Model), a conservative approximation valid in all terrain. Over the past
five years, however, an enhanced version, MATILDA PRO Version-2.0.3, has
been produced. The enhanced tool is based on an updated (2012) TIALD
model, which has more complex PRA algorithms appropriate for hilly
terrain(Rough Earth TIALD Model). For reasons of length, documentation of
the mathematical algorithms and computational procedures incorporated in
MATILDA PRO Version-2.0.3 has been divided between two AFRL Technical
Reports. This Technical Report, designated Part I, contains documentation
of the computational procedures for probabilistic fault/failure laser
hazard analysis. The second Technical Report, designated Part II, will
document the fault-free laser hazard analysis.
KW - Laser safety
KW - Laser hazards
KW - Risk analysis
KW - Laser target designators
KW - Probability distribution functions
KW - Terrain
KW - Computer program documentation
KW - Matilda(military advanced technology integrated laser hazard assessment)
KW - Pra(probabilistic risk assessment) algorithms
KW - Nohd(nominal ocular hazard distance)
KW - Hilly terrain
KW - Computational procedures
RN - AFRL-RH-FS-TR-2017-0009
OD - 74
YR - 2017
PC - 800220591
CT - 46C | Optics &amp; Lasers
CT - 41I | Job Environment
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 95G | Protective Equipment
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1033890_a

67 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Ethyl p-nitrophenyl
phenylphosphorothioate (EPN) (CAS No. 2104-64-5).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Although the mathematical model did not predict EPN to be absorbed through
the skin following dermal exposure, toxicokinetic data on cats [Abou-Donia
et al. 1983a; 1983d, 1983e], data from acute toxicity studies in rats
[Gaines 1969], rabbits [Hodge et al 1954], and cats [Abou-Donia et al.
1983b], and findings in subchronic studies of hens and cats [Abou-Donia et
al. 1983b, 1983c] indicate EPN is absorbed through skin, is systemically
available, and has the potential to cause systemic effects, including
fatality, following dermal exposure. No in vivo or in vitro studies of
humans or animals that evaluated the potential of EPN to cause direct skin
effects or skin sensitization were identified. Therefore, on the basis of
these assessments, EPN is assigned a composite skin notation of SK: SYS
(FATAL). Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard designations for EPN
previously issued by NIOSH and other organizations. The equivalent dermal
designation for EPN, according to the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for
Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, is Acute Toxicity Category 1
(Hazard statement: Fatal in contact with the skin) [European Parliament
2008].
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Toxicology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - Skin absorption
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - EPN
KW - Phenyls
KW - Thioates
KW - Mortality data
KW - Mathematical models
KW - Biological effects
KW - Health effects
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 2104-64-5
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-136
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102217_a

68 - TOXLINE
TI - Small Molecule Protection of Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells.
AU - Monnat, R. J.
AD - Washington Univ., Seattle.
AB - During the above project period we:1. demonstrated the ability of two
small molecules, metformin and aminoguanidine, to improve growth,
suppressaldehyde-induced DNA damage, and improve aldehyde dose-dependent
survival of FANCG-deficient human cells.2. used of a combination of
chemical determination and dose-response assays to provide mechanistic
insight intolikely mechanisms by which each small molecule provides
aldehyde dose-dependent protection in human cells.3. developed a new
quantitative formaldehyde-DNA adduct/crosslink HPLC-MS/MS assay.4. small
molecule suppression of markers of DNA damage in human cells in culture,
and improved hematopoiesisand delayed cancer formation in a
metformin-treated murine model of Fanconi anemia.5. completed and
published two manuscripts related to this work.
KW - Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cells
OD - 34
YR - 2017
PC - 005042000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047413_a

69 - TOXLINE
TI - Dynamic Control System Mode Performance of the Space Technology-7
Disturbance Reduction System.
AU - O'Donnell, J. R. J.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Hsu, O.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Maghami, P.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AB - The Space Technology-7 (ST-7) Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is an
experiment package aboard the European Space Agency (ESA) LISA Pathfinder
spacecraft, launched on December 3, 2015. DRS consists of three primary
components: Colloidal MicroNewton Thrusters (CMNTs), an Integrated
Avionics Unit (IAU), and flight-software implementing the Command and Data
Handling (C&amp;DH) and Dynamic Control System (DCS) algorithms. The CMNTs
were designed to provide thrust from 5 to 30 micro Newton, with thrust
controllability and resolution of 0.1 micro Newton and thrust noise of 0.1
micro Newton/(square root of (Hz)) in the measurement band from 1-30 mHz.
The IAU hosts the C&amp;DH and DCS flight software, as well as interfaces
with both the CMNT electronics and the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft. When in
control, the DCS uses star tracker attitude data and capacitive or
optically-measured position and attitude information from LISA Pathfinder
and the LISA Technology Package (LTP) to control the attitude and position
of the spacecraft and the two test masses inside the LTP. After completion
of the nominal ESA LISA Pathfinder mission, the DRS experiment was
commissioned followed by its nominal mission. DRS operations extended over
the next five months, interspersed with station keeping, anomaly
resolution, and periods where control was handed back to LISA Pathfinder
for them to conduct further experiments. The primary DRS mission ended on
December 6, 2016, with the experiment meeting all of its Level 1
requirements. The DCS, developed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center,
consists of five spacecraft control modes and six test mass control modes,
combined into six 'DRS Mission Modes'. Attitude Control and Zero-G were
primarily used to control the spacecraft during initial handover and
during many of the CMNT characterization experiments. The other Mission
Modes, Drag Free Low Force, 18-DOF Transitional, and 18-DOF, were used to
provide drag-free control of the spacecraft about the test masses. This
paper will discuss the performance of these DCS spacecraft and test mass
control modes. Flight data will be shown from each mode throughout the
mission, both from nominal operations and during various flight
experiments. The DCS team also made some changes to controller, filter,
and limit parameters during operations; the motivation and results of
these changes will be shown and discussed.
KW - *Aerospace engineering
KW - *Applications programs (computers)
KW - *Attitude control
KW - *Colloids
KW - *Control systems design
KW - *Drag reduction
KW - *Dynamic control
KW - *Flight control
KW - *Spacecraft control
KW - Algorithms
KW - Avionics
KW - Configuration management
KW - European space agency
KW - Optical measurement
KW - Robustness (mathematics)
KW - Star trackers
KW - Weightlessness
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN46550-2
OD - 21
YR - 2017
PC - 013129000
CT - 62 | Computers, Control &amp; Information Theory
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0009066_a

70 - TOXLINE
TI - Exploring Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: Proceedings of a
Workshop. Held in Washington, DC on June 11-12, 2016.
AB - On June 30, 2015, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) released its consensus
report "Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act",
which evaluated the factors affecting resuscitation research and outcomes
in the United States. Focusing on the public health dimensions of cardiac
arrest treatment, the report included eight recommendations that
emphasized the following: 1. Establishing a national cardiac arrest
registry 2. Fostering a culture of action through public awareness and
training 3. Enhancing the capabilities and performance of EMS systems 4.
Setting national accreditation standards related to cardiac arrest for
hospitals and health care systems 5. Adopting continuous quality
improvement programs 6. Accelerating research on pathophysiology, new
therapies, and translation of science for cardiac arrest 7. Accelerating
research on the evaluation and adoption of cardiac arrest therapies 8.
Creating a national cardiac arrest collaborative Following the release of
the consensus report, eight sponsors asked the Health and Medicine
Division (HMD) to hold a 2-day workshop to assemble diverse stakeholders
who would explore the barriers and opportunities for advancing the IOM
recommendations. The workshop was held on July 11 and 12, 2016, with more
than 120 in-person participants and 80 participants via webcast. The
workshop agenda included five plenary sessions with panel presentations
that focused on the IOM’s individual recommendations.
KW - *Cardiac arrest
KW - *Survival rates
KW - *Workshops
KW - Heart disease
KW - Resuscitation
KW - Public health
KW - Health effects
KW - Treatment
KW - Therapies
KW - Quality of care
RN - ISBN-978-0-309-45191-8
OD - 136
YR - 2017
PC - 043800000
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 44L | Health Care Needs &amp; Demands
CT - 44D | Health Care Assessment &amp; Quality Assurance
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101722_a

71 - TOXLINE
TI - Permethrin Exposure Dosimetry: Biomarkers and Modifiable Factors.
AU - Proctor, S. P.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AB - The primary aim of this project is to investigate the relationship between
various modifiable factors and the absorption of permethrin as a result of
wearing permethrin-treated Army Combat Uniforms (ACU-Permethrin). The
research objective is to examine the effect of body weight/BMI and total
energy expenditure on permethrin absorption and dose, as determined by
measurement of urinary biomarkers (3PBA and cis- and trans-DCCA) levels.
There are two studies involved in our project – the first is a study
among Army recruits during Basic Training (Study 1) and the second
involves Army National Guard Soldiers during Annual Training (Study 2).
Data collection for Study 1 and for Study 2 was completed in 2015 and 2017
respectively. Data analyses and manuscript preparations are in progress.
KW - Permethrin Exposure Dosimetry
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 118032000
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
CT - 74G | Military Operations, Strategy, &amp; Tactics
CT - 74 | Military Sciences
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043176_a

72 - TOXLINE
TI - Biology of Bioavailability: The Role of Functional Ecology in Exposure
Processes.
AU - Bridges, T. S.
AD - ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS VICKSBURG
AU - Kennedy, A. J.
AD - ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS VICKSBURG
AU - Lotufo, G. R.
AD - ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS VICKSBURG
AU - Coleman, J. G.
AD - ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS VICKSBURG
AU - Ruiz, C. E.
AD - ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS VICKSBURG
AU - Lindsay, J. H.
AD - ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS VICKSBURG
AU - Steevens, J. A.
AD - ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS VICKSBURG
AU - Wooley, A.
AD - ARMY ENGINEER WATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKSBURG MS VICKSBURG
AB - The research objective was to improve accuracy of sediment exposure
assessments by considering the functional ecology of benthic organisms and
different exposure routes (sediment particles, pore water, overlying
water). Laboratory experiments were conducted using four marine
invertebrates (a worm, two amphipods, and a clam). Organisms were exposed
to two different contaminated sediments within mesocosms designed to
assess polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposure from overlying water and
whole sediment using pathway isolation chambers. The impacts of two
sediment remediation methods were also tested: (1) a 2 cm sand cap; and
(2) activated carbon (AC) that was not aggressively mixed with sediment
prior to organism testing to simulate a field deployment. Porewater
concentrations were assessed using polyethylene devices (PEDs) and
provided a reasonable indicator of organism exposure but did not account
for organisms with connections to the overlying water and direct particle
ingestion. The sand cap significantly reduced PCB exposure for all the
species except the clam while non-equilibrated AC did not result in
significant reductions in bioaccumulation. These results can be used to
design functional bioavailability assessments and provide basis for future
guidance. Data were used to enhance the capability and predictive
reliability of an existing modeling framework (RECOVERY).
KW - Sediments
KW - Environmental protection
KW - Ecology
KW - Hydrophobic properties
KW - Aquatic organisms
KW - Contamination
KW - Chemical analysis
KW - Aqueous solutions
KW - Wildlife
KW - Bioaccumulation
KW - Passive samplers
KW - Amphipod
KW - Polychaete
KW - Bioavailability
KW - Benthos
KW - Aquatic ecology
KW - Aquatic organisms--effect of contaminated sediments on
KW - Contaminated sediments
RN - ERDC/EL-TR-17-2
OD - 248
PR - SERDP-ER-1750
YR - 2017
PC - 800221249
CT - 57C | Botany
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 99D | Basic &amp; Synthetic Chemistry
CT - 47C | Physical &amp; Chemical Oceanography
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1036487_a

73 - TOXLINE
TI - Public Health Assessment for Camp Lejeune Drinking Water, U.S. Marine
Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, January 20, 2017. Final Release.
AB - The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is a
congressionally mandated agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services. ATSDR conducted this public health assessment to: 1. Evaluate
whether past exposure to the following chemicals (referred to here as
contaminants of concern) in drinking water at the Marine Corps Base (MCB)
Camp Lejeune were likely to have resulted in adverse health impacts
related to that exposure: a. Benzene, b. Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), c.
Trichloroethylene (TCE), d. Trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE), and e.
Vinyl chloride. 2. Assess additional exposure scenarios requested by the
Community Assistance Panel. 3. Evaluate more recent exposure to lead in
drinking water based on sampling data collected at Camp Lejeune
(2005–2013).
KW - *Public health
KW - *Water quality
KW - *Health hazards
KW - *Drinking water
KW - Contamination
KW - Exposure
KW - Risk assessment
KW - Health consultations
KW - Exposure doses
KW - Potable water
KW - Health effects
KW - Chemicals
KW - Health impacts
KW - Sampling data
KW - Data collection
KW - *Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base
OD - 202
YR - 2017
PC - 092477000
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101151_a

74 - TOXLINE
TI - Intranasal Insulin for Improving Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis.
AU - Mowry, E.
AD - Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD.
AU - Newsome, S.
AD - Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD.
AU - Avornu, A.
AD - Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD.
AB - Cognitive dysfunction is common and devastating to people with multiple
sclerosis (MS). To date, multiple pharmacologic interventions have been
tried for MS-related cognitive dysfunction with disappointing results.
Hence, there is an urgent need to identify or develop novel therapies that
can help improve cognitive function in MS. This clinical trial is designed
to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of intranasal insulin
in cognitively impaired people with MS. The study will also evaluate the
impact of intranasal insulin on measures of oxidative stress, axonal
injury, cellular stress, and energy metabolism in MS. The design of this
phase I/II, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial is as
follows; 105participants will be randomized (1:1:1, stratified by
relapsing versus progressive MS) to intranasal insulin 10 international
units (IU) twice a day, 20 IU twice a day, or placebo for 24weeks. Insulin
will be administered intranasally to allow direct delivery of the
medication into the central nervous system.
KW - Multiple sclerosis
KW - Cognitive impairment
KW - Neurodegenerative diseases
KW - Intranasal insulin
KW - Symbol digit modalities test
KW - Minimal assessment of cognitive function in multiple sclerosis
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 001934000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047495_a

75 - TOXLINE
TI - Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial
Disparity in Aggressiveness of Prostate Cancer.
AU - Wu, Y.
AD - Health Research, Inc., Buffalo, NY.
AB - The proposed studies are expected to (1) identify genetic variations in
the genes of androgen transporters that are associated with the racial
differences in prostate cancer aggressiveness; (2) identify key androgen
transporters of which the expression and/or the alteration of expression
in cancer relative to benign prostate tissue are associated with racial
differences in prostate cancer aggressiveness. Progress in the reporting
period includes: 1) Completion of genotyping for all 11 SLCO members using
PCaP DNA samples; 2) Finish data processing and preliminary data analyses
for genotyping, and identified SNPs that may be associated with prostate
cancer characteristics; 3) Continued RNAScope analysis of SLCO transporter
in prostate cancer tissue sections and discover unique cell type-specific
expression of a SLCO transporter; 4) Further delineation of androgen
uptake mechanism on molecular levels.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - African americans
KW - Genetic variation
KW - Androgens
KW - Ethnic groups
KW - Aa(african american)
KW - Ea(european american)
KW - Health disparity
KW - Transporter
OD - 18
YR - 2017
PC - 012067000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042934_a

76 - TOXLINE
TI - Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Report: Volunteer Fire
Fighter Dies After Inhaling Super-Heated Gases at a Residential Structure
Fire - New York, FACE-F2015-20.
AU - Merinar, T.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA. Fire Fighter
Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program.
AU - Bowyer, M.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA. Fire Fighter
Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program.
AB - On June 28, 2015, a 46-year-old male career fire fighter/engineer was
critically injured after falling through a translucent corrugated roof
panel. The fire fighter was the engineer on Truck 8, the third truck
company dispatched to a possible structure fire at a multipurpose
commercial structure at 2132 hours. The first arriving companies found an
exterior dumpster on fire with flames extending approximately 4 feet up
the exterior sheet-metal wall along the edge of an exterior window.
District Chief 2 arrived on-scene and assumed incident command (IC) just
as the dumpster was being pulled away from the structure. Fire fighters
quickly extinguished the fire in the dumpster using a booster hose. The IC
directed crews to force entry into the structure to conduct an interior
search for occupants and fire extension. The IC also directed the Truck 8
crew to the roof to check for fire extension. All searches were negative.
The IC requested that the Truck 8 crew size up the approximate building
dimensions. While reporting the building dimensions to the incident
commander, the Truck 8 engineer stepped onto a translucent corrugated roof
panel, which cracked under his weight. The roof was not well illuminated
and the translucent panel blended with the rest of the roof. He fell
approximately 17 feet onto the concrete floor below. The engineer suffered
multiple open bone fractures and vascular damage. He was immediately
transported to a trauma hospital (Hospital 1) where multiple surgeries
were performed over a 2-week period. On July 9, 2015, the engineer was
discharged from the hospital to continue his recovery at home. On July 15,
six days after discharge, the engineer experienced sudden onset of severe
shortness of breath. He was transported by ambulance to Hospital 2, but
upon arrival in the hospital's parking lot, he suffered a cardiopulmonary
arrest. Efforts to resuscitate the engineer in the hospital's emergency
department were unsuccessful. An autopsy revealed a massive pulmonary
thromboembolism originating from a thrombus in his lower extremity formed
as a result of blunt trauma injuries sustained during his fall. The
pulmonary thromboembolism occurred despite being on anticoagulation
therapy.
KW - *Fire fighters
KW - *Emergency responders
KW - *Accident prevention
KW - *Personal protection
KW - Accident analysis
KW - Accidents
KW - Injury prevention
KW - Injuries
KW - Traumatic injuries
KW - Fire hazards
KW - Fires
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Surveillance
KW - Safety
KW - Standards
KW - Training
KW - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health(IDLH)
KW - Equipment reliability
KW - Personal protective equipment
KW - Residential structure fire
KW - *Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE)
RN - FACE-F2015-20
OD - 42
YR - 2017
PC - 093878001
CT - 41I | Job Environment
CT - 91C | Fire Services, Law Enforcement, &amp; Criminal Justice
CT - 43C | Human Resources
CT - 43D | Police, Fire, &amp; Emergency Services
CT - 91I | Emergency Services &amp; Planning
CT - 95G | Protective Equipment
CT - 92A | Job Training &amp; Career Development
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101799_a

77 - TOXLINE
TI - Dermal Coverage of Traumatic War Wounds.
AU - Nesti, L.
AD - The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, WA.
AB - The proposed study is a prospective, randomized within-patient controlled
feasibility study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the ReCell
Device for re-epithelialization of full thickness wounds treated with
INTEGRA MBWM. The ReCell Device is a stand-alone, battery operated cell
separation device that enables preparation of a cell suspension from a
small, thin, split-thickness skin biopsy. The autologous epidermal cell
suspension is available for immediatedelivery onto a prepared skin
surface. This process has the potential to enhance skin regeneration while
minimizing donor site morbidity2,3. The performance of ReCell over INTEGRA
MBWM in combination with 1:6 meshed split-thickness skin graft (STSG) will
be compared to standard practice control (i.e., 1:1.5 meshed STSG over
Integra MBWM). We expect all ReCell-treated and control areas of the
wounds to heal adequately. However, we predict areas treated with ReCell
will re-epithelialize more quickly than control areas, which has the
potential to reduce the risk of infection and scarring in ReCell-treated
areas compared to control areas.
KW - ReCell Device
KW - Traumatic war wounds
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 118767000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 95C | Biomedical Instrumentation &amp; Bioengineering
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047259_a

78 - TOXLINE
TI - Novel Therapy for Bone Regeneration in Large Segmental Defects.
AU - Kacena, M.
AD - Trustee of Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AU - McKinley, T.
AD - Trustee of Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AU - Chu, T.
AD - Trustee of Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AB - The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of thrombopoietin (TPO)
to heal a segmental bone defect (SBD) in a large animal model, the
minipig. The scope of the research comprises the following specific aims
(i) to determine the union rate of tibial midshaft defects in minipigs
treated with BMP-2, TPO, or saline control; and (ii) to evaluate the
safety and side effects of treating tibial midshaft defects in minipigs
treated with BMP-2, TPO, or saline control. Over the course of our study
we completed surgeries on 51 minipigs. Three minipigs were used to develop
our model. Of the others, 24 had a 25mm defect and were fixed with an IM
nail, 12 had a 25mm defect and were fixed with a compression plate, and 12
had a 40mm defect and were also fixed with a compression plate. Perhaps
the two most significant findings are: 1) we discovered that fixation type
(IM nail vs. compression plates) impacts the size requirement for a
critical size defect, and2) although the dose and timing may not yet be
optimized, TPO can heal bone defects in pigs and is able to more rapidly
allow for bone healing than observed in saline treated controls. Further,
no toxic effects were observed, and although additional analyses remain to
be completed, TPO and BMP-2 appear to work by different mechanisms to
elicit bone healing.
KW - Bone regeneration
KW - Peptide growth factors
KW - Stem cells
KW - Orthopedic surgical procedures
KW - Osteogenesis
KW - Bone fractures
KW - Bone diseases
KW - Calcium compounds
KW - Osteoblasts
KW - Proteins
KW - Transplants
KW - Therapy
KW - Pigs
KW - Bone healing
KW - Bmp(bone morphogenetic protein)
KW - Tpo(thrombopoietin)
KW - Fracture healing
KW - Minipigs
KW - Sbd(segmental bone defect)
OD - 64
YR - 2017
PC - 800222329
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049887_a

79 - TOXLINE
TI - Hydraulic and Environmental Behavior of Recycled Asphalt Pavement in
Highway Shoulder Applications.
AU - Aydilek, A. H.
AD - University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States).
AU - Mijic, Z.
AD - University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States).
AU - Seybou-Insa, O.
AD - University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States).
AB - Hydraulic conductivity of seven recycled asphalt pavement materials (RAPs)
was evaluated through a series of constant-head tests, while their
leaching potential was determined through batch leach tests and column
leach tests. The contaminant transport in surface waters as a function of
distance was numerically simulated. Laboratory test results indicated that
the hydraulic conductivity of recycled asphalt pavement is comparable to
that of natural aggregates with the gradation of clean sand-gravel mixture
as it ranged from 6.9 x 10(sup -3) cm/s to 1.1 x 10(sup-2) cm/s. The
concentrations of all metals released during the water leach tests were
below the water quality limits, except for copper. Column leach tests
yielded generally low or non-detectable metal concentrations. The
deviation from this trend occurred for copper and zinc concentrations, but
they fell below the regulatory limits at 4 and 0.5 pore volumes of flow,
respectively. Arsenic can leach out, most probably as less toxic
pentavalent arsenic (As(V), under acidic conditions. Concentrations of all
metals from RAP conformed to the water quality standards in surface waters
after passing through the natural formation. The results of a series of
TCLP tests showed that two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs),
chrysene and Indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, may be present in the leachates,
albeit, at concentrations very comparable to those leach from a new
asphalt material. The results of the geochemical modeling indicated that
the leached metals were solubility-controlled. Oxide and hydroxide
minerals control the leaching of aluminum and iron; whereas, leaching of
barium, calcium and magnesium were controlled by carbonate and/or sulfate
minerals.
KW - Hydraulic conductivity
KW - Leaching
KW - Reycled asphalt pavement
KW - Contaminant transport
OD - 287
YR - 2017
PC - 005683000
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100786_a

80 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Tetramethyl Lead (TML) (CAS No.
75-74-1).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - No toxicokinetic data were identified that estimated the degree of
absorption of TML following dermal exposure; however, a model predicted
TML to be absorbed following skin contact. An ALD of 6,203 mg/kg [E.I. du
Pont de Nemours and Company 1959, 1991] and a MLD of 4,000 were
identified, indicating that TML can be absorbed by the skin but were above
the critical dermal LD50 value of 2,000 mg/kg body weight that identifies
chemical substances with the potential for acute dermal toxicity. Based on
the results of the model prediction, and because virtually identical
effects were produced by the oral, cutaneous, and inhalation routes of
exposure to TML [Schepers 1964], the potency of the substance was
evaluated following repeated or prolonged exposure via other exposure
routes (i.e., oral) in animals. TML at very low doses caused liver and
neuronal damage in rats in an oral exposure study [Schepers 1964],
indicating that the potential exists for dermal exposure to cause similar
effects as observed in the oral study. No epidemiological investigations
or experimental animal studies were identified that evaluated the
potential for TML to cause direct skin effects or skin sensitization.
Therefore, on the basis of these assessments, TML is assigned a composite
skin notation of SK: SYS. Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard designations
for TML previously issued by NIOSH and other organizations. No Globally
Harmonized System (GHS) of classification and labeling of chemicals dermal
classification for TML was located [European Parliament 2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Tetraethyl lead
KW - *Health effects
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - In vivo studies
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Humans
KW - Systematic reviews
KW - Globally harmonized system(GHS)
KW - Analytical models
KW - Body weight
KW - Liver damage
KW - Cell damage
KW - Carcinogenicity
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 75-74-1
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-191
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100174_a

81 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Arsenic and Inorganic Arsenic Containing
Compounds (CAS No. 7440-38-2).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - There is some indication from toxicokinetic studies that arsenic and its
inorganic compounds have measurable, but limited potential to be absorbed
through the skin of humans and animals [Dutkiewicz 1977; Wester et al.
1993; Turkall 2003]. The limited availability by the dermal route is
consistent with the results of the acute dermal toxicity study identified
in animals [Gaines 1960] that indicates that arsenic is not acutely toxic
despite its known acute toxicity via other routes. These data are
insufficient to adequately evaluate the potential of arsenic and its
inorganic compounds to cause systemic effects, including skin cancers,
following dermal exposure. Case reports and human studies [Pinto and
McGill 1953; Bourrain 1998; Mohamed 1998] and data from animals [Boutwell
1963] indicate that chronic or high-dose dermal exposure to arsenic can
result in irritant contact dermatitis. An in vivo animal study using the
GPMT did not support the weak skin sensitization data in humans [Wahlberg
and Boman 1986]. Therefore, on the basis of these assessments, arsenic is
assigned a composite skin notation of SK: DIR (IRR). Table 3 summarizes
the skin hazard designations for arsenic previously issued by NIOSH and
other organizations. There is not an equivalent dermal designation by the
Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for the classification and labeling of
chemicals [European Parliament 2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Arsenic
KW - *Inorganic arsenic
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - Skin absorption
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Contact dermatitis
KW - Globally Harmonized System (GHS)
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 7440-38-2
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-184
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
CT - 94D | Job Environment
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100167_a

82 - TOXLINE
TI - Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer.
AU - Li, Z.
AD - Methodist Hospital Houston United States
AB - The emphasis of this first year of the award, as planned, has been on
synthetic chemistry to obtain materials to test in histology, PET
(positron emission tomography) and PDT(photodynamic therapy) studies. We
have been successful in preparing samples for the testing studies that
begin in year 2. However, as anticipated, the synthetic chemistry work was
not without problems and must continue and adapt to overcome challenges
that now become evident. For instance, one of the molecules first
prioritized, compound 1, was prepared, but only after a great deal of
effort; in retrospect it is now clear that this compound has stability
issues that make it hard to make, and inappropriate for further studies.
Another target compound (2) was then prepared, much more efficiently than
the first because it does not have stability issues, and because of the
experience we gained from making the first target. This compound has poor
solubility characteristics despite the fact that it contains two sulfonic
acid groups and may required delivery in micelles; this is something that
could not have been predicted until the compound was made. Both structures
1 and 2 are based on the aza-BODIPY dye fragment; as a back-up we have
also initiated work on a compound based on a different-dye type, eg
compound 3. The original proposal outlined plans to add cytotoxic entities
other than PDT agents; for this we entered into a collaboration with a
biotechnology company who have provided us a small sample of the previous,
highly cytotoxic, compound may tensin A. We have also prepared an agent
intended solely for PET, ie compound 4; this takes advantage of very
recent advances in the field that enable more efficient capture of 18F-
than was possible before, via so-called Perrin capture agents.
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Therapy
KW - Metastasis
KW - Histology
KW - Positron emission tomography
KW - Reagents for histology of trkc+ tumors
KW - Pdt(photodynamic therapy)
OD - 21
YR - 2017
PC - 800221191
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048531_a

83 - TOXLINE
TI - Phase II Trial on the Effect of Low-Dose versus High-Dose Vitamin D
Supplementation on Bone Mass in Adults with Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1).
AU - Viskochil, D.
AD - University of Utah Salt Lake City United States
AB - This study is now ready to be fully implemented at 3 of 4 sites. Vitamin D
has been randomized and the database is built. Participants are being
recruited by 3 of the 4 sites.Clinical trial regulatory processes have
taken more time than anticipated in the Statement of Work. An IND from the
FDA to use high-dose vitamin D in the NF1 (neurofibromatosis type 1)
population has been obtained, as requested by the University of Utah IRB.
The study was approved both by the University of Utah IRB and the DoD
USAMRMCORP HRPO. Ethics board approval from UBC has been approved by HRPO,
and U of Cincinnati is IRB and HRPO approved. The University of Hamburg is
working with the European Union Clinical Trials group (EurodratCT) to
implement this study, and a document of agreement to perform a joint
clinical trial with the University of Utah has been executed. The Clinical
Trials office in Hamburg has reviewed the proposal and we have
accommodated the custodianship of study drug, cholecalciferol, from the
manufacturer in Canada directly to Germany.
KW - Vitamin d
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Genetic disorders
KW - Adults
KW - Bones
KW - Bone fractures
KW - Nf1(neurofibromatosis type 1)
KW - Osteopenia
KW - Double-blind randomized trial
KW - Bmd(bone mineral density)
KW - Ccts(center for clinical and translational science)
KW - Cgrp(clinical genetics research program)
KW - Dexa(dual energy x-ray absorptiometry)
KW - Dxa(dual energy x-ray absorptiometry)
KW - Fda(federal drug administration)
KW - Ham(university of hamburg enrollment center)
KW - Irb(institutional review board)
OD - 13
YR - 2017
PC - 800219275
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048508_a

84 - TOXLINE
TI - Long Term Follow up of the Delayed Effects of Acute Radiation Exposure in
Primates.
AU - Cline, J.
AD - Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC. School of Health Sciences.
AB - The overarching goal of this program is to explore our recent clinically
relevant observations of DEARE in a unique cohort of non-human primates
(NHP), termed the Radiation Survivor Cohort (RSC). This work consists of 4
projects: 1. Studies of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM); 2.
Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD); 3. Chronic immune impairment with
restriction of the antigenic responserepertoire; and 4. Genomic and
transcriptomic studies of the molecular pathogenesis of T2DM, RIHD, and
immune impairmentin the context of DEARE.
KW - Acute Radiation Exposure
KW - Diabetes mellitus
OD - 137
YR - 2017
PC - 025960003
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047329_a

85 - TOXLINE
TI - WORK FUNCTION CHARACTERIZATION OF DIRECTIONALLY SOLIDIFIED LAB6VB2
EUTECTIC (POSTPRINT).
AU - Back, T. C.
AD - AFRL Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Wright Patterson Air Force Base
United States
AU - Schmid, A. K.
AD - AFRL Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Wright Patterson Air Force Base
United States
AU - Fairchild, S. B.
AD - AFRL Materials and Manufacturing Directorate Wright Patterson Air Force Base
United States
AB - With its low work function and high mechanical strength, the LaB6 /VB2
eutectic system is an interesting candidate for high performance
thermionic emitters. For the development of device applications, itis
important to understand the origin, value, and spatial distribution of the
work function in this system. Here we combine thermal emission electron
microscopy and low energy electron microscopy with Augerelectron
spectroscopy and physical vapor deposition of the constituent elements to
explore physical and chemical conditions governing the work function of
these surfaces. Our results include the observation that work function is
lower (and emission intensity is higher) on VB2 inclusions than on the La
B6 matrix. We also observe that the deposition of atomic monolayer doses
of vanadium results in surprisingly significant lowering of the work
function with values as low as 1.1 eV.
KW - Thermionic emitters
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800219386
CT - 49E | Optoelectronic Devices &amp; Systems
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1040462_a

86 - TOXLINE
TI - Auditory Localization Performance with Asymmetric Integrated Eye and Ear
Protection.
AU - Scharine, A. A.
AD - Army Research Lab., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AU - Domanico, M.
AD - Army Research Lab., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AU - Foots, A. N.
AD - Army Research Lab., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AU - Fluitt, K.
AD - Army Research Lab., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AU - Mermagen, T. J.
AD - Army Research Lab., Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD.
AB - The effect of the Asymmetric Integrated Eye and Ear Protection (AIEEP)
prototype on auditory localization ability was measured for 6 participants
wearing 1 of 2 sample prototypes. The AIEEP is a tactical communications
and protection system (TCAPS) that also provides eye protection.
Participants used a laser pointer to indicate the perceived location of
sounds presented from 1 of 36 loudspeakers. This task was completed both
with ears unoccluded (no AIEEP) and with the AIEEP. Pink noise bursts were
used for the sound stimuli (either 250 or 7000 ms). Localization accuracy
was computed as the horizontal angular difference between the target
loudspeaker location and the participants estimate. Responses were
classified as to whether they constituted correct answers, minor errors
due to blur, or front-back reversals. Because there were significant
differences in performance as a function of the prototype used, the data
are reported separately. Although decreased acuity and increased reversals
were observed relative to performance with the bare head, performance with
Prototype B was similar to that of the earlier prototype, the Gamma-IEEP,
and better than that measured for another in-the-ear TCAPS. Performance
with Prototype A was significantly worse, suggesting that issues with the
sample were affecting localization.
KW - Hearing protection
KW - Eye safety
KW - Protective equipment
KW - Attenuation
KW - Steady state
KW - Noise reduction
KW - Ambient noise
KW - Goggles
KW - Headgear
KW - Military equipment
KW - Auditory localization
KW - Eye protection
KW - Auditory situation awareness
KW - Tactical communications and protection system
KW - Asymmetric integrated eye and ear protection
RN - ARL-TR-8315
OD - 78
YR - 2018
PC - 105322000
CT - 95G | Protective Equipment
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049225_a

87 - TOXLINE
TI - Novel Therapy for Bone Regeneration in Large Segmental Defects.
AU - Kacena, M.
AD - Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AU - McKinley, T.
AD - Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AU - Chu, T.
AD - Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AB - The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of thrombopoietin (TPO)
to heal a segmental bone defect (SBD) in a large animal model, the
minipig. The scope of the research comprises the following specific aims
(i) to determine the union rate of tibial midshaft defects in minipigs
treated with BMP-2, TPO, or saline control; and (ii) to evaluate the
safety and side effects of treating tibial midshaft defects in minipigs
treated with BMP-2, TPO, or saline control. Over the course of our study
we completed surgeries on 51 minipigs. Three minipigs were used to develop
our model. Of the others, 24 had a 25mm defect and were fixed with an IM
nail, 12 had a 25mm defect and were fixed with a compression plate, and 12
had a 40mm defect and were also fixed with a compression plate. Perhaps
the two most significant findings are: 1) we discovered that fixation type
(IM nail vs. compression plates) impacts the size requirement for a
critical size defect, and2) although the dose and timing may not yet be
optimized, TPO can heal bone defects in pigs and is able to more rapidly
allow for bone healing than observed in saline treated controls. Further,
no toxic effects were observed, and although additional analyses remain to
be completed, TPO and BMP-2 appear to work by different mechanisms to
elicit bone healing.
KW - Therapy
KW - Peptide growth factors
KW - Bone fractures
KW - Osteogenesis
KW - Orthopedic surgical procedures
KW - Proteins
KW - Osteoblasts
KW - Calcium compounds
KW - Regenerative medicine
KW - Bone regeneration
KW - Transplants
KW - Stem cells
KW - Pigs
KW - Tpo(thrombopoietin)
KW - Bone healing
KW - Bmp(bone morphogenetic protein)
KW - Fracture healing
KW - Minipig
OD - 64
YR - 2017
PC - 800218346
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049892_a

88 - TOXLINE
TI - Dissecting the Mechanisms of Drug Resistance in BRCA1/2-Mutant Breast
Cancers.
AU - D'Andrea, A.
AD - Dana-Farber Cancer Inst., Boston, MA.
AB - Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition provides a promising
therapeutic modality for targeting homologous recombination (HR)deficient
tumors such as BRCA1 and BRCA2-mutated triple negative breast cancers
(TNBCs). Although PARP inhibitors have shownactivity in the
BRCA-associated TNBCs, several of these tumors develop de novo as well as
acquired PARP inhibitor (PARPi) resistance.Besides attenuation in
intracellular uptake of drugs, the only known mechanism that drives
chemotherapy resistance of BRCA1/2-deficientcancers is through the
restoration of HR. Recent studies from our laboratories (Nussenzweig and
DAndrea) indicate that deregulation ofpathways that promote extensive
degradation of nascent DNA strands and alternative end-joining (Alt-EJ)
can render BRCA1/2-deficientcells resistant to PARPi in a HR-independent
manner.
KW - Drug resistance
KW - Breast cancer
OD - 69
YR - 2017
PC - 086120000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047162_a

89 - TOXLINE
TI - NTP Technical Report on the Toxicology Studies of Indole-3-Carbinol (CAS
NO. 700-06-1) in F344/N Rats and B6C3F1/N Mice and Toxicology and
Cardcinogenesis Studies of Indole-3-Carbinol in Harlan Sprague Dawley Rats
and B6C3F1/N Mice (Gavage Studies).
AB - Indole-3-carbinol is naturally formed during the consumption of a variety
of vegetables, such as broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage,
kale, kohlrabi, and turnips. Indole-3-carbinol is also marketed as a
dietary supplement for its potential ability to prevent cancer and provide
other health benefits, such as detoxifying the liver and boosting the
immune system. Exposure occurs through ingestion of these vegetables or
dietary supplements containing indole-3-carbinol. We conducted studies of
indole-3-carbinol in rats and mice to determine if it caused cancer or
other health effects. We administered 0 (control), 75, 150, or 300 mg of
indole-3-carbinol per kg body weight in corn oil by gavage to groups
containing 50 male and female rats and mice. Animals were administered
indole-3-carbinol 5 days per week for 2 years. Tissues from more than 40
sites were examined for every animal.
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Indole-3-carbinol
KW - *Rats
KW - *Carcinogenesis studies
KW - *Mice
KW - *Toxicology studies
KW - 2-year gavage study
KW - Lesions
KW - Genetic toxicology
KW - Clinical pathology
KW - Organ weights
KW - Body weight
KW - Reproductive tissue evaluations
KW - Estrous cycle characterization
KW - Ingredients
KW - Nutrient composition
KW - Contaminant levels
RN - NTP/TR-584
OD - 210
YR - 2017
PC - 068182000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100059_a

90 - TOXLINE
TI - Review of Critical Parameters for Transportation Fuel Pathways.
AU - Hoekman, S. K.
AD - Coordinating Research Council, Inc., Alpharetta, GA.
AU - Broch, A.
AD - Coordinating Research Council, Inc., Alpharetta, GA.
AB - In 2013, the CRC commissioned a study (CRC Project E-102) to better
quantify sources of uncertainty and variability in selected LCA models
that are being used to regulate fuels by conducting an in-depth evaluation
of model inputs, and the uncertainties around these inputs, for several
specific fuel pathways. Validation of the inputs and resulting outputs
from the models was discussed, and pathway variability and overall model
uncertainty for the different pathways was assessed. The study was carried
out by (S&amp;T)2 Consultants Inc. and the final report is available from
the CRC. This follow on project, CRC E-102-2, is intended to support the
uncertainty analysis that was undertaken in CRC Project E-102 with
supporting data from published literature. The objective was to find a
range of values and/or parameter distributions outside of the default
values for a specific pathway in GREET 2014, GHGenius, and BioGrace.
Unlike project E-102, which looked at the well to wheel emissions of the
vehicle and fuel pathways, this work considered the well to tank portion
of the pathways (with the exception of heavy duty natural gas vehicles).
The CRC has identified three primary tasks for this project: a review of
the literature on the corn ethanol pathway, a review of the other
pathways, and Monte Carlo simulations of all six pathways in each of the
three models.
KW - *Life Cycle Assessment (LCA)
KW - *BioGrace Greenhouse Gas Emissions (GHG)
KW - *Carlo simulations
KW - *Heavy duty natural gas vehicles
KW - GHGenius
KW - Global Nitrous Oxide Calculator (GNOC)
RN - CRC-E-102-2
OD - 299
YR - 2018
PC - 116843000
CT - 68 | Environmental Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
CT - 97B | Energy Use, Supply, &amp; Demand
CT - 97K | Fuels
CT - 97L | Engine Studies, Energy Related
CT - 97R | Environmental Studies
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100910_a

91 - TOXLINE
TI - Feasibility Study of Food Waste Co-Digestion at U.S. Army Installations.
AU - Cosper, S. D.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Gilbert, D. S.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - MacAllister , I. E.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Rahman, M. Z.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Ricketts, J.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Rock, S. R.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Urban, A. B.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Lan, A. W.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Rodriguez, G.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AB - Army Net Zero is a comprehensive approach to preserve natural resources by
focusing on energy, water, and waste at Army installations. Army Directive
2014-02, Net Zero Installations Policy set policy and assigned
responsibility to strive toward Net Zero at all Army installations,
wherever fiscally responsible. As part of its greater vision of strategic
sustainability, Fort Huachuca, Arizona, seeks to meet Army Net Zero
objectives. The Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) at Fort Huachuca is the
focus of the net zero waste project discussed here. The U.S. Army Engineer
Research and Development Center-Construction Engineering Research
Laboratory (ERDC-CERL), with collaboration from the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency designed a study to evaluate the feasibility of food
waste co-digestion at Fort Huachuca. The study was designed to (1) reduce
the amount of organic material going to landfill, (2) reduce greenhouse
gas emissions, and (3) produce renewable energy. From this work, team
members concluded that co-digestion of food and biosolids would be a
win-win scenario for Fort Huachuca because it would help eliminate the
largest part of the waste stream (food), reduce biosolids disposal costs,
and generate power for operating the installations WWTP.
KW - Arizona
KW - Military facilities
KW - Army corps of engineers
KW - Solid waste
KW - Sewage
KW - Feasibility studies
KW - Army facilities
KW - Waste management
KW - Sustainable engineering
KW - Food waste
KW - Anaerobic treatment
KW - Biogas
KW - Fort huachuca
RN - ERDC/CERL-TR-17-7
OD - 98
PR - 455592
YR - 2017
PC - 800218623
CT - 96 | Business &amp; Economics
CT - 68C | Solid Wastes Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1038188_a

92 - TOXLINE
TI - Examination of plasma PON1 paraoxonase activity and genotype in Gulf War
veterans.
AU - Chao, L.
AD - NCIRE San Francisco United States
AB - The goal of this project is to evaluate the extent to which
PON < sub1192 > /Gulf War (GW)-related exposure interactions contribute
to the risk for Gulf War Illness (GWI), as defined by the Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) and Kansas case definitions in a large
sample of GW veterans. Specifically, we will: (1) determine the
associations between GWI and GW-related exposures with the potential for
cholinergic effects (e.g., personal pesticide use, exposure to OP nerve
agents) in subgroups of veterans with different PON < sub1192 >
genotype. (2)determine the associations between GWI and each GW-related
cholinergic exposure in subgroups of veterans with different PON1 activity
levels and (3) calculate prevalence odds ratios for GWI/exposure
associations separately for subgroups of veterans with different
PON < sub1192 > genotypes and PON1 activity levels.
KW - Persian gulf syndrome
KW - Toxic hazards
KW - Nerve agents
KW - Military medicine
KW - Genomics
KW - Pon1(paraonase-1)
KW - Organophosphates
KW - Gulf war-related exposures
OD - 17
YR - 2017
PC - 800222132
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046477_a

93 - TOXLINE
TI - Novel Therapy for Bone Regeneration in Large Segmental Defects.
AU - Chu, T.
AD - Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AU - Kacena, M.
AD - Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AU - McKinley, T.
AD - Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AB - The purpose of this study is to test the efficacy of thrombopoietin (TPO)
to heal a segmental bone defect (SBD) in a large animal model, the
minipig. The scope of the research comprises the following specific aims
(i) to determine the union rate of tibial midshaft defects in minipigs
treated with BMP-2, TPO, or saline control; and (ii) to evaluate the
safety and side effects of treating tibial midshaft defects in minipigs
treated with BMP-2, TPO, or saline control. Over the course of our study
we completed surgeries on 51 minipigs. Three minipigs were used to develop
our model. Of the others, 24 had a 25mm defect and were fixed with an IM
nail, 12 had a 25mm defect and were fixed with a compression plate, and 12
had a 40mm defect and were also fixed with a compression plate. Perhaps
the two most significant findings are: 1) we discovered that fixation type
(IM nail vs. compression plates) impacts the size requirement for a
critical size defect, and2) although the dose and timing may not yet be
optimized, TPO can heal bone defects in pigs and is able to more rapidly
allow for bone healing than observed in saline treated controls. Further,
no toxic effects were observed, and although additional analyses remain to
be completed, TPO and BMP-2 appear to work by different mechanisms to
elicit bone healing.
KW - Regenerative medicine
KW - Pigs
KW - Therapy
KW - Peptide growth factors
KW - Stem cells
KW - Bone fractures
KW - Osteogenesis
KW - Orthopedic surgical procedures
KW - Proteins
KW - Osteoblasts
KW - Calcium compounds
KW - Transplants
KW - Bone regeneration
KW - Bone healing
KW - Bmp(bone morphogenetic protein)
KW - Tpo(thrombopoietin)
KW - Fracture healing
KW - Minipig
OD - 64
YR - 2017
PC - 800218346
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049893_a
94 - TOXLINE
TI - Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Carbon
Dioxide Measurement - Novel Lidar Technologies and Techniques with Path to
Space.
AU - Singh, U. N.
AD - NASA Langley Research Center
AU - Refaat, T. F.
AD - NASA Langley Research Center
AU - Petros, M.
AD - NASA Langley Research Center
AB - The societal benefits of understanding climate change through
identification of global carbon dioxide sources and sinks led to the
desired NASA's active sensing of carbon dioxide emissions over nights,
days, and seasons (ASCENDS) space-based missions of global carbon dioxide
measurements. For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)
have developed several carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the
differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique operating at the two-micron
wavelength. Currently, an airborne two-micron triple-pulse integrated path
differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development. This IPDA lidar
measures carbon dioxide as well as water vapor, the dominant interfering
molecule on carbon dioxide remote sensing. Advancement of this
triple-pulse IPDA lidar development is presented.
KW - *Atmospheric composition
KW - *Carbon dioxide concentration
KW - *Climate change
KW - *Differential absorption lidar
KW - *Exhaust emission
KW - *Remote sensing
KW - *Water vapor
KW - Control systems design
KW - Data acquisition
KW - Detection
KW - Optical radar
KW - Semiconductor lasers
KW - Telescopes
KW - Time optimal control
KW - Transmitter receivers
KW - Wavelengths
RN - NF1676L-26317
OD - 4
PR - WBS 478643.02.09.02.02
YR - 2017
PC - 800128588
CT - 48 | Natural Resources &amp; Earth Sciences
CT - 68 | Environmental Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007401_a

95 - TOXLINE
TI - Periodic Reviews for the Renewable Fuel Standard Program.
AB - Under Section 211(o)(11) of the Clean Air Act, EPA is required to conduct
certain periodic reviews. The paragraph provides that: To allow for the
appropriate adjustment of the requirements described in subparagraph (B)
of paragraph (2), the Administrator shall conduct periodic reviews
of—(A) existing technologies; (B) the feasibility of achieving
compliance with the requirements; and (C) the impacts of the requirements
described in subsection (a)(2) on each individual and entity described in
paragraph (2). This document explains our interpretation of this paragraph
and describes how we have fulfilled it. Section I explains our
interpretation of the statutory text, including both ambiguities and
unintelligible aspects of Subparagraph (C). Section II describes our
fulfillment of the obligation to conduct periodic reviews notwithstanding
the interpretive issues, and the contexts in which we have used the
results of those periodic reviews.
KW - *Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) program
KW - Diesel fuel volumes
KW - Policy issues
KW - Congressional inquiries
KW - Ethanol blends
KW - Fuel import prices
RN - EPA/420/S-17/002
OD - 14
YR - 2017
PC - 031287300
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 97F | Fuel Conversion Processes
CT - 97G | Policies, Regulations &amp; Studies
CT - 97R | Environmental Studies
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100914_a

96 - TOXLINE
TI - Mechanism of Supercooled Water Droplet Breakup near the Leading Edge of an
Airfoil.
AU - Veras-Alba, B.
AD - Pennsylvania State Univ.
AU - Palacios, J.
AD - Pennsylvania State Univ.
AU - Vargas, M.
AD - Pennsylvania State Univ.
AU - Ruggeri, C.
AD - Pennsylvania State Univ.
AU - Bartkus, T. P.
AD - Pennsylvania State Univ.
AB - This work presents the results of an experimental study on supercooled
droplet deformation and breakup near the leading edge of an airfoil. The
results are compared to prior room temperature droplet deformation results
to explore the effects of droplet supercooling. The experiments were
conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) at The
Pennsylvania State University. An airfoil model placed at the end of the
rotor blades mounted onto the hub in the AERTS chamber was moved at speeds
ranging between 50 and 80 m/sec. The temperature of the chamber was set at
-20˚C. A monotonic droplet generator was used to produce droplets that
fell from above, perpendicular to the path of the airfoil. The supercooled
state of the droplets was determined by measurement of the temperature of
the drops at various locations below the droplet generator exit. A
temperature prediction code was also used to estimate the temperature of
the droplets based on vertical velocity and the distance traveled by
droplets from the droplet generator to the airfoil stagnation line. High
speed imaging was employed to observe the interaction between the droplets
and the airfoil. The high speed imaging provided droplet deformation
information as the droplet approached the airfoil near the stagnation
line. A tracking software program was used to measure the horizontal and
vertical displacement of the droplet against time. It was demonstrated
that to compare the effects of water supercooling on droplet deformation,
the ratio of the slip velocity and the initial droplet velocity must be
equal. A case with equal slip velocity to initial velocity ratios was
selected for room temperature and supercooled droplet conditions. The
airfoil velocity was 60 m/s and the slip velocity for both sets of data
was 40 m/s. In these cases, the deformation of the weakly supercooled and
warm droplets did not present different trends. The similar behavior for
both environmental conditions indicates that water supercooling has no
effect on particle deformation for the limited range of the weak
supercooling of the droplets tested and the selected impact velocity. The
assumption of a constant surface tension value was further supported by
the equal trend of the Bond number obtained for supercooled and room
temperature droplets.
KW - *Airfoils
KW - *Drops (liquids)
KW - *Flow velocity
KW - *Leading edges
KW - *Room temperature
KW - *Test stands
KW - *Deformation
KW - *Aircraft icing
KW - *Velocity
KW - *High speed cameras
KW - *Bond number
KW - Aerodynamic forces
KW - Numerical analysis
KW - Models
KW - Freezing
KW - Supercooling
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN42773
OD - 21
PR - WBS 081876.02.03.08.02.02
YR - 2017
PC - 800128716
CT - 85D | Transportation Safety
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
CT - 46B | Fluid Mechanics
CT - 72B | Algebra, Analysis, Geometry, &amp; Mathematical Logic
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007704_a

97 - TOXLINE
TI - Short-term Survival Rates of Branded Steller Sea Lion Pups.
AU - Fritz, L.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Chumbley, K.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Towell, R.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Luxa, K.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Cutler, J.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AB - Survival rates of western Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) pups
(total N = 621) were estimated during 2000, 2002, and 2004 at one rookery
on Marmot Island and during 2003 and 2005 at two rookeries on Ugamak
Island for up to 73 days following hot-iron branding. Estimated daily
apparent survival rates increased and standard errors of the estimates
decreased with increasing durations of in-season monitoring. An asymptotic
apparent survival rate (phi a) of 0.9995 d-1 was estimated from sightings
of marked pups on 7-30 occasions between 1 and 73 days after branding, as
well as in subsequent years through 2015. Sex and pup mass at the time of
branding were not strong factors affecting survival. Extrapolations of phi
beyond the in-season period yielded 12-week and 1-year survival rates of
0.960 and 0.837, respectively. During six of the seven in-season
monitoring periods, numbers of dead pups counted by observers following
branding were less than those estimated to have died based on our
calculated survival rate. Two more dead pups were counted than predicted
at Marmot in 2000, but the actual cause(s) of any of the pup deaths are
not known.
KW - *Survival rates
KW - *Sea lion pups
KW - In-season monitoring
KW - Sightings
KW - Branding
RN - NOAA-TM-NMFS-AFSC-368
OD - 43
YR - 2018
PC - 034391013
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 48B | Natural Resource Management
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100686_a

98 - TOXLINE
TI - Feasibility Study of Food Waste Co- Digestion at U.S. Army Installations.
AU - Cosper, S. D.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Gilbert, D. S.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - MacAllister, I. E.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Rahman, Z. M.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Ricketts, J.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Rock, S. R.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Urban, A. B.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Lan, A. W.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AU - Rodriguez, G.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AB - Army Net Zero is a comprehensive approach to preserve natural resources by
focusing on energy, water, and waste at Army installa-tions. Army
Directive 2014-02, Net Zero Installations Policy set policy and assigned
responsibility to strive toward Net Zero at all Army installations,
wherever fiscally responsible. As part of its greater vision of strategic
sustainability, Fort Huachuca, Arizona, seeks to meet Army Net Zero
objectives. The Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) at Fort Huachuca is the
focus of the net zero waste project discussed here. The U.S. Army Engineer
Research and Development Center-Construction Engineering Research
Laboratory (ERDC-CERL), with collaboration from the U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency designed a study to evaluate the feasibility of food
waste co-digestion at Fort Huachuca. The study was designed to (1) reduce
the amount of organic material going to landfill, (2) reduce greenhouse
gas emissions, and (3) produce renewable energy. From this work, team
members concluded that co-digestion of food and biosolids would be a
win-win sce-nario for Fort Huachuca because it would help eliminate the
largest part of the waste stream (food), reduce biosolids disposal costs,
and generate power for operating the installations WWTP.
KW - Food waste
KW - Net zero
KW - Wastewater treatement plants
OD - 98
YR - 2017
PC - 800218623
CT - 74 | Military Sciences
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1031653_a

99 - TOXLINE
TI - Axial-Flow Turbine Rotor Discharge-Flow Overexpansion and Limit-Loading
Condition, Part I: Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Investigation.
AU - Chen, S. S.
AD - NASA Glenn Research Center
AB - A Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) investigation is conducted over a
two-dimensional axial-flow turbine rotor blade row to study the phenomena
of turbine rotor discharge flow overexpansion at subcritical, critical,
and supercritical conditions. Quantitative data of the mean-flow Mach
numbers, mean-flow angles, the tangential blade pressure forces, the
mean-flow mass flux, and the flow-path total pressure loss coefficients,
averaged or integrated across the two-dimensional computational domain
encompassing two blade-passages, are obtained over a series of 14
inlet-total to exit-static pressure ratios, from 1.5 (un-choked;
subcritical condition) to 10.0 (supercritical with excessively high
pressure ratio.) Detailed flow features over the full
domain-of-computation, such as the streamline patterns, Mach contours,
pressure contours, blade surface pressure distributions, etc. are
collected and displayed in this paper. A formal, quantitative definition
of the limit loading condition based on the channel flow theory is
proposed and explained. Contrary to the comments made in the historical
works performed on this subject, about the deficiency of the theoretical
methods applied in analyzing this phenomena, using modern CFD method for
the study of this subject appears to be quite adequate and successful.
This paper describes the CFD work and its findings.
KW - *Computational fluid dynamics
KW - *Axial flow turbines
KW - *Pressure distribution
KW - *Turbine blades
KW - *Supercritical flow
KW - *Critical flow
KW - *Subcritical flow
KW - *Static pressure
KW - *Mach number
KW - *Flow coefficients
KW - *Mass flow
KW - Pressure ratio
KW - Aircraft engines
KW - Mean
RN - NASA/TM-2017-219506
RN - E-19365
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN36666
OD - 46
PR - WBS 081876.02.03.50.04.02
YR - 2017
PC - 800128530
CT - 46B | Fluid Mechanics
CT - 51C | Aircraft
CT - 62 | Computers, Control &amp; Information Theory
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007293_a

100 - TOXLINE
TI - Evaluation of Asphalt Pavement Interface Conditions for Enhanced Bond
Performance.
AU - Roque, R.
AD - Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
AU - Hernando, D.
AD - Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
AU - Park, B.
AD - Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
AU - Zou, J.
AD - Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
AU - Waisome, J. A. M.
AD - Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
AB - This project describes a comprehensive modeling effort aimed at examining
the potential impact of interface de-bonding on near-surface longitudinal
cracking in the wheelpath of asphalt pavements. A critical zone defined by
high shear stress coupled with low confinement was found at a depth of
about 2 in and extending to 2 in from the edge of the tire, regardless of
asphalt layer thickness. These critical stress states can promote a
de-bonded strip below the wheel-path if an interface is located at an
approximate depth of 2 in. The introduction of a de-bonded strip along the
interface caused a stress redistribution that intensified shear stress
ahead of the tip of the debonded zone and tensile stress immediately
behind the tip (tension at this location exceeded that under the tire). A
finite element parametric study based on maximum tension and maximum Von
Mises stress (associated with the strain energy of distortion) identified
three potential mechanisms of near-surface longitudinal cracking in an
asphalt pavement with localized interface de-bonding: (1) bending caused
by repeated traffic can initiate a crack below the edge of the de-bonded
strip that reflects to the surface due to traffic wander and thermal
cycles, especially given near-surface differential aging; (2) traffic
wander can initiate a vertical crack above the edge of the de-bonded strip
and promote upward propagation; and (3) internal tension due to partially
restrained dilation can result in a crack that propagates upward through
the more aged and less fracture-tolerant mixture near the surface. Future
work should focus on achieving a better understanding of the mechanism of
interface breakdown to prevent de-bonding in the first place.
Identification of bonding agents more resistant to interface bond
breakdown can help prevent and, in turn, mitigate the occurrence of
near-surface longitudinal cracking.
KW - *Asphalt pavement cracking
KW - Debonding
KW - Interface
KW - Crack
KW - Friction
KW - Evaluation
KW - Performance
KW - Thermal cycles
KW - Asphalt pavements
RN - BDV31-977-37
OD - 161
YR - 2017
PC - 009327049
CT - 50C | Construction Equipment, Materials, &amp; Supplies
CT - 71 | Materials Sciences
CT - 89D | Structural Analyses
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102637_a

101 - TOXLINE
TI - Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in Checkpoint Protein Inhibition for
Melanoma.
AU - Weber, J.
AD - New York Unviersity New York United States
AB - Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are one of the major negative
regulators of immune responses in cancer closelyassociated with negative
outcome of PD1 therapy in metastatic melanoma. TRAIL-R DR5 is selectively
up- regulated onMDSC. The goal of this study is to test the hypothesis
that agonistic TRAIL-DR5 antibody DS-8273a will be well toleratedand
augment the clinical efficacy of PD-1 blocking antibody nivolumab by
impacting on MDSC. DS-8372a at low doses (4and 8 mg/kg) was well tolerated
with 2 excellent responses in 6 patients and one mixed response; it did
not affect populationsof MDSC or other myeloid and lymphoid cells, but
monocytic MDSC function was augmented. In the first 4 patients weevaluated
the response of T cells to melanoma derived pool of overlapping peptides
in IFN- ELISPOT assay. In one patientwe observed substantial increase in
the response to peptides after 3 cycles of treatment. These results are
preliminary.Moreover, the dose of antibody was very low to expect
substantial responses. We anticipate that next two doses (16 mg/kg and24
mg/kg) with escalation occurring early in October will provide more clear
data.
KW - Suppressor cells
KW - Checkpoint protein
OD - 29
YR - 2017
PC - 800222097
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046087_a

102 - TOXLINE
TI - Randomized Phase II Trial of Adjuvant WT-1 Analog Peptide Vaccine in
Patients with Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma after Completion of
Multimodality Therapy.
AU - Zauderer, M. G.
AD - Sloan-Kettering Inst. for Cancer Research, New York.
AB - The Wilms' tumor gene, WT1, encodes transcription factors that regulate
cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. WT1 protein is highly
expressed in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), and is a rational
target for immunotherapy. We have developed a vaccine comprised of four
WT1 heteroclitic peptides that are given together with Montanide and
GM-CSF as immunologic adjuvants. This WT1 vaccine was previously tested in
a pilot trial, and shown to be safe and immunogenic. This study tested the
efficacy of this vaccine in MPM patients who have minimal disease burden
after completion of multimodality therapy, but remain at exceedingly high
risk for recurrence. A multicenter, blinded, randomized trial was
conducted comparing treatment with the WT-1 peptide vaccine
Montanide/GM-CSF to treatment with Montanide/GM-CSF alone in patients with
MPM who have completed multimodality therapy. The primary endpoint is
progression free survival rate at 1 year. The trial has completed and the
results are being published in Clinical Cancer Research.
KW - Mesothelioma
KW - Vaccines
KW - Genes
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Proteins
KW - Apoptosis
KW - Transcription factors
KW - Immunotherapy
KW - Peptides
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Wt1 vaccine
KW - Mpm (malignant pleural mesothelioma)
KW - Montanide
KW - Gm-csf
OD - 60
YR - 2017
PC - 024093000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047992_a

103 - TOXLINE
TI - CTC Sentinel: Volume 10, Issue 1. January 2017.
AU - Corner, E.
AD - U.S. Military Academy -Combating Terrorism Center West Point United States
AU - Gill, P.
AD - U.S. Military Academy -Combating Terrorism Center West Point United States
AU - Cruickshank, P.
AD - U.S. Military Academy -Combating Terrorism Center West Point United States
AU - Horton, M.
AD - U.S. Military Academy -Combating Terrorism Center West Point United States
AU - Rassler, D.
AD - U.S. Military Academy -Combating Terrorism Center West Point United States
AU - Warner, J.
AD - U.S. Military Academy -Combating Terrorism Center West Point United States
AB - The Islamic State-linked terrorism experienced in the West recently has
reignited debates about the connection between mental disorders in
terrorist activity. Indeed, the assistant commissioner for specialist
operations in London’s Metropolitan Police Service acknowledges the
Islamic State is actively trying to recruit, among others, “those with
mental health issues.”1 Similarly, Australia’s national counter
terrorism coordinator, Greg Moriarty, has outlined that many cases involve
individuals “not necessarily deeply com- mitted to and engaged with the
Islamist ideology but are none- the less, due to a range of reasons,
including mental health issues, susceptible to being motivated and lured
rapidly down a dangerous path by the terrorist narrative.”2 The debates
became particularly salient through the summer of 2016 when lone actors
inspired and encouraged by the Islamic State killed 135 civilians in
separate at tacks in Orlando and Nice. More recently, the fatal shooting
of five individuals at Fort Lauderdale airport added complexity to these
debates. All perpetrators had reported histories of mental disorder. This
article seeks to answer several questions to provide a more rigorous
evidence base for these debates. These questions include: What is the
existing evidence base regarding psychopathology and terrorist
involvement? How prevalent are mental disorders among Islamic
State-directed and -inspired offenders in the West? What is the content of
these diagnoses? When present, what relationship did the disorder have
with radicalization?
KW - Terrorism
KW - Mental disorders
OD - 34
YR - 2017
PC - 800218846
CT - 57T | Psychiatry
CT - 92B | Psychology
CT - 92 | Behavior &amp; Society
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1025358_a

104 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2015-0107-3279, July 2017. Evaluation
of Chemical Exposures at a Vape Shop.
AU - Zwack, L. M.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Stefaniak, A. B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - LeBouf, R. F.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - The Health Hazard Evaluation Program received a request from the owner of
a vape shop who was concerned about employees' potential exposure to
vaping chemicals in the workplace. We collected air samples in the vape
shop for flavoring chemicals (diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, 2,3-hexanedione,
acetaldehyde, and acetoin), nicotine, formaldehyde, and propylene glycol.
We took wipe samples for nicotine and metals on commonly touched surfaces.
We found that employees vaped in the shop throughout the day, but very few
customers vaped. None of the airborne concentrations of the specific
flavoring chemicals we measured were above applicable occupational
exposure limits although we detected low levels of two flavoring
chemicals, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione, in the personal and area air
samples. We detected the presence of metals, such as chromium, lead,
copper, and nickel, on surfaces in the shop. We found detectable levels of
nicotine on the outside surface of a nicotine transfer bottle. This may
have occurred when liquid was poured from one bottle to another without
use of a funnel. We did not find nicotine on other surfaces that we
sampled. We found that not all employees wore chemical protective gloves
when handling liquids containing nicotine. The bottle of stock nicotine
solution was stored in the same refrigerator used to store employees'
food. We recommend that the employer implement a policy prohibiting vaping
in the workplace with e-liquids that contain diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione. We also recommended not storing chemicals in the same
area where food is stored or eaten, training employees on proper chemical
handling procedures, and inspecting and maintaining the shop's exhaust
ventilation systems.
KW - *Metals
KW - *Nickel compounds
KW - Flavorings
KW - Metallic compounds
KW - Metal fumes
KW - Metal combustion
KW - Chromium coating
KW - Lead compounds
KW - Copper compounds
KW - Tobacco stores
KW - Vaping
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2015-0107-3279
OD - 30
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 71N | Nonferrous Metals &amp; Alloys
CT - 71P | Refractory Metals &amp; Alloys
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102701_a

105 - TOXLINE
TI - TBI-Induced Formation of Toxic Tau and Its Biochemical Similarities to Tau
in AD Brains.
AU - Arancio, O.
AD - Columbia Univ., New York.
AB - The goal of the current study is to demonstrate that blast-induced
traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's disease(AD) lead to similar
biochemical changes in tau that increase its toxicity and contribute to
cognitive and electrophysiological impairments. Specifically we will test
the hypothesis that 1) blast-induced TBI leads to the production of a
toxic form of tau that contributes to cognitive and electrophysiological
impairments; 2) the formation of soluble tau aggregates contributes to
cognitive impairments associated with both blast-exposure and AD; 3) an
increase in tau phosphorylation contributes to cognitive impairments
associated with both blast-exposure and AD. During the last year we have
completed experiments related to the first point of the hypothesis, and
started working on the second point. Specifically, we have found that the
presence of tau is necessary for a preparation from shockwave-exposed mice
to reduce1) memory including contextual fear memory and spatial memory,
and 2) long-term potentiation, a type of synaptic plasticity thought to
underlie learning. We have also performed a dose response curve for the
toxic effect of blasted tau onto memory and LTP.
KW - Brain injuries
KW - Military medicine
KW - Blast injuries
KW - Alzheimer disease
KW - Cognitive impairment
KW - Memory
KW - Contextual fear memory
KW - Spatial memory
KW - Synaptic plasticity
KW - Traumatic brain injury
KW - Alzheimers disease
OD - 14
YR - 2017
PC - 003788000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049169_a

106 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2016-0012-3302, January 2018.
Evaluation of Exposures and Respiratory Health at a Coffee Roasting and
Packaging Facility.
AU - Stanton, M. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Martin, S. B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Nett, R. J.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - In October 2015, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and
Health's Health Hazard Evaluation Program received a request from the
management of a coffee roasting and packaging facility with 94 employees.
The request stated concerns about exposures to and health effects from
diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione during coffee roasting, grinding, and
packaging. In April 2016, we conducted a ventilation assessment of the
production and office areas, industrial hygiene survey, and medical survey
at the facility. The industrial hygiene survey consisted of collecting
personal breathing zone and area air samples for alpha-diketones (i.e.,
diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione). We used continuous
monitoring instruments to measure total volatile organic compounds, carbon
monoxide, carbon dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity in specific
areas and during tasks. We also measured levels of carbon monoxide in
employees' exhaled breath. The medical survey consisted of a health
questionnaire and breathing tests. Sixty-nine of the 88 full-shift
personal samples collected exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit
for diacetyl of 5 parts per billion, with a maximum concentration of 25.6
parts per billion. We identified jobs where some work tasks resulted in
relatively higher air concentrations of diacetyl than other tasks.
Specifically, rework of packaged coffee, moving roasted beans or ground
coffee, grinding coffee beans, and packaging coffee were associated with
higher diacetyl levels. Overall, the most commonly reported symptoms were
nose and eye symptoms. Some production employees reported their nose and
sinus symptoms were caused or aggravated by green coffee dust or chaff,
roasted coffee dust, or ground coffee dust. Wheezing or whistling in the
chest was the most commonly reported lower respiratory symptom, and was
nearly two times higher than that expected compared with the U.S.
population of the same age, race/ethnicity, sex, and cigarette smoking
distribution. No participants had abnormal spirometry tests. We recommend
installing local exhaust ventilation at the point sources with the highest
concentrations of alpha-diketones. In addition to local exhaust
ventilation, we recommend isolating or re-locating the main grinder. We
also recommend a medical monitoring program to identify any employees who
might be developing work-related lung disease (e.g., asthma, obliterative
bronchiolitis) and to help management prioritize interventions to prevent
occupational lung disease.
KW - *Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
KW - Coffee workers
KW - Food handlers
KW - Food processing
KW - Food processing industry
KW - Food processing workers
KW - Food additives
KW - Organic dusts
KW - Ventilation systems
KW - Relative humidity
KW - Respiratory systems disorders
KW - Respiratory diseases
KW - Lung disease
KW - Lung disorders
KW - Diacetyl
KW - Carbon monoxide
KW - Carbon dioxide
KW - Industrial hygiene
KW - Air sampling
KW - Workplace monitoring
KW - Health surveys
KW - Medical surveys
KW - Questionnaires
KW - Breathing
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Exposure limits
KW - Mucous membranes
KW - Pulmonary system disorders
KW - Airway resistance
KW - Training
KW - Intervention
KW - Environmental control equipment
KW - Grinding equipment
KW - Ketones
KW - Recommended Exposure Limits (RELs)
KW - Exhaust ventilation
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2016-0012-3302
OD - 69
YR - 2018
PC - 118833000
CT - 98H | Food Technology
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57M | Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, &amp; Rehabilitation
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100579_a

107 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2016-0005-3303, January 2018.
Evaluation of Exposures and Respiratory Health at a Coffee Roasting and
Packaging Facility.
AU - Hawley, B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Reynolds, L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Nett, R. J.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Martin, S. B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - In October 2015, the Health Hazard Evaluation Program of the National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request
from management at a coffee roasting and packaging facility regarding
concerns about health issues related to exposure to diacetyl during coffee
roasting, grinding, and packaging. During February 27-March 2, 2017, we
conducted an industrial hygiene survey, ventilation assessment, and
medical survey at the facility. The industrial hygiene survey consisted of
the collection of air samples and bulk samples of coffee for the analysis
of diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and 2,3-hexanedione. Continuous monitoring
instruments were used to monitor total volatile organic compounds, carbon
monoxide, carbon dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity in specific
areas and during tasks. The medical survey consisted of a health
questionnaire and breathing tests. One of the three personal full-shift
air samples exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit for diacetyl of
5 parts per billion. The personal air sample that exceeded the recommended
exposure limit for diacetyl was collected on an employee with primary job
duties on the production floor. None of the personal full-shift air
samples exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure limit for
2,3-pentanedione. The highest partial-shift and task-based diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione exposure measurements were observed on employees that
ground coffee, or worked in the packaging area near the grinders. Areas
with ground coffee present, specifically the two main grinders, had the
highest levels of diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, total volatile organic
compounds, and carbon monoxide. We observed high instantaneous levels of
carbon monoxide during grinding. Carbon monoxide levels measured on
employees that ground coffee exceeded the NIOSH ceiling limit of 200 parts
per million. Carbon dioxide levels were low throughout most of the
facility. Nose and sinus symptoms were the most commonly reported
symptoms. Some employees reported their symptoms were better when away
from work. One of the five participants had abnormal spirometry. We
recommend a combination of engineering and administrative controls to
minimize employee exposures. We also recommend a medical monitoring
program to identify any employees who might be developing work-related
lung disease (e.g., asthma, obliterative bronchiolitis) and to help
management prioritize interventions to prevent occupational lung disease.
KW - *Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
KW - *Food processing industry
KW - *Ventilation systems
KW - Coffee workers
KW - Food handlers
KW - Food processing
KW - Food processing workers
KW - Food additives
KW - Organic dusts
KW - Relative humidity
KW - Respiratory systems disorders
KW - Respiratory diseases
KW - Lung disease
KW - Lung disorders
KW - Diacetyl
KW - Carbon monoxide
KW - Carbon dioxide
KW - Industrial hygiene
KW - Air sampling
KW - Workplace monitoring
KW - Health surveys
KW - Medical surveys
KW - Questionnaires
KW - Breathing
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Exposure limits
KW - Mucous membranes
KW - Pulmonary system disorders
KW - Airway resistance
KW - Training
KW - Intervention
KW - Environmental control equipment
KW - Administrative controls
KW - Exhaust ventilation
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2016-0005-3303
OD - 50
YR - 2018
PC - 118833000
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
CT - 57M | Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, &amp; Rehabilitation
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 92A | Job Training &amp; Career Development
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100578_a

108 - TOXLINE
TI - Autophagosomal Sequestration of Mitochondria as an Indicator of
Antiandrogen Therapy Resistance of Prostate Cancer (PCa).
AU - Wilding, G.
AD - Texas Univ., Houston.
AB - Purpose: We have investigated if sequestration of metabolically
dysfunctional mitochondria by theautophagosomes (mitophagy) imparts
anti-androgen resistance. Method: Effects of the anti-androgen
enzalutamide on the autophagy and mitophagy of androgen-dependentLNCaP and
independent C4-2 cells are studied first. Autophagy is monitored by
cellular fluorescence incells treated with monodansylcadavarine (MDC) or
stained with anti-LC3B antibody. Cellular Purpose: We have investigated if
sequestration of metabolically dysfunctional mitochondria by the
autophagosomes (mitophagy) imparts anti-androgen resistance. Method:
Effects of the anti-androgen enzalutamide on the autophagy and mitophagy
of androgen-dependent LNCaP and independent C4-2 cells are studied first.
Autophagy is monitored by cellular fluorescence in cells treated with
monodansylcadavarine (MDC) or stained with anti-LC3B antibody. Cellular
fluorescence due to Mitosox dye oxidation is used to identify mitochondria
producing high superoxide (O2-). Mitophagy is monitored using fluorescence
resonance energy transfer (FRET) by visualization of FRET images and
quantitation of FRET image intensities using a Nikon A1 or a fluorescence
due to Mitosox dye oxidation is used to identify mitochondria producing
high superoxide (O2-). Mitophagyis monitored using fluorescence resonance
energy transfer (FRET) by visualization of FRET images andquantitation of
FRET image intensities using a Nikon A1 or a Leica Di8 fluorescence
confocal microscopeand Image J software.Results and Discussion: Our data
show that the degree of mitophagy is more in androgen-dependent LNCaPcells
than in independent C4-2 cells, both growing in androgen-depleted media.
Enzalutamide treatmentinduces mitophagy in both cell lines, but the
increase in mitophagy is more pronounced in the enzalutamideresistantC4-2
than in the sensitive LNCaP cells.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Drug resistance
KW - Energy transfer
KW - Fluorescence
KW - Resonance
KW - Mitochondria
KW - Androgens
KW - Cell line
KW - Assays
KW - Cytochemistry
KW - Immunochemistry
KW - Confocal microscopy
KW - Mitophagy
KW - Fret (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)
KW - Antiandrogen therapy resistance
KW - Pca (prostate cancer)
KW - Enzalutamide
KW - Autophagy
KW - Lncap cells
KW - C4-2 cells
KW - Ctc (circulating tumor cells)
KW - Adt (androgen-deprivation therapy)
KW - Ar (androgen receptor)
KW - Ck (cytokeratin)
KW - Crpc (castrate-resistant pca)
KW - Icc (immunocytochemistry)
KW - Lc3 (light chain 3)
KW - Mdc (monodansyl cadavarine)
KW - Fret imaging
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 001794000
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049173_a

109 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2016-0121-3284, July 2017. Evaluation
of Needlestick Injuries and Other Exposures to Bloodborne Pathogens Among
Officers in a City Policy Department.
AU - de Perio, M. A.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - In response to a request from the risk management office of a city, the
Health Hazard Evaluation Program reviewed records of needlestick injuries
and other potential bloodborne pathogens exposure incidents among city
police officers. We also reviewed the city's and police department's
policies regarding bloodborne pathogens and exposures to blood or other
potentially infectious materials. We found 13 needlestick injuries and 37
additional exposure incidents across a 6-year period in a force of about
1,000 officers. The annual incidence of needlestick injuries ranged from
0-5.07 per 1,000 police officers and from 0-2.45 per 10,000 reactive calls
for service. For the needlestick injuries, of 11 source persons tested
were found to have hepatitis C. The 37 additional potential bloodborne
pathogens exposure incidents involved mostly spitting incidents, human
bites, and contact with blood other than from needlesticks. The city had a
comprehensive bloodborne pathogens exposure control plan, but the police
department had not yet adopted it. We recommended using sharps containers
for evidence collection that are puncture resistant, leakproof, and
labeled or color-coded. We also recommended continued training on safe
searching techniques, and ensuring needlestick and exposure incident
reports have complete information to allow for improved tracking.
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Law enforcement workers
KW - Needlestick injuries
KW - Sharps
KW - Risk assessment
KW - Risk management
KW - Police officers
KW - Injuries
KW - Recordkeeping
KW - Bloodborne pathogens
KW - Policy
KW - Worker safety
KW - Infectious agents
KW - Blood
KW - Bloodborne diseases
KW - Hepatitis C
KW - Hazardous waste
KW - Containers
KW - Storage containers
KW - Training
KW - Safety education
KW - Safety equipment
KW - Safety measures
KW - Hepatitis B
KW - Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2016-0121-3284
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 44D | Health Care Assessment &amp; Quality Assurance
CT - 44K | Health Services
CT - 43D | Police, Fire, &amp; Emergency Services
CT - 43C | Human Resources
CT - 91C | Fire Services, Law Enforcement, &amp; Criminal Justice
CT - 91F | Health Services
CT - 68C | Solid Wastes Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68F | Radiation Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102702_a

110 - TOXLINE
TI - Novel Technique and Technologies for Active Optical Remote Sensing of
Greenhouse Gases.
AU - Singh, U. N.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Refaat, T. F.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Petros, M.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AB - The societal benefits of understanding climate change through
identification of global carbon dioxide sources and sinks led to the
desired NASA's active sensing of carbon dioxide emissions over nights,
days, and seasons (ASCENDS) space-based missions of global carbon dioxide
measurements. For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC)
have developed several carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the
differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique operating at the two-micron
wavelength. Currently, an airborne two-micron triple-pulse integrated path
differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development. This IPDA lidar
measures carbon dioxide as well as water vapor, the dominant interfering
molecule on carbon dioxide remote sensing. Advancement of this
triple-pulse IPDA lidar development is presented.
KW - *Atmospheric composition
KW - *Greenhouse effect
KW - *Carbon dioxide
KW - *Sinks
KW - *Remote sensors
KW - *Differential absorption lidar
KW - *Pulsed lasers
KW - Technology assessment
KW - Data acquisition
RN - NF1676L-26031
OD - 6
PR - WBS 478643.02.09.02.02
YR - 2017
PC - 019044001
CT - 48 | Natural Resources &amp; Earth Sciences
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0006190_a
111 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Hemorrhage Control for Major Traumatic Vascular Injuries.
AU -
Holcomb, J. B.
AD -
Texas Univ. Health Science Center at Houston.
AU -
Moore, L. J.
AD -
Texas Univ. Health Science Center at Houston.
AB -
The objective of this proposed study is to systematically define the
clinical and logistical issues surrounding traditional open vascular
surgery and catheter-based hemorrhage control. The hypothesis is that
minimally invasive, device-driven and expert-led NCTH control techniques
improve survival compared to traditional open vascular surgery. This
project will achieve the following aims: 1) Determine current practice
patterns for the treatment of patients with NCTH among 4 clinical sites
using a retrospective study design (Phase 1a); 2) Conduct a 2-day Delphi
Panel meeting of military and civilian experts to gain consensus regarding
anatomic, technology, credentialing, competency, and training issues for
catheter-based hemorrhage control (Phase 1b); 3) Conduct a prospective
4-site observational study to test the hypothesis that less-invasive
device-driven and expert-led hemorrhage control techniques are associated
with improved survival in NCTH patients and strengthen the evidence base
to inform future development of catheters, devices, and training required
for surgeons for catheter-based hemorrhage control (Phase 2). At the end
of Y3, the retrospective study has been completed, the Delphi Meeting has
been held and a manuscript describing the results has been drafted. In
addition, the prospective study continues in all 4 sites, 228 patients
have been enrolled, and we are awaiting an EWOF to extend the prospective
study into year 4 for both enrollment and analysis.
KW - Hemorrhage
KW - Trauma
KW - Surgery
KW - Blood coagulation
KW - Death
KW - Vascular system injuries
KW - Ncth(noncompressible torso hemorrhage)
KW - Mortality
OD - 46
YR - 2017
PC - 049458000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047920_a

112 - TOXLINE
TI - Identification of Prostate Cancer Predisposition Genes on the Y
Chromosome.
AU - Cannon-Albright, L. A.
AD - Utah Univ., Salt Lake City.
AU - Teerlink, C.
AD - Utah Univ., Salt Lake City.
AU - Thomas, A.
AD - Utah Univ., Salt Lake City.
AB - We used various methods to perform a test for an excess of prostate cancer
among males sharing the same Y chromosome. Methodology is being refined by
comparing 2 competing methods and selecting the preferred model. This
analysis identified a ranked list of Y chromosomes from the UPDB resource.
A set of 20 samples representing the top 10 high risk and 10 low-risk Y
chromosomes for genotyping with a set of 16,000 Y SNPs, and Y chromosome
full genome sequencing was submitted. We used available Utah data for
~1,000 Y chromosome SNPs on 80 high risk Y chromosomes and 150 low risk Y
chromosomes with some Y chromosome genotype data available. The set of
~1,000 SNPs was used to perform a phylogenetic analysis of the high vs low
risk Y chromosomes; some clustering of high risk Y chromosomes was noted.
Analysis of 10 high risk Y sequence data compared to 10 low risk Y
sequence data, identified 3 coding and 3 non -coding candidate
genes/variants seen in excess in high-risk Y chromosomes and not observed
in the low risk set. We used the ranked list of Y chromosomes from our
initial analysis to select a set of 100 YIDs to submit for complete Y
chromosome sequencing for analysis as cases. Complete Genomics and
provided us with Y chromosome sequence data for 1,800 control men.
KW - Chromosomes
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Genes
KW - Cells
KW - Males
KW - Methodology
KW - Genome
KW - Genetic markers
KW - Cell lines
KW - Coding
KW - Y chromosomes
KW - Case/control association analysis
KW - Phylogenetic tree
KW - High risk pedigree
KW - Phylogeny
OD - 13
YR - 2017
PC - 016669000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048411_a

113 - TOXLINE
TI - Model for Understanding the Genetic Basis for Disparity in Prostate Cancer
Risk.
AU - Setalyr, V.
AD - University of Wisconsin Madison United States
AB - Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. Among
African American men, the incidence of prostate cancer is approximately
60% higher and the mortality rate in this population is 2 to 3 times
greater compared with European American men. The reasons for this
disparity are not completely understood. Current tools in hand to study
these differences, such as genetically altered mouse models, are useful
for dissecting roles of specific genes and signaling pathways in intact
animal, but have limited utility for understanding differences in disease
susceptibility in humans.The overall objective of this application is to
model prostate epithelial cells to understand the molecular basis for the
disparities in prostate cancer risk between white Caucasian and black
African-American men. The specific aims are: 1) to establish conditions
that promote differentiation of human neonatal foreskin skin
fibroblast-derived iPSC into cells with characteristics of prostate
epithelium, 2) identify differences in gene expression and epigenetic
signatures between prostate epithelial cells derived from iPSC of
Caucasian and African-American foreskin fibroblasts and 3) compare and
establish methods to transform differentiated prostate epithelial cells to
identify differences in susceptibility to transformation.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Males
KW - African americans
KW - Genetics
KW - Epithelial cells
KW - Caucasians
KW - Gene expression
KW - Cell lines
KW - Stem cells
KW - Tissues (biology)
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Fibroblasts
KW - Induced pluripotent cells
KW - Directed differentiation
KW - Disparity in cancer risk
KW - Human neonatal fibroblasts
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 800218351
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045264_a

114 - TOXLINE
TI - Autophagosomal Sequestration of Mitochondria as an Indicator of
Antiandrogen Therapy Resistance of Prostate Cancer (PCa).
AU - Wilding, G.
AD - Texas Univ., Houston.
AB - Purpose: We have investigated if sequestration of metabolically
dysfunctional mitochondria by the autophagosomes (mitophagy) imparts
anti-androgen resistance.Method: Effects of the anti-androgen enzalutamide
on the autophagy and mitophagy of androgen-dependent LNCaP and independent
C4-2 cells are studied first. Autophagy is monitored by cellular
fluorescence in cells treated with monodansylcadavarine (MDC) or stained
with anti-LC3B antibody. Cellular fluorescencedue to Mitosox dye oxidation
is used to identify mitochondria producing high superoxide (O2-).
Mitophagy is monitored using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)
by visualization of FRET images and quantitation of FRET image intensities
using a Nikon A1 or a Leica Di8 fluorescence confocal microscopeand Image
J software. Results and Discussion: Our data show that the degree of
mitophagy is more in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells than in independent
C4-2 cells, both growing in androgen-depleted media. Enzalutamide
treatment induces mitophagy in both cell lines, but the increase in
mitophagy is more pronounced in the enzalutamide-resistant C4-2 than in
the sensitive LNCaP cells. Mitophagy in circulating tumor cells (CTCs)
isolated from patient blood samples are currently being standardized.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Drug resistance
KW - Mitochondria
KW - Androgens
KW - Antibodies
KW - Fluorescence
KW - Resonance
KW - Energy transfer
KW - Cell line
KW - Assays
KW - Confocal microscopy
KW - Immunochemistry
KW - Cytochemistry
KW - Mitophagy
KW - Pca (prostate cancer)
KW - Autophagosomal sequestration
KW - Adt (androgen-deprivation therapy)
KW - Lncap cells
KW - Lncapindependent c4-2 cells
KW - Mdc (monodansylcadavarine)
KW - Anti-lc3b antibodies
KW - Fret (fluorescence resonance energy transfer)
KW - Ctc (circulating tumor cells)
KW - Ar (androgen receptor)
KW - Ck (cytokeratin)
KW - Crpc (castrate-resistant pca)
KW - Lc3 (light chain 3)
KW - Mdc (monodansyl cadavarine)
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 001794000
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049239_a

115 - TOXLINE
TI - Effect of a Microprocessor Prosthetic Foot on Function and Quality of Life
in Transtibial Amputees Who Are Limited Community Ambulators.
AU - Zucker-Levin, A.
AD - Tennessee Univ., Memphis.
AU - Richey, P. A.
AD - Tennessee Univ., Memphis.
AB - This project is a 2-arm, parallel, randomized, controlled clinical trial
designed to determine if a microprocessor controlled prosthetic foot
(MPF), with greater range of motion and active power, will translate into
improved functional performance, ambulatory safety (risk of falls) and
quality of life in trans-tibial amputees (TTA) who function as limited
community ambulators. We will assess these outcomes in 54 veterans with
TTA by randomizing participants, in a 1:1 ratio, into an intervention and
a comparison group. Participants in the intervention group will receive an
MPF, while the comparison group will continue with their currently
prescribed prosthetic foot. All participants will be followed with weekly
contact over a 6-month period of time in addition to receiving physical
therapy training. All outcome measures will be evaluated three times
during the 6 month study period. Once HRPO approval for the project was
received in April 2016, recruitment efforts via Partner Prosthetic clinics
was undertaken to identify over 700 potentially eligible individuals, 40
of whom were veterans. Similar efforts with the Regional DAV have also
been undertaken. Active recruitment began in July 2016 and has yielded 77
individuals responding to recruitment efforts, 76 of whom have been
screened for eligibility. Of those, 32 (42%) met eligibility criteria to
qualify for evaluation of Medicare Functional Classification Level (MFCL)
using the Amputee Mobility Predictor-Prosthesis (AMP-Pro). Five (15.6%) of
those individuals (who comprised 7% of the total 76 screened) met the
K-Level 2 classification as a community ambulator and were eligible for
randomization to group assignment. Recruitment, enrollment/randomization,
intervention and follow up assessments will continue in the coming
quarter/year.
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Foot
KW - Lower limb amputees
KW - Lower limb prostheses
KW - Motion
KW - Veterans(military personnel)
KW - Physical therapy
KW - Performance(human)
KW - Trans-tibial amputee
KW - Microprocessor controlled prosthetic foot
KW - Randomized clinical trial
KW - Functional performance
KW - Ambulatory safety
KW - Falls
KW - Quality of life
KW - Community ambulator
OD - 18
YR - 2017
PC - 014787000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048290_a

116 - TOXLINE
TI - Acute Meteorite Dust Exposure and Pulmonary Inflammation - Implications
for Human Space Exploration.
AU - Harrington, A. D.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - McCubbin, F. M.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Kaur, J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Smirnov, A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Galdanes, K.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Schoonen, M. A. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Chen, L. C.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Tsirka, S. E.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Gordon, T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AB - The previous manned missions to the Moon represent milestones of human
ingenuity, perseverance, and intellectual curiosity. However, one of the
major ongoing concerns is the array of hazards associated with lunar
surface dust. Not only did the dust cause mechanical and structural
integrity issues with the suits, the dust 'storm' generated upon
reentrance into the crew cabin caused "lunar hay fever" and "almost
blindness [1-3]" (Figure 1). It was further reported that the allergic
response to the dust worsened with each exposure [4]. The lack of gravity
exacerbated the exposure, requiring the astronauts to wear their helmet
within the module in order to avoid breathing the irritating particles
[1]. Due to the prevalence of these high exposures, the Human Research
Roadmap developed by NASA identifies the Risk of Adverse Health and
Performance Effects of Celestial Dust Exposure as an area of concern [5].
Extended human exploration will further increase the probability of
inadvertent and repeated exposures to celestial dusts. Going forward,
hazard assessments of celestial dusts will be determined through sample
return efforts prior to astronaut deployment. Studies on the lunar
highland regolith indicate that the dust is not only respirable but also
reactive [2, 6-9], and previous studies concluded that it is moderately
toxic; generating a greater response than titanium oxide but a lower
response than quartz [6]. The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on
the surface of the dust has been implicated. However, there is actually
little data related to physicochemical characteristics of particulates and
pulmonary toxicity, especially as it relates to celestial dust exposure.
As a direct response to this deficit, the present study evaluates the role
of a particulate's innate geochemical features (e.g., bulk chemistry,
internal composition, morphology, size, and reactivity) in generating
adverse toxicological responses in vitro and in vivo. This highly
interdisciplinary study evaluates the relative toxicity of six meteorite
samples representing either basalt or regolith breccia on the surfaces of
the Moon, Mars, and Asteroid 4Vesta (Table 1); three potential candidates
for future human exploration or colonization. Terrestrial mid-ocean ridge
basalt (MORB) is also used for comparison as a control sample.
KW - *Micrometeoroids
KW - *Exposure
KW - *Pulmonary functions
KW - *Interplanetary dust
KW - *Space exploration
KW - *Astronauts
KW - *Health
KW - *Risk
KW - *Physiological responses
KW - *Toxicity
KW - Hazards
KW - Dust storms
KW - Allergic diseases
KW - Sample return missions
KW - In vitro methods and tests
KW - In vivo methods and tests
RN - JSC-CN-39191
OD - 3
YR - 2017
PC - 019042004
CT - 84 | Space Technology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0004717_a

117 - TOXLINE
TI - Intensive Cardiorespiratory Exercise (ICE) to Remediate Mild Traumatic
Brain Injury in Active Duty Service Members.
AU - Johnson, P.
AD - University of Kansas Center for Research Lawrence United States
AB - AEx is a well-documented pathway to health and resilience, especially in
ADSM. Regular exercise induces positive physiologic and psychological
benefits and prevents many of the same chronic illnesses that are linked
to mTBI. Exercise has a biologically plausible and temporal relationship
with coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis,stroke, type 2 diabetes, some
cancers, and all-cause mortality. Three clinical evaluations will be
conducted in TBI-R and R at baseline and 6-month follow up for brain MRI,
psychological, and comprehensive physical fitness testing. To monitor
safety, AEx dynamics, and adherence throughout the intervention, ADSM will
perform monthly a standard US Army exercise challenge, the 2-mile run
where we will monitor mood, and salivary cortisol in response to the AEx
challenge. Depending on an ADSMs performance on the 2-mile run, the
interventions prescription for heart rate, distance and duration goals
will be increased in a controlled stepwise fashion to meet increasing CR
fitness goals.
OD - 14
YR - 2017
PC - 800222062
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045536_a

118 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Sulforaphane Treatment of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
AU -
Zimmerman, A. W.
AD -
University of Massachusetts Worcester United States
AB -
This randomized clinical trial seeks to investigate the effect of
sulforaphane, an isothiocyanate obtained from 3-day-old broccoli sprouts,
on children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Sulforaphane has several
possible modes of action that may benefit ASD through common cellular
mechanisms that underlie its heterogeneous phenotypes. The three specific
aims of the study are: (1) to determine if there are measurable effects on
social responsiveness and problem behaviors during treatment with orally
administered sulforaphane in 3-12 year old boys and girls with ASD; (2) to
determine if treatment with sulforaphane is safe and well tolerated; and
(3) to elucidate cellular biomarkers that support the hypothesized
mechanism of action of sulforaphane in ASD. The study design consists of a
short Pilot trial, to identify specific biomarkers for further study, and
the Main clinical trial, with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase-2
crossover design. Outcome measures include analyses of blood and urine
samples as well as scores on clinician- and parent-completed behavioral
assessments. Analyses and assessments will be done at several specific
points over the course of the study. To date, the Pilot trial of 10
children has been completed, and 36 out of the target 50 children for the
Main trial have been enrolled. Our plan for the next reporting period is
to finish recruiting and enrolling participants in the Main clinical trial
and perform data analysis.
KW - Autism
KW - Behavior
KW - Safety
KW - Biological markers
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Blood
KW - Urine
KW - Cytokines
KW - Proteins
KW - Sulforaphane
KW - Asd (autism spectrum disorder)
KW - Abc (aberrant behavior checklist)
KW - Srs (social responsiveness scale)
KW - Oacis (ohio autism clinical impressions scale)
KW - Inflammatory cytokines
KW - Hsp (heat shock proteins)
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 800221252
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045224_a

119 - TOXLINE
TI - Drag-Free Performance of the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System Flight
Experiment on the LISA Pathfinder.
AU -Maghami, P. G.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -O'Donnell, J. R.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -Hsu, O. H.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -Ziemer, J. K.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -Dunn, C. E.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AB -The Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is an experiment
package aboard the European Space Agency (ESA) LISA Pathfinder spacecraft.
LISA Pathfinder launched from Kourou, French Guiana on December 3, 2015.
The DRS is tasked to validate two specific technologies: colloidal
micro-Newton thrusters (CMNT) to provide low-noise control capability of
the spacecraft, and drag-free controlflight. This validation is performed
using highly sensitive drag-free sensors, which are provided by the LISA
Technology Package of the European Space Agency. The Disturbance Reduction
System is required to maintain the spacecrafts position with respect to a
free-floating test mass to better than 10nm/(square root of Hz), along its
sensitive axis (axis in optical metrology). It also has a goal of limiting
the residual accelerations of any of the two test masses to below 30 x
10(exp -14) (1 + ([f/3 mHz](exp 2))) m/sq s/(square root of Hz), over the
frequency range of 1 to 30 mHz.This paper briefly describes the design and
the expected on-orbit performance of the control system for the two modes
wherein the drag-free performance requirements are verified. The on-orbit
performance of these modes are then compared to the requirements, as well
as to the expected performance, and discussed.
KW - *Acceleration tolerance
KW - *Colloids
KW - *Controllability
KW - *Drag reduction
KW - *Flight control
KW - *Low noise
KW - *Position (location)
KW - *Sensitivity
KW - *Thrustors
KW - Actuation
KW - Electrostatics
KW - Esa spacecraft
KW - Frequency ranges
KW - Optical measuring instruments
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN41406
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 013129000
CT - 84G | Unmanned Spacecraft
CT - 84C | Manned Spacecraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0004848_a

120 - TOXLINE
TI - Combinatorial Therapies for Neurofibroma and MPNST Treatment and
Prevention.
AU - Carroll, S. L.
AD - Medical University of South Carolina Charleston United States
AB - We hypothesize that tamoxifen, trifluoperazine or combined
tamoxifen-trifluoperazine therapy will effectively treat established
neurofibromas and MPNSTs and prolong survival. We also hypothesize that
prophylactic treatment with these drugs will prevent neurofibroma and
MPNST pathogenesis. To test these hypotheses, we will: 1) determine
whether tamoxifen, trifluoperazine or tamoxifen-trifluoperazine therapy
effectively inhibits tumor cell proliferation and survival in established
neurofibromas and MPNSTs and prolongs the survival of mice with these
tumors and 2) determine whether prophylactic therapy with tamoxifen and/or
trifluoperazine will prevent the pathogenesis of neurofibromas and MPNSTs.
These preclinical trials will be performed using robust mouse models of
neurofibroma (Krox20-Cre;Nf1flox/- mice) and MPNST (P0-GGF3;Trp53 /- mice)
pathogenesis. In Aim 1, mice with established neurofibromas and MPNSTs
will be challenged with vehicle, tamoxifen, trifluoperazine or combined
tamoxifen-trifluoperazine therapy and we will establish which of these
treatments maximally inhibits tumor cell proliferation and survival and
improves long term survival. In Aim 2, we will begin treatment of
Krox20-Cre;Nf1flox/- and P0-GGF3;Trp53 /- mice with vehicle, tamoxifen,
trifluoperazine or tamoxifen-trifluoperazine prior to the development of
tumors and continue this treatment to 15 months of age. We will then
determine if these prophylactic therapies prevent neurofibroma and MPNST
pathogenesis or reduce the number and size of tumors in our mice.
OD - 14
YR - 2017
PC - 800218333
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045920_a

121 - TOXLINE
TI - Approximation of Engine Casing Temperature Constraints for Casing Mounted
Electronics.
AU - Kratz, J. L.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Culley, D. E.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Chapman, J. W.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AB - The performance of propulsion engine systems is sensitive to weight and
volume considerations. This can severely constrain the configuration and
complexity of the control system hardware. Distributed Engine Control
technology is a response to these concerns by providing more flexibility
in designing the control system, and by extension, more functionality
leading to higher performing engine systems. Consequently, there can be a
weight benefit to mounting modular electronic hardware on the engine core
casing in a high temperature environment. This paper attempts to quantify
the in-flight temperature constraints for engine casing mounted
electronics. In addition, an attempt is made at studying heat soak back
effects. The Commercial Modular Aero Propulsion System Simulation 40k
(C-MAPSS40k) software is leveraged with real flight data as the inputs to
the simulation. A two-dimensional (2-D) heat transfer model is integrated
with the engine simulation to approximate the temperature along the length
of the engine casing. This modification to the existing C-MAPSS40k
software will provide tools and methodologies to develop a better
understanding of the requirements for the embedded electronics hardware in
future engine systems. Results of the simulations are presented and their
implications on temperature constraints for engine casing mounted
electronics is discussed.
KW - *Propulsion system performance
KW - *Propulsion
KW - *Heat transfer
KW - *Engine control
KW - *Temperature profiles
KW - *Mass flow rate
KW - *Turbine engines
KW - *Combustion chambers
KW - *Casing
KW - *In-flight simulation
KW - *Taylor series
KW - Geometry
KW - Gas path analysis
KW - Titanium
KW - Differential equations
KW - Weight analysis
RN - AIAA Paper 2016-4858
RN - E-19349
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN39546
RN - NASA/TM-2017-219477
OD - 32
PR - WBS 109492.02.03.02.11
YR - 2017
PC - 115801001
CT - 51C | Aircraft
CT - 71N | Nonferrous Metals &amp; Alloys
CT - 72F | Statistical Analysis
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0004365_a

122 - TOXLINE
TI - Green Stormwater Infrastructure Volume 1. Primer.
AU - Jolley, J. W.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Airport Cooperative Research
Program.
AU - Tuccillo, M. E.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Airport Cooperative Research
Program.
AU - Young, M. L.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Airport Cooperative Research
Program.
AU - Barrett, M.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Airport Cooperative Research
Program.
AU - Lantin, A.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Airport Cooperative Research
Program.
AB - ACRP Research Report 174 defines and discusses green stormwater
infrastructure (GSI) management strategies, a relatively new approach to
regulation compliance. As more airports are proactively incorporating
sustainable practices in all aspects of their operations, federal and
state regulatory agencies are also promoting GSI strategies to comply with
water regulations and requirements. There are some challenges in
implementing GSI strategies, such as the perception that they are
expensive and may conflict with safety and operational regulations, as
well as a lack of understanding of what constitutes a GSI strategy, which
includes techniques, technologies, and design elements. The Volume 1:
Primer is written for the airport manager, planner, and engineer seeking
to understand stormwater management and how GSI can comply with
regulatory standards and requirements along with other benefits. Volume 2:
Guidebook has been developed to assist airport staff with evaluating the
applicability of a GSI strategy and how to select an appropriate GSI
strategy.
KW - *Stormwater management
KW - *Green infrastructure
KW - Airports
KW - Water quality
KW - Stormwater systems
KW - Stormwater runoff
KW - Sustainability
KW - Best management practices
KW - Regulatory standards
KW - Excess runoff
KW - Flooding
KW - Erosion
KW - *Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI)
RN - ISBN-978-0-309-44641-9
RN - LCCCN-2017941561
OD - 48
YR - 2017
PC - 044780010
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 50B | Civil Engineering
CT - 48G | Hydrology &amp; Limnology
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102477_a

123 - TOXLINE
TI - NTP Technical Report on the Toxicology and Carcinogenesis Studies of
Antimony Trioxide (CAS NO. 1309-64-4) In Wistar Han [Crl:WI (Han)] Rats
And B6C3F1/N Mice (Inhalation Studies).
AB - Antimony trioxide (Sb2O3) is used as a flame retardant in canvas,
textiles, paper, and plastics and in combination with some chlorinated or
brominated flame retardants on commercial furniture, draperies, wall
coverings, and carpets. It is also used in batteries, enamels and paint
pigment, and ceramics and fiberglass. Occupationally, the major sources of
exposure to antimony exist in the metal ore smelting and mining
industries. Antimony trioxide was nominated by the Consumer Products
Safety Commission and The National Institute of Environmental Health
Sciences for National Toxicology Program testing due to the potential for
substantial human exposure in occupational settings and the lack of
adequate 2-year exposure carcinogenicity studies. Male and female Wistar
Han [Crl:WI (Han)] rats and B6C3F1/N mice were exposed to antimony
trioxide (greater than 99.9% pure) by inhalation for 2 weeks or 2 years.
Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in rat and mouse peripheral
blood erythrocytes, peripheral blood leukocytes, and lung cells.
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Antimony trioxide
KW - Carcinogenesis
KW - Inhalation studies
KW - Mice
KW - Rats
RN - NTP/TR-590
OD - 265
YR - 2017
PC - 068182000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57D | Clinical Chemistry
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 44 | Health Care
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100959_a

124 - TOXLINE
TI - Rotary Kiln Gasification of Solid Waste for Base Camps.
AU - Cosper, S.
AD - U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Champaign United
States
AB - This project was undertaken to design and construct a battalion-scale
waste-to-energy (WTE) system based on the principle of gasification. This
system was designed to convert 1 to 3 tons per day of mixed wastes to
energy, with minimal pre-processing, and with a net-positive energy output
(net of parasitic losses). The size of the system should be limited to
two, 20-ft shipping containers. The rotary kiln WTE system was conceived
to address the following criteria: (1) to accept and process mixed,
unsorted municipal waste materials, (2) to minimize process energy
required through careful heat management and use of hydraulics, and (3) to
integrate into contingency utility systems by using standard diesel
generators.
KW - Solid wastes
KW - Waste management
KW - Generators
KW - Prototypes
KW - Power
KW - Synthetic fuels
KW - Army corps of engineers
KW - Rotary kiln
KW - Gasification
KW - Contingency base
KW - Wte(waste to energy)
KW - Syngas
RN - ERDC/CERL-TR-17-38
OD - 813
PR - WP-2211
YR - 2017
PC - 800218623
CT - 97K | Fuels
CT - 68C | Solid Wastes Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044597_a

125 - TOXLINE
TI - Methane Propulsion Elements for Mars.
AU - Percy, T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Polsgrove, T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Thomas, D.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AB - Human exploration beyond LEO relies on a suite of propulsive elements to:
(1) Launch elements into space, (2) Transport crew and cargo to and from
various destinations, (3) Provide access to the surface of Mars, (4)
Launch crew from the surface of Mars. Oxygen/Methane propulsion systems
meet the unique requirements of Mars surface access. A common
Oxygen/Methane propulsion system is being considered to reduce development
costs and support a wide range of primary &amp; alternative applications.
KW - *Manned space flight
KW - *Mars exploration
KW - *Methane
KW - *Oxygen
KW - *Propulsion
KW - *Propulsion system configurations
KW - *Propulsion system performance
KW - Cislunar space
KW - Cost reduction
KW - Cryogenic tanks
KW - Landing modules
KW - Launching
KW - Mars (manned reusable spacecraft)
KW - Mars surface
KW - Payloads
RN - M17-5956
OD - 16
YR - 2017
PC - 019043002
CT - 84 | Space Technology
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0004427_a

126 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Dioxathion (CAS No. 78-34-2).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - No toxicokinetic data on humans or animals and no case reports,
epidemiological studies, or repeated-dose, subchronic, or chronic toxicity
studies in animals were identified that evaluated the potential of
dioxathion to be absorbed through the skin or to cause systemic effects
following dermal exposure. Although a predictive model indicates that
dioxathion has low potential to be absorbed through the skin and be
systemically available, acute dermal toxicity studies in rats and rabbits
[Frawley et al. 1963; Gaines 1969] indicate that dioxathion is absorbed
through the skin, is systemically available, and can be fatal at low doses
following dermal exposure. No in vitro tests, case reports, or standard
skin irritation tests were identified that evaluated the potential of
dioxathion to produce direct effects on the skin. No diagnostic tests in
humans or predictive tests in animals were identified to adequately
evaluate the potential of dioxathion to cause skin sensitization.
Therefore, on the basis of these assessments, dioxathion is assigned a
composite skin notation of SK: SYS (FATAL). Table 3 summarizes the skin
hazard designations for dioxathion previously issued by NIOSH and other
organizations. The equivalent dermal designations for dioxathion,
according to the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for Classification and
Labelling of Chemicals, is Acute Toxicity Category 3 (Hazard statement:
Toxic in contact with the skin) [European Parliament 2008].
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Toxicology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - Skin absorption
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Dioxathion
KW - Mortality data
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 78-34-2
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-135
OD - 20
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102216_a

127 - TOXLINE
TI - Jet Fuel Exacerbated Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: Focus on Prediction of
Central Auditory Processing Dysfunction.
AU - Sterner, T. R.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Robinson, P. J.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Hack, C. E.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Qi, L.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Narayanan, L.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Law, S. T.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Covington, T. R.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Merrill, E. A.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Grobe, N.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Brown, D. N.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Mattie, D. R.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AB - Multiple laboratory rat studies link JP-8 jet fuel exposure to enhanced
noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Further, JP-8 jet fuel exposure, with
and without noise, has been found to result in central auditory system
dysfunctions in rats. Aircraft pilots, technicians and maintenance crews
have frequently shown increased hearing loss. The overall objective of
this project was to develop a multi-scale model, together with relevant
supporting experimental data, to describe jet fuel exacerbated noise
induced hearing loss.
KW - Pharmacokinetics
KW - Hearing loss
KW - Central nervous system
KW - Stress (physiology)
KW - Ear
KW - Brain
KW - Neural pathways
KW - Synapses
KW - Neurons
KW - Jet engine fuels
KW - Exposure (physiology)
KW - Aircraft noise
KW - Pharmacodynamics
KW - Models
KW - Jp-8 fuels
KW - Nihl(noise induced hearing loss)
RN - AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2017-0079
OD - 128
PR - H0FS
YR - 2017
PC - 118032000
CT - 57W | Stress Physiology
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043041_a

128 - TOXLINE
TI - Literature Review and OEM/Test House Interviews on Alternatives for
Determining Demerits of Vehicle Performance.
AU - Wellmann, T.
AD - Coordinating Research Council, Inc., Alpharetta, GA.
AB - The goal of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Project No.
CM-138-16-1, “Literature Review and OEM/Test House Interviews on
Alternatives for Determining Demerits of Vehicle Performance” was to
develop an understanding of current technology available to determine
vehicle driveability performance demerits using alternatives to human
trained evaluators. The results show that the evaluation of driveability
includes multiple aspects, with the transmission-related driveability as
one of main focus areas amongst the interviewees. Most of the participants
in this study (92.6 %) use a mix of objective and subjective evaluations
and none of them rely solely on objective methods to meet the requirements
for a production program. Objective evaluation tools benefit from the
large quantity of data around standard driveability maneuvers that can be
analyzed and easily compared. Further, driveability results are generally
more repeatable and not biased by subjective opinions. However, CRC Report
No. CM-138-16-1 objective tools are expensive and according to the
interviewees’ objective evaluations take on average approximately four
times longer than subjective evaluations (74 hours versus 18 hours).
Further, it was stated that objective tools often only rate specific
aspects and driving maneuvers, but currently do not give a full picture of
overall vehicle performance. Correlation between subjective impressions
and objective tools is very important for acceptance of the tools. In the
end, subjective evaluations trump objective measurements, when the two
ratings disagree. During the questionnaire it was stated that not all
possible driveability issues are currently covered by the existing tools.
Therefore, further customization and improvement of the tools regarding
items such as data management, detection of outliers, tool robustness, and
tool consistency, will be required. In summary, objective driveability
tools are well-established in the industry and these tools support
driveability evaluations with respect to improved repeatability and
documentation of results. Further, they can be used in combination with
optimization algorithms for achieving a satisfactory baseline vehicle
calibration in reasonable time. Since all experts (interviewed as part of
the survey) indicated that they do not rely solely on objective
driveability tools, a combination of subjective evaluations and objective
tools will continue to be utilized in the vehicle development process.
KW - Driveability
KW - Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR)
KW - Launch feel
KW - Performance feel
KW - Root Mean Square (RMS)
KW - Vibration Dose Value (VDV) of acceleration
KW - Maximum Transient Vibration Value ( MTVV)
KW - Acceleration Discontinuity (AD)
KW - Acceleration Hole (AH)
KW - Upshift Sportivity (UP)
KW - Automated Manual Transmission (AMT)
KW - Hybrid Electric Vehicles (HEV)
KW - Literature review
RN - CRC-CM-138-16-1
OD - 76
YR - 2017
PC - 116843000
CT - 49F | Power &amp; Signal Transmission Devices
CT - 97E | Electric Power Transmission
CT - 81B | Electric &amp; Ion Propulsion
CT - 85 | Transportation
CT - 91B | Transportation &amp; Traffic Planning
CT - 43G | Transportation
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100479_a

129 - TOXLINE
TI - Development of Predictive Models of Injury for the Lower Extremity,
Lumbar, and Thoracic Spine after discharge from Physical Rehabilitation.
AU - Rhon, D.
AD - The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, WA.
AB - Accomplishment Overview: Progress on this project has been excellent; we
narrowed the candidate list to two compounds (AN15380 and AN16458, Table
1), as planned at grant outset. At the end of grant-year1 we had
identified 4 compounds which met the candidate selection criteria
(AN15380, AN15551, AN14609, and AN15884, Table 2). Based on toxicity
findings and the short and efficient synthetic pathways of AN15380 and
AN16458, these two compounds were selected as pre-development candidates
(Table 3). AN15380 was synthesized at the 50 g scale and the synthesis of
AN16458 at the 50g scale was completed. Inhibition of the hERG channel by
AN15380 and AN16458 was low or absent. Based on the findings of strong
toxicity at low doses in the MTD studies with AN16458 work on this
molecule was suspended. We selected AN15380 to be tested in animal models
of PAH in the prevention and treatment modes. AN15380 reduced pulmonary
hypertension (PH). The Atlanta VA team has examined AN15380 in a pilot
hypoxia-induced PH study in mice, in the prevention mode. AN15380
administered orally at 30 mg/kg QD to mice reduced PH significantly by
78%, p < 0.0054 and pulmonary vessel wall thickness by 48%, p < 0.002.
There was no change in pulmonary arterial pressure in control normoxic
animals treated or not-treated with AN15380. However, some toxicity was
noted in the rat and mouse studies treated with 30 mg/kg. These toxicities
were also noted at lower concentrations of AN-15380 (0.3 and 3 mg/kg) in
both prevention and reversal models of hypoxia/Sugen induced PH. In
addition, toxicity at the lower concentrations occurred with minimal
impact on PH progression. In summary, while novel rho kinase inhibitors
were developed that met the proposed pharmacokinetic profiles, issues with
toxicity and efficacy preclude advancing these agents beyond preclinical
studies for the treatment of PH.
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Lower extremities
KW - Spine
KW - Rehabilitation
KW - Performance tests
KW - Predictive modeling
KW - Risk
KW - Military personnel
KW - Musculoskeletal system
KW - Lumbar
KW - Thoracic spine
KW - Physical rehabilitation
KW - Physical performance tests
KW - Return to duty
KW - Injury prevention
KW - Injury prediction
KW - Injury risk
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 118767000
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043174_a

130 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Morpholine (CAS No. 110-91-8).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - No toxicokinetic data were identified to evaluate the potential of
morpholine to be absorbed through the skin. However, data from an acute
dermal toxicity study in rabbits [Smyth et al. 1954] and from a short-term
dermal toxicity study in guinea pigs and rabbits [Shea 1939] are
sufficient to indicate that morpholine has the potential to be absorbed
through the skin, be systemically available and toxic, and cause liver,
kidney, and spleen effects following repeated exposure. Available studies
in animals indicate that undiluted morpholine is corrosive to the skin
[Shea 1939; Smyth 1954]. Results from a modified Buehler test suggest that
morpholine is not likely to cause skin sensitization but can cross-react
with structurally similar chemicals. Therefore, on the basis of these
assessments, morpholine is assigned a composite skin notation of SK:
SYS-DIR (COR). Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard designations for
morpholine previously issued by NIOSH and other organizations. The
equivalent dermal designation for morpholine, according to the Globally
Harmonized System (GHS) for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals,
is Acute Toxicity Category 4 (Harmful in contact with the skin) and Skin
Corrosion Category 1B (Causes severe skin burns and eye damage) [European
Parliament 2008].
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Toxicology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - Skin absorption
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Corrosives
KW - Morpholine
KW - Spleen disorders
KW - Kidney disorders
KW - Liver disorders
KW - Biological effects
KW - Chemical structure
KW - Health effects
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 110-91-8
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-137
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102218_a

131 - TOXLINE
TI - Mapping Heavy Vehicle Noise Source Heights for Highway Noise Analysis.
AU - Donavan, P. R.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. National Cooperative Highway
Research Program.
AU - Janello, C. J.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. National Cooperative Highway
Research Program.
AB - NCHRP Research Report 842 deals with two primary objectives: (1)
determining height distributions and spectral content for heavy vehicle
noise sources and (2) establishing and beginning development of an
extended heavy vehicle (truck and bus) noise source database for
incorporation into traffic noise models, including future versions of the
Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Transportation Noise Model (TNM)
acoustical code. To accomplish these objectives, the researchers
collected data by sampling commonly used heavy vehicles representing the
current national fleet across the country. The research used data
collection and analysis methods reflecting the current state of technology
in acoustic beamforming. Heavy vehicles (trucks and buses) are
significant contributors to overall traffic noise levels; noise from one
heavy truck is equivalent to noise from about 10 passenger cars.
Therefore, a thorough understanding of how heavy vehicles emit noise is
crucial to predicting and mitigating traffic noise.
KW - *Heavy vehicles
KW - *Noise pollution
KW - *Noise sources
KW - Mapping
KW - Height distributions
KW - Trucks
KW - Buses
KW - Traffic noise levels
KW - Data collection
KW - Acoustic beamforming
KW - *Transportation Noise Model (TNM) acoustical code
RN - TRB/NCHRP/RR-842
RN - ISBN-978-0-309-44618-1
RN - LCCCN-2017931040
OD - 267
YR - 2017
PC - 044780003
CT - 85H | Road Transportation
CT - 68B | Noise Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 88A | Operations &amp; Planning
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101729_a

132 - TOXLINE
TI - GENOMIC DIVERSITY AND THE MICROENVIRONMENT AS DRIVERS OF PROGRESSION IN
DCIS.
AU - Hwang, E. S.
AD - Duke Univ., Durham, NC.
AB - The project is designed to test whether genetic and/or tumor environmental
heterogeneity is a driving force in progression of breast DCIS. Our
project, a collaboration between Duke and ASU, has made substantial
progress on all 4 aims and we met our 36 month milestones. Primary
achievements for 36 months are: 1) Continued Case and control
identification (45 Pure DCIS and 36 adjacent DCIS with invasion) through
extensive database and searching at Duke 2) Deep and comprehensive full
exome sequencing for 32 cases from 30-160ng of DNA isolated from archival
FFPE specimens, 3) Comparison of analytic methods to characterize somatic
mutations from this full exome sequencing, 4) Application of sequencing
data for copy number assessment 5) Development of dual immune-staining on
DCIS lesions using 7 pairs of antibodies, 6) Imaging analysis of these
stains, including quantitative analysis, 7) Identification of upstaged
DCIS cases for the radiology aim, 8) Development of image analysis methods
for digital mammograms, 9) Validation Aim (4) approval of the Duke
IRB/TBCRC038 protocol at 12 sites, including DOD approval to initiate
collection of DCIS that either did or did not progress to invasive cancer,
10) Full integration of team members over the past year via frequent
conferencing, face to face meetings, and constant communication. This
multi-disciplinary progress puts our group into an ideal position to fully
implement the aims of the project and reach our year 4 goals.
KW - Cancer
KW - Breast
KW - Dcis(ductal carcinoma in situ)
KW - Cancer progression
KW - Intra-tumor heterogeneity
KW - Genetic diversity
KW - Phenotypic diversity
KW - Somatic evolution
KW - Microenvironment
KW - Mammographic biomarkers
OD - 21
YR - 2017
PC - 008097000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046997_a

133 - TOXLINE
TI - Role of Alveolar Macrophage Beta-2 Adrenergic Receptors in Acute Lung
Injury.
AU - Mutlu, G. M.
AD - Chicago Univ., IL.
AB - The overall goal of this project is to understand how beta2AR signaling in
macrophages contributes to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome, which is a
significant contributor to morbidity and mortality in military and
civilian settings. To achieve this goal, we proposed three specific aims.
In Aim 1, we proposed to determine whether beta2-agonists worsen influenza
A-induced lung injury via beta2ARs on tissue-resident and/or
monocyte-derived alveolar macrophages. In Aim 2, we aimed to investigate
whether IL-6 and/or recruitment of monocyte derived macrophages are
required for the effects of 2ARs activation on influenza A-induced lung
injury. In Aim 3, we proposed to determine whether inhibition of beta2ARs
attenuates age-related worsening of influenza A-induced acute lung injury.
In this reporting period, we confirmed that beta2ARs on monocytes and
macrophages are critical for influenza A virus-induced acute lung injury.
We developed and validated a method to clearly identify tissue resident
and monocyte-derived macrophages. Our findings suggest that recruited
monocyte derived, but not resident macrophages are responsible for the
influenza-induced acute lung injury. We also discovered that beta2AR
signaling in macrophages may regulate influenza-induced metabolic changes,
which are required for pro-inflammatory response against influenza
suggested by attenuation of inflammation with inhibitors of glycolysis
(Hk2) and carbonic anhydrase (Ca2).
KW - Lung
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Inflammation
KW - Influenza
KW - Viral pneumonia
KW - Macrophages
KW - Rna sequence analysis
KW - Metabolism
KW - Catecholamines
KW - Epinephrine
KW - Hk2(glycolysis)
KW - Ca2(carbonic anhydrase)
KW - Ards(acute respiratory distress syndrome)
KW - Pulmonary edema
KW - Albuterol
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 000917000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047444_a

134 - TOXLINE
TI - Neuroprotective Strategies for the Treatment of Blast-Induced Optic
Neuropathy.
AU - Rex, T. S.
AD - Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN.
AB - Traumatic optic neuropathy is a rare but devastating injury that can
result from blunt force or explosive blast. Presentation can be delayed by
weeks and patients can ultimately lose vision completely in the affected
eye. Unfortunately, in the military, bilateral injuries are more common.
We use a mouse model of closed globe trauma to induce indirect traumatic
optic neuropathy in order to test underlying mechanisms with the goal of
identifying therapies for this currently untreatable blinding condition.
We have identified that the IL-1 pathway is causative to the secondary
neurodegeneration after trauma. We have measured the release kinetics of
EPO-R76E packaged microparticles for intraocular delivery. We are
currently analyzing results from the galantamine treatment studies
including electroretinogram, visual evoked potential, and optical
coherence tomography. We detect no change in acetylcholine levels after
blast in our repeat injury model. This could suggest that the cholinergic
neurons are not particularly susceptible, or that there are important
molecular differences between single large blast and repeat lower blast
pressure injuries.
KW - Eye diseases
KW - Blast injuries
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Rgc(retinal ganglion cell)
KW - Traumatic optic neuropathy
KW - Inflammasome
KW - Epo(erythropoietin)
KW - Erg(electroretinogram)
KW - Vep(visual evoked potential)
KW - Il-1(interleukin-1)
KW - Ocular trauma
OD - 12
YR - 2017
PC - 015200000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043535_a

135 - TOXLINE
TI - Comparative Efficacy of the Masquelet versus Titanium Mesh Cage
Reconstruction Techniques for the Treatment of Large Long Bone
Deficiencies.
AU - Gugala, Z.
AD - The University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston United States
AU - Lindsey, R. W.
AD - The University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston United States
AB - The study comprises a single center, randomized, two-arm clinical trial
conducted at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation,
University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, with a primary
objective to assess and compare the functional outcome of patients with
large segmental bone defects reconstructed with the Masquelet technique
(MT) versus the titanium mesh cage technique (TMCT). The secondary
objectives include the radiographic determination of defect healing, andc
omparative assessment of cost and resource expenditures between the two
techniques. From 24 patients with segmental defects presented to our
institution throughout the entire trial period, 16 met the study
eligibility criteria and were successfully enrolled, and they include 9
MT, 7 TMCT. Within the last 12-month study period, 1 patient completed the
study, 9 are actively participating, and 1 was withdrawn.
KW - Medical research
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Bones
KW - Titanium
KW - Healing
KW - Therapy
KW - Infection
KW - Trauma
KW - Surgery
KW - Surgical mesh
KW - Bone defects
KW - Titanium mesh
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800219621
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048755_a

136 -
TOXLINE
TI -
RAN Translation as a Therapeutic in ALS.
AU -
Puglisi, J.
AD -
Leland Standford Junior University Stanford United States
AU -
Gitler, A.
AD -
Leland Standford Junior University Stanford United States
AB -
Repeat Associated, nonATG (RAN) translation likely plays a key role in ALS
disease etiology. Repeat expansionsare common, and lead to translation of
toxic repeating peptide products. Our project aims to define themechanisms
of RAN translation, and identify inhibitors of the process for therapeutic
intervention. Here we reportour results from year 1. We have achieved our
stated goals to define in vitro and in vivo systems to screen for
RANtranslation. We have shown that RAN translation can be detected in
vitro, and demonstrated the role of the 5 capin the process. We have
performed in vivo screens that have identified co-factors required for RAN
translation, andshowed that a key ribosomal protein, RpS25, is required
for RAN translation in patient-derived induced pluripotentstem cells. This
result suggests that RAN translation occurs via a non-traditional pathway
that can be selectivelyinhibited for treatment. Our results in year 1
provide the platform for screening efforts in year 2.
KW - Central nervous system diseases
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Detection
KW - Als(amyotrophic lateral sclerosis)
KW - Mnd(motor neurone disease)
KW - Ran translation
KW - Drug screens
KW - Assay development
OD - 12
YR - 2017
PC - 800222344
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050126_a

137 - TOXLINE
TI - Iron Status if Deployed Military Personnel.
AU - Wilson, C.
AD - 59 Medical Wing San Antonio United States
AB - This study provided insight into the iron status of deployed personnel.
Before the study was completed, researchers extrapolated that deployed
personnel at moderate altitude may experience ID/JOA at the same
prevalence as military personnel in training environments at moderate
altitude (Wilson &amp; Brothers, 2010). The incidence of ID was 13% in one
group of women at the start of BCT, 33% in a second group of women at the
end of BCT, and I0% in a group of women following permanent duty
assignment for a period of at least 6 months (McClung, et al, 2006). A
series of studies at U.S. Army BCT found that the prevalence of ID and JOA
in soldiers at the start of BCT was similar to the corresponding
demographic in the U.S. population, but increased immediately following
the training course (McClung &amp; Karl, et al, 2009). Among data
collected at USAFA (altitude 2210 m), between a third and a half of both
ma le and female recruits from sea level experienced ID within the first
few months of military service at altitude (Brothers, 2010). Our
finding that 6% of female military personnel experienced ID during
operational deployment is consistent with earlier reports that iron status
may be improved following completion of initial military training.
KW - Deployed personnel
RN - 17010
OD - 18
PR - N10-P20
YR - 2017
PC - 800219857
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1035553_a

138 - TOXLINE
TI - Roswell Park Cancer Institute/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars
Program.
AU - Huss, W.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AB - The Roswell Park/Howard University Prostate Cancer Scholars Program is
designed to encourage students from under-represented minority groups to
enter graduate training and ultimately careers in prostate cancer
research. The three-phased program combines elements of pre-internship
tele-mentoring, mentored summer research experience and post-internship
mentoring activities in order to: (1) inform a students decisions
regarding graduate training, (2) motivate the pursuit of prostate cancer
research with an emphasis in cancer health disparities and (3) support
successful entry, transition and retention into graduate training. Two
Howard University Honors Sophomore students and two Howard University
Junior students were accepted and enrolled in the program in PGY3. Both
Sophomore students are currently progressing through the preparatory
tele-mentoring phase of the program. One of these, optioned to conduct a
summer experience at the end of their Sophomore year in addition to the
required summer experience following her junior year as a result of
available funding and to maximize her research productivity. Four students
completed the 10 week summer experience in 2017 at Roswell Park Cancer
Institute. Three of the four students are scheduled to attend and present
their summers research at the Society for Basic Urologic Research (SBUR)
scientific conference in November.
KW - Minority groups
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Medical personnel
KW - Training
KW - Education
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Oncology
KW - Physicians
KW - Leadership
KW - Universities
KW - Howard university
KW - Roswell park cancer institute
KW - Tele-mentored directed readings
KW - Undergraduate summer research experience
OD - 31
YR - 2017
PC - 110835000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042619_a

139 - TOXLINE
TI -MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness.
AU -Bock, C.
AD -Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI.
AB -During this fourth year of the project, final DNA extraction (Task 1.b)
was completed. Activities were focused on miRNA extraction (Task 1.c) and
quantification (Task 4), which were completed at Exiqon. We evaluated
associations between plasma levels of miRNAs and prostate cancer
aggressiveness and submitted a manuscript describing the findings to the
peer-reviewed journal (Task 5.b).
KW - MicroRNA
KW - Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities
KW - Prostate cancer
OD - 9
YR - 2017
PC - 002798000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042501_a

140 - TOXLINE
TI - Map Projection Induced Variations in Locations of Polygon Geofence Edges.
AU - Neeley, P.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Narkawicz, A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AB - This Paper under-estimates answers to the following question under various
constraints: If a geofencing algorithm uses a map projection to determine
whether a position is inside/outside a polygon region, how far
outside/inside the polygon can the point be and the algorithm determine
that it is inside/outside (the opposite and therefore incorrect answer)?
Geofencing systems for unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) often model stay-in
and stay-out regions using 2D polygons with minimum and maximum altitudes.
The vertices of the polygons are typically input as latitude-longitude
pairs, and the edges as paths between adjacent vertices. There are
numerous ways to generate these paths, resulting in numerous potential
locations for the edges of stay-in and stay-out regions. These paths may
be geodesics on a spherical model of the earth or geodesics on the WGS84
reference ellipsoid. In geofencing applications that use map projections,
these paths are inverse images of straight lines in the projected plane.
This projected plane may be a projection of a spherical earth model onto a
tangent plane, called an orthographic projection. Alternatively, it may be
a projection where the straight lines in the projected plane correspond to
straight lines in the latitudelongitude coordinate system, also called a
Plate Carr´ee projection. This paper estimates distances between
different edge paths and an oracle path, which is a geodesic on either the
spherical earth or the WGS84 ellipsoidal earth. This paper therefore
estimates how far apart different edge paths can be rather than comparing
their path lengths, which are not considered. Rather, the comparision is
between the actual locations of the edges between vertices. For edges
drawn using orthographic projections, this maximum distance increases as
the distance from the polygon vertices to the projection point increases.
For edges drawn using Plate Carr´ee projections, this maximum distance
increases as the vertices become further from the equator. Distances
between geodesics on a spherical earth and a WGS84 ellipsoidal earth are
also analyzed, using the WGS84 ellipsoid as the oracle. Bounds on the 2D
distance between a straight line and a great circle path, in an
orthographically projected plane rather than on the surface of the earth,
have been formally verified in the PVS theorem prover, meaning that they
are mathematically correct in the absence of floating point errors.
KW - *Algorithms
KW - *Apexes
KW - *Edges
KW - *Great circles
KW - *Polygons
KW - *Longitude
KW - *Geodesic lines
KW - Unmanned aircraft systems
KW - Position (location)
KW - Estimates
KW - Mercator projection
KW - Floating point arithmetic
RN - L-20883
RN - NASA/TM-2017-219675
OD - 28
PR - WBS 411931-02-51-07-01
PR - WBS 999182.02.85.07.01
YR - 2017
PC - 019044001
CT - 51B | Aeronautics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0011116_a

141 - TOXLINE
TI - Local Inhibition of HSP90 to Prevent Intimal Hyperplasia after Balloon
Injury.
AU - Maier, K. G.
AD - State Univ. of New York Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse.
AB - Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remains a major threat to life and limb
and represents a disabling and potentially fatal condition in the aging
military and veteran population. Dyslipidemia is an important mechanism in
the pathogenesis of PAD and the development of restenosis secondary to
intimal hyperplasia (IH)after balloon angioplasty. IH is a complex process
that begins by platelet activation, platelets then bind to the area of
vascular injury releasing thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) and platelet derived
growth factor (PDGF). These in turn cause vascular smooth muscle (VSMC)
migration into the area of injury where they begin to proliferate and
produce extracellular matrix like hyaluronic acid (HyA). All of these
processes clearly contribute to IH by regulating the arterial response to
injury. Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is a molecular chaperone binds many
signaling proteins regulating their final maturation. HSP90 is
ubiquitously expressed and is important for normal cell function. However,
aberrant activation of HSP90 can result in increased cell migration and
proliferation. Inhibition of HSP90 has been in examined in states of
aberrant cell growth such as cancer. The quintessential HSP90 inhibitor is
the natural product geldanamycin, however, geldanamycin exhibits a
relatively high toxicity. Several derivatives of geldanamycin have been
created that have significantly less toxicity and are in clinical trials
for cancer therapy.
KW - Arteries
KW - Cardiovascular diseases
KW - Veterans(military personnel)
KW - Military medicine
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Hyperplasia
KW - Intimal hyperplasia
KW - Hsp90
KW - Heat shock protein 90
KW - Smooth muscle
KW - Microrna
OD - 9
YR - 2017
PC - 100853000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047437_a

142 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Secreted HSP Vaccine for Malaria Prophylaxis.
AU -
Strbo, N.
AD -
University of Miami Coral Gables United States
AB -
The innovative approach taken by our laboratory, relies on secreted
gp96-Ig chaperoning antigenic proteins that are efficiently taken up by
activated APCs and cross presented via MHC I to CD8 CTL, thereby
stimulating an avid, antigen specific, cytotoxic CD8 T cell response. Here
we developed malaria vaccine that relies on secreted gp96-Ig chaperoning
Plasmodium falciparum antigenic sporozoite proteins CSP and AMA1. The
generation of a powerful, cytotoxic anti sporozoiteCD8 CTL response by the
vaccine is expected to provide prophylactic immunity for malaria by
removing infected liver cells before sporozoites can replicate and spread
to the erythrocyte stage causing parasitemia. In the fourth year, we
completed all proposed mouse immunogenicity experiments that addressed the
effect of secondary 293-gp96-Ig PfAMA1-PfCSP immunization and induced
memory responses as well as we compared the immunogenicity of the
293-gp96-IgPfAMA1-PfCSP vaccine to the immunogenicity of
NMRC-M3V-D/Ad-PfCA vaccine. We found that gp96-Igvaccination provided
stronger antigen specific CD8 T cell responses in the liver and uterus
compared to NMRC vaccine. Since we have already completed manufacturing of
GMP-grade vaccine material, we are ready for non-human primate studies.
KW - Malaria
KW - Vaccines
KW - Infectious diseases
KW - Antigens
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Immunity
KW - Plasmodium falciparum
KW - Csp(circumsporozoite protein)
KW - Ama1(apical membrane antigen-1)
KW - Ama1 vaccine
KW - Heatshock proteins
KW - Gp96-ig
KW - Cytotoxic t cells
KW - Cell mediated immunity
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800218783
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1041551_a

143 - TOXLINE
TI - Disparities in Intratumoral Steroidogenesis.
AU - Freedland, S.
AD - Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA.
AB - The goal of these studies is to identify a biological origin underlying
the racial disparity in prostate cancer incidence and mortality and to
determine whether we can modulate this disparity by therapeutically
targeting elevated cholesterol. Prostate cancer disproportionately affects
African American men; they are more than 1.5 times as likely then
Caucasian men to develop prostate cancer and nearly 2.5 times as likely to
die of prostate cancer. The reasons for this racial disparity in prostate
cancer incidence and mortality are unknown but may stem from economic,
social, psychological and biological origins. In the current proposal we
hypothesize that one biological reason for the higher rates of prostate
cancer incidence and mortality in African Americans is that the level of
critical hormones that promote tumor growth (i.e. androgens e.g.
testosterone) and the enzymes that form them are elevated in the prostate
tumors of African American men. We further hypothesize that elevated
cholesterol, which is an essential component of androgen formation,
contributes to androgen formation in prostate tumors at a higher rate in
African American vs. Caucasian men. In this proposal we will examine the
prostates of men with prostate cancer (50 percent African American, 50
percent Caucasian) after surgery to remove the prostate and determine
whether there is a difference in testosterone and related androgens, as
well as the enzymes that create them in the prostates of African American
vs. Caucasian men.The second aspect of this proposal is to determine
whether we can reduce the levels of testosterone and related androgens and
slow the growth of prostate tumors. We have developed animal models that
permit us to determine the effects of elevated cholesterol on prostate
tumor growth.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Cholesterol
KW - Androgens
KW - Gene expression
KW - Racial disparity
KW - Radical prostatectomy
OD - 9
YR - 2017
PC - 005753000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047627_a

144 - TOXLINE
TI - Disparate Vitamin D Activity in the Prostate of Men with African Ancestry.
AU - Nonn, L.
AD - Illinois Univ., Chicago.
AB - African American (AA) men are disproportionally affected by prostate
cancer (PCa). AA men are not only at increased risk ofPCa compared to
American men of European descent (EA), but also are at the highest risk of
aggressive PCa and death fromPCa. Vitamin D3 deficiency increases PCa
mortality, highlighting the importance of maintaining adequate vitamin D3
status forprostate health. Vitamin D3 is acquired in the diet or via
UVB/sunlight-initiated synthesis in the skin. Cutaneous melaninabsorbs UVB
radiation, which leads to reduced vitamin D3 synthesis in darker pigmented
skin. Consequently, ~65 of AAmen are vitamin D3 deficient compared to ~20
of EA men. The level of skin pigmentation is correlated with the extent
ofAfrican ancestry and serum vitamin D3 status. Besides vitamin D3 status,
the activity of vitamin D3 is mediated by the vitaminD receptor (VDR) and
determined by several cytochrome P450 metabolism enzymes that
bioactivate/inactivate the active formof the hormone,
1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D).
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Vitamin D
OD - 23
YR - 2017
PC - 010383000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047164_a

145 - TOXLINE
TI - Optimizing Chemical-Vapor-Deposition Diamond for Nitrogen-Vacancy Center
Ensemble Magnetrometry.
AU - Alsid, S. T.
AD - MIT Lincoln Laboratory Lexington United States
AB - The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in diamond has emerged as a promising
platform for high- sensitivity, vector magnetic field detection and high
spatial resolution magnetic-field imaging due to its unique combination of
optical and spin properties. NV diamond magnetometry has enabled a wide
array of applications from the noninvasive measurement of a single neuron
action potential to the mapping &#120583;T-fields in &#120583;m-size
meteorite grains. To further improve the magnetic sensitivity of an
ensemble NV magnetometer, the growth and processing of the host diamond
must be taken into account. This thesis presents a systematic study of the
effects of diamond processing on bulk chemical-vapor-deposition diamond.
In particular, NV charge- state composition and spin decoherence times
are measured for diamonds irradiated with 1 MeV electrons at doses of 1
1015 5 1019 e−/cm2 and thermally annealed at temperatures of 850∘C
and 1250∘C. The study provides an optimal range for diamond processing
and shows the quenching of the NV center at high irradiation dosage from
the creation of additional vacancy-related defects.
KW - Nitrogen-Vacancy Center
KW - Optimizing Chemical-Vapor
OD - 125
YR - 2017
PC - 800219390
CT - 99 | Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1034647_a

146 - TOXLINE
TI - Improved Analysis Tool For Concrete Pavement.
AU - Tia, M.
AD - Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
AU - Kim, K.
AD - Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
AU - Han, S.
AD - Florida Univ., Gainesville. Dept. of Civil and Coastal Engineering.
AB - Improved 3-D finite element (FE) models were developed for analysis of (1)
precast prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP) with consideration of the
effects of longitudinal and transverse prestress forces, (2) jointed plain
concrete pavement (JPCP) containing RAP with incorporation of the actual
stress-strain characteristics of the concrete, (3) JPCP, which models
dowel bars with actual bar dimensions and properties, and (4) continuously
reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP), which analyzes the horizontal
cracking potential under environmental and traffic loading conditions.
Verification of the FE models was accomplished through comparison with
measured falling weight deflectometer (FWD) deflection basins and strain
data from test slabs. Parametric analyses on the effects of various design
parameters on the potential performance of the concrete pavements were
also conducted. A user-friendly interface software which prompts for user
inputs and generates an input file for the developed software was
developed for use in the analysis of JPCP. User-friendly guides were also
developed for input files for analysis of PPCP, JPCP, CRCP, and JPCP with
dowel joints. Various strain sensors were evaluated in the laboratory and
also in full-size concrete test slabs subjected to HVS loading. The
developed FE models were validated and recommended for use. Fiber optic
and electrical resistance strain gauge can be used to measure dynamic
strains in concrete slabs. Fiber optic and vibrating wire strain gauge can
be used to measure static and long-term strains in concrete slabs. It is
recommended that a series of 5 to 7 uniformly spaced strain gauges be
placed at and around the wheel path on the test slab in order to be able
to capture the location of the applied load and the maximum strain caused
by the applied load. The use of the critical stress-analysis and the
computed maximum stress-to-strength ratio to assess the potential
performance of concrete pavement slabs is recommended.
KW - *Concrete pavement
KW - 3-D finite-element model
KW - Precast prestressed concrete pavement (PPCP)
KW - Concrete containing RAP
KW - Continuously reinforced concrete pavement (CRCP)
KW - Fiber optic sensor
KW - Strain gauge
KW - Traffic loading conditions
RN - BDV31-977-30
OD - 541
YR - 2017
PC - 009327049
CT - 89C | Construction Management &amp; Techniques
CT - 89G | Construction Materials, Components, &amp; Equipment
CT - 50C | Construction Equipment, Materials, &amp; Supplies
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100755_a

147 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Heptachlor (CAS No. 76-44-8).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - No quantitative data on the dermal absorption kinetics of heptachlor were
identified. A mathematical model predicted heptachlor is not likely to be
absorbed through the skin. However, acute toxicity studies in rats [Gaines
1960, 1969] showed that the chemical has the potential to be absorbed
through the skin, systemically available, and toxic following acute dermal
exposure. No studies were identified that evaluated the potential of
heptachlor to be corrosive or irritating to the skin or be a skin
sensitizer. A structure- activity relationship model predicted heptachlor
to be negative for skin irritation, but a plausible skin sensitizer. Skin
sensitization potential predicted by the model highlights testing for this
endpoint as an important data gap. Therefore, on the basis of these
assessments, heptachlor is assigned a composite skin notation of SK: SYS.
Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard designations for heptachlor previously
issued by NIOSH and other organizations. The equivalent dermal designation
for heptachlor, according to the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of
Classification and Labelling of Chemicals, is Acute Toxicity Category 3
(Hazard statement: Toxic in contact with the skin) [European Parliament
2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Heptachlor
KW - *Health effects
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - In vivo studies
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Globally harmonized system(GHS)
KW - Carcinogenicity
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Skin sensitivity
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 76-44-8
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-186
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100169_a

148 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Tetraethyl Lead (TEL) (CAS No. 78-00-2).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Although the predictive mathematical model did not indicate that the
chemical can be absorbed through the skin, toxicokinetic [Kehoe and
Thamann 1931; Laug and Kunze 1948] and acute toxicity data indicate
tetraethyl lead demonstrated the ability to be absorbed through the skin
[Kehoe 1927] and has the potential to cause hyperglycemia, marked
reduction in body weight, porphyrinuria, and marked reduction in liver
function at high doses [Akatsura 1973]. No reliable information was
identified upon which to evaluate the potential of TEL to cause skin
irritation/corrosion or skin sensitization. Therefore, on the basis of
these assessments, TEL is assigned a composite skin notation of SK: SYS.
Table 3 summarizes the skin hazard designations for TEL previously issued
by NIOSH and other organizations. No dermal designation based on the
Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and Labelling of
Chemicals was identified for TEL [European Parliament 2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Tetraethyl lead
KW - *Health effects
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - In vivo studies
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Humans
KW - Systematic reviews
KW - Globally harmonized system(GHS)
KW - Mathematical models
KW - Blood sugar disorders
KW - Body weight
KW - Live function
KW - Porphyrins
KW - Urine
KW - Carcinogenicity
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 78-00-2
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-190
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100173_a

149 - TOXLINE
TI - Indigenous Amino Acids in Iron Meteorites.
AU - Elsila, J. E.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Dworkin, J. P.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Glavin, D. P.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Johnson, N. M.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AB - Understanding the organic content of meteorites and the potential delivery
of molecules relevant to the origin of life on Earth is an important area
of study in astrobiology. There have been many studies of meteoritic
organics, with much focus on amino acids as monomers of proteins and
enzymes essential to terrestrial life. The majority of these studies have
involved analysis of carbonaceous chondrites, primitive meteorites
containing approx. 3-5 wt% carbon. Amino acids have been observed in
varying abundances and distributions in representatives of all eight
carbonaceous chondrite groups, as well as in ungrouped carbonaceous
chondrites, ordinary and R chondrites, ureilites, and planetary
achondrites [1 and references therein].
KW - *Carbonaceous chondrites
KW - *Iron meteorites
KW - *Ureilites
KW - *Amino acids
KW - *Biological evolution
KW - *Exobiology
KW - *Life sciences
KW - *Abundance
KW - Meteorites
KW - Monomers
KW - Proteins
KW - Carbon
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN52492
OD - 2
YR - 2018
PC - 013129000
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\N18-0002011_a

150 - TOXLINE
TI - Gulf of Mexico OCS, Proposed Geological and Geophysical Activities:
Western, Central, and Eastern Planning Areas. Final Programmatic
Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1: Chapters 1-9.
AB - This Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the
potential significant environmental effects of multiple geological and
geophysical (G&amp;G) activities on the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Outer
Continental Shelf (OCS) in the Western, Central, and Eastern Planning
Areas (WPA, CPA, and EPA). It evaluates the types of G&amp;G surveys and
activities in the three program areas managed by the Bureau of Ocean
Energy Management (BOEM): oil and gas; renewable energy; and marine
minerals.
KW - *Gulf of Mexico
KW - *Outer Continetal Shelf (OCS)
KW - *Geophysical surveys
KW - *Environmental impact statments
KW - Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement(PEIS)
KW - Geological activities
KW - Environmental impact
KW - Biological assessment
KW - Renewable energy
KW - Marine minerals
KW - Oil
KW - *Outer Continental Shelf(OCS)
RN - OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2017-051-V1
OD - 792
YR - 2017
PC - 120312001
CT - 47E | Marine Geophysics &amp; Geology
CT - 48C | Natural Resource Surveys
CT - 48F | Geology &amp; Geophysics
CT - 68 | Environmental Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
CT - 57H | Ecology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100162_a

151 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Skin Notation (SK) Profile: Disulfoton (CAS No. 298-04-4).
AU - Hudson, N. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Dotson, G. S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - The available data in both humans and animals indicate that disulfoton is
absorbed through skin, is systemically available, acutely toxic and
potentially fatal following acute dermal exposure [Gaines 1969; Bayer AG
1978], and can cause cholinesterase inhibition following prolonged
exposure to the skin [Savage 1971; Wolfe et al. 1978]. Insufficient data
precludes the assessment of skin irritation and sensitization potential of
disulfoton. Therefore, on the basis of these assessments, disulfoton is
assigned a composite skin notation of SK: SYS (FATAL). Table 3 summarizes
the skin hazard designations for disulfoton previously issued by NIOSH and
other organizations. The equivalent dermal designations for disulfoton,
according to the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) of Classification and
Labelling of Chemicals, is Acute Toxicity Category 1 (Hazard statement:
Fatal in contact with the skin) [European Parliament 2008].
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Disulfoton
KW - *Health effects
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Acute toxicity
KW - Laboratory testing
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Animal studies
KW - Animals
KW - Kinetics
KW - Chemical kinetics
KW - Biological systems
KW - Dose response
KW - Dermal exposure
KW - In vivo studies
KW - Dermal absorption
KW - In vitro studies
KW - Lethal dose
KW - Humans
KW - Systematic reviews
KW - Toxic dose
KW - Fatalities
KW - Toxic effects
KW - Toxic materials
KW - Poisons
KW - Globally harmonized system(GHS)
KW - Carcinogenicity
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Chronic toxicity
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health(NIOSH)
KW - CAS No. 298-04-4
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-185
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
CT - 94D | Job Environment
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100168_a

152 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Biodrugs for the Treatment
of Acute Lung Injury.
AU - Giangrande, P. H.
AD - The University of Iowa Iowa City United States
AB - Extracellular (or circulating) histones have been proposed as the
causative agent of acute lung injury (ALI). The goal of this proposal is
to develop a therapeutic to neutralize (inactivate) circulating histones
and prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with multiple organ
dysfunction/acute respiratory distress syndrome (MODS/ARDS) and ALI that
can be easily delivered in combat and field situations. To accomplish this
goal, we developed novel bio-reagents (RNA aptamers) that bind to those
histones known to cause MODS/ARDS and ALI but do not bind to other
proteins or cells in blood. The RNA aptamers were evaluated for their
ability to inhibit histone-mediate 1. cytotoxicity, 2. platelet
aggregation, 3. TLR activation and 4. calcium influx. In this report, we
provide evidence for the in vitro efficacy of three individual RNA
aptamers (KU5, KU7 and KU9). Future efforts will focus on evaluating
safety and in vivo efficacy of the aptamers in murine models of ALI.
Finally, the levels of circulating histones will also be quantitated in
samples from ALI patients.
KW - Proteins
KW - Lung
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Drugs
KW - Ribonucleic acids
KW - Inhibition
KW - Toxicity
KW - Ali (acute lung injury)
KW - Ards (acute respiratory distress syndrome)
KW - Extracellular histones
KW - Circulating histones
KW - Rna biodrugs
KW - Rna (ribonucleic acids)
KW - Mods (multiple organ dysfunction syndrome)
KW - Rna aptamers
KW - Cytotoxicity
KW - Platelet aggregation
KW - Tlr activation
KW - Calcium influx
KW - Ku5
KW - Ku7
KW - Ku9
OD - 29
YR - 2017
PC - 800220554
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046378_a

153 - TOXLINE
TI - Role of Lifestyle Factors in Ovarian Cancer Prognosis.
AU - Koushik, A.
AD - Centre Hospitalier de lUniversit de Montral Montreal, Quebec Canada
AU - Faraj, N.
AD - Centre Hospitalier de lUniversit de Montral Montreal, Quebec Canada
AU - Lacaille, J.
AD - Centre Hospitalier de lUniversit de Montral Montreal, Quebec Canada
AB - The primary aims of this study are to evaluate associations between
ovarian cancer recurrence and of each of the following:(1) physical
activity, (2) healthy diet, (3) vitamin D exposure, (4) smoking, and (5)
alcohol intake, as well as to estimate the post-diagnosis prevalence of
participation in these lifestyle behaviours among ovarian cancer patients.
Over the last year, we actively recruited participants in the three
hospital sites indicated in the proposal. We have found that, overall,
recruitment rates are lower than expected based on the information at hand
when the study was designed. This is being resolved with no impact on the
budget through an increased duration of recruitment
KW - Ovarian cancer
KW - Exercise (physiology)
KW - Diet
KW - Vitamin d
KW - Tobacco smoking
KW - Alcohol consumption
KW - Patients
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Survivability
KW - Physical fitness
KW - Lifestyle
KW - Post-diagnosis
KW - Recruitment rate
KW - High grade ovarian cancer
KW - Recurrence
KW - Cohort
KW - Survivorship
KW - Physical activity
KW - Sun exposure
KW - Post diagnosis exposure
OD - 10
YR - 2017
PC - 800222271
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048791_a

154 - TOXLINE
TI - Sinking of US Cargo Vessel SS El Faro, Atlantic Ocean, Northeast of
Acklins and Crooked Island, Bahamas, October 1, 2015.
AB - On Thursday, October 1, 2015, the SS El Faro, a 40-year-old cargo ship
owned by TOTE Maritime Puerto Rico and operated by TOTE Services, Inc.,
was on a regular route from Jacksonville, Florida, to San Juan, Puerto
Rico, when it foundered and sank in the Atlantic Ocean about 40 nautical
miles northeast of Acklins and Crooked Island, Bahamas. The ship had
sailed directly into the path of Hurricane Joaquin, carrying a crew of 33,
including 5 Polish contract repair workers. All those aboard perished in
the sinking. As part of its accident investigation, the National
Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) led a joint effort with the US Navy,
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and the National Science Foundation
to locate the ship’s wreckage and retrieve its voyage data recorder
(VDR). The VDR was pulled from 15,250 feet below the ocean surface in
August 2016 during the third undersea mission and yielded more than 26
hours of parametric data and audio files. The NTSB’s accident
investigation identified the following safety issues: captain’s actions,
use of noncurrent weather information, late decision to muster the crew,
ineffective bridge resource management, inadequate company oversight,
company’s safety management system, flooding in cargo holds, loss of
propulsion, downflooding through ventilation closures, need for damage
control plan, and lack of appropriate survival craft. The NTSB made safety
recommendations to the US Coast Guard; the Federal Communications
Commission; the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; the
International Association of Classification Societies; the American Bureau
of Shipping; Furuno Electric Company, Ltd.; and TOTE Services, Inc.
KW - *Marine accident report
KW - *Sinking vessels
KW - *Cargo vessels
KW - Accident investigation
KW - Ship wreckage
KW - Voyage data recorders
KW - Safety issues
KW - Bridge resource management
KW - Cargo holds
KW - Propulsion
KW - Survival craft
RN - NTSB/MAR-17-01
OD - 299
YR - 2017
PC - 022327000
CT - 85G | Marine &amp; Waterway Transportation
CT - 47A | Marine Engineering
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 85D | Transportation Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100342_a

155 - TOXLINE
TI - Mechanisms and Treatment of Deployment-Related Lung Injury: Repair of the
Injured Epithelium.
AU - Downey, G. P.
AD - National Jewish Health Denver United States
AB - Since 2001, more than 2.8 million military personnel, DoD contractors, and
US government and NGO employees supporting the war effort have been
deployed to Southwest Asia. They have been exposed to a variety of
hazardous conditions during deployment including direct physical lung
injury from explosions as well as chronic exposures from inhalation of
airborne PM and other harmful chemicals, including smoke from burn pits,
sand, and geogenic dust containing potentially toxic metals such as
titanium, cadmium, aluminum, and lead.Exposure to cigarette smoke is an
additional risk factor for respiratory disease in these individuals.
Consequently,mounting evidence demonstrates that military personnel
returning from Southwest Asia have increased rates of respiratory symptoms
compared to non-deployed military personnel.
KW - Deployment-Related Lung Injury
KW - Titanium
KW - Cadmum
KW - Aluminum
OD - 42
YR - 2017
PC - 800222098
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
CT - 71N | Nonferrous Metals &amp; Alloys
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046095_a

156 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2016-0232-3285, August 2017.
Evaluation of Lead Exposure at an Indoor Law Enforcement Firing Range.
AU - Grant, M.
AD -National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU -Eisenberg, J.
AD -National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU -Methner, M.
AD -National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB -The Health Hazard Evaluation Program received a request from the employer
at a federal law enforcement indoor firing range who was concerned about
lead exposure among firearms instructors. This range used frangible and
nonfrangible (duty) ammunition. Duty ammunition contained mostly lead,
while frangible ammunition contained mostly copper and some zinc. During
our evaluation, HHE Program investigators observed work practices,
including shooting, cleaning firearms, range hygiene, and range cleanup.
We measured (1) airborne exposures to lead, (2) lead on employees' hands
and footwear when leaving the range, (3) employees' blood lead levels, and
(4) lead, copper, and zinc concentrations on surfaces inside and outside
the range. HHE Program investigators evaluated ventilation system
performance. We interviewed firearms instructors about work history and
practices, lead-related medical history, and recreational lead exposure
sources. We found lead in the air, but below occupational exposure limits.
Lead was found on all surfaces tested including instructors' skin and
footwear. Copper and zinc were also found on tested surfaces. All
instructors had detectable blood lead levels, some > 5 micrograms per
deciliter, which NIOSH defines as elevated according to its surveillance
case definition. The ventilation system was not performing according to
NIOSH recommendations. Instructors and shooters used dry sweeping methods
to remove lead-dust and lead-dust contaminated objects. All instructors
wore their work clothes and shoes home. To improve the safety and health
of firing range instructors and shooters, we recommended the employer (1)
hire a firing range ventilation specialist for all range ventilation
maintenance, including testing and balancing the ventilation system; (2)
start a lead exposure monitoring program; (3) use wet cleaning methods;
and (4) provide no-slip style disposable shoe covers, lockers for street
clothes and work clothes, and on-site laundry service.
KW - *Law enforcement
KW - *Lead
KW - *Lead exposure
KW - Indoor firing ranges
KW - Law enforcement workers
KW - Lead dust
KW - Lead fumes
KW - Copper
KW - Copper dust
KW - Copper fumes
KW - Zinc
KW - Work practices
KW - Ventilation
KW - Ventilation systems
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2016-0232-3285
OD - 42
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 71N | Nonferrous Metals &amp; Alloys
CT - 48A | Mineral Industries
CT - 94E | Environmental Engineering
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100067_a

157 - TOXLINE
TI - Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Report for New York: Two
Construction Workers Fatally Crushed when Cement Formwork Collapsed,
FACE-13-NY-080.
AB - On December 2, 2013, a 53-year-old construction laborer (Victim I) and a
50-year-old concrete pump operator (Victim II) suffered fatal crushing
injuries when formwork collapsed during concrete placement at a
construction site. The concrete piece being constructed was an aqueduct
mockup. On the morning of the incident, the workers were pouring concrete
to form the left and right buttress sections and the buttress formwork on
the right side collapsed. The right buttress formwork had a retaining wall
that was composed of a lower vertical face and an upper inclined face. At
the time of the incident, Victim I and Victim II were working from a
platform abutting the retaining wall. At around 12:30 pm when the freshly
poured concrete was approximately 10 feet high, workers heard loud
thudding noises as the retaining wall and the work platform collapsed. A
911 call was placed immediately and EMTs arrived at the site within
minutes. Victim 1 was trapped underneath the formwork and pronounced dead
on the scene. Victim II was also trapped underneath the formwork but
rescued by other workers who used a forklift to lift the formwork to free
him. Victim II died in a hospital nine days later from crushing injuries.
Post incident investigations identified several discrepancies between what
the formwork design specified and how the formwork was constructed. The
formwork deviated from the design specifications in the type, size, and
number of anchors to be installed. Pipe braces and hold-down brackets
indicated on the drawings were not installed. The formwork did not have
adequate capacity to resist the horizontal fluid forces and lacked any
mechanism to resist the uplift force on the formwork during concrete
placement. The formwork failed due to a combination of mechanisms
including formwork uplift followed by wash-out of the wood base platform,
vertical drop and collapse of the support wall, and shear/tension failure
of the anchoring system.
KW - *Traumatic injuries
KW - *Fatalities
KW - *Concretes
KW - Accident analysis
KW - Accident prevention
KW - Accidents
KW - Injuries
KW - Injury prevention
KW - Safety education
KW - Safety practices
KW - Safety programs
KW - Work environment
KW - Work practices
KW - Case studies
KW - Mortality data
KW - Construction
KW - Construction equipment
KW - Construction materials
KW - Construction workers
KW - Collapse zones
KW - Equipment design
KW - Failure analysis
KW - Industrial design
KW - Anchoring
KW - Structural design
KW - Structural failure
KW - Load monitoring
KW - Quality assurance
KW - Job analysis
KW - Hazards
KW - Structural engineering
KW - *Fatility Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE)
KW - *New York
RN - FACE-13-NY-080
OD - 13
YR - 2017
PC - 020289000
CT - 94D | Job Environment
CT - 94H | Industrial Safety Engineering
CT - 41I | Job Environment
CT - 89G | Construction Materials, Components, &amp; Equipment
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100073_a

158 - TOXLINE
TI - Primary Blast Injury Criteria for Animal/Human TBI Models using Field
Validated Shock Tubes.
AU - Rama Rao, K. V.
AD - New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark United States
AU - Skotak, M.
AD - New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark United States
AU - Chandra, N.
AD - New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark United States
AB - Blast-induced Traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is a leading cause of
morbidity in soldiers on the battlefield and training sites with long-term
neurological and psychological pathologies. We evaluated the extent of
lung injuries, major pathological sequelae, including oxidative stress,
neuroinflammation and BBB damage, supplemented by characterization of
proteome changes in hippocampus and cortex in an animal model of single
primary blast TBI. Three blast overpressures, 130, 180 and 240 kPa, were
used for these studies and evaluation was performed at three time points:
0, 4 and 24 hours post injury. Spatiotemporal patterns of oxidative stress
were examined using two isoforms NADPH oxidase 1 and 2 (NOX1, NOX2),
superoxide and 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE) protein adducts. Gross protein
changes were evaluated via Western blot, followed by immunofluorescence
signal quantification performed on entire coronal sections. One of the
major findings is differential regional and cellular distribution of
injury markers. Expression of NOX isoforms displayed: NOX1 is increased in
hippocampus and thalamus, whereas in the frontal cortex the NOX2
expression reached the highest levels. Cell-specific analysis revealed
NOX1 and NOX 2 levels were significantly higher in neurons compared to
astrocytes and microglia. These results demonstrate uniform pressure
loading results in differential pathological response, which depends on
the local tissue composition, and the response is to insult depends upon
the cell type.
KW - Brain injuries
KW - Blast injuries
KW - Btbi(blast induced traumatic brain injury)
KW - Blast induced neurotrauma
KW - Neuroinflammation
KW - Oxidative stress
KW - Neuroproteomics
KW - Bop(blast overpressure)
KW - Blood-brain barrier
OD - 30
YR - 2017
PC - 800218869
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046531_a
159 - TOXLINE
TI - Using Frozen Barriers for Containment of Contaminants.
AU - Wagner, A. M.
AD - Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management Washington
United States
AU - Yarmak Jr., E.
AD - Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management Washington
United States
AB - In the summer of 2011, a full-scale test of a frozen soil barrier was
deployed at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory site in
Fairbanks, AK. Hybrid thermosyphons, a more efficient cooling technology
than conventional ground freezing, were used to create the frozen soil.
The hybrid units were actively cooled by a 4.5 kilowatt refrigeration
condensing unit for 62 days. A vertical frozen barrier of 9 meters (m)
extending from a depth of 7 m below the surface to the ground surface was
completed in 42 days, and the barrier was 1 m thick in 48 days. This
frozen barrier installation has successfully shown that this technology
can freeze the ground quickly. At the end of winter 2012, the barrier was
approximately 3.8 m thick. This barrier thickness was maintained
throughout the summer of 2012. The results showed only the top 0.5 m
thawed even though the system was inactive for approximately a year. A
cost analysis was performed to compare the cost of frozen barriers and
slurry walls. It was concluded that construction and operating and
maintenance costs of frozen barriers are on par with other barrier
systems.
KW - Contaminants
RN - ERDC/CRREL TR-17-14
OD - 56
PR - FY12-55
YR - 2017
PC - 800221394
CT - 57O | Pathology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1039597_a

160 - TOXLINE
TI - Characterization of in vitro phenotypes of pathogenic Burkholderia strains
isolated from infected mice.
AU - Welkos, S.
AD - ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FORT DETRICK MD FORT
DETRICK
AU - Cote, C. K.
AD - ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FORT DETRICK MD FORT
DETRICK
AU - Amemiya, K.
AD - ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FORT DETRICK MD FORT
DETRICK
AU - Waag, D.
AD - ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FORT DETRICK MD FORT
DETRICK
AU - Klimko, C. P.
AD - ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FORT DETRICK MD FORT
DETRICK
AU - Bernhards, R. C.
AD - ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FORT DETRICK MD FORT
DETRICK
AU - Worsham, P. L.
AD - ARMY MEDICAL RESEARCH INST OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES FORT DETRICK MD FORT
DETRICK
AB - Burkholderia pseudomallei (Bp) and B. mallei (Bm), the agents of
melioidosis and glanders respectively, are Tier 1 biothreats. They infect
humans and animals, causing disease ranging from acute and fatal to
protracted and chronic. Chronic infections are especially challenging to
treat, and the identification of in vitro phenotypic markers which signal
progression of an acute to a more persistent infection would be
beneficial. A three-stage phenotyping strategy was developed employing
colony morphotyping, chemical sensitivity testing, and macrophage
infection and LPS fingerprint analyses to distinguish Burkholderia
strains. Different strains of Bp often exhibited greater colony
heterogeneity, more resistance to environmental and host stresses, and
greater macrophage survival and cytotoxicity than Bm strains. Mouse spleen
isolates of Bp or Bm collected 3-180 days after infection were analyzed.
KW - Biological warfare agents
KW - Mice
KW - Infection
KW - Bacterial infections
KW - Gram-negative bacterial infections
KW - Burkholderia
KW - Glanders
KW - Melioidosis
KW - Mouse
KW - Spleen isolates
KW - Biothreats
KW - Bacterial threat agents
RN - TR-17-131
OD - 59
PR - CCAR-CB3846 PPE-1 Burkholderia
YR - 2017
PC - 800220633
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 74D | Chemical, Biological, &amp; Radiological Warfare
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1035800_a

161 - TOXLINE
TI - Sustainability Logistics Basing - Science and Technology Objective -
Demonstration; Demonstration #1 - 50 Person Camp Demo.
AU - Benasutti, P. B.
AD - ARMY NATICK SOLDIER RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER MA NATICK
United States
AU - Harris, W. F.
AD - ARMY NATICK SOLDIER RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER MA NATICK
United States
AU - Krutsch, M. C.
AD - ARMY NATICK SOLDIER RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER MA NATICK
United States
AU - Miletti, J. A.
AD - ARMY NATICK SOLDIER RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER MA NATICK
United States
AB - During the period from 29 September - 17 October 2014, the U. S. Army
Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center (NSRDEC)
collected data on technologies related to the objectives of the SLB-STO-D
at the Base Camp Integration Laboratory (BCIL), Fort Devens, MA. The goal
of the SLB-STO-D is to demonstrate through operationally relevant field
experimentation and subsequent analysis that emerging materiel solution
technologies and associated non-materiel solutions can reduce the need for
fuel resupply by 25 , for water resupply by 75 , and for waste removal by
50 , while maintaining or improving the quality of life at expeditionary
base camps in the size range of 50-1000 personnel. The SLB-STO-D is using
modeling and simulation, closely integrated with field demonstrations, to
show fuel, water, and waste savings attributed to these technologies.
Technologies demonstrated in Demo 1 at the BCIL include: Expedient
Shelters with Non-woven Composite Insulation Liner (LINER); 1kWe JP-8
Fueled, Man-Portable GenSet (MANGEN); Renewable Energy for Distributed
Under-supplied Command Environments (REDUCE); and Bidirectional Onboard
Vehicle Power/Tactical Vehicle-to-Grid Module (OBVP/TV2GM). This Technical
Report documents the objectives, technologies, methods, and results of the
Demonstration 1 venue at the BCIL.
KW - Environmental management
KW - Model based systems engineering
KW - Renewable energy
KW - Energy consumption
KW - Battery chargers
KW - Electrical loads
KW - Manportable equipment
KW - Wireless sensor networks
KW - Logistics
KW - Electrical grids
KW - Solar energy
KW - Fuel consumption
KW - Fuel tanks
KW - Measurement
KW - Solid waste
KW - Simulations
KW - Environmental. electric power
KW - Sustainment
KW - Waste management
KW - Insulation
KW - Waste water
KW - Feedback
KW - Bcil(base camp integration laboratory)
KW - Tecd(technology enhanced capability demonstration)
KW - Reduced footprint
KW - Waste disposal
KW - Waste water
KW - Contingency basing
KW - Modeling and simulation
KW - Gensets
KW - Fuel demand reduction
KW - Savings
RN - NATICK/TR-17/022
OD - 93
PR - D.SDR.2015.41
YR - 2017
PC - 800219214
CT - 97I | Electric Power Production
CT - 68C | Solid Wastes Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1039162_a

162 - TOXLINE
TI - Role of Inflammation in Development of Alzheimer's Disease Following
Repetitive Head Trauma.
AU - Lamb, B. T.
AD - Indiana University Indianapolis United States
AB - Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects approximately 3.8 million people
annually and costs the US more than $48 million. Furthermore, TBI has
become an increasingly common feature of modern military conflicts. It has
been estimated that in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts following the
terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the rate of TBI in military
populations has dramatically increased to upwards of 10-20% of those
serving, with over 250,000 soldiers exposed to some form of TBI (Source;
DoD). The long-term consequences of TBI are multifaceted and include
increased risk for AD. To date, mechanisms linking TBI to AD remain
unclear. One of the earliest hallmark features of TBI is
neuroinflammation, which is defined as the brains innate immune response.
Post-injury neuroinflammation includes activation of brain resident
microglia, infiltration of peripheral monocytes due to disruption of the
blood-brain barrier, and high level production of pro- and
anti-inflammatory molecules. Although this initial response is thought to
promote repair following TBI, exaggerated or persistent neuroinflammation
can be detrimental. For example, TBI can trigger progressive
neurodegeneration, brain atrophy, neuronal loss, and axonal degeneration
for months to years after the initial insult and these events are often
associated with neuroinflammation. We hypothesize that the TBI-induced
neuroinflammatory response is critical in mediating AD-related pathology
and specific inflammatory proteins can be used as post-injury biomarkers.
KW - Inflammation
KW - Brain injuries
KW - Trauma
KW - Alzheimer disease
KW - Monocytes
KW - Proteins
KW - Biological markers
KW - Pathology
KW - Macrophages
KW - Cytokines
KW - Neurons
KW - Magnetic resonance imaging
KW - Positron emission tomography
KW - Gene expression
KW - Cognitive impairment
KW - Tbi (traumatic brain injuries)
KW - Ad (alzheimer disease)
KW - Neuroinflammation
KW - Microglia
KW - Neurodegeneration
KW - Mapt pathology
KW - Trem2 protein
KW - Immunity
KW - Mri (magnetic resonance imaging)
KW - Pet (positron emission tomography)
KW - Csf (cerebral spinal fluid)
KW - Trem2 (triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2)
KW - Mci (mild cognitive impairment)
KW - Tau
KW - Moca (montreal cognitive assessment)
OD - 30
PR - 0010706781-0002
YR - 2017
PC - 800218346
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048787_a
163 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Observational Signatures of Magnetic Reconnection in the Extended Corona.
AU -
Savage, S.
AD -
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
AU -
West, M. J.
AD -
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
AU -
Seaton, D. B.
AD -
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
AU -
Kobelski, A.
AD -
NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
AB -
Observational signatures of reconnection have been studied extensively in
the lower corona for decades, successfully providing insight into energy
release mechanisms in the region above post-flare arcade loops and below
1.5 solar radii. During large eruptive events, however, energy release
continues to occur well beyond the presence of reconnection signatures at
these low heights. Supra-Arcade Downflows (SADs) and Supra-Arcade
Downflowing Loops (SADLs) are particularly useful measures of continual
reconnection in the corona as they may indicate the presence and path of
retracting post-reconnection loops. SADs and SADLs have been faintly
observed up to 18 hours beyond the passage of corona mass ejections
through the SOHO/LASCO field of view, but a recent event from 2014 October
14 associated with giant arches provides very clear observations of these
downflows for days after the initial eruption. We report on this unique
event and compare these findings with observational signatures of magnetic
reconnection in the extended corona for more typical eruptions.
KW - *Coronal mass ejection
KW - *Coronal loops
KW - *Magnetic field reconnection
KW - *Magnetic flux
KW - *Solar corona
KW - *Solar magnetic field
KW - Field of view
KW - Height
KW - High temperature plasmas
KW - Radii
KW - Signatures
RN - MSFC-E-DAA-TN42749
OD - 1
YR - 2017
PC - 800128512
CT - 54C | Astrophysics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007468_a

164 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeting Extracellular Histones with Novel RNA Bio drugs for the
Treatment of Acute Lung Injury.
AU - Miller, F. J.
AD - Duke University Durham United States
AB - Extracellular (or circulating) histones have been proposed as the
causative agent of acute lung injury (ALI). The goal of this proposal is
to develop a therapeutic to neutralize(inactivate) circulating histones
and prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with multiple organ
dysfunction/acute respiratory distress syndrome (MODS/ARDS) and ALI that
can be easily delivered in combat and field situations. To accomplish this
goal, we developed novel bio-reagents (RNA aptamers) that bind to those
histones known to cause MODS/ARDS and ALI but do not bind to other
proteins or cells in blood. The RNA aptamers were evaluated for their
ability to inhibit histone-mediate 1. cytotoxicity, 2. platelet
aggregation, 3. TLR activation and 4. calcium influx. In this report, we
provide evidence for the in vitroefficacy of three individual RNA aptamers
(KU5, KU7 and KU9). Future efforts will focus on evaluating safety and in
vivo efficacy of the aptamers in murine models of ALI. Finally, the levels
of circulating histones will also be quantitated in samples from ALI
patients.
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Lung
KW - Respiratory system
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Military medicine
KW - Proteins
KW - Rna
KW - Toxicity
KW - Exposure (physiology)
KW - Infection
KW - Burns
KW - Ali(acute lung injuries)
KW - Ards(acute respiratory distress syndrome)
KW - Extracellular histones
KW - Circulating histones
KW - Histones
OD - 26
YR - 2017
PC - 800218493
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046380_a

165 - TOXLINE
TI - Pathomechanics of Post-Traumatic OA Development in the Military Following
Articular Fracture.
AU - Rivera, J. C.
AD - The Geneva Foundation Tacoma United States
AB - The objective of the proposed research is to develop new models for
predicting the risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) following
intra-articular fracture (IAF). Aim 1, pursued this year, involved
evaluating pre- and post-treatment CT data from patients with
combat-related IAFs to measure fracture severity and post-reduction
contact stress exposure. This study is being conducted in collaboration
with the University of Iowa (PI: Donald Anderson, PhD) who is conducting
these calculations on patients identified at the U.S. Army Institute of
Surgical Research. IRB and HRPO approval has been obtained at both sites.
Ongoing screening of potential subjects identified through the Department
of Defense Trauma Registry has resulted in 64 fractures transferred and
studied by the U of Iowa. Our partners at the U of Iowa continue to work
on related efforts in civilian trauma patients to refine the measuring
techniques. The military subjects pose some unique challenges in terms of
injury severity but we remain confident that our collaborators skill in
imaging analysis will remain successful as we study our military patients.
KW - Trauma
KW - Arthritis
KW - Computerized tomography
KW - Military medicine
KW - Surgery
KW - Bone fractures
KW - Signs and symptoms
KW - Ptoa (post-traumatic osteoarthritis)
KW - Ct-based analysis
KW - Iaf (intra-articular fractures)
KW - Ct (computerized tomography)
KW - Pathomechanics
KW - Fracture reduction surgery
KW - Quality of life
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800218385
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048792_a

166 - TOXLINE
TI - Developing a PTEN-ERG Signature to Improve Molecular Risk Stratification
in Prostate Cancer.
AU - Lotan, T.
AD - John Hopkins University Baltimore United States
AB - Based on previous work and our own preliminary data, it is clear that
there exist distinctive molecular correlates of PTEN loss in the context
of ETS-negative versus ETS-positive human prostate cancers and that these
may drive prognosis following PTEN loss. Ultimately, elucidation of the
molecular underpinnings of PTEN-ERG crosstalk holds promise for clarifying
the mechanisms underlying the aggressive behavior seen in
ERG-negative/PTEN-negative tumors, and may enable rational design of more
effective therapeutic strategies and prognosticators for this subset of
patients. We propose to test two hypotheses generated by our preliminary
data: 1) PTEN loss in the absence of ETS gene expression is associated
with an increased proliferative rate and a significantly increased risk of
metastasis and death; and 2) ETS expression interacts with PTEN loss to
modulate the transcriptional output from key oncogenic transcription
factors such as MYC. Here we report on the initial studies performed for
this award.
KW - Molecular Risk Stratification
KW - Prostate cancer
OD - 10
YR - 2017
PC - 800219043
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046109_a

167 - TOXLINE
TI - Roller Compacted Concrete over Soil Cement under Accelerated Loading.
AU - Wu, Z.
AD - Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge. Dept. of Civil and Environmental
Engineering.
AU - Rupnow, T.
AD - Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge. Dept. of Civil and Environmental
Engineering.
AU - Mahdi, M. I.
AD - Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge. Dept. of Civil and Environmental
Engineering.
AB - In this study, six full-scale APT pavement sections, each 71.7 ft. long
and 13 ft. wide, were constructed at the LTRC’s Pavement Research
Facility (PRF) using normal pavement construction procedures. The test
sections include three RCC thicknesses (4 in., 6 in., and 8 in.) and two
base designs: a 150 psi unconfined compressive strength (UCS) cement
treated soil base with a thickness of 12 in. and a 300 psi UCS soil cement
base with a thickness of 8.5 in. over a 10 in. cement treated subgrade. A
heavy vehicle load simulation device (ATLaS30) was used for APT loading.
In situ pavement testing, instrumentation, and crack-mapping were employed
to monitor the load-induced pavement responses and pavement cracking
performance. The APT results generally indicated that a thin RCC pavement
(thickness of 4 to 6 in.) would eventually have a structurally fatigue
cracking failure under the repetitive traffic and environmental loading
due to a combined effect of pavement cracking and pumping. The visible
cracks first showed up on pavement surface as a single or several fine
cracks along the longitudinal traffic direction within the wheel paths.
The longitudinal cracks were then extended and gradually propagated to
transverse and other directions under the continued loading, and finally
merged into a fatigue cracking failure. Post-mortem trenching results
showed that the majority of the cracks were bottom-up, but some did show
developed as the top-down. The results further showed that all tested thin
RCC pavement structures over an adequate base support would have superior
load carrying capability. The 6-in. RCC sections carried an estimated 87.4
million and 19.4 million ESALs to failure for the soil cement and cement
treated base, respectively. The 4-in. RCC section over the soil cement
base performed well with an estimated 19.2 million ESALs to failure. The
data also indicated that the more substantial base (i.e., soil cement)
support generally provided additional structural capacity as compared the
less substantial cement treated soil base. The APT results were then used
to evaluate the pavement fatigue life, cracking pattern and failure mode
of thin RCC-surfaced pavements, which led to the development of a set of
RCC fatigue models for thin RCC fatigue damage analysis. Finally, a
thickness design procedure that includes a fatigue model suitable for
analyzing a thin RCC surfaced pavement structure was proposed and the
corresponding construction cost savings when implementing thin
RCC-surfaced pavement as a design option for a low volume pavement were
estimated.
KW - *Pavement performance
KW - *Cement asphalt cement
KW - *Construction procedures
KW - Roller compacted concrete
KW - Cracking
KW - Fatigue analysis
KW - Thickness design
KW - Accelerated loading facility testing
KW - Pavement testing
KW - Implememntation
RN - LTRC-12-7P
OD - 108
YR - 2017
PC - 011064008
CT - 85H | Road Transportation
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 50C | Construction Equipment, Materials, &amp; Supplies
CT - 89G | Construction Materials, Components, &amp; Equipment
CT - 71F | Composite Materials
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102840_a

168 - TOXLINE
TI - Isolation, Characterization and Identification of Environmental Bacterial
Isolates with Screening for Antagonism Against Three Bacterial Targets.
AU - Stote, R.
AD - ARMY NATICK SOLDIER RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER MA NATICK
United States
AU - Rego, J. M.
AD - ARMY NATICK SOLDIER RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER MA NATICK
United States
AU - Kirby, R.
AD - ARMY NATICK SOLDIER RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER MA NATICK
United States
AB - Current antimicrobial treatments exhibit a broad range of killing power,
promoting the increase of multi-drug resistant organisms. This has led to
the urgent need to develop targeted antimicrobials as an alternative to
todays treatments. This report summarizes work conducted to identify
microorganisms that exhibit narrow-spectrum activity through the secretion
of antimicrobials, termed bacteriocins, from a pool of environmental
isolates collected at Fort Devens. The environmental isolates were
characterized and found to be comprised mostly of microorganisms from the
genus Bacillus and Staphylococcus. The environmental isolates were
screened for bacteriocin-induced activity against three target strains of
interest to the DoD: Bacillus anthracis Sterne, Staphylococcus aureus and
Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The percentage of environmental isolates that
demonstrated activity against Bacillus anthracis Sterne was 15 (9 of 62
isolates screened), while 2 of the isolates (2 of 114 isolates screened)
exhibited activity against Staphylococcus aureus. No isolates were active
against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The active isolates were screened further
against additional targets to confirm their narrow-spectrum activity.
This work successfully identified environmental microorganisms that
exhibit bacteriocin-driven activity to produce narrow-spectrum
antimicrobials that target DoD relevant microorganisms.
KW - Bacterial targets
RN - NATICK/TR-17/014
OD - 23
YR - 2017
PC - 800219214
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1033352_a

169 - TOXLINE
TI - Optimizing Treatment of Lung Cancer Patients with Comorbidities.
AU - Wisnivesky, J.
AD - Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York United States
AB - The overall goal of this project is to improve the management of military
personnel and Veterans with localized lung cancer and comorbidities. The
Specific Aims are to: 1) Enhance and validate the Lung Cancer Policy Model
to simulate the management and subsequent outcomes of military personnel
and Veterans with early stage lung cancer and specific comorbidities; 2)
Determine the optimal management and indications for lobectomy, elective
limited resection, stereotactic body radiotherapy, and other treatments
for military personnel and Veterans with stage I NSCLC and chronic lung or
heart disease as well as by overall burden of comorbidities; and 3)
Determine the optimal indications for adjuvant chemotherapy in military
personnel and Veterans with stage II and IIIA NSCLC and chronic lung,
heart, or renal disease and by overall burden of comorbidities. We have
completed the majority of analyses to inform the parameter estimates for
our simulation models that will ultimately provide guidance regarding
optimal treatment of lung cancer patients with major comorbid illnesses.
Most contributing analyses involved national VA health data; we identified
a cohort of greater than 20,000 NSCLC patients and collected data on
comorbidities, cancer treatments and outcomes to generate estimates of
treatment complications, overall survival and quality of life. These
results are currently being incorporated into the well-validated Lung
Cancer Policy Model to generate specific treatment recommendations.
KW - Lung cancer
KW - Veterans (military personnel)
KW - Military personnel
KW - Therapy
KW - Comorbidities
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 800220149
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046536_a

170 - TOXLINE
TI - Designing Base and Subbase to Resist Environmental Effects on Pavements.
AU - Oman, M. S.
AD - Braun Intertec Corp., Minneapolis, MN.
AU - Lund, N. G.
AD - Braun Intertec Corp., Minneapolis, MN.
AB - MnDOT’s current pavement thickness design procedures do not characterize
the effects of subgrade soil frost susceptibility. Previous research
indicates frost action is the most severe environmental factor on pavement
performance. The most accepted mitigation practice is to replace the
frost-susceptible material with non-frost-susceptible material to a depth
of one-half or more of the frost depth, with silt soils possessing the
highest potential for frost heave. MnDOT currently requires minimum total
depths of 30 or 36 inches of “frost-free” materials (FFM) for flexible
pavements. Limited conclusions with regard to subgrade frost action could
be drawn from MnDOT’s pavement performance data. Data from the Long-Term
Pavement Performance (LTPP) program SPS-8 sites in South Dakota and
Wisconsin suggest that lesser FFM depth and greater subgrade silt content
correlate well with poorer performance. Data regression based on nine
freezing climate zone SPS-8 sites provide a very good fit and a
simple-to-use design tool is based on project location, predicted frost
depth, and sub-grade soil silt content. The required percentage treatment
of the predicted frost depth ranges from about 30 percent (0 percent silt)
to over 80 percent (100 percent silt). The tool provides a straightforward
means to select frost treatment depth that is simple and cost-effective to
implement, requires limited additional laboratory testing, and
requirements are generally in line with MnDOT’s current practices.
Short-term and long-term recommendations are provided to help MnDOT expand
on the results of this project.
KW - *Environmental effects
KW - *Non-frost-susceptible material
KW - *Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP)
KW - Frost
KW - Action
KW - Depth
KW - Protection
KW - Subgrade
KW - Design
KW - Performance
KW - Recommendations
KW - Pavement performance data
KW - Cost-effective
KW - *Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT)
OD - 157
YR - 2018
PC - 111169000
CT - 85D | Transportation Safety
CT - 85H | Road Transportation
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 55C | Meteorological Data Collection, Analysis, &amp; Weather Forecasting
CT - 55F | Weather Modification
CT - 48H | Snow, Ice, &amp; Permafrost
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100950_a

171 - TOXLINE
TI - Molecular Indicators of Stress-Induced Neuroinflammation in a Mouse Model
Simulating Features of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (Open Access).
AU - Jett, M.
AD - U.S Army Center for Environmental Health Research Fort Detrick United States
AU - Muhie, S.
AD - U.S Army Center for Environmental Health Research Fort Detrick United States
AU - Gautam, A.
AD - U.S Army Center for Environmental Health Research Fort Detrick United States
AU - Chakraborty, N.
AD - U.S Army Center for Environmental Health Research Fort Detrick United States
AU - Hoke, A.
AD - U.S Army Center for Environmental Health Research Fort Detrick United States
AU - Meyerhoff, J.
AD - U.S Army Center for Environmental Health Research Fort Detrick United States
AU - Hammamieh, R.
AD - U.S Army Center for Environmental Health Research Fort Detrick United States
AB - A social-stress mouse model was used to simulate features of
post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The model involved exposure of an
intruder (male C57BL/6) mouse to a resident aggressor (male SJL) mouse for
5 or 10 consecutive days. Transcriptome changes in brain regions
(hippocampus, amygdala, medial pre frontal cortex and hemibrain), blood
and spleen as well as epigenome changes in the hemibrain were assayed
after 1- and 10-day intervals following the 5-day trauma or after 1- and
42-day intervals following the 10-day trauma. Analyses of differentially
expressed genes (common among brain, blood and spleen) and differentially
methylated promoter regions revealed that neurogenesis and synaptic
plasticity pathways were activated during the early responses but were
inhibited after the later post-trauma intervals. However, inflammatory
pathways were activated throughout theobservation periods, except in the
amygdala in which they were inhibited only at the later post-trauma
intervals. Phenotypically,inhibition of neurogenesis was corroborated by
impaired Y-maze behavioral responses.
KW - Stress-Induced Neuro inflammation
KW - Social-stress mouse model
KW - Post-traumatic stress disorder
OD - 10
YR - 2017
PC - 800220755
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
CT - 74 | Military Sciences
CT - 57T | Psychiatry
CT - 92C | Social Concerns
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045481_a

172 - TOXLINE
TI - Development of Lifecycle Data for Hydrogen Fuel Production and Delivery.
AU - Miller, M.
AD - California Univ., Davis.
AU - Raju, A. S.
AD - California Univ., Davis.
AU - Roy, P. S.
AD - California Univ., Davis.
AB - The purpose of this project is to address three distinct but related
hydrogen issues – lifecycle analysis of renewable hydrogen pathways, the
potential for hydrogen injection and distribution through natural gas
pipeline infrastructure, and the potential demand for hydrogen from
off-road transportation markets. The specific objectives of the project
are: (1) Review the available literature to assess the most effective
combinations of alternative fuels, fuel infrastructure, and vehicle
powertrain technology to reduce GHG and criteria air pollutant emission in
hydrogen fuel pathways. (2) Perform lifecycle analyses to determine
pathways with the lowest GHG and criteria pollutant emissions for the
production, distribution, and storage of hydrogen. (3) Estimate the costs
of each potential hydrogen pathway to determine the most cost-effective
options for reducing GHG and criteria pollutant emissions. (4) Assess the
potential for using the current natural gas infrastructure in renewable
hydrogen fuel pathways. Identify potential hydrogen markets in the
off-road transportation sector that could increase overall hydrogen demand
and identify barriers to growth and strategies to overcome these barriers
in these markets.
KW - *Hydrogen fuel
KW - Lifecycle analysis
KW - Renewable hydrogen pathways
KW - Hydrogen injection
KW - Natural gas pipeline
KW - Alternative fuels
KW - Fuel infrastructure
KW - Vehicle powertrain
KW - Air pollutant emissions
OD - 121
YR - 2017
PC - 004365000
CT - 85H | Road Transportation
CT - 97K | Fuels
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100695_a

173 - TOXLINE
TI - Progress toward Topology Optimization (TO) for Additive Manufacturing (AM)
and Fatigue.
AU - Johnson, T. E.
AD - Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) Belcamp United States
AB - This report summarizes research progress to date in topology optimization
(TO) for additive manufacturing (AM) and fatigue. The effort has been
divided into 2 parts: TO for AM and TO for fatigue of metals. The 2-D and
3-D solutions are presented for TO for AM and fatigue. The proposed design
approaches have produced promising results and suggest further
investigation. A path forward is suggested in the conclusion.
KW - Additive manufacturing
KW - Topology
KW - Fatigue (mechanics)
KW - Optimization
KW - Powder metals
KW - Equations
KW - To (topology optimization)
KW - Am (additive manufacturing)
KW - To for am
KW - To for fatigue
KW - Overhang projection
KW - Void projection
KW - Clustered fatigue stress
KW - Stress life
KW - Cantilever in shear
OD - 28
YR - 2017
PC - 800221241
CT - 41G | Quality Control &amp; Reliability
CT - 46E | Structural Mechanics
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1035229_a

174 - TOXLINE
TI - Availability of Acute and/or Subacute Toxicokinetic Data for Select
Compounds for the Rat and Physiologically Based Pharmacokinetic (PBPK)
Models for Rats and Humans for Those Compounds.
AU - Sweeney, L. M.
AD - Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton Wright Patterson Air Force Base United
States
AU - Goodwin, M. R.
AD - Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton Wright Patterson Air Force Base United
States
AB - US Army Center for Environmental Health Research (USACEHR) has expressed a
need for support for the physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK)
modeling efforts. Specifically, information has been requested regarding
the availability of acute and/or subacute toxicokinetic data and PBPK
models for arsenic, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, nickel, allyl
alcohol, bromobenzene, and carbon tetrachloride, in the rat. As the
interest in these models pertains to data development in the rat and
extrapolation to humans, BPK models for humans were also of interest.
Short-term toxicokinetic data in the rat were identified for all compounds
of interest. Toxicokinetic/biokinetic models for at least one species (rat
or human) exist for all compounds of interest except nickel and
bromobenzene.
KW - Pharmacokinetics
KW - Models
KW - Toxicology
KW - Rats
KW - Solvents
KW - Metals
KW - Arsenic
KW - Cadmium
KW - Chromium
KW - Cobalt
KW - Lead (element)
KW - Nickel
KW - Toxicokinetics
KW - Pbpk (physiologically based pharmacokinetics)
KW - Pbpk models
KW - Allyl alcohol
KW - Bromobenzene
KW - Carbon tetrachloride
RN - NAMRU-D-17-94
OD - 72
YR - 2017
PC - 800220944
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
CT - 71N | Nonferrous Metals &amp; Alloys
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1034952_a

175 - TOXLINE
TI - Stress and PTSD Mechanisms as Targets for Pharmacotherapy of Alcohol
Abuse, Addiction and Relapse.
AU - Rasmussen, D.
AD - Seattle Institute For Biomedical And CLI Seatle United States
AB - We have demonstrated that (1) alcohol-nave rats exhibiting high acoustic
startle response (associated with increased anxiety-like behavior) develop
increased subsequent alcohol intake and preference which are correlated
with acoustic startle response determined before initial alcohol access,
providing a prospective index of vulnerability to developing alcohol
abuse, as well as insights into mechanism; (2) suppression of
noradrenergic signaling decreases alcohol drinking in rats with a history
of traumatic stress, but not in rats without this stress history
(informing clinical studies in which subjects exhibit variable responses
to prazosin); (3) this treatment also suppresses alcohol drinking by rats
with history of compulsive-like alcohol drinking, but increases alcohol
drinking by rats that do not (these results inform clinical studies in
which subjects have been reported to exhibit opposite responses that are
dependent on family history of compulsive alcohol drinking; (4)
suppression of noradrenergic signaling at the time of traumatic stress
decreases acquisition of increased voluntary alcohol drinking long after
the stress, which provides a new model for preventive treatment.
Accomplishment 1 has been published, 2-4 are in preparation for
publication. All remaining proposed studies are currently in progress as
planned, with no changes in scope, although with some delays due to
personnel changes and due to the need for some methodology refinements.
KW - Traumatic stress disorder
KW - Alcohols
KW - Ethanols
KW - Anxiety
KW - Stress (psychology)
KW - Rats
KW - Ptsd(post traumatic stress disorder)
KW - Prazosin
KW - Noradrenergic
KW - Pharmacotherapy
KW - Alcohol abuse
OD - 28
YR - 2017
PC - 800222146
CT - 57T | Psychiatry
CT - 92B | Psychology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046951_a

176 - TOXLINE
TI - Kinase Mediated Regulation of 40S Ribosome Assembly in Human Breast
Cancer.
AU - Cleveland, J.
AD - H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Tampa United States
AB - This work directly addresses how breast cancers grow and how this
uncontrolled cellular growth can be stopped. Specifically, we will
decipher the role of the 40S ribosome assembly pathway for tumor cell
growth and death induced by novel anti-tumor agents. Here we propose to
further dissect the role and mechanism of the CK1delta-to-Ltv1circuit in
the maintenance of the malignant state in triple negative breast cancer.
In Aim 1 we will clarify if the anti-proliferative activity of CK1delta
inhibitors is due to a block of Ltv1 release in ribosome assembly; if the
CK1delta-to-Ltv1circuit is overactive in breast cancer cells; if bypass of
the CK1delta-dependent regulation of 40S ribosome assembly augments the
tumorigenic potential of cancer cells. In Aim 2 we will confirm
preliminary observations that the autophagy and exosome pathways degrade
stalled assembling ribosomes, leading to cell death; and test if enhancing
these pathways by overexpression or administration of FDA-approved drugs
that induce autophagy, potentiates the effect from CK1delta inhibitors.
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Tumor cell line
KW - Triple negative breast cancer
KW - Ribosome assembly
KW - Autophagy
KW - Crispr/cas9
OD - 20
YR - 2017
PC - 800220960
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1036026_a

177 - TOXLINE
TI - Report on the Collection of Data During the Acoustic-Trawl and Daily Egg
Production Methods Survey of Coastal Pelagic Fish Species and Krill
(1604RL) Within the California Current Ecosystem, 22 March to 22 April
2016, Conducted Aboard Fisheries Survey Vessel 'Reuben Lasker'.
AU - Stierhoff, K. L.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Zwolinkski, J. P.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Renfree, J. S.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Demer, D. A.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AB - Coastal pelagic fish species (CPS), krill, and their environment within
the California Current Ecosystem (CCE) were sampled using multi-frequency
echo-sounders, surface trawls, vertically integrating net tows, continuous
underway fish-egg sampler (CUFES), and vertical
conductivity-temperature-depth probes (CTD), and assessed using the
Acoustic-Trawl Method (ATM) and the Daily Egg Production Method (DEPM)
during the Spring CPS Survey (1604RL) aboard the NOAA Fisheries Survey
Vessel (FSV) Reuben Lasker (hereafter, Lasker), 22 March to 22 April 2016.
The objectives of the survey were to: 1) acoustically map the
distributions and estimate the abundances of CPS, including, but not
limited to Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), Northern anchovy (Engraulis
mordax), Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii), Pacific mackerel (Scomber
japonicus), and jack mackerel (Trachurus symmetricus); and krill
(euphausiid spp.); 2) characterize the biotic and abiotic environments of
these species, and investigate linkages; and 3) gather information
regarding the animals’ life history parameters. This report provides an
overview of the survey objectives and includes a summary of the survey
equipment, acoustic-system calibration, sampling and analysis methods, and
preliminary results. The biomass of Pacific sardine from this survey were
described in greater detail by Hill et al. (2017). Final biomass and
abundance estimates for other CPS and krill will be reported separately.
KW - *Collection analysis
KW - *Egg production
KW - *California Current Ecosystem (CCE)
KW - *Continuous underway fish-egg sampler (CUFES)
KW - *Pacific Sardine(Sardinops sagax)
KW - *Trachurus symmetricus
KW - Fisheries Survey Vessel (FSV)
KW - Echo-sounders
KW - Clupea pallasii
KW - Acoustic-Trawl Method (ATM)
KW - Biomass
KW - Euphausiid distribution
KW - *Daily Egg Production Method (DEPM)
RN - NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-581
OD - 26
YR - 2017
PC - 037938004
CT - 98F | Fisheries &amp; Aquaculture
CT - 57H | Ecology
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
CT - 63A | Acoustic Detection
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102516_a

178 - TOXLINE
TI - Clean Water Act Requirements for Airports. Airport Cooperative Research
Program (ACRP) Research Report 169.
AU - Mericas, D.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Airport Cooperative Research
Program.
AU - Longsworth, J.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Airport Cooperative Research
Program.
AU - Shannon, K.
AD - Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Airport Cooperative Research
Program.
AB - TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 169:
Clean Water Act Requirements for Airports describes the environmental
regulations and permitting programs to which airports may be subject in
their management of stormwater and other types of water resources. It
covers governing federal programs; storm-water discharges associated with
industrial activities, construction activities, and municipal separate
storm sewer systems; process water or wastewater treatment discharges;
industrial wastewater pre-treatment discharges; and other relevant permit
programs.
KW - *Airports
KW - *Guidebook
KW - *Aviation
KW - *Clean Water Act (CWA)
KW - *Environmental regulations
KW - Airport management
KW - Planning
KW - Airport operators
KW - Requirements
KW - Wastewater
KW - Pretreatment discharges
KW - Storm sewer
KW - *Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP)
RN - TRB/ACRP-169
RN - ISBN 978-0-309-44608-2
RN - LCCCN-2016960097
OD - 38
PR - PROJECT 02-61
YR - 2017
PC - 044780010
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
CT - 88A | Operations &amp; Planning
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102963_a

179 - TOXLINE
TI - Interpreting the Results of Airport Water Monitoring, A Guidebook. Airport
Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 166.
AB - TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 166:
Interpreting the Results of Airport Water Monitoring provides
comprehensive guidance and a set of tools that operators of airports of
varying sizes can use to understand, diagnose, and interpret airport water
quality. This guidebook addresses water leaving the airport that does not
go to an off-site treatment facility. Accompanying the report are the
following tools to assist practitioners in diagnosing root causes and
possible sources of specific problems that may require attention or
mitigation:
KW - *Airports
KW - *Water monitoring
KW - *Guidebook
KW - Airport management
KW - Water quality
KW - Mitigation
RN - TRB/ACRP-166
RN - ISBN-978-0-309-44622-8
RN - LCCCN-2017934123
OD - 166
PR - PROJECT 02-53
YR - 2017
PC - 800194552
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
CT - 88A | Operations &amp; Planning
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102960_a

180 - TOXLINE
TI - Homocysteine Is an Oncometabolite in Breast Cancer, Which Promotes Tumor
Progression and Metastasis.
AU - Ganapathy, V.
AD - Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Lubock United States
AB - The hypothesis in this project is that homocysteine is an oncometabolite
in breast cancer. We propose to test this hypothesis with three specific
aims: (1) Investigate using two different mouse models of spontaneous
breast cancer(MMTV-HRAS mouse and MMTV-PyMT mouse) whether Mthfr is
silenced through DNA methylation and as a result the levels of the
oncometabolite homocysteine are elevated in tumors; (2) Investigate
whether homocysteine promotes breast cancer progression and lung
metastasis by comparing the disease process in MMTV-HRAS and MMTV-PyMT
mice on two different genetic backgrounds: Mthfr+/+ and Mthfr-/-.
Investigate the ability of homocysteine to induce TGF-beta, ANGPTL4, and
MMP-9 in breast cancer cell lines and to disrupt the barrier function of
lung microvascular endothelial cells; (3) Investigate using breast cancer
cell lines whether over expression of MTHFR or exposure to
N5-methyltetrahydrofolate decreases cell proliferation in vitro and
suppresses tumor grow thin xenografts in vivo.
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Cell line
KW - Epithelial cells
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Amino acids
KW - Monomolecular films
KW - Blood vessels
KW - Permeability
KW - Lung cancer
KW - Deoxyribonucleic acids
KW - Metabolism
KW - Laboratory animals
KW - Homocysteine
KW - Oncometabolite
KW - Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase
KW - Mouse models of breast cancer
KW - Tumor progression
KW - Metastasis to the lung
KW - Breast cancer cell lines
KW - Lung endothelial cells
OD - 7
YR - 2017
PC - 800220847
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1035589_a

181 - TOXLINE
TI - Biological Characterization and Clinical Utilization of Metastatic
Prostate Cancer-Associated lincRNA SchLAP1.
AU - Xiao, L.
AD - Regents of the University of Michigan Ann Arbor United States
AB - During the research period, we followed our proposal to characterize the
biological function of SChLAP1 in prostate cancer and assess the
translational potential of SChLAP1 in prostate cancer. To ascertain the
potential protein binding sites of SChLAP1, we performed PIP-seq in
prostate cancer cells, and found SChLAP1 Exon 5 is the most protected
exonic region. Then, we performed smFISH assay to precisely characterize
the subcellular localization pattern of SChLAP1 at single molecule level.
We found that SChLAP1 is highly nuclear specific transcript, and the
absolute counts of SChLAP1 molecules was ascertained in prostate cancer
cell line as well as prostate cancer biopsies. To functional annotate the
interaction between SChLAP1 and SWI/SNF complex, we performed MNase-seq to
determine the effect of SChLAP1 on global nucleosomes occupancy changes,
we found that overexpression of SChLAP1 in prostate cells significantly
affectsnucleosome position around the genes with FPKM > 1. Gene ontology
(GO) analysis suggest that cell-cell adherens and cell cycle regulation
are the most affected gene sets by SChLAP1. To sum up, our recently
findings have substantial impact on understanding the biological function
of SChLAP1 in prostate cancer progression, and helped us to further
explore the potential of SChLAP1 to serve as biomarkers and therapeutic
target for metastatic prostate cancer.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Metastasis
KW - Sequence analysis
KW - Cell line
KW - Biopsy
KW - Genes
KW - Biological markers
KW - Cell physiological processes
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Lincrna
KW - Schlap1 (second chromosome locus associated with prostate-1)
KW - Swi/snf
KW - Ezh2
KW - Aso
KW - Go (gene ontology)
KW - Go analysis
KW - Cell-cell adherens
KW - Cell cycle regulation
OD - 47
YR - 2017
PC - 800218500
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050190_a

182 - TOXLINE
TI - Sources of Human-Related Injury and Mortality for U.S. Pacific West Coast
Marine Mammal Stock Assessments, 2011-2015.
AU - Carretta, J. V.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Muto, M. M.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Greenman, J.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Wilkinson, K.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Lawson, D.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Viezbicke, J.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Jannot, J.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AB - The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) requires the National Marine
Fisheries Service (NMFS) to document human-caused mortality, non-serious
injury (NSI), and serious injury (SI) of marine mammals, as part of marine
mammal stock assessments and to evaluate human-caused injury and mortality
levels in the context of potential biological removal (PBR) levels under
the MMPA (Wade 1998). NMFS defines SI as “any injury that will likely
result in mortality”. While documenting mortality is straightforward,
distinguishing NSI from SI requires data on injury severity and animal
condition, often from challenging environments where thorough examination
of animals is not always possible. NMFS updated its SI designation and
reporting process in 2012, using guidance from previous SI workshops
(Angliss and DeMaster 1998, Andersen et al. 2008), expert opinion, and
analysis of historical injury cases to develop new criteria for
distinguishing SI from NSI (NMFS 2012a, 2012b; NOAA 2012; Moore et al.
2013). This report contains human-caused injury and mortality records of
pinnipeds and cetaceans that occur in U.S. west coast waters for the
period 2011-2015, for those species evaluated in Pacific region marine
mammal stock assessment reports (SARs) (Carretta et al. 2016a). Mortality
records, while included in this report, were not a part of the SI/NSI
status evaluation that included only live animals. Subsistence and
directed takes (i.e., gray whales taken by Russian natives) are not
reported here but are reported in SARs published by NMFS. Previous
records, including cases from 2007 through 2010, are published in previous
reports (Carretta et al. 2013, 2014, 2015b, 2016b).
KW - *Marine mammals
KW - *Pacific Ocean
KW - *Injuries
KW - *Mortality
KW - Animal populations
KW - Cetaceans
KW - Pinnipeds
KW - Wildlife management
KW - Workshops
KW - *Stock assessments
KW - Marine Mammal Protection Act(MMPA)
RN - NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-579
OD - 129
YR - 2017
PC - 037938004
CT - 47D | Biological Oceanography
CT - 98F | Fisheries &amp; Aquaculture
CT - 48B | Natural Resource Management
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102514_a

183 - TOXLINE
TI - Novel Pleiotropic Anti-Inflammatory Drug to Reduce ARDS Incidence.
AU - Nieman, G.
AD - Upstate Medical University Syracuse United States
AB - Our trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) injury model was highly effective at
causing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in all Control groups.
However, TRB-N0224 treatment, although it lowered both plasma and
bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF) IL-6 levels, resulted in no significant
improvement in clinical outcome, in the form of improve lung function (i.e
lung compliance or PaO2/FiO2 ratio) or histopathology. We postulate that
there were two problems with the study: 1) the stress of the gavage was an
additional trauma in an already severe T/HS model and 2) the T/HS model
causes severe damage to the gut, which significantly reducedTRB-N0224
adsorption. To solve this problem we have requested a one-year no-cost
extension to use an intravenous formulation of TRB-N0224 that, if our
postulate is correct, will solve both of our problems. As a secondary
solution to our problem if the IV formulation of TRBN0224is not effective
in the T/HS model we will try in our rat cecal ligation and puncture(CLP)
model. This will determine if TRB-N0224 is effective for trauma and/or
sepsis.
KW - Anti-inflammatory agents
KW - Inflammation
KW - Hemorrhagic shock
KW - Trauma
KW - Sepsis
KW - Drug therapy
KW - Cytokines
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Ards(acute respiratory distress syndrome)
KW - Trb-n0224
KW - Intravenous formulation
KW - Sirs(systemic inflammatory response syndrome)
KW - Mmp(matrix metalloproteinases)
KW - Curcumin
OD - 6
YR - 2017
PC - 800222049
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045338_a

184 - TOXLINE
TI - Planetesimals Born Big by Clustering Instability?
AU - Cuzzi, J. N.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AU - Hartlep, T.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AU - Simon, J. I.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AU - Estrada, P. R.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AB - Roughly 100km diameter primitive bodies (today's asteroids and TNOs; [1])
are thought to be the end product of so-called "primary accretion". They
dominated the initial mass function of planetesimals, and precipitated the
onset of a subsequent stage, characterized by runaway gravitational
effects, which proceeded onwards to planetary mass objects, some of which
accreted massive gas envelopes. Asteroids are the parents of primitive
meteorites; meteorite data suggest that asteroids initially formed
directly from freelyfloating nebula particles in the mm-size range.
Unfortunately, the process by which these primary 100km diameter
planetesimals formed remains problematic. We review the most diagnostic
primitive parent body observations, highlight critical aspects of the
nebula context, and describe the issues facing various primary accretion
models. We suggest a path forward that combines current scenarios of
"turbulent concentration" (TC) and "streaming instabilities" (SI) into a
triggered formation process we call clustering instability (CI). Under
expected conditions of nebula turbulence, the success of these processes
at forming terrestrial region (mostly silicate) planetesimals requires
growth by sticking into aggregates in the several cm size range, at least,
which is orders of magnitude more massive than allowed by current
growth-by-sticking models using current experimental sticking parameters
[2-4]. The situation is not as dire in the ice-rich outer solar system;
however, growth outside of the snowline has important effects on growth
inside of it [4] and at least one aspect of outer solar system
planetesimals (high binary fraction) supports some kind of clustering
instability.
KW - *Aggregates
KW - *Protoplanets
KW - *Asteroids
KW - *Nebulae
KW - *Turbulence
KW - *Meteorites
KW - *Particle size distribution
KW - Gravitational effects
KW - Gas giant planets
KW - Planetary mass
KW - Solar system
KW - Astronomical models
RN - JSC-CN-39793
OD - 2
YR - 2017
PC - 119866000
CT - 54B | Astronomy &amp; Celestial Mechanics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0006935_a

185 - TOXLINE
TI - NTP Technical Report on the Toxicity Studies of Triethylamine (CAS NO.
121-44-8) Administered by Inhalation to F344/N Rats and B6C3F1/N Mice.
AU - Morgan, D. L.
AD - National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC.
AU - Flake, G. P.
AD - National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC.
AB - Triethylamine is used primarily as a catalyst to cure the resin systems
incorporated into sand cores for foundry molds. It is also used as a
curing catalyst in phenol-formaldehyde particle board adhesives, for the
precipitation and purification of penicillin and cephalosporin
antibiotics, and in the interfacial polymerization process for the
production of polycarbonate resins. Triethylamine was nominated by the
United Auto Workers Union for long-term toxicity and carcinogenicity
studies based on its high production volume, the large number of
occupationally exposed workers, and the lack of carcinogenicity data. Male
and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1/N mice were exposed to triethylamine
(greater than 99% pure) by whole body inhalation for 2 weeks or 3 months.
Genetic toxicology studies were conducted in Salmonella typhimurium and
mouse peripheral blood erythrocytes.
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Triethylamine
KW - *Technical report
KW - *Triethylamine #119
KW - *Precipitation
KW - Interfacial
KW - Typhimurium
KW - Cephalosporin antibiotics
KW - Purification by Diffusion
RN - NTP/TRS-78
OD - 118
YR - 2018
PC - 068182000
CT - 44D | Health Care Assessment &amp; Quality Assurance
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57V | Radiobiology
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57D | Clinical Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100956_a

186 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2016-0013-3294, October 2017.
Evaluation of Exposures and Respiratory Health at a Coffee Roasting and
Packaging Facility.
AU - Hawley, B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Martin, S. B.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Duling, M.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Bailey, R. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - In October 2015, the Health Hazard Evaluation Program of the National
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health received a request from
management at a coffee roasting and packaging company. The request stated
concerns about health issues related to exposure to diacetyl during coffee
roasting, grinding, and packaging. In April 2016, we conducted an
industrial hygiene survey and ventilation assessment at the facility. The
industrial hygiene survey consisted of the collection of air samples and
bulk samples of coffee for the analysis of diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, and
2,3-hexanedione. Continuous monitoring instruments were used to monitor
total volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide,
temperature, and relative humidity in specific areas and during tasks. We
returned in June 2016 to perform a medical survey. The medical survey
consisted of a health questionnaire and breathing tests. Sixteen of the 27
personal full-shift air samples exceeded the NIOSH recommended exposure
limit for diacetyl of 5 parts per billion. These sixteen personal air
samples were collected on employees with primary job duties on the
production floor. High full-shift and task-based diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione exposure measurements were observed on employees that
ground coffee, packaged ground coffee, or worked in areas near ground
coffee. Areas with ground coffee present, specifically the main grinders
and new weigh-fill machine, consistently had the highest levels of
diacetyl, 2,3-pentanedione, total volatile organic compounds, and carbon
monoxide. We observed high instantaneous levels of diacetyl and
2,3-pentanedione during grinding. Carbon monoxide levels near the main
grinders exceeded the NIOSH ceiling limit of 200 parts per million. Carbon
dioxide levels were low throughout most of the facility. Mucous membrane
symptoms, specifically eye, nose, and sinus symptoms, were the most
commonly reported symptoms. Some employees reported their symptoms were
caused or aggravated by green coffee bean and roasted coffee dust, bagging
ground coffee, or cleaning the roaster. Breathing trouble was the most
commonly reported lower respiratory symptom followed by wheezing and chest
tightness. All administered spirometry tests (n=13) were normal. Two of 13
participants had high exhaled nitric oxide, a marker of allergic airways
inflammation. We recommend installing local exhaust ventilation and
training employees about workplace hazards. We also recommend a medical
monitoring program to identify any employees who may be developing
work-related lung disease (e.g., asthma, obliterative bronchiolitis) and
to help management prioritize interventions to prevent occupational lung
disease.
KW - *Volatile organic compounds (VOCs)
KW - *Food processing industry
KW - *Respiratory systems disorders
KW - Coffee workers
KW - Food handlers
KW - Food processing
KW - Food processing workers
KW - Food additives
KW - Organic dusts
KW - Ventilation systems
KW - Relative humidity
KW - Respiratory diseases
KW - Lung disease
KW - Lung disorders
KW - Diacetyl
KW - Carbon monoxide
KW - Carbon dioxide
KW - Industrial hygiene
KW - Air sampling
KW - Workplace monitoring
KW - Health surveys
KW - Medical surveys
KW - Questionnaires
KW - Breathing
KW - Exposure assessment
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Exposure limits
KW - Mucous membranes
KW - Pulmonary system disorders
KW - Airway resistance
KW - Training
KW - Intervention
KW - Environmental control equipment
KW - Recommended Exposure Limits (RELs)
KW - Exhaust ventilation
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2016-0013-3294
OD - 65
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 98H | Food Technology
CT - 41I | Job Environment
CT - 92A | Job Training &amp; Career Development
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57M | Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, &amp; Rehabilitation
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100580_a

187 - TOXLINE
TI - NiTi Alloys: New Materials that enable Shockproof, Corrosion Immune
Bearings.
AU - DellaCorte, C.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AB - Though steel is the dominant material of choice for mechanical components
(bearings and gears) it has intrinsic limitations related to corrosion and
plastic deformation. In contrast, dimensionally stable nickel-rich Ni-Ti
alloys, such as Nitinol 60, are intrinsically rustproof and can withstand
high contact loads without damage (denting). Over the last decade, focused
RD to exploit these alloys for new applications has revealed the science
behind NiTi's remarkable properties. In this presentation, the
state-of-the-art of nickel-rich NiTi alloys will be introduced along with
a discussion of how NASA is adopting this new technology inside the space
station water recycling system as a pathfinder for more down-to-earth
tribological challenges.
KW - *Binary alloys
KW - *Corrosion
KW - *Nickel alloys
KW - *Plastic deformation
KW - *Titanium alloys
KW - *Gears
KW - *Bearings
KW - *Tribology
KW - *Steels
KW - Damage
KW - Recycling
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN38532
OD - 32
PR - WBS 109492.02.03.02.01
YR - 2017
PC - 115801001
CT - 71N | Nonferrous Metals &amp; Alloys
CT - 94 | Industrial &amp; Mechanical Engineering
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0006853_a

188 - TOXLINE
TI - Effect of Prazosin and Naltrexone on Script Induced Alcohol Craving in
Veterans with Alcohol Use Disorders with and without Co-occurring PTSD.
AU - Simpson, T.
AD - Seattle Institute for Biomedical and Clinical Research Seattle United States
AB - Background: Military personnel are at risk for developing hazardous
drinking patterns post-deployment that can negatively impact their health
and psychiatric stability. This phenomenon is compounded by the fact that
despite recent gains in establishing effective pharmacological and
behavioral treatments for alcohol use disorders (AUD), nonremittance and
relapse remain major problems for those with AUDs. One individual factor
that is strongly associated with continued problematic use and relapse is
craving. Three different types of craving have been hypothesized, reward,
relief, and obsessive, and each is postulated to be mediated by different
neurological substrates. The neural networks postulated to subserve reward
and relief craving receive afferents from and project to noradrenergic
neurons in non-human primates and humans express 1 adrenergic receptors.
Given the interplay of the noradrenergic system with craving-related brain
systems, blocking 1 receptors with the noradrenergic antagonist, prazosin,
theoretically has the potential to modulate reward and relief craving.
KW - Prazosin and naltrexone
OD - 10
YR - 2017
PC - 800218370
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1025979_a

189 - TOXLINE
TI - Long-Term Survival and Observable Healing of Two Deepwater Rockfishes,
Sebastes, After Barotrauma and Subsequent Recompression in Pressure Tanks.
AU - Rodgveller, C. J.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Juneau, AK. Auke Bay Lab.
AU - Malecha, P. W.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Juneau, AK. Auke Bay Lab.
AU - Lunsford, C. R.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Juneau, AK. Auke Bay Lab.
AB - The authors evaluated the long-term survival and observable healing over
6–18 months for two species of deepwater rockfishes that experienced
barotrauma followed by repressurization in portable pressure tanks and
slow depressurization to surface pressure. Blackspotted Sebastes
melanostictus and rougheye rockfish Sebastes aleutianus were captured at
depths from 123 m to 279 m. Barotrauma was assessed immediately after
capture and fish were recompressed to 70 psi in pressure tanks on-board
the fishing vessel, gradually acclimated to atmospheric pressure at
sea-level over a 2- or 4-day period, then held in the laboratory. Others
were released from a weighted cage held at approx. 75 m and observed with
a video camera. Survival in the laboratory was highest when fish were
given 4 days (78% in 2013) to acclimate to the pressure change, as opposed
to 2 days (54–60% in 2011 and 2012, respectively). A longer fish length
increased the probability of mortality; however, neither the presence of
external or internal barotrauma nor the depth of capture were associated
with the probability of survival. Videos taken of fish that were released
after capture from the weighted cage showed that fish were not positively
buoyant, were oriented upright, and 67% were able to swam away. A
previously released fish was recaptured in a bottom-longline fishery 6
months later, 58 km from the release site, demonstrating that fish are
capable of surviving in the wild post-barotrauma. This study illustrates
the utility of pressure tanks for 1) slowly acclimating fish to surface
pressure for transport to a holding facility and 2) as an alternative to
underwater cages for short-term observations. Our results indicate that
short-term observations of recompressed fish may be adequate for studies
of survival. However, long-term observations are required to observe the
healing of some injuries.
KW - *Long-term survival
KW - *Observable Healing
KW - *Deepwater Rockfishes
KW - Sebastes alutus
KW - Barotrauma
KW - Subsequent Recompression
KW - Pressure tanks
KW - Fishery assessment
KW - Underwater cages
KW - Fish abundance
KW - Wild post-barotrauma
RN - NOAA-TM-NMFS-AFSC-359
OD - 45
YR - 2017
PC - 057053002
CT - 98F | Fisheries &amp; Aquaculture
CT - 98E | Animal Husbandry &amp; Veterinary Medicine
CT - 47 | Ocean Sciences &amp; Technology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102716_a

190 - TOXLINE
TI - Implicitly Coordinated Detect and Avoid Capability for Safe Autonomous
Operation of Small UAS.
AU - Balachandran, S.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Munoz, C. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Consiglio, M. C.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AB - As the airspace becomes increasingly shared by autonomous small Unmanned
Aerial Systems (UAS), there would be a pressing need for coordination
strategies so that aircraft can safely and independently maneuver around
obstacles, geofences, and traffic aircraft. Explicitly coordinating
resolution strategies for small UAS would require additional components
such as a reliable vehicle-to-vehicle communication infrastructure and
standardized protocols for information exchange that could significantly
increase the cost of deploying small UAS in a shared airspace. This paper
explores a novel approach that enables multiple aircraft to implicitly
coordinate their resolution maneuvers. By requiring all aircraft to
execute the proposed approach deterministically, it is possible for all of
them to implicitly agree on the region of airspace each will be occupying
in a given time interval. The proposed approach lends itself to the
construction of a suitable feedback mechanism that enables the real-time
execution of an implicitly conflict-free path in a closed-loop manner
dealing with uncertainties in aircraft speed. If a network infrastructure
is available, the proposed approach can also exploit the benefits of
explicit information.
KW - *Unmanned aircraft systems
KW - *Feedback control
KW - *Communication networks
KW - *Airspace
KW - *Real time operation
KW - *Autonomy
KW - *Air traffic
KW - Deployment
KW - Feedback
RN - NF1676L-25792
OD - 10
PR - WBS 154692.02.70.07.02
YR - 2017
PC - 019044001
CT - 85D | Transportation Safety
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0006072_a

191 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeting Tumor-Initiating Cells for the Therapeutics of Breast Cancer.
AU - Chen, S.
AD - The University of Iowa Iowa City United States
AB - HER2+ breast cancers are a highly aggressive form that occurs in 20-30% of
metastatic breast cancers and correlates with poor prognosis. HER2+ breast
cancers are usually treated with HER2-targeted therapy, but cancers
quickly develop resistance to the therapy within 1 to 2 years. The
mechanisms underlying resistance remain largely unknown but are attributed
to a reservoir of stem-cell-like, tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Under the
pressure of current therapies, these cells have a survival advantage and
may escape therapies, and so likely account for drug resistance, tumor
recurrence, and metastasis. This proposal aims to determine the role of
Gi/o-coupled receptors (Gi/o-GPCR) signaling in regulating the
tumorigenicity of TICs to drive HER2+ breast cancer growth and metastasis,
and confer drug resistance to the HER2-targeted therapy. Our studies thus
far have demonstrated that Gi/o-GPCR signaling is essential for the
initiation and progression of HER2-induced mammary tumors in mice, and
HER2-mediated human breast cancer cell growth and migration in vitro.
Moreover, we provided the evidence that Gi/o-GPCRs drive tumor progression
at least in part through enhancing the tumorigenicity of TICs. The
proposal was terminated early because of partial overlapping with a
NCI-funded R01 proposal. Nevertheless, findings from these studies have
laid the foundation for further investigation of the function and
mechanisms of Gi/o-GPCRs in driving HER2 breast cancer.
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Drug resistance
KW - Therapy
KW - Proteins
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Her2+ breast cancer
KW - Gpcr (g protein coupled receptors)
KW - Signal transduction
KW - Her2-targeted therapy
KW - Tic (tumor-initiating cells)
KW - Gi o-gpcr
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 800220554
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050362_a

192 - TOXLINE
TI - Software Defined Radios - Architectures, Systems and Functions.
AU - Sims, W. H.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AB - Software Defined Radio is an industry term describing a method of
utilizing a minimum amount of Radio Frequency (RF)/analog electronics
before digitization takes place. Upon digitization all other functions are
performed in software/firmware. There are as many different types of SDRs
as there are data systems. Software Defined Radio (SDR) technology has
been proven in the commercial sector since the early 90's. Today's rapid
advancement in mobile telephone reliability and power management
capabilities exemplifies the effectiveness of the SDR technology for the
modern communications market. In contrast the foundations of transponder
technology presently qualified for satellite applications were developed
during the early space program of the 1960's. SDR technology offers
potential to revolutionize satellite transponder technology by increasing
science data through-put capability by at least an order of magnitude.
While the SDR is adaptive in nature and is "One-size-fits-all" by design,
conventional transponders are built to a specific platform and must be
redesigned for every new bus. The SDR uses a minimum amount of
analog/Radio Frequency components to up/down-convert the RF signal to/from
a digital format. Once analog data is digitized, all processing is
performed using hardware logic. Typical SDR processes include; filtering,
modulation, up/down converting and demodulation. This presentation will
show how the emerging SDR market has leveraged the existing commercial
sector to provide a path to a radiation tolerant SDR transponder. These
innovations will reduce the cost of transceivers, a decrease in power
requirements and a commensurate reduction in volume. A second pay-off is
the increased flexibility of the SDR by allowing the same hardware to
implement multiple transponder types by altering hardware logic - no
change of analog hardware is required - all of which can be ultimately
accomplished in orbit. This in turn would provide high capability and low
cost transponder to programs of all sizes.
KW - *Radio frequencies
KW - *Radio equipment
KW - *Firmware
KW - *Analog data
KW - *Transponders
KW - *Hardware
KW - *Transmitter receivers
KW - *Computer systems programs
KW - *Space programs
KW - Analog to digital converters
KW - Volume
KW - Flexibility
KW - Low cost
RN - M17-5987
OD - 1
YR - 2017
PC - 019043002
CT - 45 | Communication
CT - 62A | Computer Hardware
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0005339_a

193 - TOXLINE
TI - Simulated Space Environment Effects on a Candidate Solar Sail Material.
AU - Kang, J. H.
AD - National Inst. of Aerospace
AU - Bryant, R. G.
AD - National Inst. of Aerospace
AU - Wilkie, W. K.
AD - National Inst. of Aerospace
AU - Wadsworth, H. M.
AD - National Inst. of Aerospace
AU - Craven, P. D.
AD - National Inst. of Aerospace
AU - Nehls, M. K.
AD - National Inst. of Aerospace
AU - Vaughn, J. A.
AD - National Inst. of Aerospace
AB - For long duration missions of solar sail vehicles, the sail material needs
to survive the harsh space environment as the degradation of the sail
material determines its operational lifetime. Therefore, understanding the
effects of the space environment on the sail membrane is essential for
mission success. In this study, the effect of simulated space environments
of ionizing radiation and thermal aging were investigated. In order to
assess some of the potential damage effects on the mechanical, thermal and
optical properties of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) polyester solar
sail membrane. The solar sail membrane was exposed to high energy
electrons [about 70 keV and 10 nA/cm(exp. 2)], and the physical properties
were characterized. After about 8.3 Grad dose, the tensile modulus,
tensile strength and failure strain of the sail membrane decreased by 20
to 95%. The aluminum reflective layer was damaged and partially
delaminated but it did not show any significant change in solar absorbance
or thermal emittance. The mechanical properties of a precracked sample,
simulating potential impact damage of the sail membrane, as well as
thermal aging effects on metallized PEN (polyethylene naphthalate) film,
will be discussed.
KW - *Aging (materials)
KW - *Commercial off-the-shelf products
KW - *Impact damage
KW - *Degradation
KW - *Ionizing radiation
KW - *Membranes
KW - *Metal films
KW - *Solar sails
KW - *Tensile strength
KW - *Thermal emission
KW - *High energy electrons
KW - Environment effects
KW - Laminates
KW - Aerospace environments
KW - Polyethylenes
KW - Wear tests
RN - NASA/TP-2017-219644
RN - L-20833
RN - NF1676L-27441
OD - 28
PR - WBS 432938.08.01.07.01
YR - 2017
PC - 800136358
CT - 84G | Unmanned Spacecraft
CT - 84C | Manned Spacecraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007244_a

194 - TOXLINE
TI - Phase II Clinical Trial of Intraoral Grafting of Human Tissue Engineered
Oral Mucosa.
AU - Feinberg, S. E.
AD - Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor.
AB - This is a randomized, parallel-group phase II study to assess the safety
and efficacy for use of human EVPOME for soft tissue intraoral grafting
procedures compared to the gold standard palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft.
The study will determine differences in the primary efficacy measure of
increased keratinized mucosa; secondary measures of graft contracture and
Wound Healing Index; and ancillary outcome measures of tissue perfusion
measured graft color and laser Doppler flowmetry, and postoperative pain.
Sixty subjects, thirty subjects per treatment group, will be randomized to
receive either the experimental treatment, EVPOME (Group 1), or standard
of care, the palatal oral mucosa (POM) graft (Group 2). The study
population will include non-smoking adults (ages 18 and older) in need of
additional keratinized oral mucosa This trial has recently been awarded a
No Cost Extension to continue its recruitment efforts.
KW - Skin grafts
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Reconstructive surgical procedures
KW - Oral surgery
KW - Evopme
KW - Pom(palatal oral mucosa)
KW - Keratinized mucosa
KW - Graft contracture
OD - 6
YR - 2017
PC - 002797000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047985_a

195 - TOXLINE
TI - GPS/Optical/Inertial Integration for 3D Navigation Using Multi-Copter
Platforms.
AU - Dill, E. T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Young, S. D.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Uijt De Haag, M.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AB - In concert with the continued advancement of a UAS traffic management
system (UTM), the proposed uses of autonomous unmanned aerial systems
(UAS) have become more prevalent in both the public and private sectors.
To facilitate this anticipated growth, a reliable three-dimensional (3D)
positioning, navigation, and mapping (PNM) capability will be required to
enable operation of these platforms in challenging environments where
global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) may not be available
continuously. Especially, when the platform's mission requires maneuvering
through different and difficult environments like outdoor opensky, outdoor
under foliage, outdoor-urban and indoor, and may include transitions
between these environments. There may not be a single method to solve the
PNM problem for all environments. The research presented in this paper is
a subset of a broader research effort, described in [1]. The research is
focused on combining data from dissimilar sensor technologies to create an
integrated navigation and mapping method that can enable reliable
operation in both an outdoor and structured indoor environment. The
integrated navigation and mapping design is utilizes a Global Positioning
System (GPS) receiver, an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), a monocular
digital camera, and three short to medium range laser scanners. This paper
describes specifically the techniques necessary to effectively integrate
the monocular camera data within the established mechanization. To
evaluate the developed algorithms a hexacopter was built, equipped with
the discussed sensors, and both hand-carried and flown through
representative environments. This paper highlights the effect that the
monocular camera has on the aforementioned sensor integration scheme's
reliability, accuracy and availability.
KW - *Drone aircraft
KW - *Three dimensional models
KW - *Positioning
KW - *Optical scanners
KW - *Inertial navigation
KW - *Laser applications
KW - *Air traffic control
KW - *Unmanned aircraft systems
KW - *Management systems
KW - Algorithms
KW - Flight paths
KW - Systems integration
RN - NF1676L-26570
OD - 11
PR - WBS 154692.02.70.07.01
YR - 2017
PC - 019044001
CT - 85E | Pipeline Transportation
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0005464_a

196 - TOXLINE
TI - Comparative Study of Two Azimuth Based Non Standard Location Methods.
AU - Jih, R.
AD - Department of State, Washington, DC.
AB - Two non-standard, independently developed, azimuth-based seismic
triangulation procedures are evaluated. The goal is to develop ad hoc
algorithms which can effectively tackle the seismic location problem under
the following difficult yet realistic situations often encountered in
seismic monitoring for the purposes of hazard reduction as well as for the
underground nuclear explosion monitoring: 1) the crustal model is not
known, and hence an arbitrary global model may have to be utilized; 2) the
seismic network is not calibrated, and hence the phase arrivals will be
used as they are without any station-specific or path-specific
correction; and 3) the azimuthal coverage of the recording stations is
poor.
KW - Triangulation
KW - Seismic monitoring
RN - AVC-VTN-16-G08
OD - 9
YR - 2017
PC - 000572000
CT - 48F | Geology &amp; Geophysics
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1030308_a

197 - TOXLINE
TI - Autophagosomal Sequestration of Mitochondria as an Indicator of
Antiandrogen Therapy Resistance of Prostate Cancer (PCa).
AU - Wilding, G.
AD - Texas Univ., Houston.
AB - Purpose: We have investigated if sequestration of metabolically
dysfunctional mitochondria by theautophagosomes (mitophagy) imparts
anti-androgen resistance.Method: Effects of the anti-androgen enzalutamide
on the autophagy and mitophagy of androgen-dependentLNCaP and independent
C4-2 cells are studied first. Autophagy is monitored by cellular
fluorescence incells treated with monodansylcadavarine (MDC) or stained
with anti-LC3B antibody. Cellular fluorescencedue to Mitosox dye oxidation
is used to identify mitochondria producing high superoxide (O2-).
Mitophagyis monitored using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)
by visualization of FRET images andquantitation of FRET image intensities
using a Nikon A1 or a Leica Di8 fluorescence confocal microscopeand Image
J software.Results and Discussion: Our data show that the degree of
mitophagy is more in androgen-dependent LNCaPcells than in independent
C4-2 cells, both growing in androgen-depleted media. Enzalutamide
treatmentinduces mitophagy in both cell lines, but the increase in
mitophagy is more pronounced in the enzalutamideresistantC4-2 than in the
sensitive LNCaP cells. Mitophagy in circulating tumor cells (CTCs)
isolatedfrom patient blood samples are currently being standardized.
KW - Application software
KW - Computer programs
KW - Digital data
KW - Mathematics
KW - Notation
KW - Digital information
KW - Metadata
KW - Word processors
KW - Coding
KW - Identities
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 001794000
CT - 41N | Computer Software
CT - 62S | Data Files
CT - 44T | Data &amp; Information Systems
CT - 72 | Mathematical Sciences
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1049237_a

198 - TOXLINE
TI - Analysis of Proton Radiation Effects on Gallium Nitride High Electron
Mobility Transistors.
AU - Augustine, R. T.
AD - Naval Postgraduate School Monterey United States
AB - In this work, a physics-based simulation of non-ionizing proton radiation
damage effects at different energy levels on a GaN-on-silicon high
electron mobility transistor was created. Based on physical results of
2.0-MeV protons irradiation to fluence levels of 6 × 1014
protons/cm2, the simulation was tuned to match electron mobility µn and
then compared to threshold voltage Vth on state resistance Ron and
transconductance gm. A Monte Carlo simulator was used to model two
particle interactions utilizing the Kinchin and Pease model. The model was
developed in Silvaco ATLAS, but the Athena and Victory Stress modules were
also utilized. After comparison of changing characteristics between the
model and the physical device at 2.0-MeV proton irradiation, predictions
were made for 5.0, 10.0, 20.0 and 40.0-MeV proton irradiation. The model
generally over predicted damage in the lattice when compared to the
physical results seen in prior work.
KW - Proton Radiation Effects
KW - Electron Mobility Transistors
KW - aluminum gallium nitride
OD - 87
YR - 2017
PC - 800218342
CT - 99E | Photochemistry and Radiation Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1045792_a

199 - TOXLINE
TI - Drag-Free Performance of the ST7 Disturbance Reduction System Flight
Experiment on the LISA Pathfinder.
AU - Maghami, P.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - O'Donnell, J. J.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Hsu, O.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Ziemer, J.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Dunn, C.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AB - The Space Technology-7 Disturbance Reduction System (DRS) is an experiment
package aboard the European Space Agency (ESA) LISA Pathfinder spacecraft.
LISA Pathfinder launched from Kourou, French Guiana on December 3, 2015.
The DRS is tasked to validate two specific technologies: colloidal
micro-Newton thrusters (CMNT) to provide low-noise control capability of
the spacecraft, and drag-free control flight. This validation is performed
using highly sensitive drag-free sensors, which are provided by the LISA
Technology Package of the European Space Agency. The Disturbance Reduction
System is required to maintain the spacecrafts position with respect to a
free-floating test mass to better than 10nmHz, along its sensitive axis
(axis in optical metrology). It also has a goal of limiting the residual
accelerations of any of the two test masses to below 30 (1 + [f3 mHz])
fmsHz, over the frequency range of 1 to 30 mHz.This paper briefly
describes the design and the expected on-orbit performance of the control
system for the two modes wherein the drag-free performance requirements
are verified. The on-orbit performance of these modes are then compared to
the requirements, as well as to the expected performance, and discussed.
KW - *Spacecraft control
KW - *Drag reduction
KW - *Aerospace engineering
KW - *Esa spacecraft
KW - *Controllability
KW - *Attitude control
KW - Low noise
KW - Frequency ranges
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN42495
OD - 21
YR - 2017
PC - 013129000
CT - 84G | Unmanned Spacecraft
CT - 84C | Manned Spacecraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0004855_a

200 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Powering Up Mitichondrial Functions to Treat Mitochondrial Disease.
AU -
Wallace, D. C.
AD -
Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AU -
Pei, L.
AD -
Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AB -
We proposed that induction of the ERRalpha/gamma signaling pathway can
enhance mitochondrial functionin both cell and animal models of
mitochondrial disease. Our major findings include;1)We recently compared
in detail the different mitochondrial disease animal models (under review
in Cell Metabolism). We found that the compound Ant1-/-ND6 mutant mouse
model exhibited the earliest and strongest mitochondrial cardiomyopathy
phenotype and therefore provided the best therapeutic window for our
proposed intervention research strategy. 2) We discovered that GDF15 is a
heart-derived hormone whose serum level correlates positively with the
severity of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy (recently published with DOD
grant support acknowledged), and it can be used as a biomarker in our
studies.
KW - Heart disease
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Genetic markers
KW - Cell structures
KW - Dysfunction
KW - Cell biology
KW - Membranes
KW - Mitochondria
KW - Transcription factors
KW - Mitochondria
KW - Mitochondrial disease
KW - Cardiomyopathy
KW - Estrogen-related receptor
KW - Transcriptional regulation
KW - Mitochondrial biogenesis
KW - Signaling
KW - Ipscs
OD - 98
YR - 2017
PC - 110835000
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048404_a

201 - TOXLINE
TI - Trace Contaminant Control for the International Space Station's Node 1-
Analysis, Design, and Verification.
AU - Perry, J. L.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AB - Trace chemical contaminant generation inside crewed spacecraft cabins is a
technical and medical problem that must be continuously evaluated.
Although passive control through materials selection and active control by
adsorption and catalytic oxidation devices is employed during normal
operations of a spacecraft, contaminant buildup can still become a
problem. Buildup is particularly troublesome during the stages between the
final closure of a spacecraft during ground processing and the time that a
crewmember enters for the first time during the mission. Typically, the
elapsed time between preflight closure and first entry on orbit for
spacecraft such as Spacelab modules was 30 days. During that time, the
active contamination control systems are not activated and contaminants
can potentially build up to levels which exceed the spacecraft maximum
allowable concentrations (SMACs) specified by NASA toxicology experts. To
prevent excessively high contamination levels at crew entry, the Spacelab
active contamination control system was operated for 53 hours just before
launch.
KW - *Contaminants
KW - *International space station
KW - *Ingress (spacecraft passageway)
KW - *Trace contaminants
KW - *Spacecraft cabins
KW - *Adsorption
KW - *Spacecraft cabin atmospheres
KW - *Ventilation
KW - *Material balance
KW - *Offgassing
KW - *Differential equations
KW - Oxidation
KW - Toxicology
KW - Charcoal
KW - Tests
RN - NASA/TP-2017-218235
OD - 90
YR - 2017
PC - 019043002
CT - 84B | Extraterrestrial Exploration
CT - 72B | Algebra, Analysis, Geometry, &amp; Mathematical Logic
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0005170_a

202 - TOXLINE
TI - Powering Up Mitochondrial Functions to Treat Mitochondrial Disease.
AU - Wallace, D. C.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AU - Pei, L.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AB - We proposed that induction of the ERRalpha/gamma signaling pathway can
enhance mitochondrial function in both cell and animal models of
mitochondrial disease. Our major findings include;1) We recently compared
in detail the different mitochondrial disease animal models (under review
in Cell Metabolism). We found that the compound Ant1-/-ND6 mutant mouse
model exhibited the earliest and strongest mitochondrial cardiomyopathy
phenotype and therefore provided the best therapeutic window for our
proposed intervention research strategy.2) We discovered that GDF15 is a
heart-derived hormone whose serum level correlates positively with the
severity of mitochondrial cardiomyopathy (recently published with DOD
grant support acknowledged), and it can be used as a biomarker in our
studies.
KW - Heart diseases
KW - Cell structures
KW - Cell biology
KW - Membranes
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Mitochondria
KW - Dysfunction
KW - Intervention
KW - Mitochondria
KW - Mitochondrial disease
KW - Cardiomyopathy
KW - Estrogen-related receptor
KW - Transcriptional regulation
KW - Mitochondrial biogenesis
KW - Signaling
OD - 79
YR - 2017
PC - 110835000
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048403_a

203 - TOXLINE
TI - Parametric Investigation on the Use of Lateral and Logitudinal Rotor Trim
Flapping for Tiltrotor Noise Reduction.
AU - Malpica, C.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AB - This paper presents an acoustics parametric study of the effect of varying
lateral and longitudinal rotor trim flapping angles (tip-path-plane tilt)
on noise radiated by an isolated 26-ft diameter proprotor, similar to that
of the AW609 tiltrotor, in edgewise flight. Three tip-path-plane angle of
attack operating conditions of -9, 0 and 6 deg, at 80 knots, were
investigated. Results showed that: 1) minimum noise was attained for the
tip-path-plane angle of attack value of -9 deg, and 2) changing the cyclic
trim state (i.e., controls) altered the airloads and produced noticeable
changes to the low-frequency (LF) and blade-vortex interaction (BVI)
radiated-noise magnitude and directionality. In particular, by trimming
the rotor to a positive (inboard) lateral flapping angle of 4 deg, further
reductions up to 3 dB in the low-frequency noise sound pressure level were
attained without significantly impacting the BVI noise for longitudinal
tip-path-plane angles of -9 and 6 deg.
KW - *Blade-vortex interaction
KW - *Aerodynamic loads
KW - *Noise reduction
KW - *Sound pressure
KW - *Tilt rotor aircraft
KW - *Angle of attack
KW - *Acoustics
KW - Flapping
KW - Low frequencies
KW - Rotors
RN - ARC-E-DAA-TN41358
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 119866000
CT - 46A | Acoustics
CT - 51B | Aeronautics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0004551_a

204 - TOXLINE
TI - Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow Toxic
Agents.
AU - Spellman, S.
AD - National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, MN.
AU - Confer, D. L.
AD - National Marrow Donor Program, Minneapolis, MN.
AB - 1. Contingency Prepardness: Collect information from transplant centers,
build awareness of the Transplant Center Contingency Planning Committee
and educate the transplant community about the critical importance of
establishing a nationwide contingency response plan.2. Rapid
Identification of Matched Donors: Increase operational efficiencies that
accelerate the search process and increase patient access are key to
preparedness in a contingency event.3. Immunogenetic Studies: Increase
understanding of the immunologic factors important in HSC
transplantation.4. Clinical Research in Transplantation: Create a platform
that facilitates multicenter collaboration and data management.
KW - Medical research
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Stem cells
KW - Patients
KW - Immune systems
KW - Surgical transplantation
KW - Organs(anatomy)
KW - Tissue donors
KW - Transplant community
KW - Contingency response
KW - Contingency preparedness
KW - Marrow toxic agents
OD - 76
YR - 2018
PC - 103980000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047855_a

205 - TOXLINE
TI - Central Mechanisms and Treatment of Blast Induced Auditory and Vestibular
Injuries.
AU - Long, J. B.
AD - The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, WA.
AB - As a consequence of advances in military medical care there are greatly
increased numbers of survivors of blast-induced traumatic brain injury
(bTBI) sustaining persistent neurosensory dysfunction including hearing
loss and balance disorder. The study is to utilize our well defined shock
tube simulation of mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) in
rodents to characterize interrelated biomechanical and pathophysiological
mechanisms of blast induced central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs)
and central vestibular injuries (CVIs)and to develop an early therapeutic
intervention for hearing loss and balance disordermitigation. The major
objectives of the proposed studies and relevant research sub-gaps are:1)
Verify the time course of hearing loss and balance disorders induced by
blast exposureand define plasma and CSF TDP-43 as a biomarker related to
blast-induced central auditory/vestibular deficits; 2) Characterize blast
induced biochemical, functional and morphological alterations in central
auditory/vestibular systems and establish that blast induced altered
expression of TDP-43 and its BDPs in these structures play a
keypathophysiological mechanism leading to secondary injuries.
KW - Blast induced auditory injuries
KW - Blast induced traumatic brain injury
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 118767000
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1030918_a

206 - TOXLINE
TI - NTP Research Report on Biological Activity of Bisphenol A (BPA) Structural
Analogues and Functional Alternatives.
AB - Recent studies report widespread usage or exposure to a variety of
chemicals with structural or functional similarity to bisphenol A (BPA),
referred to as BPA analogues or derivatives. These have been detected in
foodstuffs, house dust, environmental samples, human urine or blood, and
thermal paper. Compared to BPA relatively little is known about potential
toxicity of these compounds. The objective is to identify and summarize
human, animal, and mechanistic toxicity data for 24 BPA analogues of
emerging interest to research and regulatory communities. The objective
was addressed by two efforts: 1) a systematic review of the available
research; and 2) analysis of data available from the high throughput
screening programs Tox21/ToxCast. We used systematic review methods to
identify relevant studies from the published literature. Over 5,100
literature studies were screened for relevance and 166 were considered
relevant. Analyses of the high throughput screening data focused on
assessing structural and biological similarity among the BPA analogues and
between BPA or estradiol (E2).
KW - *Biological activity
KW - *Bisphenol A
KW - Structural Analogues
KW - Human
KW - Urine
KW - Blood
KW - Environmental samples
KW - Mechanistic toxicity data
RN - NTP/RR-4
OD - 80
YR - 2017
PC - 068182000
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57V | Radiobiology
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100955_a

207 - TOXLINE
TI - Ballooning for Biologists: Mission Essentials for Flying Experiments on
Large NASA Balloons.
AU - Smith, D. J.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AU - Sowa, M.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AB - Despite centuries of scientific balloon flights, only a handful of
experiments have produced biologically-relevant results. Yet unlike
orbital spaceflight, it is much faster and cheaper to conduct biology
research with balloons, sending specimens to the near space environment of
Earths stratosphere. Samples can be loaded the morning of a launch and
sometimes returned to the laboratory within one day after flying. The
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) flies large, unmanned
scientific balloons from all over the globe, with missions ranging from
hours to weeks in duration. A payload in the middle portion of the
stratosphere (approx. 35 km above sea level) will be exposed to an
environment similar to the surface of Mars: temperatures generally around
-36 C, atmospheric pressure at a thin 1 kPa, relative humidity levels
< 1%, and a harsh illumination of ultraviolet (UV) and cosmic radiation
levels (about 100 W/sq m and 0.1 mGy/d, respectively) that can be obtained
nowhere else on the surface of the Earth, including environmental chambers
and particle accelerator facilities attempting to simulate space radiation
effects. Considering the operational advantages of ballooning and the
fidelity of space-like stressors in the stratosphere, researchers in
aerobiology, astrobiology, and space biology can benefit from balloon
flight experiments as an intermediary step on the extraterrestrial
continuum (ground, low Earth orbit, and deep space studies). Our
presentation targets biologists with no background or experience in
scientific ballooning. We will provide an overview of large balloon
operations, biology topics that can be uniquely addressed in the
stratosphere, and a roadmap for developing payloads to fly with NASA.
KW - *Balloons
KW - *Aerobiology
KW - *Aerospace medicine
KW - *Balloon flight
KW - *Radiation effects
KW - *Particle accelerators
KW - *Exobiology
KW - *Atmospheric pressure
KW - *Aerospace environments
KW - *Ultraviolet radiation
KW - Nasa programs
KW - Space flight
KW - Radiation dosage
RN - ARC-E-DAA-TN47874
OD - 38
YR - 2017
PC - 119866000
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\N18-0001327_a

208 - TOXLINE
TI - Advancing Our Understanding of the Etiologies and Mutational Landscapes of
Basal-Like, Luminal A, and Luminal B Breast Cancers.
AU - Chinnaiyan, A.
AD - Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor.
AU - Li, C.
AD - Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor.
AU - Porter, P.
AD - Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor.
AB - We are conducting a five-year population-based case-control breast cancer
study to identify how various breast cancer risk factors differ in their
relationships to different molecular subtypes of breast cancer and to
further characterize molecular differences between these subtypes. To
address the existing research gaps regarding the etiologies of different
molecular subtypes of breast cancer we will employ state of the art
multidisciplinary approaches to advance our understanding of the
epidemiology and mutational landscapes of basal-like, luminal A, and
luminal B tumors. Our original goal was to recruit about 2,700 women in
Western Washington who have been diagnosed with breast cancer to compare
to 900 women who have never been diagnosed with breast cancer, but control
ascertainment has been unacceptably low, so on 8/25/15 we submitted a
request to modify the SOW to drop the control group and replace it with an
additional 80 to 100 ER cases. Participation in this research includes a
detailed telephone interview, collection of breast tissue and oral samples
and medical record abstraction. Breast tissue samples will be reviewed and
tested at Fred Hutchinson Research Center and special tissue analyses will
also be performed at the Michigan Center for Translational Pathology. This
research may eventually be of help in developing clinically important
insights and treatment protocols for future breast cancer patients. There
are no major findings from this study yet as data collection is currently
in progress.
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Etiology
KW - Epidemiology
KW - Pathology
KW - Mutations
KW - Genes
KW - Genetic markers
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Women
KW - Tissue
KW - Medical screening washington (state)
KW - Theraupetics
KW - Medical research
KW - Molecular subtypes of breast cancer
KW - Basal-like
KW - Luminal a
KW - And luminal b tumors
KW - Breast cancer risk factors
OD - 13
YR - 2017
PC - 002797000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048130_a

209 - TOXLINE
TI - Bottom Backscattering Strengths Measured in Shallow and Deep Water.
AU - Gauss , R. C.
AD - NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC WASHINGTON United States
AU - Kunz, E. L.
AD - NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC WASHINGTON United States
AU - Fialkowski, J. M.
AD - NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC WASHINGTON United States
AU - Menis, R.
AD - NAVAL RESEARCH LAB WASHINGTON DC WASHINGTON United States
AB - For a low-frequency (LF; < 1 kHz) or mid-frequency (MF; 1 to 10 kHz)
active sonar, scattering from the seafloor, coupled with propagation
conditions, can severely limit the detectability of returns from features
of interest. Acoustic scattering from the seabed can be a complex mix of
surface roughness and volume heterogeneity contributions, so that
reverberation levels can vary dramatically, depending on the local
geology. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) performed LF and MF,
direct-path bottom backscattering strength (BBS) measurements at 105 sites
over 6 experiments in 5 distinct environments from 1993 to 2005. This
report presents the BBS results from these experiments, as well as
empirical fits to the MF results.
KW - Backscattering
KW - Active sonar
KW - Seabed
KW - Underwater acoustics
KW - Reverberation
KW - Low frequencies
KW - Surface roughness
KW - Sonar signals
KW - Data processing
KW - Bbs(bottom scattering strength)
KW - Mid-frequency
KW - Bottom reverberation
RN - NRL/MR/7160-17-9701
OD - 144
YR - 2017
PC - 800218543
CT - 63A | Acoustic Detection
CT - 46A | Acoustics
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1030090_a

210 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Current Status and Future Challenges in Risk-Based Radiation Engineering.
AU -
Pellish, J. A.
AD -
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AB -
This presentation covers the basis and challenges for radiation effects in
electronic systems. The three main types of radiation effects in
electronics are: 1) total ionizing dose (TID), 2) total non-ionizing dose
(TNID) / displacement damage dose (DDD), and 3) single-event effect (SEE).
Some content on relevant examples of effects, current concerns, and
possible environmental model-driven solutions are also included.
KW - *Single event upsets
KW - *Radiation effects
KW - *Risk
KW - *Radiation damage
KW - *Spacecraft electronic equipment
KW - *Microelectronics
KW - Dosage
KW - Damage
KW - Displacement
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN48236
OD - 20
YR - 2017
PC - 800203019
CT - 54C | Astrophysics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0011271_a

211 - TOXLINE
TI - Unlocking Barriers to DNA Vaccine Immunogenicity: A Cross-Species Analysis
of Cytosolic DNA Sensing in Skeletal Muscle Myocytes.
AU - Zaharatos, G. J.
AD - Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital Montreal, Quebec Canada
AU - Edaye, S.
AD - Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital Montreal, Quebec Canada
AB - DNA vaccine technology holds great promise as a platform for developing
vaccines against both emerging and established global pathogens. Despite
this potential, significant challenges impede the capacity of DNA vaccines
to prevent disease in humans. Foremost amongst these, is the gap between
remarkable results obtained in pre-clinical mouse models and relatively
modest immunogenicity observed in humans. The present work is testing the
hypothesis that skeletal muscle myocytes sense cytosolic DNA and elaborate
an inflammatory response to DNA vaccines and that species-specific
differences in the cytosolic DNA sensing system bring about divergent
inflammatory responses in human versus mouse skeletal muscle myocytes. We
are pursuing the following specific aims: 1) characterize the inflammatory
response elaborated by myocytes following the delivery of DNA to the
cytosol, 2) define the components of the cytosolic DNA sensing system that
are present in skeletal muscle myocytes and 3) ascertain which components
of the myocyte cytosolic DNA sensing system are engaged upon delivery of
DNA to the cytosol. We are utilizing molecular, biochemical and proteomic
methods to analyze the consequences of DNA vaccine vector delivery into
mouse and human myocyte-derived cell lines and primary cells. We
anticipate that our efforts will produce important insights on cytosolic
DNA sensors and provide a key to unlock DNA vaccine immunogenicity for
humans.
KW - Dna
KW - Vaccines
KW - Cytosolic dna sensors
KW - Skeletal muscle myocytes
OD - 36
YR - 2017
PC - 800222026
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044799_a

212 - TOXLINE
TI - Acute Pancreatitis as a Model to Predict Transition of Systemic
Inflammation to Organ Failure in Trauma and Critical Illness.
AU - Whitcomb, D. C.
AD - Pittsburgh Univ., PA.
AU - Wilson, A. S.
AD - Pittsburgh Univ., PA.
AB - Trauma, extensive burns, bacterial infections, and acute pancreatitis (AP)
are common conditions of tissue injury and immune system activation that
can result in the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS).
Surprisingly, about half of the patients with SIRS quickly recover, while
the others develop a multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS). SIRS and MODS
do not occur immediately: SIRS evolves over a 4-12 hour period, while MODS
evolves over12-24 hours. Vascular leak syndrome (VLS) is a critical
component of the transition from SIRS to MODS. Understanding the mechanism
by which SIRS triggers VLS and progresses to MODS is critical to correctly
model disease course thereby aiding in treatment of patients. In this
report, we analyzed the serum samples for proteins and fatty acids that
will help to understand a mechanism for cytotoxicity to endothelial cells.
The results demonstrate elevated cytokine, Ang-1, Ang-2 and activin levels
in serum samples from patients with severe AP. Also, initial mass
spectrometry findings show potential biomarkers that will be explored.
KW - Pancreas
KW - Inflammation
KW - Biological markers
KW - Endothelium
KW - Viability
KW - Pancreatitis
KW - Systemic
KW - Vascular leak
KW - Multiple organ dysfunction
KW - Biomarkers
OD - 19
YR - 2017
PC - 005269000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047997_a

213 - TOXLINE
TI - Effect of Tube-Based X-Ray Microtomography Imaging on the Amino Acid and
Amine Content of the Murchison CM2 Chondrite.
AU - Glavin, D. P.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Friedrich, J. M.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Aponte, J. C.
AD - Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU - Dworkin, J. P.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -Ebel, D. S.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -Elsila, J. E.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -Hill, M.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -McLain, H. L.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AU -Towbin, W. H.
AD -Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD.
AB -X-ray and synchrotron X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) are
increasingly being used for three dimensional reconnaissance imaging of
chondrites and returned extraterrestrial material prior to detailed
chemical and mineralogical analyses. Although micro-CT imaging is
generally considered to be a non-destructive technique since silicate and
metallic minerals in chondrites are not affected by X-ray exposures at the
intensities and wavelengths typically used, there are concerns that the
use of micro-CT could be detrimental to the organics in carbonaceous
chondrites. We recently conducted a synchrotron micro-CT experiment on a
powdered sample of the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous chondrite exposed to a
monochromatic high energy (approximately 48 kiloelectronvolts) total X-ray
radiation dose of approximately 1 kilogray (kGy) using the Advanced Photon
Source beamline 13-BMD (13-Bending Magnet-D Beamline) at Argonne National
Laboratory and found that there were no detectable changes in the amino
acid abundances or enantiomeric compositions in the chondrite after
exposure relative to a Murchison control sample that was not exposed.
However, lower energy bremsstrahlung X-rays could interact more with amino
acids and other lower molecular weight amines in meteorites. To test for
this possibility, three separate micro-CT imaging experiments of the
Murchison meteorite using the GE Phoenix v/tome/x s 240 kilovolt
microfocus high resolution tungsten target X-ray tube instrument at the
American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) were conducted and the amino
acid abundances and enantiomeric compositions were determined. We also
investigated the abundances of the C1-C5 amines in Murchison which were
not analyzed in the first study.
KW - *X ray analysis
KW - *X ray tubes
KW - *Carbonaceous chondrites
KW - *Computer aided tomography
KW - *X ray imagery
KW - *Imaging techniques
KW - *Radiation dosage
KW - *Abundance
KW - *Amino acids
KW - *Amines
KW - *Murchison meteorite
KW - Chemical analysis
KW - Enantiomers
KW - Solvent extraction
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN39070
OD - 2
YR - 2017
PC - 013129000
CT - 99F | Physical &amp; Theoretical Chemistry
CT - 54 | Astronomy &amp; Astrophysics
CT - 84B | Extraterrestrial Exploration
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0002388_a
214 - TOXLINE
TI - Central Mechanisms and Treatment of Blast-Induced Auditory and Vestibular
Injuries.
AU - Long, J. B.
AD - The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, WA.
AB - As a consequence of advances in military medical care there are greatly
increased numbers of survivors of blast-induced traumatic brain injury
(bTBI) sustaining persistent neurosensory dysfunction including hearing
loss and balance disorder. The study is to utilize our well-defined shock
tube simulation of mild blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) in
rodents to characterize interrelated biomechanical and pathophysiological
mechanisms of blast induced central auditory processing disorders (CAPDs)
and central vestibular injuries (CVIs)and to develop an early therapeutic
intervention for hearing loss and balance disorder mitigation. The major
objectives of the proposed studies and relevant research sub-gaps are:1)
Verify the time course of hearing loss and balance disorders induced by
blast exposure and define plasma and CSF TDP-43 as a biomarker related to
blast-induced central auditory/vestibular deficits; 2) Characterize blast
induced biochemical, functional and morphological alterations in central
auditory/vestibular systems and establish that blast induced altered
expression of TDP-43 and its BDPs in these structures play a key
pathophysiological mechanism leading to secondary injuries.
KW - Blast injuries
KW - Hearing loss
KW - Exposure (physiology)
KW - Brain injuries
KW - Biological markers
KW - Pathophysiology
KW - Biomechanics
KW - Blast-induced auditory injuries
KW - Vestibular injuries
KW - Tbi (traumatic brain injuries)
OD - 20
YR - 2018
PC - 118767000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048129_a

215 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Hazard Evaluation Report: HHE-2015-0070-3304, February 2018.
Evaluation of Metalworking Fluid Exposure, Dermatitis, Respiratory
Symptoms, and Psychosocial Factors in an Engine Machining Plant.
AU - Beaucham, C.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Tapp, L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Wiegand, D.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Couch, J.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Mueller, C.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - The Health Hazard Evaluation Program received a request from a union
representative at an automotive engine machining plant with concerns about
metalworking fluid (MWF) exposures in the cylinder head machining
department possibly causing skin and respiratory symptoms among employees.
We (1) interviewed 89 cylinder head employees about their health concerns
and examined those with skin rashes; (2) administered 172 questionnaires
to cylinder head, crankshaft, and long block assembly department employees
about their work exposures and symptoms; (3) took personal and area air
samples for metalworking fluids and area air samples for amines; and (4)
and reviewed illness and injury logs, air sampling reports, and medical
records. Although MWF mist levels measured were below occupational
exposure limits, employees reported a high prevalence of work-related
nasal (45%-55%), respiratory (29%-31%) and skin (25%) symptoms. The
work-related nasal and respiratory symptoms reported by employees were
significantly associated with methods used to clean machines and machine
parts: compressed air, water spray, and coolant spray. We observed
employees not wearing the required protective clothing and using work
practices that could increase the risk for skin exposure to MWF. Twelve
out of 16 employees with rash who were examined at interview appeared to
have skin symptoms likely related to coolant exposure. Some metalworking
fluid was passing through the mist collectors and being exhausted back
into the plant. We recommend limiting exposure to metalworking fluids by
not using compressed air, water, or coolant spray and improving
engineering controls, using gloves consistently, improving communication,
and encouraging employees to report work-related symptoms early.
KW - *Dermal exposures
KW - Dermatitis
KW - Skin exposure
KW - Skin irritants
KW - Metalworking fluids (MWFs)
KW - Metalworking industry
KW - *Health Hazard Evaluation Report
RN - HHE-2015-0070-3304
OD - 60
YR - 2018
PC - 118833000
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100785_a

216 - TOXLINE
TI - Progress of High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor Simulations Using
TURBO.
AU - Kulkarni, S.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Beach, T. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AB - Three-dimensional, time-accurate, and phase-lagged computational fluid
dynamics (CFD) simulations of the High Efficiency Centrifugal Compressor
(HECC) stage were generated using the TURBO solver. Changes to the TURBO
Parallel Version 4 source code were made in order to properly model the
no-slip boundary condition along the spinning hub region for centrifugal
impellers. A startup procedure was developed to generate a converged flow
field in TURBO. This procedure initialized computations on a coarsened
mesh generated by the Turbomachinery Gridding System (TGS) and relied on a
method of systematically increasing wheel speed and backpressure. Baseline
design-speed TURBO results generally overpredicted total pressure ratio,
adiabatic efficiency, and the choking flow rate of the HECC stage as
compared with the design-intent CFD results of Code Leo. Including
diffuser fillet geometry in the TURBO computation resulted in a 0.6
percent reduction in the choking flow rate and led to a better match with
design-intent CFD. Diffuser fillets reduced annulus cross-sectional area
but also reduced corner separation, and thus blockage, in the diffuser
passage. It was found that the TURBO computations are somewhat insensitive
to inlet total pressure changing from the TURBO default inlet pressure of
14.7 pounds per square inch (101.35 kilopascals) down to 11.0 pounds per
square inch (75.83 kilopascals), the inlet pressure of the component test.
Off-design tip clearance was modeled in TURBO in two computations: one in
which the blade tip geometry was trimmed by 12 mils (0.3048 millimeters),
and another in which the hub flow path was moved to reflect a 12-mil axial
shift in the impeller hub, creating a step at the hub. The one-dimensional
results of these two computations indicate non-negligible differences
between the two modeling approaches.
KW - *Centrifugal compressors
KW - *Applications programs (computers)
KW - *Simulation
KW - *Turbomachinery
KW - *Computational fluid dynamics
KW - *Computational grids
KW - *Inlet pressure
KW - *Design analysis
KW - Mathematical models
KW - Pressure ratio
KW - Blade tips
KW - Clearances
KW - Rotor speed
KW - Boundary conditions
KW - Impellers
KW - Fillets
KW - Flow velocity
KW - Choked flow
RN - E-19315
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN31275
RN - NASA/TM-2017-219418
OD - 28
PR - WBS 664817.02.03.02.03.01
YR - 2017
PC - 115801001
CT - 51C | Aircraft
CT - 46B | Fluid Mechanics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0002701_a

217 - TOXLINE
TI - Atypical Opioid Mechanisms of Control of Injury-Induced Cutaneous Pain by
Delta Receptors.
AU - Scherrer, G.
AD - Stanford University Palo Alto
AB - Severe pain due to war-related injuries is difficult to treat, and current
opioids (i.e. mu opioid receptor agonists such as morphine) cause
unacceptable side effects including addiction. Injuries suffered most
frequently by active military personnel include traumatic brain injury,
nerve trauma, skin incision, and burn injury, and all these injuries are
associated with acute cutaneous pain and/or mechanical
allodynia/hypersensitivity. The goals of our research are to evaluate
analgesics acting on delta opioid receptors (DORs) in animal models
relevant to todays battlefield experience (Specific Aim 2), and elucidate
the mechanisms by which DOR agonists, administered in skin and acting on
mechanosensory dorsal root ganglia neurons, relieve pain (Specific Aim 1).
We have determined the analgesic effect of two DOR agonists, deltorphin II
and SNC80. We show that these compounds significantly elevate mechanical
pain threshold, indicating their acute antinociceptive action.
Furthermore, we found that in two models of injuries, namely skin incision
and nerve trauma, a single injection of deltorphin II eliminates the
mechanical hyper sensitivity caused by injury. We have also initiated
studies aiming at identifying the peripheral sensory neurons that express
DOR, a first step towards understanding the analgesic mechanism of action
of DOR agonists. We are currently extending these findings by performing
the other experiments described in our original proposal, without
significant change in our plans and strategy. Importantly, our promising
results support our hypothesis that DOR agonists, acting in the skin,
represents an effective therapeutic strategy for blocking severe pain
associated with injuries that can be suffered on the battlefield.
KW - Pain
KW - Drug receptors
KW - Neurons
KW - Military medicine
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Analgesics
KW - Burns
KW - Electrophysiology
KW - Histology
KW - Dor (delta opioid receptors)
KW - Dor agonists
KW - Deltorphin ii
KW - Snc80
KW - Cutaneous pain
KW - Acute pain
KW - Battlefield injuries
KW - Injury-induced chronic pain
KW - Incision injury
KW - Nerve injury
KW - Mice
KW - Intraplantar injections
KW - Pain behavior
KW - Drg (dorsal root ganglion)
KW - Drg neurons
KW - Mechanism of action
KW - Allodynia
OD - 16
YR - 2017
PC - 800221965
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044400_a

218 - TOXLINE
TI - Mobile Acoustic Sampling to Map Bathymetry and Quantify the Densities and
Distributions of Salmonid Smolt Predators in the San Joaquin River.
AU - Cutter, G. R.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Manugian, S. C.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Renfree, J.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Smith, J.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Michel, C.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Huff, D.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Sessions, T. S.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Elliot, B. E.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Stierhoff, K.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Mau, S.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Murfin, D.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Demer, D. A.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AB - Salmon smolt mortality in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River (SJR) system of
central California is impacted by predatory fish. To quantify the
abundance, distribution, and habitats of these predators, we devised and
implemented novel active-acoustic methods to sample the fish and
bathymetry in this shallow-water environment. Acoustic surveys using
vertically- and horizontally-oriented split-beam and multibeam sonars were
conducted between March and May, 2014 and 2015, from the Port of Stockton
to Lathrop, California. Individual fish were acoustically detected using
single-target detection and echo-track processing methods, and aggregated
fish counts were converted to densities and abundances by compensating for
the sampled volumes of the acoustic beams, the probability of target
detections, and the river volume. Volume was estimated from 1-by-1- m
grid-cell bathymetric maps produced from M3 multi-beam sonars for the
26-km study area. Bathymetric mapping and target detection efforts were
complicated by the low grazing angles, high-reverberation and clutter,
and strong second bottom returns induced by the shallow river environment.
Riverbed habitats were discriminated by morphology and back-scatter
intensity, and bathymetry data were used to constrain sonar detections of
fish. Additionally, novel signal processing of M3 water-column data was
used to map submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) beds and to detect fish
among clutter. Predators were associated with certain riverbed features
and SAV along the part of the route that salmon smolt migrate to the
ocean. Fish densities were highly variable in both space and time,
however, persistently high densities occurred in many deep pools in the
bends of the river.
KW - *Mobile Acoustic Sampling
KW - *Map Bathymetry
KW - *Salmonid habitat
KW - *Smolt migration
KW - Quantifying
KW - Densities
KW - Distributions functions
KW - San Joaquin River Basin California
KW - Habitats (Ecology)
KW - Backscatter analysis
KW - Fish densities
KW - Abundances
KW - Morphology (Biology)
KW - *Sacramento-San Joaquin River (SJR) system
RN - NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-575
OD - 137
YR - 2017
PC - 037938004
CT - 57H | Ecology
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
CT - 47B | Dynamic Oceanography
CT - 48I | Cartography
CT - 48B | Natural Resource Management
CT - 98F | Fisheries &amp; Aquaculture
CT - 63A | Acoustic Detection
CT - 63B | Electromagnetic &amp; Acoustic Countermeasures
CT - 46A | Acoustics
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102237_a

219 - TOXLINE
TI - Breeding Season Distribution and Population Growth of California Sea
Lions, "Zalophus califorianus", in the United States During 1964-2014.
AU - Lowry, M. S.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Melin, S. R.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Laake, J. L.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, La Jolla, CA. Southwest Fisheries Science
Center.
AB - Breeding-season distribution and population growth rate of California sea
lions (Zalophus californianus) in the U.S. population are estimated from
counts of pups and non-pups collected during 1964 to 2014. Pup and non-pup
count data were compiled from published and unpublished sources. These
data showed that during this period the U.S. count of live-pups increased
at an average annual rate of 4.7% per year (L95% CI=4.2%, U95% CI=5.2%).
Average annual growth rates of live-pup counts at the four main
island-rookeries in southern California (Santa Barbara Island, San
Clemente Island, San Nicolas Island, and San Miguel Island; hence fore
referred to as the Main Channel Islands) ranged from 4.2% to 5.5% from
1964 to 2014. The Channel Islands count of non-pups (non-pup counts were
unavailable for the entire U.S. population prior to 2003) increased at an
average annual growth rate of 2.8% per year (L95% CI=2.4%, U95% CI=3.4%).
San Nicolas Island and San Miguel Island were the largest rookeries in the
U.S. population, both having the most pups and non-pups. Prior to 1990,
59.2% of live pups counted in the Channel Islands were on San Miguel
Island, and 32.4% were on San Nicolas Island. After 1990, these islands
constituted 44.9% and 45.6% of Channel Island pups, respectively.
California-wide surveys conducted during 2003-2005, 2007, and 2011-2013
indicated that the Main Channel Islands rookeries accounted for 99.71% of
live pups counted in California and 77.35% of hauled-out non-pups in
California during the breeding season. Sea lion counts were modeled (using
generalized linear modeling) as a function of sea level height at Los
Angeles, California (SLH-LA), Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), North
Pacific Gyre Oscillation (NPGO), and Multivariate El Niño Index (MEI).
This model indicated that more pups were produced during cold-water
conditions and fewer pups were produced during warmwater conditions, and
that fewer non-pups were present at southern California rookeries during
warm-water conditions and more were present during cold-water conditions.
KW - *Distribution
KW - *Population growth
KW - *California (State)
KW - *Sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus)
KW - *Zalophus califorianus
KW - San Nicolas Island(California)
KW - *Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO)
RN - NOAA-TM-NMFS-SWFSC-574
OD - 66
YR - 2017
PC - 037938004
CT - 98F | Fisheries &amp; Aquaculture
CT - 57H | Ecology
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102238_a

220 - TOXLINE
TI - Flexible Regenerative Nanoelectronics for Advanced Peripheral Neural
Interfaces.
AU - Baker , A. B.
AD - Texas Univ., Austin.
AU - Xie, C.
AD - Texas Univ., Austin.
AB - The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a set of
technologies to enable peripheral neural electrodes that have a
high-density contact array, ultra-flexibility, and spatially defined
biomaterials that promote neurovascular regeneration. The resulted
regenerative neural electrode will be capable of selective interfacing and
promote the ingrowth of neural and vascular tissues, which result in a
seamless integration of peripheral nerves, vessels and electrode. We
proposed the following related specific tasks to create advanced neural
interfaces: Task 1. Design and fabrication of high-density ultra-flexible
mesh electrodes. Task 2. Create and optimize patternable materials that
can specifically induce neurovascular regeneration to stabilize
electrode-nerve interaction. Task 3. Construct nerve guidance scaffolds
comprising of embedded ultra-flexible mesh electrodes with defined
pathways for neurogenesis/angiogenesis and test these scaffolds in a mouse
subcutaneous implantation model and a rat sciatic nerve gap model.
KW - Nanoelectronics
KW - Electrodes
KW - Regenerative medicine
KW - Biological materials
KW - Fabrication
KW - Sciatic nerve
KW - Assays
KW - Peripheral neural interfaces
KW - Neurovascular regeneration
KW - Patternable materials
KW - Electrode-nerve interactions
KW - Nerve guidance scaffolds
KW - Neurogenesis
KW - Angiogenesis
KW - Mouse models
KW - Flexible neural electrodes
OD - 20
YR - 2017
PC - 009813000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 49 | Electrotechnology
CT - 71M | Miscellaneous Materials
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048282_a

221 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Consultation: Evaluation of Stream Sediment and Floodplain Soil
Downstream from the Ward Transformer NPL Site, Raleigh, North Carolina,
March 31, 2017. EPA Facility ID: NCD003202603.
AB - ATSDR and DPH previously released a public health assessment (ATSDR 2005b)
and a health consultation (ATSDR 2008) evaluating potential health effects
related to contamination from the Ward Transformer NPL site. The public
health assessment evaluated the potential for health effects from exposure
to contaminated fish, soil, sediment, and surface water (ATSDR 2005b)1.
The previous health consultation evaluated the potential for health
effects from exposure to contaminated fish downstream from the site (ATSDR
2008)2. These previous site investigations noted that the primary
contaminant of concern for the downstream portions of this site is
polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). PCBs were chemicals used until 1977 in
electrical equipment and for other uses.
KW - *Public health
KW - *Water quality
KW - *Health hazards
KW - *Contamination
KW - Streams
KW - Exposure
KW - Health consultations
KW - Sediments
KW - Floodplains
KW - Surface water
KW - Contaminated fish
KW - Contaminated soil
KW - Floodplain soil samples
KW - Downstream areas
KW - *Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)
KW - *National Priorities List (NPL)
OD - 34
YR - 2017
PC - 118782000
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 48G | Hydrology &amp; Limnology
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102111_a

222 - TOXLINE
TI - Science of Emissions from Alternative Fuels.
AU - Roquemore, W. M.
AD - Air Force Research Lab Wight-Patterson AFB United States
AU - Litzinger, T. A.
AD - Air Force Research Lab Wight-Patterson AFB United States
AB - Gas turbine engines (GTEs) consume approximately 70 percent of the total
fuel purchased by the DoD and are the major source of carbon monoxide
(CO), unburned hydrocarbons (UHC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), and
particulate matter (PM) emissions produced at military airbases. The DoD
has established goals for use of synthetic derived alternative JP-8, which
will consist of blends of petroleum-based JP-8 and synthetic fuels and
potentially fully synthetic fuels. These goals present new challenges for
low emissions combustors that will burn alternative fuels. First, the
alternative fuels, that could be in the DoD inventory in the next ten to
twenty years, are in the early stages of being defined, and second, there
is very little fundamental data on the combustion of possible alternative
fuels. This SERDP program described in this report was designed to address
these challenges by establishing a scientific base for modeling all
emissions from GTEs burning alternative fuels and by developing a
methodology for selecting future alternative fuels based on their
emissions characteristics. Field studies of aircraft engine emissions have
identified clear effects of alternative fuels. Alternative fuels have been
demonstrated to have an impact on the composition of the UHC emissions.
Blending paraffinic alternative fuels into JP-8 has also been found to
substantially reduce particulate matter emissions. Field and laboratory
studies have also shown that each of the emissions vary substantially as
engine power varies. At low power conditions, emissions of unburned
hydrocarbons and CO are the highest, and they decrease with increasing
power. Soot and NOx emissions are most significant at higher engine power.
Thus, it is important to understand the effects of alternative fuels at
both low and high power conditions.
KW - Emission
KW - Alternative fuels
KW - Gas turbines
KW - Models
KW - Simulation
KW - Shock tubes
KW - Jet flames
KW - Combustors
KW - Gte(gas turbine engine)
KW - Dod(dep[artment of defense)
KW - Stirred reactors
OD - 348
YR - 2017
PC - 800221981
CT - 97K | Fuels
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044930_a

223 - TOXLINE
TI - Targeted Radiation Therapy for Cancer Initiative.
AU - Macdonald, D.
AD - The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, WA.
AB - This program established the infrastructure to provide state-of-the-art
targeted radiation therapy to military personnel and veteranswith cancer.
The research aspect of this project demonstrated that 1) targeted
radiation therapy with real-time localization andtracking allows use of a
smaller planning treatment volume margin with a significant decrease in
rectal and bladder volume treatedand that the use of such targeted therapy
can occur within standard treatment times and thus is feasible for routine
clinical use, 2)Beacon Transponder is of benefit in pelvic radiation
therapy following prostatectomy by allowing reduction in bladder
volumeincorporated into treatment volume, 3) the precision and accuracy of
radiation therapy using breath-hold technique for left-sidedbreast cancer
patients treated with adjuvant radiation therapy, with the benefit of
confirmatory tracking via the Calypso 4DLocalization System will help to
spare toxicity to the heart, 4) a military medical center department, with
essentially fixed costs, mayfeasibly apply advanced technologies and
hypofractionation to palliative patients and 6) use of the Calypso system,
and otheradvanced radiation therapy equipment, can improve treatment
techniques and outcomes in malignancies arising in other parts of thebody.
KW - Targeted Radiation
KW - Cancer
OD - 58
YR - 2017
PC - 118767000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57V | Radiobiology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047377_a

224 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Identification of NPM and DDX5 as Therapeutic Targets in TSC.
AU -
Weber, J. D.
AD -
Washington University ST. Louis United States
AB -
TSC is a common inherited predisposition syndrome, affecting nearly 1 in
7,500 individuals. Individuals with TSC develop benign tumors in multiple
organs, including the retina, skin, lung, kidney and brain. The
identification of valid targets in TSC has been discouraging. In search of
TSC targets, we recently identified NPM as a downstream effector of mTOR
signaling in TSC cells, providing cells with an abundant supply of
ribosomes necessary for supporting their increased growth rate. We now
provide evidence that NPM forms a novel complex with DDX5 to drive TSC
cell growth. Using the NCI diversity set and Maybridge chemical compound
sets, we have now identified two compounds that potently inhibit
split-luciferase activity in two TSC cells lines. Notably, these two
compounds also inhibit the proliferation of TSC/p53-null and UMB1949 TSC
cells while not altering the growth rates of p53-null cells that maintain
TSC function, suggesting that these compounds might specifically target
NPM-DDX5 complex formation when it is enhanced in TSC cells. We have also
shown that these two compounds inhibit the formation of endogenous
NPM-DDX5 complexes in TSC cells.
KW - Sclerosis
KW - Genetic disorders
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Cell line
KW - Inhibition
KW - Npm
KW - Ddx5
KW - Tsc (tuberous sclerosis complex)
KW - Chemical libraries
KW - Split-luciferase activity
KW - Tsc cells
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800219738
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050076_a

225 - TOXLINE
TI - NASA's Space Launch System: Systems Engineering Approach for Affordability
and Mission Success.
AU - Hutt, J. J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Whitehead, J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Hanson, J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AB - NASA is working toward the first launch of a new, unmatched capability for
deep space exploration, with launch readiness planned for 2018. The
initial Block 1 configuration of the Space Launch System will more than
double the mass and volume to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) of any launch vehicle
currently in operation - with a path to evolve to the greatest capability
ever developed. The program formally began in 2011. The vehicle
successfully passed Preliminary Design Review (PDR) in 2013, Key Decision
Point C (KDPC) in 2014 and Critical Design Review (CDR) in October 2015 -
nearly 40 years since the last CDR of a NASA human-rated rocket. Every
major SLS element has completed components of test and flight hardware.
Flight software has completed several development cycles. RS-25 hotfire
testing at NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) has successfully demonstrated
the space shuttle-heritage engine can perform to SLS requirements and
environments. The five-segment solid rocket booster design has
successfully completed two full-size motor firing tests in Utah. Stage and
component test facilities at Stennis and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center
are nearing completion. Launch and test facilities, as well as
transportation and other ground support equipment are largely complete at
NASA's Kennedy, Stennis and Marshall field centers. Work is also underway
on the more powerful Block 1 B variant with successful completion of the
Exploration Upper Stage (EUS) PDR in January 2017. NASA's approach is to
develop this heavy lift launch vehicle with limited resources by building
on existing subsystem designs and existing hardware where available. The
systems engineering and integration (SE&amp;I) of existing and new designs
introduces unique challenges and opportunities. The SLS approach was
designed with three objectives in mind: 1) Design the vehicle around the
capability of existing systems; 2) Reduce work hours for nonhardware/
software activities; 3) Increase the probability of mission success by
focusing effort on more critical activities.
KW - *Deep space
KW - *Launch vehicles
KW - *Low earth orbits
KW - *Space exploration
KW - *Spacecraft launching
KW - *Systems engineering
KW - *Payload integration
KW - *Spacecraft performance
KW - *Solid propellant rocket engines
KW - Certification
KW - Complex systems
KW - Cost effectiveness
KW - Proving
RN - M17-5932
OD - 3
YR - 2017
PC - 019043002
CT - 84E | Space Launch Vehicles &amp; Support Equipment
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0012312_a

226 - TOXLINE
TI - Technical Guidance Manual: Contaminant Flux Reduction Barriers for
Managing Difficult-to-Treat Source Zones in Unconsolidated Media.
AU - Newell, C.
AD - Department of Defense, Arlington, VA. Environmental Security Technology
Certification Program Office.
AU - Kulkarni, P. R.
AD - Department of Defense, Arlington, VA. Environmental Security Technology
Certification Program Office.
AU - Higgins, E. A.
AD - Department of Defense, Arlington, VA. Environmental Security Technology
Certification Program Office.
AU - Strasters, B. A.
AD - Department of Defense, Arlington, VA. Environmental Security Technology
Certification Program Office.
AU - Newell, C. J.
AD - Department of Defense, Arlington, VA. Environmental Security Technology
Certification Program Office.
AB - The overall objective of this project was to evaluate if inexpensive flow
reduction agents delivered via permeation grouting technology could help
manage difficult-to-treat chlorinated solvent source zones. This approach
aims to provide two benefits for improving groundwater quality at
chlorinated volatile organic carbon (CVOC) sites by: 1. physically
reducing the mass flux of contaminants leaving the source zone by using
permeation grouting, thereby reducing risk and making the down gradient
plume more amenable for management by natural attenuation processes; and
2) increasing the Natural Source Zone Depletion (NSZD) rate within the
source by diverting competing electron acceptors around the source zone to
create an enhanced reductive dechlorination zone (ERDZ).
KW - Environmental security
KW - Groundwater
KW - Water supplies
KW - Monitoring
KW - Silica gels
KW - Case studies
KW - Attenuation
KW - Organic materials
KW - Chlorination
KW - Solvents
KW - Grouting
KW - Barrier
KW - Erdz(enhanced reductive dechlorination zone)
KW - Nszd(natural source zone depletion)
KW - Chlorinated solvents
KW - Inexpensive flow reduction
RN - ER-201328
OD - 51
PR - ER-201328
YR - 2017
PC - 111673010
CT - 50C | Construction Equipment, Materials, &amp; Supplies
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042945_a

227 - TOXLINE
TI - Gulf War Illness Inflammation Reduction Trial.
AU - Bach, R. R.
AD - Department of Defense, Washington, DC.
AB - The objective of this clinical trial is to find an evidence-based
treatment for Gulf War Illness (GWI). Elevated biomarkers of inflammation
were observed in our pilot observational study of GWI. Thus, chronic
inflammation appears to be part of the underlying pathophysiology of GWI.
Reducing GWI-associated inflammation may alleviate some symptom of the
disorder and improve the health-related quality of life of veterans with
GWI. This is a randomized, two-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled
clinical trial of delayed-release prednisone versus matching placebo. A
total of 100 veterans with GWI will be enrolled in the trial. Prednisone
was chosen as the study drug because of its well-established pleiotropic
anti-inflammatory properties. The specific aims of the study are to
measure the effects of the treatment on the following: 1) physical and
mental functioning 2) pain, fatigue, and cognitive dysfunction 3)
biomarkers of inflammation. All regulatory approvals for this clinical
trial have been received. Recruitment and enrollment have begun. A
successful trial with improved clinical outcomes and reduced
proinflammatory biomarkers would be direct evidence of the role that
chronic inflammation plays in the underlying pathophysiology of GWI. Thus,
a new paradigm for the diagnosis and treatment of GWI would be
established. The potential impact of this new paradigm on the health and
well-being of veterans with GWI is very significant.
KW - Persian gulf syndrome
KW - Inflammation
KW - Drugs
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Biological markers
KW - Pain
KW - Fatigue (physiology)
KW - Cognitive impairment
KW - Gwi (gulf war illness)
KW - Chronic inflammation
KW - Delayed-release prednisone
KW - Proinflammatory biomarkers
KW - Evidence-based treatment
OD - 9
YR - 2017
PC - 000139000
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043062_a

228 - TOXLINE
TI - P52 Activation and Enzalutamide Therapy in Prostate Cancer.
AU - Gao, A. C.
AD - California Univ., Davis.
AB - There has been a major focus on the androgen receptor (AR) pathway as the
principal therapeutic target for CRPC including recently approved
therapies such as next-generation antiandrogen enzalutamide and
abiraterone. Despite these advances that provide temporary respite, almost
all patients will go on to die from progressive and resistant prostate
cancer. Therefore, there is an urgent need to identify resistant pathways
that perpetuate disease progression. We provided preliminary data
demonstrating that p52 increases AR variant V7 (AR-V7) expression and
enhances prostate cancer cell resistance to next generation antiandrogen
enzalutamide treatment. We hypothesize that overexpression of p52
signaling activates resistance pathways to enzalutamide and co-targeting
p52 will overcome treatment resistance. In this project, we will examine
the potential mechanisms underlying p52-mediated treatment resistance (Aim
1). Aim 2 will validate the efficacy of co-targetingp52 to overcome
treatment resistance to enzalutamide. We hope to identify the mechanisms
of adaptive/resistant pathways that are responsible for enzalutamide
resistance, and provide a rationale for therapeutic co-targeting to
overcome enzalutamide resistance
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Proteins
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Resistance
KW - Disease attributes
KW - Transcription factors
KW - Cell physiological processes
KW - Androgens
KW - Nf-b2/p52
KW - Androgen receptor
KW - Variants
KW - Enzalutamide
OD - 7
YR - 2017
PC - 004365000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042920_a

229 - TOXLINE
TI - Human Exploration of the Solar System by 2100.
AU - Litchford, R. J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AB - It has been suggested that the U.S., in concert with private entities and
international partners, set itself on a course to accomplish human
exploration of the solar system by the end of this century. This is a
strikingly bold vision intended to revitalize the aspirations of HSF in
service to the security, economic, and scientific interests of the nation.
Solar system distance and time scales impose severe requirements on crewed
space transportation systems, however, and fully realizing all objectives
in support of this goal will require a multi-decade commitment employing
radically advanced technologies - most prominently, space habitats capable
of sustaining and protecting life in harsh radiation environments under
zero gravity conditions and in-space propulsion technologies capable of
rapid deep space transits with earth return, the subject of this paper.
While near term mission destinations such as the moon and Mars can be
accomplished with chemical propulsion and/or high power SEP, fundamental
capability constraints render these traditional systems ineffective for
solar system wide exploration. Nuclear based propulsion and alternative
energetic methods, on the other hand, represent potential avenues, perhaps
the only viable avenues, to high specific power space transport evincing
reduced trip time, reduced IMLEO, and expanded deep space reach. Here,
very long term HSF objectives for solar system wide exploration are
examined in relation to the advanced propulsion technology solution
landscape including foundational science, technical/engineering
challenges, and developmental prospects.
KW - *Space exploration
KW - *Deep space
KW - *Solar system
KW - *Manned space flight
KW - *Aerospace environments
KW - *Extraterrestrial radiation
KW - *Radiation effects
KW - *Propulsion system performance
KW - *International cooperation
KW - Space transportation system
KW - In situ resource utilization
KW - Long duration space flight
KW - Systems health monitoring
KW - Human tolerances
KW - Human factors engineering
KW - Specific impulse
KW - Propellant mass ratio
RN - MSFC-E-DAA-TN39208
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 019043002
CT - 84B | Extraterrestrial Exploration
CT - 84 | Space Technology
CT - 84G | Unmanned Spacecraft
CT - 84C | Manned Spacecraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0001554_a

230 - TOXLINE
TI - NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety: Results from 2016 Midcourse Review.
AU - Fosbroke, D.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Olsavsky, R.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Pratt, S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Rodriguez-Acosta, R.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - The NIOSH Center for Motor Vehicle Safety (CMVS), with our partners,
conducts research and develops strategies to prevent work-related motor
vehicle crashes and injuries. Through 5 strategic goals, we're working to:
1) identify risk factors for work-related crashes 2) apply engineering and
technology-based safety interventions 3) promote evidence-based policies,
standards, and regulations 4) collaborate with global partners and 5)
communicate safety and policy recommendations. Why we do it: Millions of
workers drive or ride in a motor vehicle as part of their jobs. Motor
vehicle crashes are the leading cause of work-related injury deaths in the
United States, accounting for 23,865 deaths from 2003-2015. These deaths
have an impact on workers, their families, businesses, and communities. In
2013 alone, motor vehicle crashes at work cost U.S. employers $25 billion
- $65,000 per nonfatal injury and $671,000 per death. All workers are at
risk of crashes, whether they drive light or heavy vehicles, or whether
driving is a main or incidental job duty. The goal of the Center for Motor
Vehicle Safety is to make sure that those who work in or near vehicles
come home safely at the end of their work day. Who we work with: CMVS
researchers collaborate with partners in industry, labor, professional and
trade associations, government agencies, and academia. What sets us apart:
NIOSH is the only part of the U.S. federal government whose mission
encompasses prevention of work-related motor vehicle crashes and resulting
injuries for all worker populations. Other federal agencies have
responsibilities and interest in motor vehicle safety for specific worker
groups (e.g., truckers, fire fighters, law enforcement officers). Priority
populations: We research and provide guidance to promote motor vehicle
safety for truck drivers, other high-risk workers (e.g., emergency medical
service (EMS), law enforcement, oil and gas extraction workers), and all
who drive for work (e.g., home healthcare workers, sales representatives).
KW - *Occupational safety and health
KW - *Motor vehicle drivers
KW - *Traffic safety
KW - Accident prevention
KW - Employees
KW - Environmental exposure
KW - Fatalities
KW - Hazards
KW - Injuries
KW - Interventions
KW - Motor vehicle accidents
KW - Public health
KW - Risk
KW - Safety belts
KW - Strategic plan
KW - Workplace
KW - Morbidity rates
KW - Mortality rates
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-139
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 85D | Transportation Safety
CT - 85H | Road Transportation
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102219_a

231 - TOXLINE
TI - Mathematical Model of HIF-1 alpha Pathway, Oxygen Transport and Hypoxia.
AU - Robinson, P. J.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Hack, C. E.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Merrill, E. A.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Mattie, D. R.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AB - Episodes of hypoxia-like events experienced by F-22 pilots after training
missions have raised questions about pilot exposures and diminished
operational mission accomplishment. These episodes identified data gaps in
the understanding of pilot exposures in high performance aircraft. We,
therefore, need to understand how levels of low oxygen at lower than
atmospheric pressure causes physiological hypoxia, and how this relates to
alterations in cognition. Oxygen sensing pathways, particularly those
involving the oxygen sensing cytosolic gene transcription factor HIF-1,
are key to understanding these responses. A mathematical model was
developed to integrate these experimental measurements and provide a
description of hypoxia mechanisms and the organisms response.
KW - Cerebral hypoxia
KW - Sensory receptor cells
KW - Proteins
KW - Neurons
KW - Cellular structures
KW - Microvessels
KW - Experimental data
KW - Gene expression
KW - High altitude
KW - Mathematical models
KW - Body fluids
KW - Cardiovascular physiological processes
KW - Transcription factors
KW - Pilots
KW - Fighter aircraft
KW - Exposure (physiology)
KW - Flight training
KW - Stress (physiology)
KW - Military medicine
KW - Signaling pathways
KW - Brain hypoxia
KW - Oxygen delivery
KW - Vegf(vascular endothelial growth factor)
KW - Angiogenesis
KW - Carotid body
KW - F-22 aircraft
RN - AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2017-0080
OD - 49
PR - 7757
YR - 2017
PC - 118032000
CT - 57W | Stress Physiology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043051_a

232 - TOXLINE
TI - Pulmonary Inflammatory Responses To Acute Meteorite Dust Exposures -
Implications For Human Space Exploration.
AU - Harrington, A. D.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - McCubbin, F. M.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Kaur, J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Smirnov, A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Galdanes, K.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Schoonen, M. A. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Chen, L. C.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Tsirka, S. E.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AU - Gordon, T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AB - The previous manned missions to the Moon represent milestones of human
ingenuity, perseverance, and intellectual curiosity. However, one of the
major ongoing concerns is the array of hazards associated with lunar
surface dust. Not only did the dust cause mechanical and structural
integrity issues with the suits, the dust 'storm' generated upon
reentrance into the crew cabin caused "lunar hay fever" and "almost
blindness" (Figure 1). It was further reported that the allergic response
to the dust worsened with each exposure. The lack of gravity exacerbated
the exposure, requiring the astronauts to wear their helmet within the
module in order to avoid breathing the irritating particles. Due to the
prevalence of these high exposures, the Human Research Roadmap developed
by NASA identifies the Risk of Adverse Health and Performance Effects of
Celestial Dust Exposure as an area of concern. Extended human exploration
will further increase the probability of inadvertent and repeated
exposures to celestial dusts. Going forward, hazard assessments of
celestial dusts will be determined through sample return efforts prior to
astronaut deployment. Studies on the lunar highland regolith indicate that
the dust is not only respirable but also reactive, and previous studies
concluded that it is moderately toxic; generating a greater response than
titanium oxide but a lower response than quartz. The presence of reactive
oxygen species (ROS) on the surface of the dust has been implicated.
However, there is actually little data related to physicochemical
characteristics of particulates and pulmonary toxicity, especially as it
relates to celestial dust exposure. As a direct response to this deficit,
the present study evaluates the role of a particulate's innate geochemical
features (e.g., bulk chemistry, internal composition, morphology, size,
and reactivity) in generating adverse toxicological responses in vitro and
in vivo. This highly interdisciplinary study evaluates the relative
toxicity of six meteorite samples representing either basalt or regolith
breccia on the surfaces of the Moon, Mars, and Asteroid 4Vesta; three
potential candidates for future human exploration or colonization.
Terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is also used for comparison as a
control sample.
KW - *Pulmonary functions
KW - *Interplanetary dust
KW - *Meteorites
KW - *Space exploration
KW - *Astronauts
KW - *Physiological responses
KW - *Exposure
KW - *Toxicity
KW - *Health
KW - *Risk
KW - Geochemistry
KW - Lunar rocks
KW - Sample return missions
KW - Hazards
KW - In vitro methods and tests
KW - In vivo methods and tests
RN - JSC-CN-38658
OD - 2
YR - 2017
PC - 019042004
CT - 84 | Space Technology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0001337_a

233 - TOXLINE
TI - Regulating Cancer-Associated Fibroblast Biology in Prostate Cancer.
AU - Kraft, A.
AD - Arizona Univ., Tucson.
AB - There is an urgent need to develop both new approaches to the treatment of
prostate cancer. Analysis of human prostate samples demonstrates that a
specific signaling pathway, the Pim kinase pathway is elevated in the
fibroblasts from human prostate tumors. To understand the role of
myofibroblast/cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in transformation, the
laboratory proposes (1) to examine in detail the proteins secreted by the
stroma that can modulate epithelial growth, (2) to evaluate the ability of
Pim inhibitors to block this activity, and (3) to investigate whether
exosomes can potentially be used as a biomarker of Pim kinase inhibitor
activity. Results to date demonstrate that Pim increases in prostate
stromal cells enhances protein synthesis, the levels of important
transcription factors, long non-coding RNAs, and tyrosine kinases
associated with signal transduction as well increased exosomal transfer
both in cells co-cultured and when conditioned media is placed on prostate
epithelial cells. These changes are blocked by the addition of Pim
inhibitors. These results suggest that the Pim protein kinase can regulate
stromal cell biology to modulate epithelial growth and that inhibitors of
this protein kinase have the potential to block this process and thus
inhibit tumor growth.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Fibroblasts
KW - Therapy
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Caf(cancer associate fibroblast)
KW - Myofibroblasts
KW - Pim protein kinase
KW - Exosomes
OD - 12
YR - 2017
PC - 000951000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043346_a

234 - TOXLINE
TI - Molecular and Cellular Determinants of Malignant Transformation in
Pulmonary Premalignancy.
AU - Krysan, K.
AD - University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles United States
AB - During the first funding period we completed Major Tasks 1 and 2. The
areas of interest were identified in 41 lung cancer patient and isolated
by LCM. Genomic DNA was isolated from these areas and whole exome
sequencing was performed. The data has been analyzed and the
progression-associated mutations, as well as premalignant- and
malignant-specific mutations, were identified. The mutational data was
analyzed in the pathway context. Based on the mutational analysis,
neoantigens were identified.
KW - Lung cancer
KW - Mutations
KW - Antigens
KW - Deoxyribonucleic acids
KW - Immunochemistry
KW - Lesions
KW - Premalignancy
KW - Progression
KW - Wes (whole exome sequencing)
KW - Driver mutations
KW - Neoantigens
KW - Genomic dna
KW - Aah (atypical adenomatous hyperplasia)
KW - Adc (adenocarcinoma)
KW - Dna (deoxyribonucleic acids)
KW - Ihc (immunohistochemistry)
KW - Lcm (laser capture microdissection)
KW - Ais (adc in situ)
KW - Pam (progression-associated mutations)
KW - Msm (malignant-specific mutations)
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 800218772
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050188_a

235 - TOXLINE
TI - Beluga Whale, Delphinapterus leucas, Satellite-Tagging and Health
Assessments in Cook Inlet, Alaska, 1999 to 2002.
AU - Shelden, K. E. W.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Goetz, K. T.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Hobbs, R. C.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Hoberecht, L. K.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Laidre, K. L.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Mahoney, B. A.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - McGuire, T. L.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AU - Norman, S. A.
AD - National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA. Alaska Fisheries Science
Center.
AB - Cook Inlet beluga whales, Delphinapterus leucas, are currently listed as
‘Endangered’ under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA). The National
Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) began monitoring this population during
the 1990s after it was added to the ESA Candidate Species list in 1988.
Monitoring efforts included aerial surveys, and in 1995, the first
attempts to capture and satellite-tag whales. Working with Canadian
scientists and Alaska Native subsistence hunters in 1995 and 1997, tagging
methods were adapted to conditions in Cook Inlet (muddy water, extreme
tides, and extensive mudflats), culminating in successful capture and
tracking of a whale during the summer of 1999. This was followed by three
more years of capture and tagging studies during late summer. Tags were
attached to 18 whales between 1999 and 2002. We do not have detailed
accounts of these later tagging seasons (e.g., similar to the Appendix
chronicling events from the 1997 and 1999 seasons in Ferrero et al.
(2000)). Litzky et al. (2001) summarized field operations for the 2000
tagging season, but no reports exist for 2001 and 2002. A reanalysis of
the tag dataset (Goetz et al. 2012) led to questions about the captures
and how tags were programmed during this time period. Given the Cook Inlet
population has continued to decline (Hobbs et al. 2015, Shelden et al.
2017), and was listed as an Endangered Distinct Population Segment under
the ESA in October 2008 (NOAA 2008), future recommendations for tagging
will depend on lessons learned from these past projects. Lacking detailed
field reports, we consolidated information from multiple sources. Herein,
the authors bring these varied sources together to provide a thorough
documentation of the tagging operations undertaken in Cook Inlet each
summer in 2000, 2001, and 2002. They include revised tag transmission
timelines, monthly movement maps, dive behavior data, and ice-association
graphs and maps for all whales (where applicable) tagged in 1999, 2000,
2001, and 2002. Whale locations were compared to sighting records
(opportunistic and systematic) to determine how many whales were likely
proximate to tagged whales. Animations of whale movements (accessed 17
Aug. 2016). Beginning with the 2000 season, each whale underwent a health
assessment at the time of tagging. Results from laboratory analyses of the
blood, blubber, skin, and mucus samples are presented. These include
results obtained for hematology and serum chemistry values, hormones, DNA
extractions, blubber lipid composition, fatty acid profiles, stable
isotope ratios, and persistent organic pollutant profiles. The authors
also provide a follow-up to the tagging study, describing captured and
tagged whales that have been photo-documented since 2005 by the Cook Inlet
Beluga Whale Photo-identification Project.
KW - *Beluga whales
KW - *Delphinapterus leucas
KW - *Tagging fish
KW - *Cook Inlet (Alaska)
KW - Satellite Analysis
KW - Recommendations
KW - Blubber lipid composition
KW - *National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
KW - *Endangered Species Act (ESA)
RN - NOAA-TM-NMFS-AFSC-369
OD - 234
YR - 2018
PC - 034391013
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 98F | Fisheries &amp; Aquaculture
CT - 57H | Ecology
CT - 47D | Biological Oceanography
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100721_a

236 - TOXLINE
TI - Oxygen Extraction from Minerals.
AU - Muscatello, T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cocoa Beach, FL. John F.
Kennedy Space Center.
AB - Oxygen, whether used as part of rocket bipropellant or for astronaut life
support, is a key consumable for space exploration and commercialization.
In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) has been proposed many times as a
method for making space exploration more cost effective and sustainable.
On planetary and asteroid surfaces the presence of minerals in the
regolith that contain oxygen is very common, making them a potential
oxygen resource. The majority of research and development for oxygen
extraction from minerals has been for lunar regolith although this work
would generally be applicable to regolith at other locations in space.
This presentation will briefly survey the major methods investigated for
oxygen extraction from regolith with a focus on the current status of
those methods and possible future development pathways. The major oxygen
production methods are (1) extraction from lunar ilmenite (FeTiO3) with
either hydrogen or carbon monoxide, (2) carbothermal reduction of iron
oxides and silicates with methane, and (3) molten regolith electrolysis
(MRE) of silicates. Methods (1) and (2) have also been investigated in a
two-step process using CO reduction and carbon deposition followed by
carbothermal reduction. All three processes have byproducts that could
also be used as resources. Hydrogen or carbon monoxide reduction produce
iron metal in small amounts that could potentially be used as construction
material. Carbothermal reduction also makes iron metal along with silicon
metal and a glass with possible applications. MRE produces iron, silicon,
aluminum, titanium, and glass, with higher silicon yields than
carbothermal reduction. On Mars and possibly on some moons and asteroids,
water is present in the form of mineral hydrates, hydroxyl (-OH) groups on
minerals, andor water adsorbed on mineral surfaces. Heating of the
minerals can liberate the water which can be electrolyzed to provide a
source of oxygen as well. The chemistry of these processes, some key
development and demonstration projects, the challenges remaining to be
overcome, and possible future directions will be discussed with a goal of
increased understanding of these important ISRU technologies and their
potential applications to space exploration and settlement.
KW - *Oxygen production
KW - *Minerals
KW - *Reactor design
KW - *Silicates
KW - *Solar cells
KW - *Lunar rocks
KW - *Reduction (chemistry)
KW - *Space transportation
KW - *Refueling
KW - *Hydrogen
KW - *Carbon monoxide
KW - *Ilmenite
KW - *In situ resource utilization
KW - Space exploration
KW - Lunar landing sites
KW - Production engineering
KW - Extraction
KW - Cost effectiveness
KW - Asteroids
KW - Water
RN - KSC-E-DAA-TN39055
OD - 37
PR - WBS 460421.04.06.04
YR - 2017
PC - 019040001
CT - 54 | Astronomy &amp; Astrophysics
CT - 84B | Extraterrestrial Exploration
CT - 97 | Energy
CT - 84 | Space Technology
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0001458_a

237 - TOXLINE
TI - Gulf of Mexico OCS, Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2017-2022. Gulf of Mexico
Lease Sales 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 256, 257, 259, and 261. Final
Multiscale Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1: Chapters 1-3.
AB - The Final Multiscale Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the
proposed 2017-2022 Gulf of Mexico's Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and
gas lease sales as scheduled in the 2017-2022 Outer Continental Shelf Oil
and Gas Leasing: Proposed Final Program (Five-Year Program). The 10
proposed regionwide lease sales are Lease Sale 249 in 2017, Lease Sales
250 and 251 in 2018, lease Sales 252 and 253 in 2919, Lease Sales 254 and
256 in 2020, Lease Sales 257 and 259 in 2021, and Lease Sale 261 in 2022.
KW - *Mexico Gulf
KW - *Offshore drilling
KW - *Lease sales
KW - Environmental impact statements
KW - Offshore operations
KW - Coastal waters
KW - Oil
KW - Natural gas
KW - *Outer Continental Shelf(OCS)
RN - OCS-EIS/EA-BOEM-2017-009-V1
OD - 368
YR - 2017
PC - 120312001
CT - 47 | Ocean Sciences &amp; Technology
CT - 48A | Mineral Industries
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101828_a

238 - TOXLINE
TI - Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) Suppression and Long Delivery Fibers
at the Multikilowatt Level with Chirped Seed Lasers.
AU - White, J. O.
AD - US Army Research Laboratory Adelphi United States
AU - Harfouche, M.
AD - US Army Research Laboratory Adelphi United States
AU - Edgecumbe, J.
AD - US Army Research Laboratory Adelphi United States
AU - Satyan, N.
AD - US Army Research Laboratory Adelphi United States
AU - Rakuljic, G.
AD - US Army Research Laboratory Adelphi United States
AU - Yariv, A.
AD - US Army Research Laboratory Adelphi United States
AB - In a high-power fiber amplifier, a frequency-chirped seed interrupts the
coherent interaction between the laser and Stokes waves, raising the
threshold for stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS). Moving the external
mirror of a vertical cavity surface-emitting diode laser 0.2 m in 10 s can
yield a frequency chirp of 5 1017 Hz/s at a nearly constant output power.
Opto-electronic feedback loops can linearize the chirp and stabilize the
output power. The simple and deterministic variation of phase with time
preserves temporal coherence, in the sense that it is straightforward to
coherently combine multiple amplifiers despite a large path-length
mismatch. The seed bandwidth, as seen by the counterpropagating SBS, also
increases linearly with fiber length, resulting in a nearly
length-independent SBS threshold. Experimental results at the 1.6-kW level
with a 19-m delivery fiber are presented. A numerical simulation is also
presented.
KW - Brillouin scattering
KW - Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers
KW - Fiber optics
KW - Fiber amplifiers
KW - Sbs(stimulated brillouin scattering)
KW - Frequency-chirped seed
KW - Temporal coherence
KW - Chirped diode lasers
KW - Optical pulses
KW - Csa(chirped seed amplification)
RN - ARL-TR-7979
OD - 26
YR - 2017
PC - 800218327
CT - 46C | Optics &amp; Lasers
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1031469_a

239 - TOXLINE
TI - Detection of Early lung Cancer Among Military Personnel (DECAMP).
AU -Spira, A. E.
AD -Boston Univ., MA.
AU -Moses, E.
AD -Boston Univ., MA.
AB -The purpose of this work is to develop and validate molecular biomarkers
found in blood, tissues, or other bodily fluids, whichmay be used for the
early detection of lung cancer among military personnel and veterans. Over
the course of the sixth year ofthis award, we have made significant
progress towards enrollment in both clinical trials, including the
addition of two newrecruitment sites. We have recruited ~75 of the 500
total subjects in the indeterminate pulmonary nodule study (Protocol
1),and ~60 of the 800 total subjects in the longitudinal screening study
(Protocol 2). We have also added a junior facultypulmonary physician and
scientific program manager to supplement the leadership of this project.
Additionally, the Leadership,Steering, Adjudication, Biostatistics,
Imaging and Biomarker Committees continue to meet regularly. Most notably,
significantprogress has been made in adjudication of cases and controls
within DECAMP1 which will facilitate the validation of ourcancer
biomarkers. We have also made significant progress towards discovering
novel molecular biomarkers for lung cancerdetection in the endobronchial
biopsy and nasal brushing samples. Finally, we continue to identify
additional funding sourcesto both supplement infrastructure support within
DECAMP and pursue additional biomarker studies.
KW - Digital data
KW - Digital information
KW - Metadata
OD - 25
YR - 2017
PC - 004325000
CT - 41N | Computer Software
CT - 44T | Data &amp; Information Systems
CT - 62S | Data Files
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047603_a

240 - TOXLINE
TI - Gulf of Mexico OCS, Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2017-2022. Gulf of Mexico
Lease Sales 249, 250, 251, 252, 253, 254, 256, 257, 259, and 261. Final
Multiscale Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Chapters 4-8.
AB - The Final Multiscale Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the
proposed 2017-2022 Gulf of Mexico's Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and
gas lease sales as scheduled in the 2017-2022 Outer Continental Shelf Oil
and Gas Leasing: Proposed Final Program (Five-Year Program). The 10
proposed regionwide lease sales are Lease Sale 249 in 2017, Lease Sales
250 and 251 in 2018, lease Sales 252 and 253 in 2919, Lease Sales 254 and
256 in 2020, Lease Sales 257 and 259 in 2021, and Lease Sale 261 in 2022.
KW - *Mexico Gulf
KW - *Offshore drilling
KW - *Lease sales
KW - Environmental impact statements
KW - Offshore operations
KW - Coastal waters
KW - Oil
KW - Natural gas
KW - *Outer Continental Shelf(OCS)
RN - OCS-EIS/EA-BOEM-2017-009-V2
OD - 700
YR - 2017
PC - 120312001
CT - 47 | Ocean Sciences &amp; Technology
CT - 48A | Mineral Industries
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101830_a

241 - TOXLINE
TI - Multi-Objective Flight Control for Drag Minimization and Load Alleviation
of High-Aspect Ratio Flexible Wing Aircraft.
AU - Nguyen, N.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AU - Ting, E.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AU - Chaparro, D.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AU - Drew, M.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AU - Swei, S.
AD - Army Research Development and Engineering Command, Ames Research Center,
Moffett Field, CA.
AB - As aircraft wings become much more flexible due to the use of light-weight
composites material, adverse aerodynamics at off-design performance can
result from changes in wing shapes due to aeroelastic deflections.
Increased drag, hence increased fuel burn, is a potential consequence.
Without means for aeroelastic compensation, the benefit of weight
reduction from the use of light-weight material could be offset by less
optimal aerodynamic performance at off-design flight conditions.
Performance Adaptive Aeroelastic Wing (PAAW) technology can potentially
address these technical challenges for future flexible wing transports.
PAAW technology leverages multi-disciplinary solutions to maximize the
aerodynamic performance payoff of future adaptive wing design, while
addressing simultaneously operational constraints that can prevent the
optimal aerodynamic performance from being realized. These operational
constraints include reduced flutter margins, increased airframe responses
to gust and maneuver loads, pilot handling qualities, and ride qualities.
All of these constraints while seeking the optimal aerodynamic performance
present themselves as a multi-objective flight control problem. The paper
presents a multi-objective flight control approach based on a
drag-cognizant optimal control method. A concept of virtual control, which
was previously introduced, is implemented to address the pair-wise flap
motion constraints imposed by the elastomer material. This method is shown
to be able to satisfy the constraints. Real-time drag minimization control
is considered to be an important consideration for PAAW technology. Drag
minimization control has many technical challenges such as sensing and
control. An initial outline of a real-time drag minimization control has
already been developed and will be further investigated in the future. A
simulation study of a multi-objective flight control for a flight path
angle command with aeroelastic mode suppression and drag minimization
demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed solution. In-flight
structural loads are also an important consideration. As wing flexibility
increases, maneuver load and gust load responses can be significant and
therefore can pose safety and flight control concerns. In this paper, we
will extend the multi-objective flight control framework to include load
alleviation control. The study will focus initially on maneuver load
minimization control, and then subsequently will address gust load
alleviation control in future work.
KW - *Aeroelasticity
KW - *Flexible wings
KW - *Optimal control
KW - *Flight control
KW - *Aerodynamic characteristics
KW - *Aircraft design
KW - *Dynamic control
KW - *High aspect ratio
KW - *Drag
KW - Weight reduction
KW - Loads (forces)
KW - Elastomers
RN - ARC-E-DAA-TN38210
OD - 32
PR - WBS 081876.02.01.02.01.01
YR - 2017
PC - 119866000
CT - 51C | Aircraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0000931_a

242 - TOXLINE
TI - NTP Technical Report on the Toxicity Studies of o-Chloropyridine (CAS No.
109-09-1) Administered Dermally and in Drinking Water to F344/N Rats and
B6C3F1/N Mice.
AB - o-Chloropyridine is an industrial chemical used as an intermediate in the
production of a variety of chemical products. We conducted 2-week dermal
and 3-month drinking water studies to determine the potential toxicity of
o-chloropyridine from different routes of exposure in rats and mice.
KW - *Industrial chemicals
KW - *Chemical products
KW - Dermal studies
KW - Drinking water
KW - Mice
KW - Rats
KW - Toxicity
KW - Exposure
KW - *o-Chloropyridine
RN - NTP/TRS-83
OD - 132
YR - 2017
PC - 068182000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 99 | Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101646_a

243 - TOXLINE
TI - Restoration Handbook for Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems with Emphasis on
Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat. Part 1. Concepts for Understanding and
Applying Restoration.
AU - Pyke, D. A.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AU - Chambers, J. C.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AU - Pellant, M.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AU - Knick, S. T.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AU - Miller, R. F.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AB - This restoration handbook is the first in a three-part series on
restoration of sagebrush ecosystems. In Part 1, we discuss concepts
surrounding landscape and restoration ecology of sagebrush ecosystems and
greater sage-grouse that habitat managers and restoration practitioners
need to know to make informed decisions regarding where and how to
restore specific areas. We will describe the plant dynamics of sagebrush
steppe ecosystems and their responses to major disturbances, fire, and
defoliation. We will introduce the concepts of ecosystem resilience to
disturbances and resistance to invasions of annual grasses within
sagebrush steppe. An introduction to soils and ecological site
information will provide insights into the specific plants that can be
restored in a location.
KW - *Sagebrush
KW - *Ecosystems
KW - *Restoration
KW - *Shrubs
KW - Bird habitats
KW - Land use
KW - Urban growth
KW - Land degradation
KW - Invasive plants
KW - Land birds
KW - Land management
KW - Habitat management
KW - Defoliation
KW - Decision making
KW - *Greater Sage-Grouse ('Centrocercus urophasianus')
KW - *Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystem
RN - USGS-CIRC-1416
OD - 56
YR - 2017
PC - 041619000
CT - 98D | Agronomy, Horticulture, &amp; Plant Pathology
CT - 57C | Botany
CT - 48B | Natural Resource Management
CT - 57H | Ecology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101548_a

244 - TOXLINE
TI - Mid-L/D Lifting Body Entry Demise Analysis.
AU - Ling, L.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX. Lyndon B. Johnson
Space Center.
AB - The mid-lift-to-drag ratio (mid-L/D) lifting body is a fully autonomous
spacecraft under design at NASA for enabling a rapid return of scientific
payloads from the International Space Station (ISS). For contingency
planning and risk assessment for the Earth-return trajectory, an entry
demise analysis was performed to examine three potential failure
scenarios: (1) nominal entry interface conditions with loss of control,
(2) controlled entry at maximum flight path angle, and (3) controlled
entry at minimum flight path angle. The objectives of the analysis were to
predict the spacecraft breakup sequence and timeline, determine debris
survival, and calculate the debris dispersion footprint. Sensitivity
analysis was also performed to determine the effect of the initial pitch
rate on the spacecraft stability and breakup during the entry. This report
describes the mid-L/D lifting body and presents the results of the entry
demise and sensitivity analyses.
KW - *Lifting bodies
KW - *Spacecraft design
KW - *Trajectory analysis
KW - *Lift drag ratio
KW - *Atmospheric entry
KW - *Flight control
KW - *International space station
KW - *Risk assessment
KW - Payloads
KW - Autonomy
KW - Flight paths
RN - JSC-CN-37613
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 019042004
CT - 51A | Aerodynamics
CT - 84G | Unmanned Spacecraft
CT - 84C | Manned Spacecraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N16-0012385_a

245 - TOXLINE
TI - Characterization of mTOR-Responsive Truncated mRNAs in Cell Proliferation.
AU - Yong, J.
AD - Regents of the University of Minnesota Minneapolis United States
AB - Defective Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) 1 or 2 gene leads to
deregulated mTOR activation and consequent cell proliferation/growth.Thus,
studying the mTOR pathway at a molecular level is fundamental to
understand TSC pathogenesis. We recently discovered genome-widealterations
of polyadenylation site in mRNAs. These findings identify a previously
uncharacterized role for mTOR in modulating 3-UTR length of mRNAs by
alternative polyadenylation (APA). Another outcome of APA in the
mTOR-activated transcriptome is an earlytermination of mRNA transcription
to produce truncated mRNAs with polyadenylation in upstream introns/exons.
Truncated mRNAscontain distinct molecular signatures at both RNA and
protein levels: the new 3-end of mRNAs is from introns (intronic 3-end)
and itgenerates a brand new C-terminus protein sequence encoded from
introns. Thus, it is likely that activation of mTOR adds new
molecularsignatures to functional transcriptome and proteome by
alternating polyandeylation. In this reporting period, we profiled
truncated mRNAsand their protein products using RNA-seq, 3-end seq, high
capacity mass spectrometry and bioinformatics tools. We developed a
newbioinformatics tool to integrate RNA-seq and 3-end seq and this tool
makes it possible to reveal truncated mRNAs genome-wide. In
silicoproteogenomics database for intron-coded C-terminus of truncated
proteins has been developed and used for search of truncated
proteins.Additional new software to find unannoated truncated mRNAs are
under development.
KW - Sclerosis
KW - Ribonucleic acids
KW - Genes
KW - Proteins
KW - Rna sequence analysis
KW - Algorithms
KW - Computer programs
KW - Biomedical information systems
KW - C-terminomics
KW - Apa (alternative polyadenylation)
KW - Intmap (integrative model for alternative polyadenylation)
KW - Mtor (mammalian target of rapamycin)
KW - Tsc (tuberous sclerosis complex)
KW - Mtor-responsive truncated mrna
KW - Cell proliferation
KW - Tsc1
KW - Tsc2
KW - Introns
KW - Molecular signatures
KW - Rna seq (rna sequence analysis)
KW - Truncated proteins
KW - 3-end seq
OD - 14
YR - 2017
PC - 800218522
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 62B | Computer Software
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050203_a

246 - TOXLINE
TI - Identifying Urban Designs and Traffic Management Strategies for Southern
California that Reduce Air Pollution Exposure.
AU - Paulson, S.
AD - California Univ., Los Angeles.
AB - This project investigated the impact of the built environment on
concentrations of roadway pollutants, specifically ultrafine particles.
The report emphasizes the configurations that arise around transit, mode
shifting and transit-oriented development, and types of development that
are needed to move California communities toward improved public health
combined with Senate Bill (SB) 375 goals of sustainability. As higher
density communities and transit-oriented developments are built, there is
potential to create situations that expose more people to more roadway
emissions. We seek to understand features of the built environment that
may be adjusted to avoid or mitigate potential unintended consequences.
Built environment effects are considered on several different scales: (1)
sub-street scale within few meter of a road, (2) street scale looking at
entirety of a single street, and (3) multi-block scale that spans over
several blocks. The analyses were based on extensive field measurements
made in several communities in the Los Angeles area during 2013, 2014 and
2015, most of it at high spatial and temporal resolution. In some cases,
other datasets were used either from a 2008 study, also in Downtown Los
Angeles and also supported by CARB, or from a longer term study in
Hanover, Germany performed by other investigators. The communities in the
Los Angeles area included four sites in Downtown Los Angeles, and sites in
Temple City, Beverly Hills and Koreatown. Exposure to elevated levels of
roadway pollutants has been associated with a wide range of adverse health
outcomes. Freshly emitted vehicular pollution is a complex mixture of
gases and particles, of which ultrafine particles (UFP) is a major
component.
KW - *Ultrafine particles
KW - *Senate Bill 375 (SB 375)
KW - *Roadway emissions
KW - Transit
KW - Development
KW - Public health
KW - Emissions
KW - Roads
KW - Streets
KW - Urban planning
KW - Traffic
KW - Air pollution
KW - Emitted vehicular pollution
OD - 132
YR - 2017
PC - 005420000
CT - 85 | Transportation
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 97R | Environmental Studies
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101791_a

247 - TOXLINE
TI - National Stormwater Calculator User’s Guide - Version 1.2.
AU - Rossman, L. A.
AD - Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. National Risk Management
Research Lab.
AU - Berner, J.
AD - Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH. National Risk Management
Research Lab.
AB - The National Stormwater Calculator is a simple to use tool for computing
small site hydrology for any location within the US. It estimates the
amount of stormwater runoff generated from a site under different
development and control scenarios over a long-term period of historical
rainfall. The analysis takes into account local soil conditions, slope,
land cover, and meteorology. Different types of low impact development
(LID) practices (also known as green infrastructure) can be employed to
help capture and retain rainfall on-site. Future climate change scenarios
taken from internationally recognized climate change projections can also
be considered. The calculator provides planning level estimates of capital
and maintenance costs which will allow planners and managers to evaluate
and compare effectiveness and costs of LID controls. The calculator’s
primary focus is informing site developers and property owners on how well
they can meet a desired stormwater retention target. It can be used to
answer such questions as: (1) What is the largest daily rainfall amount
that can be captured by a site in either its pre-development, current, or
post-development condition? (2) To what degree will storms of different
magnitudes be captured on site? (3) What mix of LID controls can be
deployed to meet a given stormwater retention target? (4) How well will
LID controls perform under future meteorological projections made by
global climate change models? (5) What are the relative cost (capital and
maintenance) differences for various mixes of LID controls? The calculator
seamlessly accesses several national databases to provide local soil and
meteorological data for a site. The user supplies land cover information
that reflects the state of development they wish to analyze and selects a
mix of LID controls to be applied. After this information is provided, the
site’s hydrologic response to a long-term record of historical hourly
precipitation, possibly modified by a particular climate change scenario,
is computed. This allows a full range of meteorological conditions to be
analyzed, rather than just a single design storm event. The resulting time
series of rainfall and runoff are aggregated into daily amounts that are
then used to report various runoff and retention statistics. In addition,
the site’s response to extreme rainfall events of different return
periods is also analyzed.
KW - *Stormwater collection
KW - *Users guide
KW - *Stormwater runoff control
KW - *Hydrologic
KW - Soil conditions
KW - Rainfall
KW - Statistics (Data)
KW - Meteorological conditions
KW - Meteorology
KW - *National Stormwater Calculator
KW - *Low Impact Development (LID)
RN - EPA/600/R-13/085D
OD - 98
YR - 2017
PC - 034122099
CT - 55 | Atmospheric Sciences
CT - 55C | Meteorological Data Collection, Analysis, &amp; Weather Forecasting
CT - 48G | Hydrology &amp; Limnology
CT - 48E | Soil Sciences
CT - 68 | Environmental Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
CT - 40F | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102181_a

248 - TOXLINE
TI - TOP 04-1-010 Effectiveness Testing of Mechanical Clearing Systems - Roller
Systems Operating in a Straight Path.
AB - The purpose of this Test Operations Procedure (TOP) is to provide the
tester standardized testing methodologies and procedures to assess roller
systems to analyze effectiveness against landmines and improvised
explosive devices (IEDs) and trigger threats. Testing is performed on a
primary (hard packed), secondary (compacted gravel or dirt surfaces),
and/or improved, controlled lanes with buried threat targets at various
depths.
KW - Mine rollers
KW - Test equipment
KW - Improvised explosive devices
KW - Mine roller system
KW - Lane boundary
KW - Pressure plate improvised explosive device
KW - Simulated mine target
RN - TOP 04-1-010
OD - 105
YR - 2017
PC - 119161001
CT - 79A | Ammunition, Explosives, &amp; Pyrotechnics
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042811_a

249 - TOXLINE
TI - Annexin A2 in Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy.
AU - Hajjar, K. A.
AD - Cornell Univ., New York. Medical Coll.
AB - Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is one of the major remaining
challenges in retinal surgery. PVR occurs in patients with previous
complex retinal surgery and also in patients with penetrating globe
injury, of which there are more than 200,000 worldwide per year. PVR is
thought to result from proliferation and migration of retinal pigment
epithelial (RPE) cells, leading to formation of an epiretinal membrane,
retinal detachment, and loss of vision. At present, there are no reliable
means of preventing this complication of ocular trauma and retinal
surgery. In this project, we have addressed specific aims to [1] analyze
the PVR response in wild type versus annexin A2-deficient mice, [2] define
the role of A2 in the function of activated macrophages and RPE cells in
PVR, and [3] examine the expression pattern of A2 in human PVR. We are now
able to conclude that A2 plays a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of
PVR in the mouse, that its expression is needed in both macrophages and
RPE cells, and that A2 is extensively expressed within cells of epiretinal
membranes in human PVR. Our data suggest that A2 may represent a druggable
therapeutic target for the prevention of the PVR response.
KW - Retina
KW - Surgery
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Epithelial cells
KW - Macrophages
KW - Pathogenesis
KW - Inflammation
KW - Retinopathy
KW - Molecules
KW - Antibodies
KW - Annexin a2
KW - Pvr (proliferative vitreoretinopathy)
KW - Retinal surgery
KW - Penetrating ocular injury
KW - Rpe (retinal pigment epithelial)
KW - Rpe cells
KW - Diabetic retinopathy
KW - Emt (epithelial-mesenchymal transition)
KW - Chronic inflammation
KW - Rpe cell migration
OD - 31
YR - 2017
PC - 008583003
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043097_a

250 - TOXLINE
TI - Modulation of Invading and Resident Inflammatory Cell Activation as a
Novel Way to Mitigate Spinal Cord Injury-Associated Neuropathic Pain.
AU - Ward, S. J.
AD - TEMPLE UNIVERSITY PHILADELPHIA United States
AB - Experiments completed during the project period were designed to test the
hypothesis that the non-psychoactive cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) would
attenuate spinal cord injury neuropathic pain (SCI-NP) and associated
inflammatory markers, and that these protective effects would extend to
exacerbating effects of morphine or alcohol exposure on SCI-NP. Our
findings from Year 1 demonstrated that CBD treatment attenuates the
development of SCI-NP but did not lead to an improvement in locomotor or
bladder function. Unlike our original hypothesis, CBD did not have
profound effects on microglial activation or on the overall expression of
microglial markers, especially those that may promote an anti-inflammatory
phenotype. Instead, experiments point to a robust effect of CBD on markers
of T cell activation and migration, and a decrease in infiltrating T cells
into the injured cord. In Year 2 we determined that morphine exacerbated
locomotor and bladder function and that these effects were not
counteracted by CBD treatment, although again CBD treatment decreased
SCI-NP and T cell infiltration. Lastly in Year 3, we determined that
ethanol exposure led to circulating inflammatory markers in the blood and
that select inflammatory plasma markers were reduced following CBD
treatment.
KW - Spinal cord
KW - Spinal injuries
KW - Pain
KW - Inflammation
KW - Drugs
KW - T lymphocytes
KW - Locomotion
KW - Bladder (urinary)
KW - Ethanols
KW - Alcohols
KW - Sci (spinal cord injuries)
KW - Np (neuropathic pain)
KW - Cbd (cannabidiol)
KW - Inflammation microglia
KW - T cells
KW - Sci-np
KW - Cannabinoid
KW - Thc (delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol)
KW - Allodynia
KW - Microglial activation
KW - Infiltration
KW - Proinflammatory phenotype
KW - Anti-inflammatory phenotype
KW - Locomotor function
KW - Bladder function
KW - Morphine
KW - Tlr (toll like receptor)
KW - Bms (basso mouse scale)
OD - 35
YR - 2017
PC - 800219845
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048467_a

251 - TOXLINE
TI - Assessing EphA2 and Ephrin-A as Novel Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers
of Prostate Cancer.
AU - Nguyen, C.
AD - Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH.
AB - This study seeks to evaluate EphA2 and ephrin-A1 as novel biomarkers of
prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis and/or prognosis. We are recruiting men at
high risk for PCa who are undergoing prostate biopsy and prostatectomy at
our institution. We will correlate their levels of EphA2 and ephrin-A1
mRNA as well as staining of phosphorylated pS897-EphA2 to the presence of
PCa, the aggressiveness of PCa as determined by traditional clinical
predictors, and race. Completion of the studies will achieve the
following: 1) Novel biomarkers to improve the ability to distinguish
between indolent and aggressive PCa; 2) More accurate prediction of
disease outcomes to facilitate optimal treatment selection for each
patient; 3) Elucidation of the biological mechanisms behind the PCa health
disparities that affect minority men. During this last study period, we
have enrolled 20 additional male patients into our study. We have
optimized the RNA isolation protocol and have been able to obtain
excellent quality RNA from 90 patients. Complementary DNA was then made
from all 90 patient RNA samples and we have performed RT-PCR analyses on
52 patients thus far. The sample size remains small but preliminary data
suggest differential expression by race of some members of the Eph family
of tyrosine kinases: lower EPHA4 and higher EPHB1 expression among black
men with PCa as well as lower EPHA1 expression in black men without
cancer. We have also successfully created viable mouse prostate organoid
cultures, with plans to establish prostate organoids using primary human
prostate tissue derived from prostatectomy specimens.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - African americans
KW - Biological markers
KW - Risk analysis
KW - Biopsy
KW - Predictions
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Patient care management
KW - Diagnosis (medicine)
KW - Racial disparity
KW - Health outcomes
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 004688000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043099_a

252 - TOXLINE
TI - Environmental Persistence of a Pathogen Used in Microbial Insect Control.
AU - Polivka, K. M.
AD - Forest Service, Portland, OR. Pacific Northwest Research Station.
AU - Dwyer, G.
AD - Forest Service, Portland, OR. Pacific Northwest Research Station.
AU - Mehmel, C. J.
AD - Forest Service, Portland, OR. Pacific Northwest Research Station.
AB - We conducted an experimental study of infection, transmission, and
persistence of a nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) of Douglas-fir tussock moth
(Orgyia pseudotsugata) to better understand mechanisms determining the
efficacy of the virus when it is used as a microbial control agent. In a
field experiment, we quantified infection rates of larvae exposed to
either Tussock Moth Biocontrol-1, the strain currently used for control by
the U.S. Forest Service, or a wild-type strain isolated from a natural
population. We first allowed each pathogen to decay on experimental
branches for 0, 1, or 3 days before allowing uninfected larvae to feed on
the branches, and then we fit both a generalized linear model and an
epidemiological model of virus transmission to the infection data. Longer
decay of the NPV resulted in lower infection rates, but evidence that
overall virus transmission differed between wild and pesticide isolates of
NPV was weak. The short persistence time of the virus suggests that it
does not last long on foliage, in turn suggesting that application of TM
Biocontrol-1 must be carefully timed to ensure maximum mortality.
KW - *Douglas-fir tussock moth
KW - *Baculovirus
KW - *Epidemiological model
KW - *Environmental persistence
KW - Biocontrol
KW - Pathogen
KW - Mucleopolyhedrovirus
KW - Pesticide
RN - FSRN-PNW-573
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 007881006
CT - 57C | Botany
CT - 48B | Natural Resource Management
CT - 48D | Forestry
CT - 57H | Ecology
CT - 57P | Pest Control
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101436_a

253 - TOXLINE
TI - Health Consultation: Evaluation of Contaminants in Residential Drinking
Water Wells Near the Pearce Creek Dredged Material Containment Area
(DMCA), Earleville, Cecil County, Maryland, February 15, 2017.
AB - In July 2014, the Cecil County Health Department requested ATSDR’s
assistance to address their concerns regarding elevated levels of metals
found in residential drinking water wells near the Pearce Creek DMCA. The
health department’s concerns focused on two specific issues: (1) Can
exposure to individual contaminants (such as aluminum, manganese, and
iron) at concentrations exceeding a secondary (non health-based) drinking
water standard pose a public health hazard? (2) Are synergistic effects
possible from exposure to multiple contaminants at concentrations
exceeding secondary drinking water standards? That is, can the combined
effect from exposure to a mixture of such contaminants be greater than the
sum of the effects from exposure to the contaminants individually? To
address the health department’s concerns, ATSDR evaluated environmental
data from water samples collected by the health department between 1987
and 2013 from approximately 187 residential wells near the Pearce Creek
DMCA. The purpose of ATSDR’s evaluation was to determine whether
exposure to contaminants (both “primary” and “secondary”) in water
from these wells could harm people’s health. ATSDR also reviewed
available scientific literature regarding the effect of chemical
interactions on the overall toxicity of contaminant mixtures.
KW - *Public health
KW - *Water quality
KW - *Health hazards
KW - Contamination
KW - Exposure
KW - Risk assessment
KW - Health consultations
KW - Drinking water
KW - Potable water
KW - Contaminants
KW - Water wells
KW - Metals (Lead)
KW - Water samples
KW - Environmental data
KW - Toxicity
KW - *Pearce Creek Dredged Material Containment Area (DMCA)
OD - 60
YR - 2017
PC - 092477000
CT - 68D | Water Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101589_a

254 - TOXLINE
TI - POC Clinical Trial for PTSD with a First-In-Class Vasopressin 1a Receptor
Antagonist.
AU - Simon, N. G.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AU - Difede, J.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AB - In this reporting period, year 2 of the project, the major milestones met
included obtaining renewal from the responsible local Institutional Review
Board (IRB) and the Human Research Protections Office (HRPO) and the DSMB.
Patient enrollment began in year 2 with 10 patients currently randomized.
In the third year of the project, the major objective will be to continue
to recruit and enroll subjects to participate in the clinical study that
will test the effect of SRX246, a first-in-class vasopressin 1a receptor
antagonist, as a potential new treatment for PTSD.
KW - Traumatic stress disorder
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Receptor sites (physiology)
KW - Drug therapy
KW - Hormone antagonists
KW - Signs and symptoms
KW - Depression
KW - Ptsd(post traumatic stress disorder)
KW - Srx246; vasopressin 1a receptor antagonist
KW - Phase ii proof of concept clinical trial
OD - 9
YR - 2017
PC - 110835000
CT - 57T | Psychiatry
CT - 92B | Psychology
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043345_a

255 - TOXLINE
TI - HBCU Summer Undergraduate Training Program in Prostate Cancer: A
Partnership Between USU-CPDR and UDC.
AU - Srivastava, S.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Sreenath, T.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AU - Huderson, B.
AD - Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD.
AB - Two meritorious students were selected under this Training Program in
Prostate Cancer by USU-CPDR and UDC selection committee to provide
motivating experience in the state-of-the-art CaP research. The main
objectives were: (a) Recruit and motivate highly qualified undergraduate
trainees from UDC, (b) expose UDC students to an intellectual environment
that promotes state-ofthe-art hands-on training and education in CaP
research through special lectures by CPDR scientists and guest lectures,
(c) motivate summer interns to contribute to CaP research centers at
HBCUs, (d) to ensure that the new generation of biomedical scientists are
properly trained to continue the fight against CaP. These objectives were
achieved through the following Specific Aims: Aim 1. Selection of students
and exposure to the state-of-the-art CaP research environment; Aim 2.
Assignment of mentors and research project; Aim 3. Progress report
preparation and presentation. Results: Two meritorious students were
selected from a pool of applicants, to participate in this training
program. Students were paired with mentors to work in an ongoing research
projects. Prior to starting the research projects, the students were
underwent Laboratory safety training and certified to work in the
laboratory. Students were trained in basic techniques of cell biology,
designing experiments, and conducting key experiments. Students presented
their research goals and objectives and results obtained from their
experiments in biweekly presentations. At the end of the training, each
student made final presentation of the completed project. Each student was
given a certificate of completion of achievement.
KW - Universities
KW - Department of defense
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Students
KW - Genes
KW - African americans
KW - Training
KW - College students
KW - Hbcu-prostate cancer training
KW - Cpdr (center for prostate disease research)
KW - Udc (univ of district of columbia)
KW - Dod-pcrp
KW - Usu (uniformed services university)
KW - Department of surgery
KW - Wrnmmc (walter reed national military medical center)
KW - Bsrp (basic science research program)
KW - Hbcu (historically black colleges and universities)
KW - Dod (department of defense)
KW - Pcrp (prostate cancer research program)
OD - 15
YR - 2017
PC - 118032000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1043146_a

256 - TOXLINE
TI - TOP 08 2 503 Low Volatility Agent Permeation (LVAP) Swatch Testing.
AB - This Test Operations Procedure (TOP) provides the current standard methods
for testing the permeation of low volatility chemicals, such as persistent
nerve agent (VX), through swatches of materials. Swatches can be taken
from clothing or equipment that is new, with or without pretreatment(s),
and that was previously subjected to periods of wear under varying
conditions of field use, storage, and/or environmental exposure(s). These
procedures are designed to be used as part of an overall assessment
program evaluating the material performance, manufacturing, and
integration with other pieces of the protective ensemble.
KW - Permeation
KW - Low volatility chemicals
RN - TOP 08-2-503
OD - 41
YR - 2018
PC - 054854000
CT - 99 | Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047321_a

257 - TOXLINE
TI - Restoration Handbook for Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems with Emphasis on
Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat. Part 3. Site Level Restoration Decisions.
AU - Pyke, D. A.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AU - Chambers, J. C.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AU - Pellant, M.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AU - Miller, R. F.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AU - Beck, J. L.
AD - Geological Survey, Reston, VA.
AB - When a decision is made on where restoration treatments should be
applied, there are a number of site-specific decisions managers face
before selecting the appropriate type of restoration. This site-level
decision tool for restoration of sagebrush steppe ecosystems is organized
in nine steps. Step 1 describes the process of defining site-level
restoration objectives. Step 2 describes the ecological site
characteristics of the restoration site. Step 3 compares the current
vegetation to the plant communities associated with the site State and
Transition models. Step 4 takes the manager through the process of current
land uses and past disturbances that may influence restoration success.
Step 5 is a brief discussion of how weather before and after treatments
may impact restoration success. Step 6 addresses restoration treatment
types and their potential positive and negative impacts on the ecosystem
and on habitats, especially for greater sage-grouse. Step 7 addresses
decisions regarding post-restoration livestock grazing management. Step 8
addresses monitoring of the restoration; we discuss important aspects
associated with implementation monitoring as well as effectiveness
monitoring. Step 9 takes the information learned from monitoring to
determine how restoration actions in the future might be adapted to
improve restoration success.
KW - *Sagebrush
KW - *Ecosystems
KW - *Restoration
KW - *Shrubs
KW - Bird habitats
KW - Land use
KW - Urban growth
KW - Land degradation
KW - Invasive plants
KW - Land birds
KW - Land management
KW - Habitat management
KW - Defoliation
KW - Decision making
KW - *Greater Sage-Grouse ('Centrocercus urophasianus')
KW - *Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystem
KW - *Landscape restoration decision tool
RN - USGS-CIRC-1426
OD - 74
YR - 2017
PC - 041619000
CT - 98D | Agronomy, Horticulture, &amp; Plant Pathology
CT - 57C | Botany
CT - 48B | Natural Resource Management
CT - 57H | Ecology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-101550_a

258 - TOXLINE
TI - Inhibition of 53BP1: Potential for Restoring Homologous Recombination In
Ovarian Cancer Cells.
AU - Botuyan, M. V.
AD - Mayo Clinic Rochester United States
AB - In this Pilot Award, we explore at the molecular level how the relocation
of DNA damage response (DDR) protein 53BP1 to chromatin harboring DNA
double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be negatively regulated. 53BP1 is a
natural inhibitor of homologous recombination (HR), a DNA repair pathway
that is often inhibited in ovarian cancer cells. Therefore, by preventing
the chromatin recruitment of 53BP1 one could in principle activate HR. Our
idea is that by understanding how 53BP1recruitment is regulated we could
design ways to block 53BP1 chromatin recruitment in ovarian cancer cells,
and by this means correct the HR defect and prevent ovarian tumor
formation. We have three aims. For this first year of funding, our work
for Aim 1 has revealed how a DDR protein can block the 53BP1-binding
surface on the nucleosome, the smallest subunit of chromatin. Our studies
for Aim 2 show how a regulatory protein blocks the chromatin-binding
domain of 53BP1. For Aim 3, our data reveal how small synthetic organic
chemicals trigger the dimerization of 53BP1 and thereby mask the
chromatin-binding surface of 53BP1. The significance of our combined work
is that it shows how 53BP1 chromatin recruitment can be inhibited by
blocking the 53BP1-binding site in chromatin (Aim 1), or by blocking the
chromatin-binding domain of 53BP1 (Aims 2 and 3). In future studies, we
will probe the effectiveness of 53BP1 inhibition in correcting HR defects
in ovarian cancer cells.
KW - Inhibition
KW - Ovarian cancer
KW - X-ray crystallography
KW - Nuclear magnetic resonance
KW - Spectroscopy
KW - Calorimetry
KW - Proteins
KW - Deoxyribonucleic acids
KW - Interactions
KW - Ddr (dna damage response)
KW - Hr (homologous recombination)
KW - 53bp1 inhibition
KW - Nmr (nuclear magnetic resonance)
KW - Chromatin
KW - Nmr spectroscopy
KW - Ovarian cancer cells
KW - Dna dsb
KW - Dsb (double-strand breaks)
KW - Dna (deoxyribonucleic acids)
KW - Ddr proteins
KW - Nucleosomes
KW - Synthetic organic chemicals
KW - Dimerization
KW - H2ak15ub (mono-ubiquitylated histone h2a)
KW - Rnf169
KW - H4k20me2 (di-methylated histone h4)
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 800218499
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050229_a

259 - TOXLINE
TI - Genomic Evolution of Prostate Cancer.
AU - VanderWeele, D. J.
AD - The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, WA.
AB - The goal of this research proposal is to characterize the oncogenesis of
prostate cancer and to more fully understand the relationship between
clinically benign and aggressive disease. With help from my mentors I have
identified four areas where I will focus my training during the completion
of the proposed project: 1. To continue to acquire a comprehensive
understanding of prostate cancer genomics. 2. To develop an understanding
of evolutionary genomics and tumor evolution. 3. To develop skills in
translational prostate cancer biomarker development. 4. To continue to
develop laboratory management and grant writing skills.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Genetics
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Genomics
KW - Biological markers
KW - Biomedical research
KW - Mutations
KW - Genetic variation
KW - Exome sequencing
KW - Tumor evolution
KW - Tumor heterogeneity
OD - 68
YR - 2017
PC - 118767000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042319_a

260 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Genomic Evolution of Prostate Cancer.
AU -
VanderWeele, D. J.
AD -
The Geneva Foundation, Tacoma, WA.
AB -
The goal of this research proposal is to characterize the oncogenesis of
prostate cancer and to more fully understand the relationship between
clinically benign and aggressive disease. With help from my mentors I have
identified four areas where I will focus my training during the completion
of the proposed project: 1. To continue to acquire a comprehensive
understanding of prostate cancer genomics. 2. To develop an understanding
of evolutionary genomics and tumor evolution. 3. To develop skills in
translational prostate cancer biomarker development. 4. To continue to
develop laboratory management and grant writing skills.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Genetics
KW - Metastasis
KW - Genomics
KW - Therapy
KW - Biological markers
KW - Tissues
KW - Tumor evolution
KW - Tumor heterogeneity
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Exome sequencing
OD - 68
YR - 2017
PC - 118767000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042353_a

261 - TOXLINE
TI - Large Oncosomes: A Novel Liquid Biopsy for Genetic Profiling in Patients
with Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.
AU - Di Vizio, D.
AD - Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA.
AB - The overarching goal of my laboratory is to investigate whether
circulating LO, a novel class of atypically large (1-10 microns diameter),
bioactive extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are released by highly
invasive and metastatic amoeboid tumor cells in the plasma, and contain
abundant RNA, miRNA, DNA, and protein cargo, report clinically relevant
information and tumor-specific genomic alterations, thus representing a
valuable alternative and/or complement to other technologies proposed as a
means of liquid biopsy. Collectively ourfindings indicate that DNA
analyses of LO in blood (plasma) may provide a faithful representation of
the genome of the tumor cells of origin. Because we have performed also
comparative analysis with other EVs and shown that LO are a source of high
quality and abundant DNA and they contain the whole genome of donor tumor
cells, our overall objective isto test whether enumeration and genomic
profiling of LO circulating in patient blood allow early detection of
metastatic PC and identification of clinically significant PC-specific
genomic aberrations, thereby overcoming the current limitations of the
liquid biopsy.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Patients
KW - Metastasis
KW - Metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer
KW - Ev(extracellular vesicle)
KW - Extracellular dna
KW - Large oncosomes
KW - Next generation sequencing
KW - Liquid biopsy
KW - Digital droplet pcr
KW - Crpc(castration resistant prostate cancer)
KW - Pc(prostate cancer)
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 005753000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047442_a

262 - TOXLINE
TI - TNK2 Tyrosine Kinase as a Novel Therapeutic Target in Triple-Negative
Breast Cancer.
AU - Pandey, A.
AD - Johns Hopkins University Baltimore United States
AB - Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) represent only 10%-15% of all
breast cancers; however, they are highly aggressive and have a higher rate
of metastasis. In order to explore the role of tyrosine kinase signaling
in TNBCs, we have performed global phosphotyrosine profiling for a panel
of 25 TNBC cell lines. When we correlated protein phosphorylation levels
with cellular oncogenic phenotypes, we observed a novel non-receptor
tyrosine kinase, TNK2, to be hyperphosphorylated and activated in highly
aggressive TNBC cells. Suppression of TNK2 by specific siRNAs
significantly reduced the proliferation, colony formation, and invasive
ability of TNBC cells. The objective of this proposal is to evaluate the
therapeutic potential of TNK2 in the treatment of TNBCs. The Specific Aims
of this project are: Aim 1: Do TNK2 protein levels and activation
correlate with clinical and pathological features of TNBC? Aim 2: What is
the value of TNK2 as a therapeutic target in vitro and in preclinical
animal models? Aim 3: How is TNK2 signaling altered during oncogenesis in
TNBCs?
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Tyrosine
KW - Kinases
KW - Metastasis
KW - Cell line
KW - Proteins
KW - Phosphorylation
KW - Pathology
KW - Proteomics
KW - Mass spectrometry
KW - Peptides
KW - Tnbc (triple-negative breast cancer)
KW - Tyrosine kinases
KW - Phosphotyrosine profiling
KW - Tnbc cell lines
KW - Tnk2
KW - Oncogenesis
KW - Tnk2 signaling
KW - Proteome
KW - Dz1-067
KW - Shtnk2 cells
OD - 13
YR - 2017
PC - 800218377
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048747_a

263 - TOXLINE
TI - South Carolina Cancer Health Equity Consortium: HBCU Student Summer
Training Program.
AU - Ford, M. E.
AD - The Medical University of South Carolina Charleston United States
AU - Bagasra, O.
AD - The Medical University of South Carolina Charleston United States
AU - Salley, J. D.
AD - The Medical University of South Carolina Charleston United States
AU - Stukes, G.
AD - The Medical University of South Carolina Charleston United States
AB - Background: There is a severe shortage of diverse biomedical scientists in
the United States and in South Carolina. The goal of the South Carolina
Cancer Health Equity Consortium: HBCU Student Summer Training Program is
to provide a biomedical research training experience to 12 students (i.e.,
Student Fellows) from three Historically Black Colleges/Universities
Claflin University, South Carolina State University, and Voorhees College
over a three-year period. The major goals of the Training Program are:
Goal 1.) To provide training in biomedical and prostate cancer research
through the participation of four Student Fellows each year in a newly
developed 15 credit hour prostate cancer health equity research course;
Goal 2.) To conduct a hands-on research laboratory intensive with four
Student Fellows each year. Each Student Fellow will complete a 10-week
research project; Goal 3.) To provide the Student Fellows with clinical,
cultural, and biotechnical learning opportunities through clinical
shadowing experiences with physicians and/or other allied health care
professionals; observations of a multidisciplinary prostate cancer tumor
board; lay navigation shadowing in the clinical setting to gain
experiences in the cultural and social context of prostate cancer
treatment/survivorship issues; and interacting with biotechnical experts
within the HCC shared resources/courses (e.g., Cancer Genomics,
Proteomics, Biorepository and Tissue Analysis, Flow Cytometry and Cell
Sorting, Cell and Molecular Imaging, and Lipidomics).
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Scientific research
KW - Training
KW - College students
KW - Universities
KW - Research training programs
KW - Health equity research
KW - Student fellows
KW - Hbcu (historically black colleges and universities)
KW - Chec (cancer health equity consortium)
KW - Mentoring
OD - 49
YR - 2017
PC - 800222033
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1044977_a

264 - TOXLINE
TI - Supporting Military Families with Young Children throughout the Deployment
Lifecycle.
AU - DeVoe, E. R.
AD - Boston Univ., MA.
AB - U.S. military service since the September 11th, 2001 terrorist attacks has
placed tremendous demands on families. Approximately 43 of the Total
Forces are parents and two million children have experienced parental
deployment. Of these children, 42 were younger than five years during the
deployment-separation period(s). In order to build and maintain strong
family relationships that support family resilience and child well-being,
Soldier and non-deploying parents must successfully meet the challenges of
care giving throughout the deployment cycle. The primary aim of this
research is to adapt and test the efficacy of a preventive intervention
program that was originally developed as a reintegration program to reduce
parenting stress and promote family resilience in Active Duty military
families through all phases of the deployment cycle. The study will be
conducted in three phases. In phase 1, qualitative interviews will be
administered a sample of 40 with Soldiers (20) and Non-Deploying Parents
(20) of young children, and 10 key informants to identify parenting needs
in the context of deployment. In phases 2 and 3, we conduct a randomized
clinical trial with a sample of 150 Active Duty families who are within 6
months of deployment. Families will be randomized to receive the Strong
Families parenting program or theStrong Parents self-care program. Primary
outcomes include parenting stress, family resilience, and dimensions of
family resilience.Secondary goals of this research are to conduct a
prospective examination of coparenting through deployment and
cost-effective analysis.
KW - Family resiliance
KW - Deployment lifecyle
OD - 17
YR - 2017
PC - 004325000
CT - 92B | Psychology
CT - 92 | Behavior &amp; Society
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047167_a

265 - TOXLINE
TI - Unmasking Cognitive Defects after Recovering from Mild Traumatic Brain
Injury.
AB - The purpose of the report is to compare cognitive function and cerebral
tissue oxygen saturation (SctO(sub 2)) in mTBI subjects and subjects
without a history of brain injury following exposure to room air and mild
hypoxia.
KW - *Cognitive defects
KW - *Traumatic brain injury
KW - Cognitive function
KW - Cerebral tissue
KW - Tissue oxygen
OD - 24
PR - N11-P15
YR - 2017
PC - 008097000
CT - 44K | Health Services
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100335_a

266 -
TOXLINE
TI -
LAM Pilot Study with Imatinib Mesylate (LAMP 1).
AU -
Strange, C.
AD -
Medical Univ. of South Carolina, Charleston.
AB -
Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare disease in which tumor cells (LAM
cells) proliferate and destroy healthy lung tissue, leading to respiratory
compromise or failure. Vascular endothelial growth factor-D (VEGF-D) is
generated by LAM cells and is a robust biomarker for LAM disease activity
and therapeutic response. Studies in the laboratory of Dr. D'Armiento
suggest that imatinib mesylate (imatinib) could completely block the
growth of LAM cells through initiation of targeted cell death. Currently,
most LAM patients are treated with Sirolimus (rapamycin). Rapamycin growth
inhibits but does not kill LAM cells. This pilot trial employs a dual
agent design intended to generate safety and efficacy data sufficient to
power and design a phase 3 study of imatinib vs placebo for LAM. The
hypothesis is that imatinib will be equivalent to rapamycin in short term
efficacy and safety. Importantly, VEGF-D level will be used as a marker
for LAM disease activity in this small clinical trial design using 20
participants at two institutions. IRB and HRPO approvals are in place and
enrollment of participants is anticipated in the upcoming quarter.
KW - Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM)
OD - 16
YR - 2017
PC - 005370000
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047178_a

267 - TOXLINE
TI - Applied Knowledge Management to Mitigate Cognitive Load in Network-Enabled
Mission Command.
AU - Hawley, J. K.
AD - Army Materiel Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. Ballistic Research Lab.
AU - Swehla, M. W.
AD - Army Materiel Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD. Ballistic Research Lab.
AB - This report presents results from an applied knowledge management (KM)
demonstration project conducted in the 2nd Brigade Combat Team of the 1st
Armored Division immediately prior to and during Army Warfighting
Assessment 17.1. The focus of the applied KM demonstration project was
two-fold. The first objective was to assess the effectiveness of the Army
KM Proponents 3 doctrine-based KM courses: Knowledge Management
Qualification Course, Knowledge Management Representative Course, and
Senior Leader Executive Overview. The second objective was to assess the
utility of the KM Proponents KM Maturity Model as a tool for commanders
and their senior staff to assess KM maturity within their unit, and
determine concrete paths forward for KM improvements. Results pertaining
to each of these objectives are presented and discussed. The KM assessment
results clearly demonstrated that getting a program such as applied KM up
and running in a tactical unit is a challenging undertaking. Considerable
program structuring, training, developmental work, and command emphasis on
the part of the target unit are required to get such a program off the
ground and functioning successfully. Maintaining an effective KM program
in the face of routine personnel turnover is yet another challenge.
KW - Knowledge management
KW - Doctrine
KW - Information systems
KW - Network centric warfare
KW - Application software
KW - Command control communication
KW - Information management
KW - Mission command
KW - Demonstration project
KW - Army warfighting assessment
KW - Km maturity model
KW - Program evaluation
KW - Cognitive load
KW - Hsi(human-systems integration)
RN - ARL-TN-0859
OD - 46
YR - 2017
PC - 003025004
CT - 88B | Information Systems
CT - 74 | Military Sciences
CT - 74G | Military Operations, Strategy, &amp; Tactics
CT - 45C | Common Carrier &amp; Satellite
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042146_a

268 - TOXLINE
TI - Beamforming and Reconfiguration of a Structurally Embedded Vascular
Antenna Array (SEVA2) in Both Multi-Layer and Complex Curved Composites
(Preprint).
AU - Hartl, D. J.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AU - Baur, J. W.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AU - Frank, G. J.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AU - Bradford, R.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AU - Phillips, D.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AU - Gibson, T.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AU - Rapking, D.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AU - Bal, A.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AU - Huff, G.
AD - Universal Technology Corp., Dayton, OH.
AB - Recently, reconfigurable structurally embedded vascular antenna (SEVA) has
been demonstrated in flat epoxy/quartz fiber composite panels based on the
internal transport of liquid metal within embedded microchannels. The
liquid metal is a non-toxic eutectic gallium-indium alloy which remains
liquid down to -20 C, has low viscosity, and has high electrical
conductivity. Patterned microchannels are created using fused deposition
printing of sacrificial catalyzed polylactic acid (cPLA) followed by
transfer, composite lamination, composite cure, and then thermal removal
of the sacrificial cPLA during post-cure. When the resulting embedded
channel are progressively filled with liquid metal and electromagnetically
connected, they can be tuned over a large frequency range which is
dependent on the resulting shape of the liquid metal. The large frequency
response, the small footprint, the low volume of the metal ( < 2 ), and
the retention of an aerodynamically efficient composite shape makes SEVA
attractive for agile aircraft antenna. Mechanical modeling, mechanical
testing, and multi-physics optimization of the microvascular panels has
shown modest decreases in tensile strength due to the microchannels,
depending on the design and thermal/RF environment. This paper will
highlight the composite fabrication of a multi-element SEVA, or
Structurally Embedded Antenna Array (SEVA2), within a complex curved
article that resembles an aircraft leading-edge.
KW - Liquid metals
KW - Microchannel plates
KW - Frequency agility
KW - Antenna configurations
KW - Aircraft antennas
KW - Composite material fabrication
KW - Radiation patterns
KW - Seva(structurally embedded vascular antenna)
KW - Gallium-indium alloys
KW - Cpla(catalyzed polylactic acid)
KW - Complex curved composites
KW - Frequency reconfigurable antennas
OD - 21
PR - 4347
YR - 2017
PC - 030323000
CT - 49 | Electrotechnology
CT - 46H | Radiofrequency Waves
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1042385_a

269 - TOXLINE
TI - Options for Hardening FinFETS with Flowable Oxide Between Fins.
AU - Hughes, H.
AD - Naval Research Laboratory Washington United States
AU - McMarr, P.
AD - Naval Research Laboratory Washington United States
AU - Lee, J.
AD - Naval Research Laboratory Washington United States
AU - Alles, M.
AD - Naval Research Laboratory Washington United States
AU - Zhang, E.
AD - Naval Research Laboratory Washington United States
AU - Ball, D.
AD - Naval Research Laboratory Washington United States
AU - Doris, B.
AD - Naval Research Laboratory Washington United States
AU - Southwick, R.
AD - Naval Research Laboratory Washington United States
AB - A methodology using radiation-induced charge measurements by CV techniques
on blanket oxides is shown to aid in the choice of process options for
hardening FinFETs. Net positive charge in flowable oxides was reduced by
50% using a simple non-intrusive process change. This process translates
into a 10x reduction in radiation induced offstate current for nFinFETs.
KW - Radiation hardening
KW - Complementary metal-oxide semiconductors
KW - Radiation hardening by process
KW - Tid(total ionizing dose)
KW - Finfet technology
KW - Capacitance voltage measurements
KW - Flowable oxide
OD - 2
YR - 2017
PC - 800218361
CT - 49 | Electrotechnology
CT - 46 | Physics
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1041973_a

270 - TOXLINE
TI - IL-9-Producing Mast Cell Precursors and Food Allergy.
AU - Wang, Y. H.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AU - Hogan, S. P.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AU - Tomar, S.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AU - Shik, D.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AU - Smith, A.
AD - Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (Provisional), Fort Detrick, MD.
AB - Food allergy is a harmful immune reaction driven by uncontrolled type-2
immune responses. Current knowledge provide limited insights into why only
some, rather than all food allergic individuals are prone to develop
life-threatening anaphylaxis. We have identified a novel multi-functional
IL-9-producing mucosal mast cells (MMC9s) that produce large amounts of
IL-9, IL-13, and mast cell mediators. The objective of this proposal is to
identify the factors that regulate MMC9 induction, which represents the
key cellular checkpoint to develop food-induced anaphylaxis. The central
hypothesis is that signals induced by IL-4 and antigen/IgE/FcRcomplex
crosslinking act together to induce mast cell (MC) progenitors to develop
into the pathogenic MMC9s, which amplify anaphylactic response to dietary
allergens. We have established genetically modified murine strains, a new
reconstitution model of experimental food allergy, and the system to
acquire duodenal biopsy samples from food allergic patients. Preliminary
evidences show that both IL-4 and antigen/IgE/FcRI complex are essential
for MMC9 development. The findings provide a plausible view that the
combinatorial signals from atopic status and dietary allergen ingestions
can induce aberrant MMC9 development, resulting in the susceptibility to
life-threatening anaphylaxis. The impact from these studies may facilitate
the discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets for diagnosing,
preventing, and treating food allergy.
KW - Allergy and immunology
KW - Response
KW - Food
KW - Patients
KW - Anaphylaxis
KW - Hypersensitivity
KW - Therapeutics
KW - Genetic markers
KW - Immune system
KW - Exposure (physiology)
KW - Signs and symptoms
KW - Allergens
KW - Food allergy
KW - Mucosal mast cells
KW - Il-9
OD - 22
YR - 2017
PC - 110835000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57L | Nutrition
CT - 98H | Food Technology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047654_a

271 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Development of a Multimarker Urine Test for Prostate Cancer.
AU -
Liu, A. Y.
AD -
BATTELLE MEMORIAL INST SEATTLE WA SEATTLE United States
AB -
Targeted mass spectrometry proteomics was developed (identifying the most
suitable surrogate peptides) to measure a set of proteins secreted by cell
types of prostate tumors in voided urine. These cancer-associated protein
biomarkers were identified by transcriptomic comparison of cancer cells
vs. normal luminal cells; cancer-associated stromal cells vs. normal
stromal cells. The assays allow quantification of many markers
simultaneously in the same bio specimens. Using the levels of PSA for
normalization, the multimarker panel achieved an AUC of 0.95 (specificity
1, sensitivity 0.86) in distinguishing cancer from non-cancer.
Furthermore, levels of marker MMP9 can be used to distinguish significant
cancer from low-risk cancer because MMP9 shows an increased expression in
Gleason pattern 4 tumor glands than pattern 3 tumor glands. Biomarker
measurements by mass spectrometry and ELISA were in good agreement so that
a multiplex ELISA could be developed in the future. Urine collection from
patient donors is simple and does not require a digital rectal exam so
that donations can be given multiple times with minimal risk since urine
is a natural waste product. Antibodies developed for biomarker ELISA can
also be used in cancer therapy, especially for a marker (AGR2) that is on
the cell surface of cancer cells but inside of normal cells.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Antigens
KW - Urine
KW - Cancer
KW - Mass spectrometry
KW - Pc(prostate cancer)
KW - Protein biomarkers
KW - Multimarker panel
KW - Tumor-associated surface antigens
KW - Lg-srm(long-gradient selected reaction monitoring)
KW - Prism-srm(high-pressure high-resolution separation with intelligent
selection andmultiplexing)
OD - 101
YR - 2017
PC - 800222250
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048555_a

272 - TOXLINE
TI - Control of Atherosclerosis Regression by PRMT2 in Diabetes.
AU - Fisher, E.
AD - New York University School of Medicine New York United States
AB - Diabetics have more heart disease than their non-diabetic counterparts,
even though drugs like statins are equally effective in both groups at
lowering the blood levels of harmful cholesterol. We have identified an
enzyme called PRMT2, which regulates the abundance of a cellular
cholesterol transporter that helps to prevent cells from accumulating in
arteries and forming a plaque. We have shown that the level of PRMT2,
while high in healthy cells, is very low in cells from diabetics when
blood sugar levels are elevated. Because PRTM2 isnt around in cells under
diabetic conditions, we predict that more cells accumulate in the artery,
thus allowing the plaque to grow and exacerbating heart disease in
diabetics. To test this, we will determine what happens to the growth of a
plaque in an artery when we eliminate PRMT2 with and without diabetes in
mouse models of heart disease. We expect that plaques will grow larger in
the absence of PRMT2. To better understand how PRMT2 suppresses plaque
growth, we will also identify proteins that are modified by PRMT2 in cells
from the plaque and determine if these proteins participate in plaque
formation. Given that we also dont understand why PRMT2 levels decrease in
diabetes, we will identify cellular proteins that regulate PRMT2 levels.
That knowledge might enable us to develop ways to restore the normal level
of PRMT2 in diabetes, and prevent the cells from contributing to plaque
formation, and reduce heart attacks.
KW - Heart diseases
KW - Sclerosis
KW - Diabetes
KW - Enzymes
KW - Proteins
KW - Macrophages
KW - Transcription (genetics)
KW - Bone marrow
KW - Atherosclerosis regression
KW - Prmt2 (protein arginine methyltransferase 2)
KW - Lxr (liver x receptor)
KW - Lxr transcriptional activity
OD - 10
YR - 2017
PC - 800218716
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050236_a

273 - TOXLINE
TI - Human Domain and the Future of Army Warfare: Present as Prelude to 2050.
AU - Wood, C. D.
AD - ERDC-CERL Champaign United States
AB - Studies on the future of warfare tend to focus on technology and place but
largely overlook the actors. Warfare in 2050 will be predominantly urban,
utilizing robotics and other advanced technologies, but at the core will
remain an inherently human and political struggle. Military services will
not fight armed conflicts alone in 2050, but will require joint,
interagency, international, and multinational collaboration for success.
Despite the appeal of advanced technology, the U.S. Army could greatly
benefit by looking beyond strictly technological solutions and improving
its methods of understanding and engaging adversaries. Like U.S. soldiers,
adversaries are to trained adapt, improvise, and overcome in order to
solve complex problems. Adversaries use off-the-shelf technologies and
simple, cost-effective, locally sourced manufacturing to lethal effect on
the battlefield. They also sponsor computer hackers to probe and penetrate
secure U.S. government networks and to spread propaganda and
misinformation. The author discusses how strictly technological approaches
are insufficient to gain tactical, operational, or strategic advantage due
to the democratization of technologies and other factors. He also
considers social trends that will shape the future operational environment
of combat, trends in geopolitical power, and the evolving role of the
soldier. A synthesis and recommendations are also provided.
KW - Army personnel
KW - International relations
KW - Warfare
KW - Additive
KW - Military applications
KW - International law
KW - Public policy
KW - Economic systems
KW - Insurgency
KW - Military training
KW - Education
KW - Engineering
KW - Culture (social sciences)
KW - National security
KW - Technology forecasting
KW - Interagency coordination
KW - Military art and science; war--forecasting
RN - ERDC/CERL-MP-17-2
OD - 23
YR - 2017
PC - 800220477
CT - 92C | Social Concerns
CT - 74 | Military Sciences
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1041345_a

274 - TOXLINE
TI - Double Blind, Randomized Study of Safety and Efficacy of
OnabotulinumtoxinA (OnaBoNT A) versus Oral Oxybutynin in SCI Patients with
NDO (11 09 10 04).
AU - Smith, C. P.
AD - Baylor College of Medicine Houston United States
AB - The purpose is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of 200 U OnaBoNT-A
injected into the detrusor versus oral oxybutynin for the treatment of
urinary incontinence (UI) caused by neurogenic detrusor over activity
(NDO) in spinal cord injured volunteers; and (2) To determine the
potential role of urine biomarkers as patient selection and surrogate
endpoints of treatment outcome predictors. Thirty-six patients will be
randomized to two treatment groups. The first patient was enrolled to the
study at The Institute of Rehabilitation and Research (TIRR) on June 17,
2016. A total of thirteen patients have been consented to date at TIRR.
Three have completed the study. Three are continuing on protocol with each
having been injected with the study drug. Enrollment is continuing. The
study was closed at the Michael E. DeBakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Houston in July 2016 due to lack of accrual.
KW - Urinary tract
KW - Urologic diseases
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Medical research
KW - Biological markers
KW - Bladder(urinary)
KW - Spinal injuries
KW - Overactive bladder
KW - Spinal cord injury
KW - Urinary incontinence
KW - Urine biomarkers
KW - Botulinum toxin
OD - 252
YR - 2017
PC - 800219091
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1041778_a

275 - TOXLINE
TI - Measures for Environmental Sustainability Outcomes of Transportation
Agencies.
AU - Adams, T.
AD - Wisconsin Univ.-Madison.
AU - Miller, E.
AD - Wisconsin Univ.-Madison.
AU - Moynihan, D.
AD - Wisconsin Univ.-Madison.
AU - Oberhart, E.
AD - Wisconsin Univ.-Madison.
AU - Zietlow, B.
AD - Wisconsin Univ.-Madison.
AU - Schumann, E.
AD - Wisconsin Univ.-Madison.
AU - Fok, J.
AD - Wisconsin Univ.-Madison.
AU - Wang, F.
AD - Wisconsin Univ.-Madison.
AB - Sustainability and performance management are increasingly politically
relevant topics, and while the USDOT goals of safety, infrastructure state
of good repair, and economic development are known to be central to the
mission of transportation agencies as well as well represented in their
performance reporting, the non-traditional goals of livability and
environmental sustainability are less well defined, are not commonly
measured, and have yet to reach a level of pervasiveness within state
DOTs. The study of public sector performance systems reveals that
non-traditional measures of transportation measures that do not match
closely with the historical DOT mission to provide mobility for people and
goods- are often left unmeasured and unlikely put to meaningful use. This
report examines the current state of sustainability measurement guidance
from international, national, and state perspectives; assesses commonly
observed performance measures related to environmental sustainability and
livability; and discusses ways to encourage the purposeful use of
performance measures through organizational learning techniques. While the
evaluated measures do not directly meet all requirements of their
respective criteria, these criteria will help state DOTs develop
potentially stronger measures going forward.
KW - *Performance measures
KW - *Environmental sustainability
KW - Livability
KW - Organizational learning
KW - Mobility
KW - Guidance
KW - Public sector
KW - Sustainability practices
KW - Transportation accessibility
KW - Alternative fuels
KW - Air quality
KW - Emissions
KW - Resource consumption
RN - CFIRE 10-06
RN - NEXTRANS-178UWY2.2
OD - 69
YR - 2017
PC - 048949000
CT - 97K | Fuels
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100259_a

276 - TOXLINE
TI - Elucidate the Mechanism of Telomere Maintenance in STAG2 Mutated Tumor
Cells.
AU - Daniloski, Z.
AD - New York University New York United States
AB - Sister chromatids are held together by cohesin, a tripartite ring with a
peripheral SA1/2 subunit, where SA1 is required for telomere cohesion and
SA2 for centromere cohesion. The STAG2 gene encoding SA2 is often
inactivated in human cancer, but not in in a manner associated with
aneuploidy. Thus, how these tumors maintain chromosomal cohesion and how
STAG2 loss contributes to tumorigenesis remain open questions. Here we
show that, despite a loss in centromere cohesion, sister chromatids in
STAG2 mutant tumor cells maintain cohesion in mitosis at chromosome arms
and telomeres. Telomere maintenance in STAG2 mutant tumor cells occurred
by either telomere recombinationor telomerase activation mechanisms.
Notably, these cells were refractory to telomerase inhibitors, indicating
recombination can provide an alternative means of telomere maintenance.
STAG2 silencing in normal human cells which lack telomerase led to
increased recombination attelomeres, delayed telomere shortening and
postponed senescence onset. Insofar as telomere shortening and replicative
senescence prevent genomic instability and cancer by limiting the number
of cell divisions, our findings suggest that extending the lifespan of
normal human cells due to inactivation of STAG2 could promote
tumorigenesis by extending the period during which tumor-driving mutations
occur.
KW - Cohesion
KW - Mutations
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Cells
KW - Cancer
KW - Dna
KW - Proteins
KW - Cell lines
KW - Gene expression
KW - Medical research
KW - Inhibitors
KW - Chromosomes
KW - Telomere
KW - Telomerase
KW - Alt
KW - Stag2
KW - Gene mutation
OD - 28
YR - 2017
PC - 800218613
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048794_a

277 - TOXLINE
TI - One-Dimensional Model for the Ultrasonic Response of Resin-Filled Gaps in
Automated Tape Layup Composites.
AU - Johnston, P. H.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Juarez, P. D.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AB - Automated tow placement has become a widely used fabrication technique,
especially for large aerospace structures. Robotic heads lay down strips
(tows) of preimpregnated fiber along programmed paths. The intention is to
lay adjacent tows abutted to one another, but sometimes a gap is left
between a tow and the previously-placed tow. If a tow gap exists, it fills
with resin during cure, forming a fiber-free volume. In immersion
ultrasonic pulse-echo measurements of a cured laminate, the gap can be
observed to produce a noticeable echo, without significantly attenuating
the back-wall reflection of the laminate. To understand this behavior, we
considered a one dimensional model of the composite laminate, with a thin
layer having the ultrasonic sound speed and density of neat resin,
sandwiched between two layers of material having the sound speed and
density of fiber-reinforced composite and surrounded on both sides by
water. Neglecting attenuation, we considered the transmission and
reflection coefficients of each interface, as well as that of the thin
resin layer. Using the initial water/composite reflection as a reference,
we computed the relative magnitude of the back surface/water reflection in
the presence and in the absence of a resin-only layer, as well as the
relative magnitude of the reflection arising from a thin resin layer in
composite. While the one-dimensional model did not fully match the
measurements, it did qualitatively explain the observed behavior.
KW - *Acoustic velocity
KW - *Echoes
KW - *Ultrasonic radiation
KW - *Water
KW - *Fabrication
KW - *Laminates
KW - *Lay-up
KW - *Mathematical models
KW - *Reflectance
KW - *Resins
KW - *Simulation
KW - *Thickness
KW - Aircraft structures
KW - Concentration (composition)
KW - Plane waves
KW - Robotics
KW - Thermography
KW - Transducers
KW - Waveforms
RN - NF1676L-26722
OD - 5
PR - WBS 826611.04.07.02
YR - 2017
PC - 019041001
CT - 50 | Civil Engineering
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0009109_a

278 - TOXLINE
TI - Proposal and Development of a High Voltage Variable Frequency Alternating
Current Power System for Hybrid Electric Aircraft.
AU - Sadey, D. J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Taylor, L. M.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AU - Beach, R. F.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH. NASA John H.
Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.
AB - The development of ultra-efficient commercial vehicles and the transition
to low-carbon emission propulsion are seen as strategic thrust paths
within NASA Aeronautics. A critical enabler to these paths comes in the
form of hybrid electric propulsion systems. For megawatt-class systems,
the best power system topology for these hybrid electric propulsion
systems is debatable. Current proposals within NASA and the Aero community
suggest using a combination of alternating current (AC) and direct current
(DC) for power generation, transmission, and distribution. This paper
proposes an alternative to the current thought model through the use of a
primarily high voltage AC power system, supported by the Convergent
Aeronautics Solutions (CAS) Project. This system relies heavily on the use
of doubly-fed induction machines (DFIMs), which provide high power
densities, minimal power conversion, and variable speed operation. The
paper presents background on the activity along with the system
architecture, development status, and preliminary results.
KW - *Hybrid propulsion
KW - *Electric propulsion
KW - *High voltages
KW - *Alternating current
KW - *Frequencies
KW - *Electric motor vehicles
KW - *Propulsion system configurations
KW - *Propulsion system performance
KW - Convergence
KW - Ac generators
KW - Critical path method
RN - GRC-E-DAA-TN46211
OD - 10
PR - WBS 533127.02.16.03.04
YR - 2017
PC - 115801001
CT - 51C | Aircraft
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0009087_a

279 - TOXLINE
TI - Stochastic Network Vehicular Origin-Destination Demand Using Multi-Sensor
Information Fusion Approaches.
AU - Liou, H.
AD - Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN.
AU - Hu, S.
AD - Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN.
AU - Peeta, S.
AD - Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN.
AB - This study proposes an integrated two-stage optimization model for the
HSDP-OD problem. The first stage is the heterogeneous traffic sensors
deployment model, which seeks to determine the sensor deployment strategy
that optimizes the traffic information available to the second-stage O-D
matrix estimation problem. The weights of the objective function terms in
this model are functions of the errors between the observed and estimated
link and path/O-D flow data determined in the second-stage model. The
second stage is the O-D matrix estimation model that leverages the traffic
information obtained in the first-stage model to determine the O-D matrix
that minimizes the errors between the observed and estimated traffic flow
data. The traffic information from the first stage and the traffic flow
data errors from the second stage integrate this two-stage optimization
model. The two-stage model for the HSDP-OD problem is described hereafter.
KW - *Vehicular origin-destination
KW - *Multi-sensor information
KW - Traffic sensors
KW - Traffic information
KW - Traffic flow data
RN - NEXTRANS-158PUY2.2
OD - 24
YR - 2017
PC - 009058000
CT - 91B | Transportation &amp; Traffic Planning
CT - 85H | Road Transportation
CT - 43G | Transportation
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100255_a

280 - TOXLINE
TI - Incidence and Fate of Volatile Methyl Siloxanes in a Crewed Spacecraft
Cabin.
AU - Perry, J. L.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Kayatin, M. J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AB - Volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) arise from diverse, pervasive sources
aboard crewed spacecraft ranging from materials offgassing to
volatilization from personal care products. These sources lead to a
persistent VMS compound presence in the cabin environment that must be
considered for robust life support system design. Volatile methyl siloxane
compound stability in the cabin environment presents an additional
technical issue because degradation products such as dimethylsilanediol
(DMSD) are highly soluble in water leading to a unique load challenge for
water purification processes. The incidence and fate of VMS compounds as
observed in the terrestrial atmosphere, water, and surface (soil)
environmental compartments have been evaluated as an analogy for a crewed
cabin environment. Volatile methyl siloxane removal pathways aboard crewed
spacecraft are discussed and a material balance accounting for a DMSD
production mechanism consistent with in-flight observations is presented.
KW - *Methyl polysiloxanes
KW - *Siloxanes
KW - *Volatile organic compounds
KW - *Spacecraft cabin atmospheres
KW - *Systems engineering
KW - *International space station
KW - Henry law
KW - Offgassing
KW - Life support systems
KW - Spacecraft cabins
KW - Trace contaminants
KW - Ground tests
RN - ICES-2017-233
RN - M17-6340
OD - 14
YR - 2017
PC - 019043002
CT - 95E | Life Support Systems
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0010355_a
281 - TOXLINE
TI - Genomic Epigenomic, and Quality-of-Life Charteristics of Long-Term
Survivors of Ovarian Cancer.
AU - Birrer, M.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Wenzel, L.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Fulci, G.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Coukos, G.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Lankes, H.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Mok, S.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Nephew, K.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Parmigiani, G.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Scroggins, M. J.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AU - Ramirez, N.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AB - Ovarian cancer (OC) remains a major health problem in the United Sates
(US). In 2012, there will be an estimated 22,280 cases of epithelial OC
(EOC) resulting in 15,500 deaths. While the median survival of OC patients
has improved over the last two decades, the vast majority of patients
suffer relapse and develop chemo-resistant disease. The overall survival
of patients suffering from OC has not changed appreciably over the last
three decades. Despite these dismal statistics, there is a minority of OC
patients who are long-term (LT) survivors ( > 10 years). This includes a
subset of advanced stage (~15%) and a higher proportion of early-stage
disease (75%). Unfortunately, there is little genomic or biologic
characterization of these tumors, or patient reported outcomes that
characterize LT survivors. The clinical importance of identifying subsets
of patients who may or may not benefit from therapy, and understanding the
biology of their tumors, is significant both from a patient survival and
quality of life (QOL) standpoint. The characterization of LT survivors of
advanced stage OC will potentially identify molecular and clinical
pathways that can be targeted to help women who have shorter survivals.
Further, careful characterization of these patients, including their
initial and longitudinal health-related QOL reports, their response to
treatments, and their tumors will provide significant measures of
prognostic factors. Accurate identification of women with high-grade,
early stage OC who will recur will allow for tailoring therapy to only
those who will benefit. Thus, the systematic molecular and
patient-reported outcomes evaluation of LT survivors of OC (both early and
advanced stage) will yield data, which can significantly impact the
management of OC patients.
KW - Genomics
KW - Ovarian cancer
KW - Survival
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Immunochemistry
KW - Sampling
KW - Epigenomics
KW - Qol (quality of life)
KW - Lt (long-term)
KW - Lt survivors
KW - Oc (ovarian cancer)
KW - Consortium development
KW - Psychosocial
KW - Survivorship
KW - Molecular signatures
KW - Immunohistochemistry
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800218306
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048744_a

282 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Control of Atherosclerosis Regression by PRMT2 in Diabetes.
AU -
Garabedian, M.
AD -
Columbia Univ., New York. School of Medicine.
AB -
Diabetics have more heart disease than their non-diabetic counterparts,
even though drugs like statins are equally effective in both groups at
lowering the blood levels of harmful cholesterol. We have identified an
enzyme called PRMT2, which regulates the abundance of a cellular
cholesterol transporter that helps to prevent cells from accumulating in
arteries and forming a plaque. We have shown that the level of PRMT2,
while high in healthy cells, is very low in cells from diabetics when
blood sugar levels are elevated. Because PRTM2 isnt around in cells under
diabetic conditions, we predict that more cells accumulate in the artery,
thus allowing the plaque to grow and exacerbating heart disease in
diabetics. To test this, we will determine what happens to the growth of a
plaque in an artery when we eliminate PRMT2 with and without diabetes in
mouse models of heart disease. We expect that plaques will grow larger in
the absence of PRMT2. To better understand how PRMT2 suppresses plaque
growth, we will also identify proteins that are modified by PRMT2 in cells
from the plaque and determine if these proteins participate in plaque
formation. Given that we also dont understand why PRMT2 levels decrease in
diabetes, we will identify cellular proteins that regulate PRMT2 levels.
That knowledge might enable us to develop ways to restore the normal level
of PRMT2 in diabetes, and prevent the cells from contributing to plaque
formation, and reduce heart attacks.
KW - Sclerosis
KW - Diabetes
KW - Heart diseases
KW - Enzymes
KW - Macrophages
KW - Substrates
KW - Glucose
KW - Atherosclerosis regression
KW - Prmt2 enzyme
KW - Lxr transcriptional activity
KW - Atherosclerotic plaques
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 003788245
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050237_a
283 - TOXLINE
TI - Modeling to Mars: a NASA Model Based Systems Engineering Pathfinder
Effort.
AU - Phojanamongkolkij, N.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Lee, K. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Miller, S. T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Vorndran, K. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Vaden, K. R.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Ross, E. P.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Powell, B. C.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Moses, R. W.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AB - The NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) Systems Engineering (SE)
Technical Discipline Team (TDT) initiated the Model Based Systems
Engineering (MBSE) Pathfinder effort in FY16. The goals and objectives of
the MBSE Pathfinder include developing and advancing MBSE capability
across NASA, applying MBSE to real NASA issues, and capturing issues and
opportunities surrounding MBSE. The Pathfinder effort consisted of four
teams, with each team addressing a particular focus area. This paper
focuses on Pathfinder team 1 with the focus area of architectures and
mission campaigns. These efforts covered the timeframe of February 2016
through September 2016. The team was comprised of eight team members from
seven NASA Centers (Glenn Research Center, Langley Research Center, Ames
Research Center, Goddard Space Flight Center IV&amp;V Facility, Johnson
Space Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Stennis Space Center).
Collectively, the team had varying levels of knowledge, skills and
expertise in systems engineering and MBSE. The team applied their existing
and newly acquired system modeling knowledge and expertise to develop
modeling products for a campaign (Program) of crew and cargo missions
(Projects) to establish a human presence on Mars utilizing In-Situ
Resource Utilization (ISRU). Pathfinder team 1 developed a subset of
modeling products that are required for a Program System Requirement
Review (SRR)/System Design Review (SDR) and Project Mission Concept Review
(MCR)/SRR as defined in NASA Procedural Requirements. Additionally, Team 1
was able to perform and demonstrate some trades and constraint analyses.
At the end of these efforts, over twenty lessons learned and recommended
next steps have been identified.
KW - *Systems engineering
KW - *In situ resource utilization
KW - *Cargo
KW - *Spacecraft launching
KW - *Models
KW - *Project management
KW - *Mars missions
KW - *Statistical analysis
KW - *Mission planning
KW - *Configuration management
KW - Teams
KW - Mars surface
KW - Lessons learned
RN - NF1676L-26665
OD - 15
PR - WBS 432938.11.01.07.42.12
YR - 2017
PC - 019041001
CT - 84A | Astronautics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0009110_a

284 - TOXLINE
TI - Workplace Design Solutions: Protecting Workers during the Handling of
Nanomaterials.
AU - Dunn, K. H.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Topmiller, J. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - McCleery, T.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Whalen, J.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are materials that are intentionally
produced to have at least one primary dimension less than 100 nanometers
(nm). These materials have new or unique properties different from those
of larger forms of the same material, making them desirable for specific
product applications. The health effects associated with nanomaterials are
not yet clearly understood, so it is important for producers and users of
ENMs to reduce employee exposure and manage risks appropriately. In 2013,
the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
published a compendium of control approaches for nanomaterial production
and use processes entitled "Current Strategies for Engineering Controls in
Nanomaterial Production and Downstream Handling Processes". This Workplace
Design Solutions document provides guidance on exposure control options
for protecting workers during the handling of nanomaterials.
KW - Prevention through Design (PTD)
KW - Nanotechnology
KW - Nanotoxicology
KW - Nanoparticles
KW - Nanomaterials
KW - Engineering
KW - Nanoscale
KW - Risk management
KW - Engineering controls
KW - Hierarchy of controls
KW - Toxic materials
KW - Carbon nanotubes
KW - Carbon nanofibers
KW - Control methods
KW - Control technology
KW - Titanium dioxide
KW - Guidelines
KW - Workplace solutions
KW - Work environment
KW - Environmental control
KW - Employee exposure
KW - Ventilation
KW - Worker safety
KW - Manual materials handling
KW - Hazardous materials
KW - Personal protective equipment (PPE)
KW - Gloves
KW - Manufacturing
KW - Hazard communication
KW - Hazard labels
KW - Warning systems
KW - Industrial design
KW - Protective measures
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2018-121
OD - 8
YR - 2018
PC - 118833000
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100783_a

285 - TOXLINE
TI - Remote detection of chem/bio hazards via coherent anti-Stokes Raman
spectroscopy.
AU - Malinovskaya, S.
AD - Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken United States
AB - The goal the project is to assess the feasibility of Femtosecond Adaptive
Spectroscopic Technique applied to coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy
(FAST CARS) for a real time remote detection of hazardous microparticles
in atmosphere and to evaluate the range of distances for typical species
and the parameters of laser system that drive the limits of applicability.
We will formulate a semiclassical theory of nonlinear scattering to
estimate the number of detectable photons from a prototype molecule at a
distance.
KW - Raman scattering
KW - Raman spectroscopy
KW - Remote sensing
KW - Detection
KW - Chemical agents
KW - Biological agents
KW - Laser beams
KW - Stimulated raman scattering
KW - Remote detection
KW - Biochemical agents
KW - Explosives
KW - Optical frequency comb
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800220299
CT - 74D | Chemical, Biological, &amp; Radiological Warfare
CT - 99F | Physical &amp; Theoretical Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1040400_a

286 - TOXLINE
TI - Workplace Design Solutions: Protecting Workers during Nanomaterial Reactor
Operations.
AU - Dunn, K. H.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Topmiller, J. L.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - McCleery, T.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Whalen, J.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are materials that are intentionally
produced to have at least one primary dimension less than 100 nanometers
(nm). These materials have new or unique properties different from those
of larger forms of the same material, making them desirable for specific
product applications. The health effects associated with nanomaterials are
not yet clearly understood, so it is important for producers and users of
ENMs to reduce employee exposure and manage risks appropriately. In 2013,
the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
published a compendium of control approaches for nanomaterial production
and use processes entitled "Current Strategies for Engineering Controls in
Nanomaterial Production and Downstream Handling Processes". This Workplace
Design Solutions document provides guidance on exposure control approaches
for protecting workers during nanomaterial reactor operations.
KW - Prevention through Design (PTD)
KW - Nanotechnology
KW - Nanotoxicology
KW - Nanoparticles
KW - Nanomaterials
KW - Engineering
KW - Nanoscale
KW - Risk management
KW - Engineering controls
KW - Hierarchy of controls
KW - Hazardous materials
KW - Toxic materials
KW - Carbon nanotubes
KW - Carbon nanofibers
KW - Control methods
KW - Control technology
KW - Titanium dioxide
KW - Nanowires
KW - Machine operation
KW - Machine operators
KW - Equipment design
KW - Equipment maintenance
KW - Guidelines
KW - Workplace solutions
KW - Work environment
KW - Environmental control
KW - Employee exposure
KW - Ventilation
KW - Protective measures
KW - Worker safety
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2018-120
OD - 8
YR - 2018
PC - 118833000
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100782_a

287 - TOXLINE
TI - Multivalent Peptidomimetic Conjugates as Inhibitors of Androgen Receptor
Function in Therapy-Resistant Prostate Cancer.
AU - Nettles, K. W.
AD - Scripps Florida Jupiter United States
AB - Androgens are hormones that play a critical role in stimulating prostate
cancer growth. Androgens activate a protein called the androgen receptor
(AR), which regulates genes involved in cell growth. Although powerful
anti-androgen drugs can be administered to block AR action and have been
used successfully to treat patients with prostate cancer, over time the
tumors become resistant to the drugs, leaving few treatment options. The
goal of this proposal is to develop a new approach to block AR activity
and stop prostate cancer growth using a new family of molecules called
multivalent peptidomimetic conjugates. We have previously demonstrated
that a conjugate with two ethisterone steroidal groups arrayed with eight
intervening monomers, (MPC6), had the greatest anti-proliferative effect
in LNCaP-abl cells (a cellular model advanced disease that express AR, and
proliferates in the absence of androgen), with more or less intervening
monomers in between the ethisterone ligands diminishing compound
activities. We are now creating a set of MPC6 variants, and evaluating if
they block androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell growth. To understand
how these molecule blocks AR function, we will determine the
three-dimensional structure of AR bound to MPC6. These studies will be
used to guide our ability to tailor the conjugates for optimal
interactions with the AR.
KW - Androgens
KW - Hormones prostate cancer
KW - Receptors(physiology)
KW - Genes
KW - Cells(biology)
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Androgen receptors
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800222262
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048734_a

288 - TOXLINE
TI - REVISITING THE LIBERAL LEVIATHAN: CHINA AND AN ALTERNATE LIBERALORDER.
AU - WALLACE, J. S.
AD - Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. School of Advanced Air and Space Studies.
AB - This study analyzes China's recent political activity in the context of
three potential paths to great power status. The author shows how China's
recent adoption of the One Bridge, One Road initiative and founding of the
Asian Investment Infrastructure Bank are more consistent with an intent to
create an alternate liberal order. China is no longer content to rise
within the existing US-led liberal order, but an alternate Chinese-led
order would not necessarily be illiberal in nature. China's increasing
frustration with impediments to further growth and influence in the
existing US-led order, coupled with new-found economic power, has fueled
China's desire to construct an alternate order. Also, the crisis of
authority stemming from US unilateral actions under the Bush
administration along with US economic missteps have created the necessary
space for China's emergence as a new global leader. But a
Chinese-dominated international order would not, as many analysts suggest,
eschew liberal economic and political tenets. Although China is seeking to
create an alternate order, key elements of the existing liberal order
would persist, to include the use of multilateral institutions, economic
cooperation based on free trade, and the incorporation of a rules-based
system of international governance. However, a Chinese liberal order would
be distinct from the present system in terms of new economic institutions
without political strings attached and an increased emphasis on
nation-state sovereignty and the norm of non-interference in domestic
affairs.
KW - China
KW - Government(foreign)
KW - International politics
KW - Economics
KW - Banking
KW - Finance
KW - Military forces(foreign)
KW - International relations
KW - Globalization
KW - Leadership
KW - Liberal order
KW - International order
KW - Global stability
OD - 86
YR - 2017
PC - 000806003
CT - 92 | Behavior &amp; Society
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047284_a

289 - TOXLINE
TI - Dispersion Modeling Guidance for Airports Addressing Local Air Quality
Health Concerns. Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research
Report 179.
AU - Arunachalam, S.
AD - North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.
AU - Valencia, A.
AD - North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.
AU - Woody, M. C.
AD - North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.
AU - Snyder, M. G.
AD - North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.
AU - Huang, J.
AD - North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.
AU - Weil, J.
AD - North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.
AU - Soucacos, P.
AD - North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill.
AB - Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 179:
Dispersion Modeling Guidance for Airports Addressing Local Air Quality
Health Concerns provides guidance for selecting and applying dispersion
models to study local air quality health impacts resulting from
airport-related emissions. The report explores challenges associated with
modeling emissions in an airport setting for the purpose of understanding
their potential impacts on human health.
KW - *Best practices methodology
KW - *Airport safety
KW - *Generating Revenue
KW - *Airport revenues
KW - *Dispersion modeling systems
KW - Airport operators
KW - Maintenance
KW - Risk management
KW - Guidebook
KW - Regulation compliance
KW - Requirements
KW - Standards
KW - Development planning
KW - Modeling Guidance
KW - Air quality analysis
KW - Health concerns
KW - Emissions analyses
KW - *Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP)
RN - ACRP-179
RN - ISBN 978-0-309-44654-9
RN - LCCCN 2017951641
OD - 46
PR - 02-58
YR - 2017
PC - 004441000
CT - 51C | Aircraft
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
CT - 70B | Management Practice
CT - 92D | Education, Law, &amp; Humanities
CT - 85D | Transportation Safety
CT - 43A | Finance
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 44D | Health Care Assessment &amp; Quality Assurance
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100095_a

290 - TOXLINE
TI - TALE OF TWO CULTURES: BREXIT AND THE FUTURE OF UK-EUROPEAN SECURITY
COOPERATION.
AU - RADLEY, J.
AD - Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. School of Advanced Air and Space Studies.
AB - This study is an analysis of the evolution of UK and European security
cooperation since 1945 and a forecast of plausible future cooperation in
the wake of Britain's withdrawal from the European Union. It considers a
variety of theoretical approaches but focuses on developing a framework
for strategic culture that is applied to the historical evolution of both
European and UK security cooperation. From this foundation, the study
engages in constructivist forecasting of plausible pathways of development
for future UK-European security cooperation in the post-Brexit context.
KW - European union
KW - United kingdom
KW - Government(foreign)
KW - Elections
KW - Political parties
KW - Legislation
KW - Political negotiations
KW - Treaties
KW - European union strategic culture
KW - United kingdom strategic culture
KW - Security cooperation
KW - Brexit
OD - 129
YR - 2017
PC - 000806003
CT - 92 | Behavior &amp; Society
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047286_a

291 - TOXLINE
TI - Noninvasive in Vivo MRI Assessment of Prostate Cancer Using Hyperpolarized
15N Choline.
AU - LUMATA, L. L.
AD - University of Texas at Dallas Richardson United States
AB - This study involved the use of hyperpolarized 15N choline as potential
magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) metabolic agent for prostate cancer
diagnostics. The main goal of this study was to monitor the anticipated
high uptake of choline in tumors and the subsequent overproduction of
phosphocholine due to overexpression of choline kinase. Using dissolution
dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method, the MRI signal of 15N-enriched
choline was amplified to about 48,000-fold measured in a 9.4 T magnet at
298 K. The 15N spin-lattice relaxation time of hyperpolarized choline in
the liquid-state was found to be 240 s or 4 minutes. Hyperpolarized 15N
choline was tested in vitro in PC-3 prostate cancer cells. We have found
that choline metabolism is relatively slow in which it could take several
hours to have substantial production of phosphocholinea time scale which
is outside the 8-10 minute observation window of hyperpolarized 15N MRI.
The scientific efforts in this project have resulted in a number of
research papers regarding optimization of hyperpolarized MRI signals and
improvement of protocols for metabolic cell studies using
hyperpolarization.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Metabolism
KW - Magnetic resonance imaging
KW - Culture techniques
KW - Enzyme kinetics
KW - Electron spin resonance
KW - Paramagnetic resonance
KW - Lanthanides
KW - Arteries
KW - Nuclear magnetic resonance
KW - Polarization
KW - Dnp(dynamic nuclear polarization)
KW - Hyperpolarization
OD - 89
PR - PC121415
YR - 2017
PC - 800218710
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1039702_a

292 - TOXLINE
TI - Oil and Gas Extraction Worker Fatalities 2014: NIOSH Fatalities in Oil and
Gas Extraction (FOG) Database.
AU - Ridl, S.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Retzer, K.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AU - Hill, R.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Washington, DC.
AB - This report describes fatal incidents identified by the NIOSH Fatalities
in Oil and Gas Extraction (FOG) database that occurred in 2014. The
purpose of FOG is to collect detailed information about worker fatalities
related to U.S. oil and gas extraction. This report provides updates to
fatalities published in the Oil and Gas Extraction Worker Fatalities, 2014
Mid-year Report: January 1, 2014 - June 30, 2014, and also includes
fatalities from the second half of the year. It is intended to serve as a
resource for health and safety professionals, managers, and other
stakeholders in identifying and eliminating hazards encountered by workers
during oil and gas extraction operations. In this report, fatalities are
presented by rig count, workforce, location, industry group, event type,
operation, activities, and the number of fatalities per incident.
KW - *Occupational hazards
KW - *Oil industry
KW - *Mortality rates
KW - Occupational Health Programs
KW - Occupational safety programs
KW - Occupations
KW - Gas industry
KW - Injuries
KW - Traumatic injuries
KW - Mortality data
KW - Mortality surveys
KW - Information retrieval systems
KW - Statistical analysis
KW - Oil refinery workers
KW - Industrial processes
KW - Injury prevention
KW - Surveillance programs
KW - Workplace monitoring
KW - Petroleum industry
KW - Petroleum oils
KW - Petroleum refineries
KW - Fuel production
RN - DHHS/PUB/NIOSH-2017-193
OD - 74
YR - 2017
PC - 118833000
CT - 97B | Energy Use, Supply, &amp; Demand
CT - 97A | Reserves
CT - 97K | Fuels
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100179_a

293 - TOXLINE
TI - Line Pilot Perspectives on Complexity of Terminal Instrument Flight
Procedures.
AU - Chandra, D. C.
AD - John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Cambridge, MA.
AU - Markunas, R.
AD - John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, Cambridge, MA.
AB - Instrument flight procedures (IFPs) based on RNAV and RNP offer safety
enhancements along with new levels of flexibility to negotiate terrain,
airspace, and environmental considerations. However, operational
implementation of performance-based IFPs does not always go smoothly. We
gathered input on subjective factors related to IFP and chart complexity
by interviewing 45 professional line pilots from major and regional
airlines, corporate operators, and an air taxi operator. We observed
groups of 2 or 3 pilots (from the same operator, flying the same aircraft)
review and brief IFPs as they would normally do, then discussed the IFPs
in detail to identify areas of potential confusion about either the IFP or
the chart. The primary goal of the study was to identify subjective
factors in IFP complexity. The secondary goal was to understand how pilots
use charts today, especially for arrivals and departures. Results
identified a broad range of issues including IFP design, issues related to
both IFP design and charting, and issues that are outside the scope of the
IFP design per se, such as crew and operator factors, the use of aircraft
automated systems to fly PBN IFPs, and interactions with Air Traffic
Control.
KW - Instrument flight procedures (IFPs)
KW - Flight path management
KW - Automated systems
RN - DOT-VNTSC-FAA-17-06
OD - 140
YR - 2017
PC - 098811000
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100218_a
294 - TOXLINE
TI - Flowing Plasma Interaction with an Electric Sail Tether Element.
AU - Schneider, T.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Vaughn, J.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Wright, K.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Andersen, A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AU - Stone, N.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Huntsville, AL. George C.
Marshall Space Flight Center.
AB - Electric sails are a relatively new concept for providing high speed
propellant-less propulsion. Employing multiple tethers biased to high
positive voltage levels (kV), electric sails are designed to gain momentum
from the solar wind by repelling solar wind protons. To maximize the area
of the sail that interacts with the solar wind, electric sails rely on the
formation of a large plasma sheath around each small diameter tether.
Motivated by interest in advancing the development of electric sails, a
set of laboratory tests has been conducted to study the interaction of a
drifting plasma with a sheath formed around a small diameter tether
element biased at positive voltages. The laboratory test setup was created
with Debye length scaling in mind to offer a path to extrapolate (via
modeling) to full scale electric sail missions. Using an instrument known
as a Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP) the interaction between a
positively biased tether element and a drifting plasma has been measured
for several scenarios. Clear evidence of the tether element sheath
deflecting ions has been obtained. Maps of the flow angle downstream from
the tether element have been made and they show the influence of the
plasma sheath. Finally, electron current collection measurements have been
made for a wide range of plasma conditions and tether element bias
voltages. The electron collection data will have an impact on electric
sail power requirements, as high voltage power supplies and electron guns
will have to be sized to accommodate the electron currents collected by
each tether.
KW - *Solar wind
KW - *Solar electric propulsion
KW - *Electric potential
KW - *Plasma sheaths
KW - *Plasmas (physics)
KW - *Electron energy
KW - Debye length
KW - Flux (rate)
KW - Bias
KW - Momentum
RN - M17-6019
OD - 5
YR - 2017
PC - 019043002
CT - 84 | Space Technology
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0008055_a

295 - TOXLINE
TI - NUCLEAR SYMBOLISM AND RITUAL UPHOLDING THE NATIONAL MYTH: A STUDY OF
INDIAN AND PAKISTANI NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION.
AU - YELNICKER, M. C.
AD - Air Univ., Maxwell AFB, AL. School of Advanced Air and Space Studies.
AB - This study suggests studying nuclear proliferation as an outcome of
national myth. It begins by examining the theoretical role of myth in
general and then specifically political myths. Ultimately, it describes
myth as a conceptual entity that provides meaning and context to objective
facts. Through the use of symbolism and ritual, ideas becomes reality.
This study focuses on how national myth influences nuclear posture. It
claims nations resist pressures from changes in environment to protect
national myth by insuring the ritual and symbol remain congruent with the
myth. The study examines this phenomenon by looking at the fifty-year
history of India and Pakistans path to full nuclear weaponization,
ultimately concluding that analyzing a nations nuclear proliferation as
symbol and ritual provides insights that other reductionist theories
cannot.Finally it suggests the study of nuclear symbolism and ritual of
future nuclear proliferators, such as Saudi Arabia and Iran, will prove
useful for U.S. policy makers and their anti-proliferation agenda.
KW - Nuclear proliferation
KW - Nuclear posture
OD - 83
YR - 2017
PC - 000806003
CT - 74H | Nuclear Warfare
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1047376_a

296 - TOXLINE
TI - Why is Coco Orange: Coco and His Friends Solve this Mystery as They Learn
About Air Quality, September 2017.
AB - Coco has a problem. Hes a chameleon, but he cant change colors, and his
asthma is acting up. Read how Coco and his friends at Lizard Lick
Elementary solve this mystery as they learn about air quality and how to
stay healthy when the air quality is bad. This book is for all children,
especially those with asthma, and their caretakers. Ages 4-8.
KW - *Air pollution
KW - *Health effects
KW - *Asthma
KW - Action plans
KW - Inhalers
KW - Air quality
KW - Ozone
KW - US EPA
RN - EPA-456/K-17/001
OD - 36
YR - 2017
PC - 034680059
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100999_a

297 - TOXLINE
TI - Survey of Key Monarch Habitat Areas Along Roadways in Central and North
Florida.
AU - Daniels, J. C.
AD - Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville.
AB - Roadsides in North and Central Florida harbor a large number of milkweed
populations important to the monarch butterfly. A total of 303 roadway
locations had one or more plants of the target species Asclepias
humistrata (pinewoods milkweed) or Asclepias tuberosa (butterflyweed).
Plant densities ranged from 1 to 161 individuals per site, 40 high density
sites were identified. The majority of these populations occurred on the
back, steeply sloped section of the road verge with exposed sand/soil
present and adjacent to dry habitats such as scrub, pineland, and
sandhill. A comprehensive georeferenced Excel spreadsheet of all
population locations and related population data was developed and
submitted to Florida Department of Transportation.
Communication/dissemination and vegetation management recommendations are
presented to help maximize the availability and productivity of roadside
milkweed populations for monarch and pollinator conservation.
KW - *Monarch butterfly
KW - *Habitat areas
KW - Vegetation management
KW - Milkweed
KW - Host plants
KW - Populations
RN - BDV31-977-49
OD - 25
YR - 2017
PC - 094409000
CT - 98D | Agronomy, Horticulture, &amp; Plant Pathology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100761_a

298 - TOXLINE
TI - Survey of Key Monarch Habitat Areas Along Roadways in Central and North
Florida, Summary.
AU - Daniels, J. C.
AD - Florida Museum of Natural History, Gainesville.
AB - University of Florida researchers examined a large section of north
central Florida to locate milkweed stands that serve as monarch breeding
sites and to document their productivity and use by monarch butterflies.
KW - *Monarch butterfly
KW - *Habitat areas
KW - Vegetation management
KW - Milkweed
KW - Host plants
KW - Populations
RN - BDV31-977-49-SUMMARY
OD - 1
YR - 2017
PC - 094409000
CT - 98D | Agronomy, Horticulture, &amp; Plant Pathology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100762_a

299 - TOXLINE
TI - Evaporation and Degradation of a Sessile Droplet of VX on an Impermeable
Surface.
AU - VARADY, M. J.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - RILEY, P. C.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - MANTOOTH, B. A.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - SCHENNING, A. M.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - FOUSE, J. C.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - PEARL, T. P.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AB - This report highlights experimental studies into the combined physical and
chemical processes that occur when a sessile droplet of
2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl-O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate (VX) evaporates
from an impermeable surface at elevated temperature. Specifically, when
the VX droplet is in atmospheric conditions at elevated temperatures
( > 40 C), degradation of VX occurs via an established autocatalytic
mechanism. The resulting chemical change causes a corresponding change in
the contact angle and evaporation rate of the sessile droplet on an
impermeable surface. Comparison to the evaporation rate and contact angles
of known degradation byproducts suggests that phase separation of
hydrophilic (ethyl methylphosphonic acid and VX-pyro) and hydrophobic
(VX-disulfide) components occurs. The hydrophilic components make up the
core of the droplet and the hydrophobic component comprises the shell.
Continuum models of the process suggest that experimental observations
cannot be reproduced without accounting for phase separation.
KW - Chemical warfare agents
KW - Phase separation
KW - Water vapor
KW - Mass spectroscopy
KW - Chemical composition
KW - Chromatography
KW - Diffusivity
KW - Material degradation processes
KW - Vx agent
KW - Physical properties
KW - Chemical analysis
KW - Humidity
KW - Contact angle
KW - Sessile droplet
KW - Impermeable surfaces
RN - ECBC-TR-1478
OD - 50
PR - CB3062
YR - 2017
PC - 800218423
CT - 99F | Physical &amp; Theoretical Chemistry
CT - 74D | Chemical, Biological, &amp; Radiological Warfare
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1039376_a

300 - TOXLINE
TI - Gulf of Mexico OCS, Proposed Geological and Geophysical Activities:
Western, Central, and Eastern Planning Areas. Final Programmatic
Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Figures, Tables, Keyword Index,
and Appendices A-D.
AB - This Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the
potential significant environmental effects of multiple geological and
geophysical (G&amp;G) activities on the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Outer
Continental Shelf (OCS) in the Western, Central, and Eastern Planning
Areas (WPA, CPA, and EPA). It evaluates the types of G&amp;G surveys and
activities in the three program areas managed by the Bureau of Ocean
Energy Management (BOEM): oil and gas; renewable energy; and marine
minerals.
KW - *Gulf of Mexico
KW - *Outer Continetal Shelf (OCS)
KW - *Geophysical surveys
KW - *Environmental impact statments
KW - Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement(PEIS)
KW - Geological activities
KW - Environmental impact
KW - Biological assessment
KW - Renewable energy
KW - Marine minerals
KW - Oil
KW - *Outer Continental Shelf(OCS)
RN - OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2017-051-V2
OD - 808
YR - 2017
PC - 120312001
CT - 47E | Marine Geophysics &amp; Geology
CT - 48C | Natural Resource Surveys
CT - 48F | Geology &amp; Geophysics
CT - 68 | Environmental Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
CT - 57H | Ecology
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100163_a

301 - TOXLINE
TI - NTP Research Report on Absence of Formaldehyde-Induced Neoplasia in Trp53
Haploinsufficient Mice Exposed by Inhalation.
AB - Formaldehyde inhalation is linked to nasal cancer and leukemia in humans.
Formaldehyde-induced DNA-protein crosslinks and enhanced cell
proliferation are important in the pathogenesis of nasal cancer and,
potentially, leukemia. Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene Trp53 have
been associated with formaldehyde-induced nasal tumors and might be a key
mechanistic event in formaldehyde-induced leukemia. The objective of this
study was to evaluate the potential role of the Trp53 gene in
formaldehyde-induced nasal carcinogenicity, leukemia or
lymphohematopoietic cancer, and potentially other neoplasms in genetically
susceptible mice. Male, Trp53 haploinsufficient (Trp53+) mouse strains
(B6.129-Trp53tm1Brd and C3B6.129F1-Trp53tm1Brd) were exposed to 0-, 7.5-
or 15-ppm formaldehyde (25/group) 6 h/d, 5 d/wk for 8 wk, and then held
for 32 wk. Blood was collected for hematology, and major tissues and gross
lesions were collected for histopathology. The primary
formaldehyde-related finding was squamous metaplasia of the respiratory
epithelium of the nose. Inhalation of a maximum tolerated dose of
formaldehyde caused significant injury to the nasal mucosa and cell
proliferation, but did not cause nasal tumors or an increased prevalence
of leukemia or lymphohematopoietic cancer in Trp53+ mice. All observed
neoplasms were considered background lesions for these mouse strains. The
results of this short-term carcinogenicity study do not support a role for
Trp53 in formaldehyde-induced neoplasia.
KW - *Formaldehyde
KW - *Trp53+ mice
KW - *Inhalation
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Health effects
KW - Trp53 mutations
KW - Nasal cavity
KW - Neoplasia
KW - Animal exposure
KW - Hematology
KW - Necropsy
KW - Immunohistochemistry
KW - Body weights
KW - Organ weights
KW - Histopathology
KW - Neoplasms
RN - NTP/RR-3
OD - 30
YR - 2017
PC - 068182000
CT - 99D | Basic &amp; Synthetic Chemistry
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100056_a

302 - TOXLINE
TI - Preclinical Development of TVAX: An Advanced Multiantigen Vaccine for
Therapy and Prevention of Malignant Mesothelioma.
AU - Bertino, P.
AD - Unviersity of Hawaii Honolulu United States
AB - We proposed to evaluate the efficacy of a multi-antigen vaccine for the
treatment of malignant mesothelioma (MM) in mice. The first version of
this vaccine, called mTvax, included epitopes to activate antigen-specific
T cells against survivin, metastasin, midkine, Wilm's Tumor 1, brachyury,
Fibroblast Activation Protein and VEGFR2. In mTvax we also included the
immunostimulatory molecules CD80, CD54, and CD48 with the purpose of
improving T cells responses. The mTvax antigen, comprising of the epitopes
for T cell activation and the three immunostimulatory molecules, has been
inserted into the DNA of different vectors (p-mTvax, MVA-mTvax and
FP-mTvax). When experiments were performed to evaluate the efficacy of
mTvax vaccines, only FP-mTvax induced a statistically significant delay in
tumor progression. Moreover, when we combined FP-mTvax with OX40 agonist
antibodies (OX86), we did not observe any reduction in tumor growth. To
investigate our hypothesis that CD80, CD54, and CD48 reduce the efficacy
of our vaccines, we produced mTvax 2.0 that expresses the same cancer
antigen of mTvax but lacks the three immune stimulatory molecules.
Experiments performed using mTvax 2.0 in mice carrying MM tumors showed
vaccine-induced specific T cell responses and delay in tumor growth using
both MVA and FP vectors.
KW - Mesothelioma
KW - Vaccines
KW - Epitopes
KW - Disease vectors
KW - T lymphocytes
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Antibodies
KW - Peptides
KW - Ribonucleic acids
KW - Mm (malignant mesothelioma)
KW - Fp-mtvax
KW - P-mtvax
KW - Mva-mtvax
KW - Anti-cancer vaccines
KW - T cell-epitope
KW - Multi-epitope vaccines
KW - T regulatory cells
KW - Tregitopes.
KW - Ox86 antibodies
KW - Rna (ribonucleic acids)
KW - Mrna (messenger rna)
OD - 16
YR - 2017
PC - 800222127
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046243_a

303 - TOXLINE
TI - Development of a Synthetic Lethal Drug Combination That Targets the Energy
Generation Triangle for Liver Cancer Therapy.
AU - Xu, S.
AD - University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles United States
AB - Metabolic reprogramming in HCC promotes cancer cell survival and growth.
This reprograming also suggests possibilities to identify as yet
unexplored therapeutic targets. While most normal tissues use HK1 for
glycolysis, HK4 is the only HK isoform in hepatocytes. The transition from
hepatocyte to HCC is frequently accompanied by a complete switch from HK4
to the highly active HK2 isoform, and increased glycolysis (the Warburg
effect). HK2 gene deletion in adult mice does not significantly affect
normal tissues; however, HK2 inhibition in HCC is cytostatic. Our high
throughput screen (HTC) discovered diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) as a
synthetic lethal partner that, in combination with HK2 inhibition, kills
HCC cells through its inhibition of mitochondrial complex I. The
combination of HK2 inhibition with DPI shifts fatty acid (FA) metabolism
from FA synthesis to FA oxidation (FAO) in HCC cells to compensate energy
loss. Compared to normal liver, HCC up-regulates expression of genes
involved in FA biosynthesis and down-regulates expression of genes
involved in FAO. Perhexiline (PER), a FAO inhibitor in clinical use,
sensitizes HCC cells to HK2 inhibition/DPI-induced toxicity. In contrast,
the HK2 inhibition/DPI/PER combination does not cause significant
cytotoxicity in cells from other cancers (e.g., breast, lung, colon),
suggesting this therapy will be tolerated in vivo. In this study, we
developed a triple combination of HK2 inhibition, DPI, and PER to target
the energy generation triangle (glycolysis, oxidative phosphorylation, and
FAO) as a translational, effective and safe therapy for HCC.
KW - Carcinomas
KW - Glycolysis
KW - Fatty acids
KW - Oxidation
KW - Mitochondria
KW - Drugs
KW - Metabolism
KW - Genes
KW - Inhibition
KW - Liver
KW - Cancer
KW - Cell line
KW - Hcc (hepatocellular carcinoma)
KW - Hk2 (hexokinase 2)
KW - Dpi (diphenyleneiodonium)
KW - Perhexiline
KW - Htc (high throughput screen)
KW - Fao (fatty acid oxidation)
KW - Electron transport chain
KW - Mitochondria complex-i
KW - Metabolic reprogramming
KW - Energy generation triangle
KW - Liver cancer therapy
KW - Hk2 inhibition
KW - Hcc cells
KW - Doxycycline
OD - 11
YR - 2017
PC - 800218772
CT - 57A | Anatomy
CT - 57S | Physiology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57Q | Pharmacology &amp; Pharmacological Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046027_a

304 - TOXLINE
TI - Joint Service Aircrew Mask (JSAM) - Tactical Aircraft (TA) A/P22P-14A
Respirator Assembly (V)3: Noise Attenuation and Speech Intelligibility
Performance with Double Hearing Protection, HGU-55A/P JHMCS Flight Helmet.
AU - Swayne, B.
AD - 711 Human Performance Wing Wright-Patterson AFB United States
AU - Gallagher, H.
AD - 711 Human Performance Wing Wright-Patterson AFB United States
AB - Noise attenuation and speech intelligibility measurements were conducted
in accordance with American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.6-1997
Methods for Measuring the Real-Ear Attenuation of Hearing Protectors
andANSI S3.2-2009Method for Measuring the Intelligibility of Speech over
Communication Systems on the Joint Service Aircrew MaskTactical Aircraft
(JSAM-TA) A/P22P-14A Respirator Assembly (V)3 with the HGU-55A/P Joint
Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) flight helmet in combination with
Communications Earplug (CEP) and 3M EAR Classic foam earplugs. The
objective of these measurements was to determine if the JSAM-TA
performance requirements were met when double hearing protection was used.
KW - Joint Service Aircrew Mask
KW - Noise standards
KW - Tactical aircraft
RN - AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2017-0019
OD - 27
YR - 2017
PC - 800219563
CT - 74E | Logistics, Military Facilities, &amp; Supplies
CT - 51C | Aircraft
CT - 68B | Noise Pollution &amp; Control
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1034178_a

305 - TOXLINE
TI - Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Report: Fire Fighter
Struck and Killed by Tanker Backing into the Bay of the Fire Station -
Pennsylvania, FACE-F2016-16.
AU - Bowyer, M. E.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA. Fire Fighter
Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program.
AU - Lincoln, J. E.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA. Fire Fighter
Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program.
AB - On July 23, 2016, a 60-year-old male volunteer fire fighter died when he
was struck by a tanker backing into the bay at the fire station. The
volunteer fire department had been assisting the community in a motorcycle
benefit for a children's cancer organization. At 1130 hours, the fire
department placed three of their apparatus at different route locations to
control traffic for the motorcycles riding in the benefit. Approximately 2
hours later, when the event had concluded, Tanker 72 returned to the fire
station. The driver was attempting to back into Bay 3 when the fire
fighter, near the station's man door approximately 30 feet away, walked
toward the rear of the backing tanker. A second fire fighter around Side B
of the station heard the fire fighter yelling the driver's name and walked
around to Side A to see why he was yelling. The second fire fighter
noticed that the tanker's right rear wheels were on the fire fighter's
left leg and the fire fighter was horizontal on the parking pad of the
fire station. The second fire fighter ran to the driver's door to get the
driver's attention to stop. When the driver stopped the tanker, it had
completely run over the left half of the fire fighter's body. An ambulance
was called that arrived within minutes but the fire fighter was pronounced
dead at the scene.
KW - *Fire fighters
KW - *Emergency responders
KW - *Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
KW - Safety practices
KW - Accident analysis
KW - Accident prevention
KW - Accidents
KW - Injuries
KW - Injury prevention
KW - Traumatic injuries
KW - Work practices
KW - Motor vehicles
KW - Training
KW - Hearing impairment
KW - Protective clothing
KW - Proximity detection
KW - Sensors
KW - Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE)
RN - FACE-F2016-16
OD - 16
YR - 2018
PC - 093878001
CT - 95G | Protective Equipment
CT - 91C | Fire Services, Law Enforcement, &amp; Criminal Justice
CT - 91I | Emergency Services &amp; Planning
CT - 43D | Police, Fire, &amp; Emergency Services
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 92A | Job Training &amp; Career Development
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100665_a

306 - TOXLINE
TI - Joint Service Aircrew Mask (JSAM) - Tactical Aircraft (TA) A/P22P-14A
Respirator Assembly (V)3: Noise Attenuation and Speech Intelligibility
Performance with Double Hearing Protection, HGU-68/P Flight Helmet.
AU - Swayne, B.
AD - 711 Human Performance Wing Wright-Patterson AFB United States
AU - Gallagher, H.
AD - 711 Human Performance Wing Wright-Patterson AFB United States
AB - Noise attenuation and speech intelligibility measurements were conducted
in accordance with American National Standards Institute (ANSI) S12.6-1997
Methods for Measuring the Real-Ear Attenuation of Hearing Protectors
andANSI S3.2-2009Method for Measuring the Intelligibility of Speech over
Communication Systems on the Joint Service Aircrew MaskTactical Aircraft
(JSAM-TA) A/P22P-14A Respirator Assembly (V)3 with the HGU-68/P flight
helmet in combination with Communications Earplug (CEP) and 3M EAR Classic
foam earplugs. The objective of these measurements was to determine if the
JSAM-TA performance requirements were met when double hearing protection
was used.
KW - Noise attenuation
KW - Respirator assembly
RN - AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2017-0020
OD - 27
YR - 2017
PC - 800219563
CT - 68B | Noise Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 74E | Logistics, Military Facilities, &amp; Supplies
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1034182_a

307 - TOXLINE
TI - Randomized Clinical Trial of the Collaborative Assessment and Management
of Suicidality vs. Enhanced Care as Usual for Sucidal Soldiers.
AU - Jobes, D.
AD - The Catholic University of America Washington United States
AU - Comtois, K.
AD - The Catholic University of America Washington United States
AU - Gutierrez, P.
AD - The Catholic University of America Washington United States
AU - Brenner, L.
AD - The Catholic University of America Washington United States
AU - Crow, B.
AD - The Catholic University of America Washington United States
AU - Singer, B.
AD - The Catholic University of America Washington United States
AU - Jennings, K.
AD - The Catholic University of America Washington United States
AB - This randomized controlled trial compared the use of the Collaborative
Assessment and Management of Suicidality (CAMS) to enhanced care as usual
(E-CAU). Method: Study participants were 148 Active-Duty Soldiers who
presented to a military outpatient behavioral health clinic. There were 73
Soldiers received CAMS; 75 Soldiers received E-CAU in the same clinic.Nine
a-priori treatment outcomes were measured at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, and
12 months (with a 78% retention of intent-to-treat participants at 12
months). Results: Soldiers in both arms of the trial responded to study
treatments in terms of all outcomes (effect sizes ranged from 0.63 to
12.04). CAMS participants were significantly less likely to have any
suicidal thoughts by 3 months in comparison to those in E-CAU (p=.028).
Conclusions: Soldiers who received CAMS and E-CAU significantly improved
post-treatment. Those who received CAMS were less likely to report SI at 3
months.
KW - Suicide
KW - Suicide control
OD - 94
YR - 2017
PC - 800221375
CT - 57T | Psychiatry
CT - 92B | Psychology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1038952_a

308 - TOXLINE
TI - Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) Report: Volunteer Fire
Fighter Dies After Running Out of Air and Becoming Disoriented in Retail
Store in Strip Mall Fire - North Carolina, FACE-F2016-07.
AU - Merinar, T. R.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA. Fire Fighter
Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program.
AU - Bowyer, M. E.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA. Fire Fighter
Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program.
AU - Loflin, M.
AD - National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Atlanta, GA. Fire Fighter
Fatality Investigation and Prevention Program.
AB - On April 30, 2016, a 20-year-old male volunteer fire fighter died after he
ran out of air and became disoriented while fighting a fire in a
commercial strip mall. The fire fighter was a member of the first-due
engine company, Engine 3 from Department 7. Once Engine 3 arrived
on-scene, a per-connected 1¾-inch cross-lay was stretched into the
7,000-square-foot retail store to attack the fire. The Engine 3 hose-line
crew consisted of a senior captain, a lieutenant, and two fire fighters.
After the fire was located and water was flowed on the fire, a fire
fighter working the nozzle ran low on air, gave the nozzle to the second
fire fighter (victim), and proceeded to follow the hose-line to exit the
structure. While operating the nozzle near the Charlie/Delta corner of the
retail store, the remaining fire fighter also ran low on air and told the
lieutenant and captain that he had to go outside. He immediately tried to
exit but quickly became disoriented in the near-zero visibility conditions
within the retail store. The fire fighter returned to the hose-line near
the nozzle and the lieutenant and captain tried to calm him down. The
lieutenant was low on air and told the captain that he would take the fire
fighter outside but the fire fighter broke away and disappeared into the
thick smoke toward Side C, the rear of the store. The lieutenant began to
follow the hose-line out. He heard the missing fire fighter yelling for
help off to his right and tried to make his way toward the missing fire
fighter but became entangled in the display racks. After freeing himself,
the lieutenant briefly located the missing fire fighter who stated he was
completely out of air and had to get out. The fire fighter again
disappeared, moving toward the rear of the store. The lieutenant also ran
out of air and had to remove his helmet and face-piece because his
face-piece was fogging up. The lieutenant activated his PASS device and
was soon located by the Engine 16 crew and helped outside. The lieutenant
told rescuers that the fire fighter was missing inside the store. A Mayday
was transmitted by the Engine 20 captain at the front door for a missing
fire fighter. The Engine 3 fire fighter was located about 2 minutes later
and transported to the hospital where he was pronounced dead. The
lieutenant was transported to the hospital for treatment of smoke
inhalation and was released later that day.
KW - *Emergency responders
KW - *Fire fighters
KW - *Personal protective equipment (PPE)
KW - *North Carolina (State)
KW - Injuries
KW - Injury prevention
KW - Traumatic injuries
KW - Accident analysis
KW - Accident prevention
KW - Accidents
KW - Fire fighting
KW - Fire safety
KW - Personal protection
KW - Surveillance
KW - Respiratory protective equipment
KW - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH)
KW - Supplied air respirators
KW - Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE)
RN - FACE-F2016-07
OD - 53
YR - 2017
PC - 093878001
CT - 43D | Police, Fire, &amp; Emergency Services
CT - 91C | Fire Services, Law Enforcement, &amp; Criminal Justice
CT - 91I | Emergency Services &amp; Planning
CT - 95G | Protective Equipment
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100708_a

309 - TOXLINE
TI - Review of the Role of Fungi in Wood Decay of Forest Ecosystems.
AU - Marcot, B. G.
AD - Forest Service, Portland, OR. Pacific Northwest Research Station.
AB - Fungi are key players in the health, diversity, and productivity of forest
ecosystems in Pacific Northwest forests, as mycorrhizal associations,
pathogens, decomposers, nontimber resources, and food resources for
wildlife. A number of invertebrate species are associated with wood decay
fungi, serve as vectors for fungal pathogens, or are fungivorous (consume
fungi) and influence rates of wood decay and nutrient mineralization. In
Washington and Oregon, 31 wildlife species among 8 families are
fungivores, and at least 14 wildlife species disperse fungi. Down wood can
provide nurse substrates for seedlings and beneficial mycorrhizal fungi,
refuges from pathogenic soil fungi, sources of nutrients for decay fungi,
and substrates supporting overall fungal diversity. Presence, density,
distribution, and diversity of fungi are influenced by forest stand
management practices, forest age class, and effects of fire. Old forests
provide for a suite of rare fungi species. Old legacy trees retained
during forest harvest can provide some degree of conservation of
beneficial and rare fungi. Fungi can be difficult to detect and monitor;
surveying for fungi at various times of the year, for multiple (at least
5) years, and by including hypogeous (belowground) samples, can improve
detection rates. Studies are needed in the Pacific Northwest to quantify
the amount of down wood - number of pieces, sizes, total biomass,
percentage of forest floor cover, and other attributes - necessary for
maintaining or restoring fungal biodiversity and viable levels of
individual fungi species, especially rare species.
KW - *Down wood
KW - *Fire effects
KW - *Pacific Northwest Forests
KW - *Oregon (State)
KW - *Pathogenic action
KW - *Soil fungistasis
KW - *Nontimber resources
KW - Fungi
KW - Mushrooms
KW - Mycorrhizae
KW - Coarse woody debris
KW - Wood decay
KW - Nontimber forest product
KW - Fungivores
KW - Old forests
KW - Monitoring
KW - Mineralization
RN - FSRN-PNW-575
OD - 32
YR - 2017
PC - 007881006
CT - 48E | Soil Sciences
CT - 48D | Forestry
CT - 48G | Hydrology &amp; Limnology
CT - 91I | Emergency Services &amp; Planning
CT - 43D | Police, Fire, &amp; Emergency Services
CT - 91C | Fire Services, Law Enforcement, &amp; Criminal Justice
CT - 480 | General
CT - 48A | Mineral Industries
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100039_a

310 - TOXLINE
TI - Western States Medical Monographs. Hepatitis C in El Paso County,
Colorado.
AU - Toussaint, A.
AD - Center for the Advancement of Healthcare Education and Delivery, Colorado
Springs, CO.
AB - Hepatitis C is the most common cause of chronic liver disease and the
single most common blood borne pathogen in the United States, with 3.9
million Americans infected. Transmission occurs through exposure to
infected blood. The first 6 months of infection are termed Acute Hepatitis
with anything longer labeled Chronic Hepatitis. Colorado Department of
Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) estimates there currently are about
70,935 people in Colorado living with chronic, unresolved Hepatitis C.
There are currently 2 class action lawsuits in Colorado due to under
treatment and barriers to treatment of Hepatitis C. Increasing the access
of those affected to life-saving medications, with 97% cure rates, is the
first step in combating this virus.
KW - *Medical monographs
KW - *Hepatitis C
KW - Chronic liver disease
KW - Blood borne diseases
KW - Infected blood
KW - Acute hepatitis
KW - Life-saving treatment
KW - Medications
RN - TR-06-2017
OD - 12
YR - 2017
PC - 120329000
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 44K | Health Services
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100079_a

311 - TOXLINE
TI - Role of Ca++ Influx via Epidermal TRP Ion Channels.
AU - Liedtke, W.
AD - Duke University Durham United States
AB - To benefit military veterans with amputations who suffer skin problems on
their amputation stumps, this proposal describes mechanistic studies to
pave the way for novel methods of improving skin barrier function at the
residual limb-prosthetic interface.Signaling systems in skin will be
modulated to increase barrier function, attenuate irritant dermatitis, and
characterize the underlying signaling mechanisms so that they can become
better targets for treatment.Progress in year 2 of the funding period is
described in this Annual Progress Report. We maintained all the necessary
regulatory approvals from the Durham VA, Duke University IRB and the DoD
to conduct the human experimentation. We set up experiments in primary
skin cells for mechanical stress, which we found disrupts skin barrier
function. We also found that activation of ion channel TRPV4 can
re-normalize barrier function of the skin that has been disrupted by
mechanical stress. We also found this particular pattern for keratinocytes
regulatory volume decrease, as a surrogate of their capability to
moisturize.
KW - Epidermis
KW - Veterans(military personnel)
KW - Amputations
KW - Skin (anatomy)
KW - Residual limbs
KW - Prosthetics
KW - Dermatitis
KW - Trp ion channel
KW - Keratinocyte
KW - Mechanical stress
KW - Epithelial stress response
KW - Amputation stump
KW - Skin barrier function
KW - Aquaporin channel
OD - 135
YR - 2017
PC - 800218493
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048758_a

312 - TOXLINE
TI - NTP Technical Report on the Toxicity Studies of o-Phthalaldehyde (CAS No.
643-79-8) Administered by Inhalation to Sprague Dawley (Hsd:Sprague Dawley
SD) Rats and B6C3F1/N Mice.
AU - Catlin, N. R.
AD - National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC.
AB - o-Phthalaldehyde is a high-level chemical disinfectant that is commonly
used for disinfection of dental and medical instruments as an alternative
to glutaraldehyde, which is a known skin and respiratory sensitizer.
o-Phthalaldehyde was nominated by the National Institute for Occupational
Safety and Health for toxicologic characterization based on its proposed
use as a safer alternative to glutaraldehyde for chemical disinfection,
its increasing use, the lack of adequate and publicly available
toxicologic data, and because many human case reports document incidences
of skin and respiratory sensitization following occupational exposure.
Inhalation was chosen as the route of exposure for these studies because
inhalation is a major route of human occupational exposure. Male and
female Sprague Dawley (Hsd:Sprague Dawley SD) rats and B6C3F1/N mice were
exposed to o-phthalaldehyde (99.7% pure) by whole-body inhalation for 3
months.
KW - *Toxicology
KW - *Health effects
KW - *o-Phthalaldehyde
KW - Inhalation administration
KW - Sprague dawley rat
KW - Glutaraldehyde
KW - Chemical disinfection
KW - Phthalaldehyde
KW - *National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)
RN - NTP/TRS-84
OD - 142
YR - 2018
PC - 068182000
CT - 57Y | Toxicology
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57Z | Zoology
CT - 44 | Health Care
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100957_a

313 - TOXLINE
TI - Evaluation of Koontz Lake (North Indiana) Ecological Restoration Options -
Comparison of Dredging and Aeration - and Broad Application to USACE
Projects.
AU - Medina, V. F.
AD - ERDC-EL Vicksburg United States
AU - Pokrzywinski, K.
AD - ERDC-EL Vicksburg United States
AU - Martinez-Guerra, E.
AD - ERDC-EL Vicksburg United States
AB - Koontz Lake is located in Northern Indiana. The lake has had problems with
eutrophication, harmful algae, invasive plants, and shallowing due to
accumulation of sediment and muck. A study was conducted to assist in
evaluating between two ecological restorative options under consideration:
aeration and dredging. In this report, both approaches are defined, and
various options of each are discussed. The impact of each approach is
assessed for key water quality/ecological parameters. The specific needs
of Koontz Lake are then discussed. In the case of Koontz Lake, the shallow
portions of the lake appear to limit the effectiveness of aeration.
Dredging would allow increased recreational use of the lake, particularly
minimizing limitations on boating speeds. However, aeration could be
integrated for long-term management of the lake. This report summarizes
recommendations for Koontz Lake that have a greater applicability to other
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers lake/reservoir projects. Several other
alternatives are also presented, specifically the use of PhosLock, iron,
and alum to bind phosphorus in sediments. (The U.S. Army Engineer Research
and Development Center does not endorse any specific products or brands).
KW - Dredging
KW - Environmental management
KW - Environmental protection
KW - Eutrophication
KW - Lakes
KW - Indiana
KW - Aeration
KW - Sedimentation
KW - Water quality
KW - Ecology
KW - Temperature
KW - Aquatic plants
KW - Turbidity
KW - Invasive species (flora)
KW - Iron
KW - Nitrogen
KW - Phosphorus
KW - Koontz lake (indiana)
KW - Lake aeration
KW - Do (dissolved oxygen)
KW - Organic matter
KW - Microbial organisms
KW - Nutrient loads
KW - Anaerobic zones
KW - Phoslock
KW - Aluminum sulfate
KW - Alternative technologies
KW - Ecological restoration
KW - Hydrodynamic cavitation
KW - Lfa (laminar flow aeration)
RN - ERDC/EL TR-18-2
OD - 53
PR - TA2017-002
YR - 2018
PC - 800220776
CT - 57H | Ecology
CT - 48G | Hydrology &amp; Limnology
CT - 50B | Civil Engineering
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046318_a

314 - TOXLINE
TI - Does the Loss of Stromal Caveolin-1 Remodel the Tumor Microenvironment by
Activating Src-Mediated PEAK1 and PI3K Pathways.
AU - Sobreiro, M. R.
AD - Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles United States
AU - Yang, W.
AD - Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles United States
AU - Di Vizio, D.
AD - Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles United States
AU - Freeman, M. R.
AD - Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Los Angeles United States
AB - This study describes a new mechanism of intercellular communication
originating from extracellular vesicles (EVs). We demonstrate that in the
context of prostate cancer, EV populations isolated from human patients
harbor AKT1 and that AKT1 kinase activity is sustained in these particles,
nominating them as active signaling platforms. Consistently, active AKT1
in circulating EVs from the plasma of metastatic prostate cancer patients
is detected predominantly in large, tumor-derived EVs, termed large
oncosomes (LO). LO internalization induces reprogramming of human normal
prostate fibroblasts, as reflected by high levels of -SMA, IL6, and MMP9.
In turn, LO reprogrammed normal prostate fibroblasts stimulate endothelial
tube formation in vitro.
KW - Prostate cancer
KW - Kinases
KW - Metastasis
KW - Fibroblasts
KW - Cell membrane
KW - Ev(extracellular vesicles)
KW - Pi3k
OD - 55
YR - 2017
PC - 800219701
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048478_a

315 - TOXLINE
TI - SIGNALING PATHWAYS ASSOCIATED WITH VX EXPOSURE IN MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS.
AU - ANGELINI, D.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - PHILLIPS, C.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - PRUGH, A.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - GLAROS, T.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AU - BAO, T.
AD - Edgewood Chemical Biological Center Aberdeen Proving Ground United States
AB - Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells that are
key regulators of tissue maintenance and repair. These cells have been
identified in several different tissues, but they typically originate in
the bone marrow and then circulate through the body in the bloodstream.
The U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center BioDefense Branch
members and academic laboratories have demonstrated that bone
marrow-derived MSCs exposed to organophosphate (OP) pesticides sustain
significant changes in their ability to proliferate and differentiate. In
the literature, OP compounds were shown to affect the activity and
expression levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE); however, it is still
unclear whether the effect on AChE is caused by these changes. It is also
possible that these OPcompounds have other unknown secondary effects on
MSCs. In this study, we exposed MSCs to the OP chemical warfare agent
145O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) ethylphosphonothioate (VX) and
performed phospho-array and phosphoproteomic analysis to gain insights
into the signaling pathways associated with VX exposure.
KW - Stem cells
OD - 34
YR - 2017
PC - 800218423
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1039316_a

316 - TOXLINE
TI - Evaluation of Low-Pressure Cold Plasma for Disinfection of ISS Grown
Produce and Metallic Instrumentation.
AU - Hintze, P. E.
AD - NASA Kennedy Space Center
AU - Franco, C.
AD - NASA Kennedy Space Center
AU - Hummerick, M. E.
AD - NASA Kennedy Space Center
AU - Maloney, P. R.
AD - NASA Kennedy Space Center
AU - Spencer, L. E.
AD - NASA Kennedy Space Center
AB - Cold plasma (CP) cleaning is a dry, non-thermal process, which can provide
broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity yet reportedly causes little to no
damage to the object being sanitized. Since cold plasma uses no liquids,
it has the distinct advantage when used in microgravity of not having to
separate liquids from the item being cleaned. This paper will present
results on an effort to use low pressure CP to disinfect or sterilize
materials for in space applications. Exposure times from 0 to 60 minutes
and pressures ranging from 0.10 to 1.0 mbar were used to optimize plasma
parameters. Tests were done on produce and metal coupons to simulate
medical equipment. Escherichia coli was used as the challenge organism on
produce and Bacillus pumilus SAFR-32 was used on metal surfaces. Produce
testing was not successful, with unacceptable kill rates and the produce
being negatively impacted by exposure to the plasma. The plasma caused a 5
log reduction in the number of viable bacteria on metal coupon tests,
which placed the number of viable bacteria below the detection limit. This
is a very promising result showing that sterilization of medical equipment
with cold plasma is feasible. Scanning Electron Microscope images were
taken before and after exposure. The images after plasma exposure show
that the bacteria spores have been physically affected, as their size has
gotten smaller and their appearance has changed.
KW - *Cold plasmas
KW - *Metallic plasmas
KW - *Metal surfaces
KW - *Microgravity
KW - *Sterilization
KW - *Antiinfectives and antibacterials
KW - *Medical equipment
KW - *Microorganisms
KW - *Photographic processing
KW - Technology utilization
KW - Cleaning
KW - Exposure
KW - Plasmas (physics)
RN - KSC-E-DAA-TN44363
OD - 19
YR - 2017
PC - 800128873
CT - 57 | Medicine &amp; Biology
CT - 99 | Chemistry
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007218_a

317 - TOXLINE
TI - Molecular Characterization of H.pylori Strains and Biomarkers in Gastric
Cancer.
AU - Reyes, V. E.
AD - The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston Galveston United States
AB - Helicobacter pylori (Hp) is linked to chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer
disease (PUD) and gastric cancer (GC), but it is unclear why infected
individuals develop different diseases. GC annually claims 700,000 lives
worldwide (seer.cancer.gov). Early detection of GC is crucial in improving
prognosis, but biomarkers of disease are lacking. Our objective is to
characterize unique genomic features of GC Hp isolates and gastric
epithelial responses elicited by these isolates that could represent
candidate biomarkers. We used novel human gastroids infected with a panel
of Hp isolates from different gastric diseases. Infections with different
Hp isolates revealed by real time PCR distinct expression of genes related
to immunity, NOTCH signaling, metaplasia, cell survival and cell death.
Isolates from GC and PUD elicited more pronounced changes at the mRNA
level compared to uninfected cells. For example, gastroids infected with a
GC Hp isolate induced mucin 2, an intestinal mucin, rather than mucin 5AC
characteristic of gastric surface cells, which represents neoplastic
change in the form of intestinal metaplasia. Flow cytometry confirmed
similar changes in protein expression. We noted high expression of
immunoregulatory proteins as well as NOTCH receptors and ligands in cells
infected with a GC Hp isolate. Thus, additional studies with multiple Hp
isolates leading to epithelial responses unique to them and deep genomic
sequencing may reveal candidate biomarkers and understanding of potential
targets for vaccine/therapy, respectively.
KW - Organoids
KW - Biological markers
KW - Cancer
KW - Gastrointestinal diseases
KW - Strains (biology)
KW - Gene expression
KW - Proteins
KW - Ligands
KW - Hp (helicobacter pylori)
KW - Gastritis
KW - Pud (peptic ulcer disease)
KW - Gc (gastric cancer)
KW - Gastric disease
KW - Gastroids
KW - Gc hp isolates
OD - 20
YR - 2017
PC - 800221979
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57K | Microbiology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046162_a

318 -
TOXLINE
TI -
NUP98 Gene as a Potential Modifier of NF2-Associated Tumors.
AU -
Chang, L.
AD -
Research Institute at Nationwide Childrens Hospital Columbus United States
AB -
This exploratory hypothesis-driven award will test the hypothesis that the
NUP98 gene, which plays an important role in nucleocytoplasmic transport,
gene expression, mitotic checkpoint, and pathogenesis, is frequently
mutated in VS and that NUP98 mutations are associated with disease
severity. By next-generation sequencing, we previously identified missense
mutations in the NUP98 gene in VS from two NF2 patients. We now confirmed
that the changes include a D1156N mutation in exon 23, a Q1142E variant
also in exon 23, and a K1178R mutation in exon 24, but not in the rest of
NUP98 exons. By analyzing a total of 31 NF2-associated VS and 25 sporadic
VS and by searching the COSMIC (Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer)
database, we showed that NF2-associated VS have a higher incidence of
harboring these mutations/variant than sporadic VS or individuals without
VS. These changes are heterozygous and are present in patients germline.
Intriguingly, the amino acids affected by these NUP98 mutations/variant
are evolutionarily conserved among various species and are clustered in a
coiled region of the protein. Our findings suggest that the NUP98 exons 23
and 24 encode an important functional domain and further implicate NUP98
as a potential genetic modifier for NF2.
KW - Neoplasms
KW - Genetic disorders
KW - Genes
KW - Mutations
KW - Gene expression
KW - Pathogenesis
KW - Amino acids
KW - Nf2 (neurofibromatosis type 2)
KW - Nf2 gene
KW - Nup98 (nucleoporin 98)
KW - Nup98 gene
KW - Vs (vestibular schwannoma)
KW - Nf2-associated tumors
KW - Sporadic
KW - Variant
KW - Polymorphism
KW - Genetic modifiers
KW - Nucleocytoplasmic transport
KW - Mitotic checkpoints
KW - Exons
KW - Nup98 mutations
KW - Cosmic (catalogue of somatic mutations in cancer)
OD - 45
YR - 2017
PC - 800222343
CT - 57F | Cytology, Genetics, &amp; Molecular Biology
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050097_a

319 - TOXLINE
TI - Clinical Significance and Mechanistic Insights into Ovarian Cancer
Mitochondrial Dysfunction.
AU -Hempel, N.
AD -The Pennsylvania State University Hershey United States
AU -Shin, D. H.
AD -The Pennsylvania State University Hershey United States
AB -Our work addresses the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a
role in the etiology and chemoresistance of epithelial ovarian cancers. We
are focusing on the role of the fission protein Drp1 in this context.
Specifically we discovered that expression of a low molecular weight Drp1
variant is associated with mitochondrial fission/fusion defects. Mass spec
and RNA sequencing analysis has revealed that the low molecular weight
(LMW) isoform of Drp1 does not arise as a consequence of alternate
transcriptional promoter use, but may be dependent on an alternate
variable domain and C-terminal truncation. We are interrogating the role
of short Drp1 as a dominant negative fission protein and are investigating
its binding affinity to mitochondria and interaction with fission
accessory proteins. Investigations on the function of this protein in
mediating mitochondrial dysfunction and chemoresistance are ongoing. We
have identified that expression of LMW Drp1 is detected in the majority of
high grade serous ovarian cancer cells isolated from patient ascites, and
that this is associated with hyperfused mitochondria, indicating that this
is a clinically relevant observation that could affect a majority of
ovarian cancer cases.
KW - Mitochondria
KW - Ovarian cancer
KW - Proteins
KW - Molecular weight
KW - Drp-1 fission protein
KW - Dnm1l
KW - Mitochondrial fission
KW - Chemoresistance
KW - Lmw (low molecular weight)
KW - Short drp1
KW - Lmw drp1
KW - Eoc (epithelial ovarian cancer)
KW - Mitochondrial dysfunction
OD - 55
YR - 2017
PC - 800222349
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050193_a

320 - TOXLINE
TI - Environmental Assessment for Implementation of the Installation
Development Plan at Edwards Air Force Base, California.
AB - This Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluates the potential environmental
impacts associatedwith implementation of the Installation Development Plan
(IDP) at Edwards AFB, California.The IDP is a planning tool for leadership
and decision makers of the 412th Test Wing, Air ForceMateriel Command and
United States (US) Air Force (AF) in making good developmentdecisions in
support of future commitments that will support the mission at Edwards
AFB. Inorder to test, evaluate and develop weapon systems to deliver
superior capability to the Nation'scombat forces, the installation
requires a guide for future installation development decisions.The IDP
outlines future requirements that will enhance mission capability for the
entire 412thTest Wing. The IDP was prepared in accordance with Air Force
Instruction (AFI) 32-7062,Comprehensive Planning, together with principles
from Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) 2-100-01, Installation Master
Planning.
KW - Environmental assessment
OD - 485
YR - 2017
PC - 800221240
CT - 68H | Environmental Impact Statements
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1034879_a

321 - TOXLINE
TI - Quantifying Determinants of Spray Painters' Isocyanurate Exposure.
AU - Nylander-French, L. A.
AD - North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill.
AU - Bodnar, W.
AD - North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill.
AU - Zhang, Z.
AD - North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill.
AU - Gold, A.
AD - North Carolina Univ. at Chapel Hill.
AB - Biological monitoring of occupational exposure to 1,6-hexamethylene
diisocyanate (HDI)-containing spray-paints is limited to the analysis of a
hydrolysis metabolite of HDI monomer although polymeric HDI isocyanurate
constitutes the predominant inhalation and skin exposures for workers in
the automotive paint industry. We developed a novel method to quantify
trisaminohexyl isocyanurate (TAHI), as a bio-marker of HDI isocyanurate
exposure in urine and blood samples collected from occupationally exposed
spray-painters. We utilized the quantitative measures of inhalation and
skin exposure and the biomarker levels as well as sophisticated exposure
modeling to link the observed biomarker levels to other predictors of
systemic exposure such as personal and workplace factors. To identify
specific metabolites as predictive biomarkers following exposure to HDI
isocyanurate, we developed a novel nano-UPLC-ESI-MS/MS method for small
molecule quantification. Urine samples collected from 72 workers (N = 607)
and plasma samples from 69 workers (N = 173) with exposure to
HDI-containing spray-paints were processed using a novel sample extraction
and treatment method for TAHI. The protocol was sensitive and specific for
analysis of a derivatized product of TAHI, trisacetamidohexyl isocyanurate
(TAAHI) in workers' urine and plasma with method detection limits at 0.03
?g/L and at 0.02 ?g/L, respectively. TAHI was detected in 195 of 607 urine
samples (55 of 72 workers) and in 26 of 173 plasma samples (15 of 69
workers). A positive linear correlation was observed between the measured
total daily breathing-zone HDI isocyanurate concentration and the daily
average urine TAHI concentration (r = 0.21), while the respective
correlation for HDI monomer and urine 1,6-hexamethylene diamine (HDA, a
biomarker of HDI monomer exposure) was r = -0.03. A stronger linear
correlation was observed between the measured total daily breathing-zone
HDI isocyanurate and the daily plasma TAHI (r = 0.61) while no correlation
was observed between HDI monomer and plasma HDA (r = -0.01). Our results
confirm that TAHI is a suitable biomarker for HDI isocyanurate exposure
and will allows us to distinguish between HDI isocyanurate and HDI monomer
exposure and, thus, provide a major advance in characterizing both
exposures through multiple exposure routes. The identification and
quantification of TAHI as a biomarker of HDI isocyanurate exposure is
critical for improvement of diisocyanate exposure assessment through
characterization of exposure-dose relationships for both HDI monomer and
HDI isocyanurate in occupationally exposed populations.
KW - *Painters
KW - *Hexamethylene diisocyanate
KW - *Skin exposures
KW - *Biological monitoring data
KW - Spray painting
KW - Exposure levels
KW - Risk factors
KW - Hydrolysis
KW - Metabolites
KW - Monomers
KW - Workers
KW - Work environment
KW - Automotive industry
KW - Biomarkers
KW - Urine
KW - Blood samples
KW - Sampling
KW - Models
KW - Molecular structure
KW - Diisocyanates
KW - Inhalation
KW - *Trisaminohexyl Isocyanurate (TAHI)
OD - 23
YR - 2017
PC - 045592000
CT - 41I | Job Environment
CT - 41G | Quality Control &amp; Reliability
CT - 71E | Coatings, Colorants, &amp; Finishes
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 92A | Job Training &amp; Career Development
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
CT - 44G | Environmental &amp; Occupational Factors
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100706_a

322 - TOXLINE
TI - Recent Radiation Test Results for Trench Power MOSFETs.
AU - Lauenstein, J.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Casey, M. C.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Wilcox, E. P.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Phan, A. M.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Kim, H. S.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Topper, A. D.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Ladbury, R. L.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AU - Label, K. A.
AD - NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
AB - Single-event effect (SEE) radiation test results are presented for various
trench-gate power MOSFETs. The heavy-ion response of the first (and only)
radiation-hardened trench-gate power MOSFET is evaluated: the manufacturer
SEE response curve is verified and importantly, no localized dosing
effects are measured, distinguishing it from other, non-hardened
trench-gate power MOSFETs. Evaluations are made of n-type commercial and
both n- and p-type automotive grade trench-gate device using ions
comparable to of those on the low linear energy transfer (LET) side of the
iron knee of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum, to explore suitability of
these parts for missions with higher risk tolerance and shorter duration,
such as CubeSats. Part-to-part variability of SEE threshold suggests
testing with larger sample sizes and applying more aggressive derating to
avoid on-orbit failures. The n-type devices yielded expected localized
dosing effects including when irradiated in an unbiased (0-V)
configuration, adding to the challenge of inserting these parts into space
flight missions.
KW - *Metal oxide semiconductors
KW - *Field effect transistors
KW - *Linear energy transfer (let)
KW - *Galactic cosmic rays
KW - *Schottky diodes
KW - Risk
KW - Ions
KW - Failure
RN - GSFC-E-DAA-TN44382
OD - 8
YR - 2017
PC - 800203019
CT - 49 | Electrotechnology
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007314_a

323 -
TOXLINE
TI -
2017 Pathways Student Showcase.
AU -
Fout, T.
AD -
NASA Kennedy Space Center
AB -
This presentation provides insight into the achievements and
accomplishments of my time at the Kennedy Space Center as a Pathways
Intern.
KW - *Aerospace engineering
KW - *Launching
KW - *Low earth orbits
KW - *Payloads
KW - *Solar system
KW - *Space missions
KW - *Space transportation
KW - *Telecommunication
KW - Nasa programs
KW - Organizations
KW - Universe
RN - KSC-E-DAA-TN44161
OD - 1
YR - 2017
PC - 800128873
CT - 54 | Astronomy &amp; Astrophysics
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007369_a

324 - TOXLINE
TI - Exploring the Utilization of Low-Pressure, Piston-Cylinder Experiments to
Determine the Bulk Compositions of Finite, Precious Materials.
AU - Vander Kaaden, K. E.
AD - Jacobs Technology, Inc.
AU - McCubbin, F. M.
AD - Jacobs Technology, Inc.
AU - Harrington, A. D.
AD - Jacobs Technology, Inc.
AB - Determining the bulk composition of precious materials with a finite mass
(e.g., meteorite samples) is extremely important in the fields of Earth
and Planetary Science. From meteorite studies we are able to place
constraints on large scale planetary processes like global differentiation
and subsequent volcanism, as well as smaller scale processes like
crystallization in a magma chamber or sedimentary compaction at the
surface. However, with meteorite samples in particular, far too often we
are limited by how precious the sample is as well as its limited mass. In
this study, we have utilized aliquots of samples previously studied for
toxicological hazards, including both the fresh samples (lunar mare basalt
NWA 4734, lunar regolith breccia NWA 7611, martian basalt Tissint, martian
regolith breccia NWA 7034, a vestian basalt Berthoud, a vestian regolith
breccia NWA 2060, and a terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)), and
those that underwent iron leaching (Tissint, NWA 7034, NWA 4734, MORB).
With these small masses of material, we performed low pressure (approx.
0.75 GPa), high temperature (greater than 1600 degrees Celsius) melting
experiments. Each sample was analyzed using a JEOL 8530F electron
microprobe to determine the bulk composition of the materials that were
previously examined. When available, the results of our microprobe data
were compared with bulk rock compositions in the literature. The results
of this study show that with this technique, only approx. 50 mg of sample
is required to accurately determine the bulk composition of the materials
of interest.
KW - *Breccia
KW - *Crystallization
KW - *Rocks
KW - *Lunar rocks
KW - *Meteorites
KW - *Volcanology
KW - *Basalt
KW - *Regolith
KW - *Mars surface
KW - *Low pressure
KW - *High temperature
KW - Planetary geology
KW - Magma
KW - Iron
KW - Leaching
RN - JSC-CN-40302
OD - 1
YR - 2017
PC - 800199911
CT - 54 | Astronomy &amp; Astrophysics
CT - 84B | Extraterrestrial Exploration
DOCNO- NTIS\N17-0007506_a

325 - TOXLINE
TI - Exploiting Inhibitory Siglecs to Combat Food Allergies.
AU - Kulis, M.
AD - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill United States
AU - Macauley, M.
AD - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Chapel Hill United States
AB - During this first year of the award, we were able to produce important
data, develop a new tool to track allergen-specific B cells, and generate
two humanized mouse models. We demonstrated that Ah2 STALs targeting CD22
on B cells can prevent IgE production and allergic reactions with only a
single injection in mice. We also demonstrated that Ah2 STALs targeting
CD33 on human mast cells and basophils can prevent degranulation in cell
culture experiments. A novel tool, Ah2 tetramer, was produced to quantify
numbers of allergen-specific B cells in mice. A model to test Ah2 STALs as
a therapy was developed in which nave mice were adoptively transferred
memory B and T cells from peanut allergic mice. The resulting mice make
robust levels of Ah2-IgE and experience anaphylaxis upon challenge. This
model will be used to test STALs as a therapy to deplete memory B cells.
Furthermore, two novel transgenic mouse models were generated, one
expresses human CD22 on B cells and the other expresses human CD33 on mast
cells. These models are vital to our proposed research.
KW - Allergy and immunology
KW - Inhibition
KW - B lymphocytes
KW - T lymphocytes
KW - Nanoparticles
KW - Mast cells
KW - Immunoglobulins
KW - Food allergies
KW - Peanut allergies
KW - Siglec
KW - Ige
KW - Ah2 (ara h 2)
KW - Cd22
KW - Cd33
KW - Basophils
KW - Ah2 stal
KW - Stal (siglec-engaging tolerance-inducing antigenic liposomes)
OD - 16
YR - 2017
PC - 800218833
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57L | Nutrition
CT - 98H | Food Technology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048781_a

326 - TOXLINE
TI - Bayesian Space-Time Downscaling Fusion Model (Downscaler) - Derived
Estimates of Air Quality for 2013.
AB - This report describes estimates of daily ozone (maximum 8-hour average)
and PM2.5 (24-hour average) concentrations throughout the contiguous
United States during the 2013 calendar year generated by EPA's recently
developed data fusion method termed the "downscaler model" (DS). Air
quality monitoring data from the State and Local Air Monitoring Stations
(SLAMS) and numerical output from the Community Multiscale Air Quality
(CMAQ) model were both input to DS to predict concentrations at the 2010
US census tract centroids encompassed by the CMAQ modeling domain.
Information on EPA's air quality monitors, CMAQ model, and downscaler
model is included to provide the background and context for understanding
the data output presented in this report. These estimates are intended for
use by statisticians and environmental scientists interested in the daily
spatial distribution of ozone and PM2.5.
KW - *Bayesian Space-Time
KW - *Air Quality
KW - Downscaling Fusion Model
KW - Statisticians
KW - Environmental scientists
KW - Daily spatial
KW - *U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
KW - *Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model
KW - *State and Local Air Monitoring Stations (SLAMS)
RN - EPA/450/R-17/001
OD - 114
YR - 2017
PC - 034680059
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
CT - 68A | Air Pollution &amp; Control
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2018-100911_a

327 - TOXLINE
TI - Clinical Study of Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the
Aorta (REBOA) for Severe Pelvic Fracture and Intra-Abdominal Hemorrhagic
Shock Using Continuous Vital Signs.
AU - Brenner, M.
AD - University of Maryland Baltimore United States
AB - Resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) has been clinically
demonstrated to stop bleeding below the diaphragm. It has thepotential to
significantly decrease blood loss thereby decreasing blood-product
resuscitation requirements, improve physiologic parameters,and ultimately
lead to increased survival in patients in hemorrhagic shock from severe
torso injury. This is a simple endovascular techniquewhich can be taught
to forward deployed physicians and has over the past decade vastly
improved the survival of ruptured abdominal aorticaneurysm patients.
Although the technique is still in its infancy for trauma patients, we
predict that the use of intra- aortic balloon occlusionwill improve the
survival of trauma patients and reduce morbidity. We have undertaken a 2
phase study to evaluate simulation-based REBOAtraining and the
effectiveness of REBOA stabilization of severe intra-abdominal hemorrhagic
shock and/or pelvic fracture patients. In phase I, asimulator based REBOA
training curriculum was developed to train STC clinicians, and its
efficacy will be evaluated. Phase 2 is a single center,prospective
observational study in which patients with severe hemorrhagic shock and/or
pelvic fracture admitted to the Trauma ResuscitationUnit of our level 1
trauma center are stabilized with REBOA. Our main objective was to assess
the impact on mortality and morbidity afterREBOA. We hypothesized that use
of REBOA in cases of NCTH will decrease morbidity and mortality.
KW - Trauma
KW - Hemorrhage
KW - Vital signs
KW - Bone fractures
KW - Pelvic bones
KW - Abdomen
KW - Virtual reality
KW - Clinical trials
KW - Resuscitation
KW - Patients
KW - Wounds and injuries
KW - Morbidity
KW - Patient care
KW - Medical services
KW - Junctional hemorrhage
KW - Non-compressible torso hemorrhage
KW - Combat casualty care; aortic occlusion
KW - Resuscitative balloon endovascular occlusion of the aorta
KW - Thoracotomy; aortic cross-clamp
KW - Virtual reality simulation
KW - Endovascular
OD - 56
YR - 2017
PC - 800220704
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046842_a

328 - TOXLINE
TI - Exploiting Inhibitory Siglecs to Combat Food Allergies.
AU -Macauley, M.
AD -The Scripps Research Institute La Jolla United States
AU -Kulis, M.
AD -The Scripps Research Institute La Jolla United States
AB -During this first year of the award, we were able to produce important
data, develop a new tool to track allergen-specific B cells, and generate
two humanized mouse models. We demonstrated that Ah2 STALs targeting CD22
on B cells can prevent IgE production and allergic reactions with only a
single injection in mice. We also demonstrated that Ah2 STALs targeting
CD33 on human mast cells and basophils can prevent degranulation in cell
culture experiments. A novel tool, Ah2 tetramer, was produced to quantify
numbers of allergen-specific B cells in mice. A model to test Ah2 STALs as
a therapy was developed in which nave mice were adoptively transferred
memory B and T cells from peanut allergic mice. The resulting mice make
robust levels of Ah2-IgE and experience anaphylaxis upon challenge. This
model will be used to test STALs as a therapy to deplete memory B cells.
Furthermore, two novel transgenic mouse models were generated, one
expresses human CD22 on B cells and the other expresses human CD33 on mast
cells. These models are vital to our proposed research.
KW - Allergy and immunology
KW - Mast cells
KW - Immunoglobulins
KW - Inhibition
KW - B lymphocytes
KW - T lymphocytes
KW - Food allergies
KW - Peanut allergy
KW - Siglec
KW - Ige
KW - Ah2 (ara h 2)
KW - Cd22
KW - Cd33
KW - Basophils
KW - Mouse models
KW - Ah2 stal
KW - Stal (siglec-engaging tolerance-inducing antigenic liposomes)
OD - 16
YR - 2017
PC - 800219060
CT - 57B | Biochemistry
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 57L | Nutrition
CT - 98H | Food Technology
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1048779_a

329 - TOXLINE
TI - TOXIC LEADERSHIP: A SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO SHIFT FROM REACTIVE TO PROACTIVE
SOLUTIONS.
AU - MANSELL, M.
AD - Air Command And Staff College Maxwell Air Force Base United States
AU - LANE, T.
AD - Air Command And Staff College Maxwell Air Force Base United States
AU - THOMAS-JOHNSON, G.
AD - Air Command And Staff College Maxwell Air Force Base United States
AU - LORENZO, D.
AD - Air Command And Staff College Maxwell Air Force Base United States
AB - The problem of toxic leadership is conceptually complex because it
involves human behaviors and interpersonal relations. Numerous authors
have researched and studied the issue of toxic leadership. Consequently,
there are abundant sources that analyze its intricacies. However, despite
all this, the academic community has not reached a consensus on the
definition of this elusive concept and on describing the behaviors and
attributes toxic leaders display. This lack of a common ground on which to
base policies and preventive measures permeates the US military. In fact,
apart from the US Army Center for Army Leadership annual survey (CASAL),
the rest of the services do not conduct any regular quantitative research
on the incidence of toxic leadership within their organizations.1 In
contrast, many articles and research papers about toxic leadership in the
military are available. However, just as their civilian counterparts,
researchers on the military side have focused their academic work mainly
on providing a definition of toxic leadership from the military
perspective in order to facilitate its identification, with the ultimate
goal of getting rid of those toxic leaders. In other words, their proposed
prescriptions have been reactive in nature. The most important conclusion
extracted from this fact is that the US military has not paid enough
attention to the consequences of toxic leadership, with respect to the
degree and magnitude of damage toxic leaders cause to an organization.
KW - Toxic leadership
KW - Human behaviors
KW - Interpersonal relations
OD - 45
YR - 2017
PC - 800218321
CT - 92 | Behavior &amp; Society
CT - 92C | Social Concerns
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1037957_a

330 - TOXLINE
TI - Defining High-Risk Precursor Signaling to Advance Breast Cancer Risk
Assessment and Prevention.
AU - Ellisen, L.
AD - Massachusetts General Hospital Boston United States
AB - Making a major impact on the incidence and lethality of breast cancer will
require a detailed understanding of the earliest tissue changes that
ultimately drive the process of breast cancer development. There is no
substitute for the ability to define and understand the early,
pre-malignant changes as they occur in women who are breast cancer
predisposed. One group of women at high breast cancer risk (up to 80
percent lifetime breast cancer risk) are those who have inherited
mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Currently, the only way these
women can eliminate their risk is to undergo bilateral mastectomy before
developing cancer. We have established an IRB-approved protocol that
allows us to collect and analyze a portion of this tissue.
KW - Breast cancer
KW - Preventive medicine
KW - Mutations
KW - Paracrine signaling
KW - Brca1
KW - Brca 2
OD - 18
YR - 2017
PC - 800218306
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046829_a

331 - TOXLINE
TI - Preparing Airports for Communicable Diseases on Arriving Flights. Airport
Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 83: A Synthesis of Airport
Practice.
AU -
Smith, J. F.
AD -
Smith-Woolwine Associates, Inc., Floyd, VA.
AU -
Greenberg, J.
AD -
Smith-Woolwine Associates, Inc., Floyd, VA.
AB -
TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 83: Preparing
Airports for Communicable Diseases on Arriving Flights examines current
disease preparedness and response practices at U.S. and Canadian airports
in coordination with public health officers and partners. While larger
airports that receive international flights are most likely to experience
the challenges associated with these events, the preparedness and response
lessons are transferable to the aviation sector more widely. Smaller
airports may be final destinations of those traveling with communicable
diseases, so report findings are useful to all airport operators and local
public health officers.
KW - *Synthesis
KW - *Communicable disease control
KW - *Flights
KW - *Disease preparedness
KW - Airport access
KW - Communication analysis
KW - airport practices
KW - Airport operators
KW - International flights
KW - *Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP)
KW - *Canadian airports
KW - *United States Airport
RN - ACRP/SYN-83
RN - ISBN 978-0-309-39008-8
RN - LCCCN-2017942537
OD - 106
PR - PROJECT A11-03
PR - TOPIC S04-18
YR - 2017
PC - 120477000
CT - 51E | Avionics
CT - 51C | Aircraft
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
CT - 85 | Transportation
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 45C | Common Carrier &amp; Satellite
CT - 91D | Communications
CT - 91I | Emergency Services &amp; Planning
CT - 70B | Management Practice
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 57U | Public Health &amp; Industrial Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102976_a

332 - TOXLINE
TI - Role of Smac in Lung Carcinogenesis and Therapy.
AU - Lu, B.
AD - Thomas Jefferson University Philadephia United States
AB - Ongoing efforts are focused upon generation of KRas mut Smac-/- mouse
model of lung cancer since there was a delay in obtaining the smac
knockout mice. We were able to demonstrate the feasibility of delivering
SBRT to the KRas mutant mouse model of lung cancer as described in the
following publication: Du S, Lockamy V, Zhou L, Xue C, LeBlanc J, Glenn S,
Shukla G, Yu Y, Dicker AP, Leeper DB, Lu Y, Lu B. Stereotactic Body
Radiotherapy Delivery in a GeneticallyEngineered Mouse Model of Lung
Cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys, 2016 Nov 1;96(3):529-37. We have
continued our studies using subcutaneous mouse model of lung cancer by
demonstrating that CD8 T lymphocytes and TNFa are necessary to mediate the
therapeutic synergism between ablative radiotherapy and a smac mimetic.
Since anti-PD1 immunotherapy is shown to be superior to platin-based
cytotoxic chemotherapy and change the landscape of lung cancer treatment,
we have determined and demonstrated potential synergism from the
combination of anti-PD1 therapy and a smac mimetic. These results will be
validated in the genetically engineered mouse models once they are
available.
KW - Lung cancer
KW - Immunotherapy
KW - Radiotherapy
KW - Apoptosis
KW - Immunity
KW - Lymphocytes
KW - Lung carcinogenesis
KW - Smac
KW - Nsclc (non-small cell lung cancers)
KW - Sbrt (stereotactic body radiotherapy)
KW - Tnf- (tumor necrosis factor alpha)
KW - Til (tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes)
OD - 5
YR - 2017
PC - 800222372
CT - 57E | Clinical Medicine
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1050348_a

333 -
TOXLINE
TI -
Application of Demographic Analysis to Pedestrian Safety, Summary.
AU -
Lin, P.
AD -
Center for Urban Transportation Research, Tampa, FL.
AB -
University of South Florida researchers used demographic-based methods to
classify low-income areas according to their potential for pedestrian
hazards. They also recommended engineering countermeasures and pedestrian
safety education/outreach plans tailored to area demographics.
KW - *Pedestrian safety
KW - *Summary
KW - *Education and outreach
KW - Low income area
KW - Demographic analysis
KW - Crash frequency
KW - Injury severity
KW - Countermeasures
KW - Land use types
KW - Pedestrian hazards
RN - BDV25-977-30-SUMMARY
OD - 1
YR - 2017
PC - 117329000
CT - 68G | Environmental Health &amp; Safety
CT - 91A | Environmental Management &amp; Planning
CT - 85D | Transportation Safety
CT - 43G | Transportation
CT - 85H | Road Transportation
DOCNO- NTIS\PB2017-102622_a

334 - TOXLINE
TI - Performance Prediction Relationships for AM2 Airfield Matting Developed
from Full-Scale Accelerated Testing and Laboratory Experimentation.
AU - Rushing, T. W.
AD - ERDC-GSL Vicksburg United States
AB - The AM2 airfield matting system is used by the U.S. military for
temporary, rapidly constructed airfields. Predicting the number of
allowable aircraft passes across an AM2 installation is challenging
because of the complex design of the joining system and the fatigue
behavior of the joints. Prior to this work, the prevailing methods used to
predict the performance of AM2 were based on the CBR design procedure for
flexible pavements using a small number of full-scale test sections over
CBRs ranging from 4 to 10 percent and simulated aircraft that are no
longer in service. This report presents results from nine full-scale
experiments conducted on sections of AM2 matting installed on
un-stabilized soil and gravel subgrades with CBRs of 6, 10, 15, 25, and
100 percent, and provides improved relationships for predicting subgrade
deformation underneath an AM2 mat installation and the associated fatigue
damage when subjected to F-15E and C-17 traffic. Additionally, a
laboratory fixture and procedure is described for evaluating an AM2 style
joint in fatigue and relating its performance to given field conditions
without requiring the expense of full-scale testing. These relationships
are suitable for design and evaluation frameworks currently used for
airfield pavements and matting systems.
KW - Runways
KW - Pavements
KW - Landing mats
KW - Trafficability
KW - Predictions
KW - Army corps of engineers
RN - ERDC/GSL-TR-18-1
OD - 93
PR - 63
YR - 2018
PC - 800220605
CT - 85A | Air Transportation
DOCNO- NTIS\AD1046721_a

335 - TOXLINE
TI - Assessment of a Conceptual Flap System Intended for Enhanced General
Aviation Safety.
AU - Campbell, B. A.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AU - Carter, M. B.
AD - National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Hampton, VA. Langley Research
Center.
AB - A novel multielement trailing-edge flap system for light general aviation
airplanes was conceived for enhanced safety during normal and emergency
landings. The system is designed to significantly reduce stall speed, and
thus approach speed, with the goal of reducing maneuveringflight accidents
and enhancing pilot survivability in the event of an accident. The
research objectives were to assess the aerodynamic performance
characteristics of the system and to evaluate the extent to which it
provided both increased lift and increased drag required for the low-speed
landing goal. The flap system was applied to a model of a light general
aviation, high-wing trainer and tested in the Langley 12- Foot Low-Speed
Wind Tunnel. Data were obtained for several device deflection angles, and
component combinations at a dynamic pressure of 4 pounds per square foot.
The force and moment data supports the achievement of the desired increase
in lift with substantially increased drag, all at relatively shallow
angles of attack. The levels of lift and drag can be varied through device
deflection angles and inboard/outboard differential deflections. As such,
it appears that this flap system may provide an enabling technology to
allow steep, controllable glide slopes for safe rapid descent to landing
with reduced stall speed. However, a simple flat-plate lower surface
spoiler (LSS) provided either similar or superior lift with little impact
on pitch or drag as compared to the proposed system. Higher-fidelity
studies are suggested prior to use of the proposed system.
K