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Practice Workbook

This workbook is designed for use in Live instructor-led training and for OnDemand selfstudy.
The explanations and demonstrations are provided by the instructor in the classroom, or in the OnDemand
eLectures of this course available on the Bentley LEARN Server (learn.bentley.com).

This practice workbook is formatted for on-screen viewing using a PDF reader.
It is also available as a PDF document in the dataset for this course.

Modeling Pumps, Tanks, and PRVs


This workbook contains exercises to teach you how to incorporate and evaluate tanks, pumps, and PRVs
(pressure reducing valves) in a water model. The workbook is written for use with the stand-alone platform.

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Description and Objectives

Course Description
In this workshop, you will:

 Add a tank, pump, and PRV elements to complete a water model network.

 Enter the data for these elements

 Analyze the system

 Look for issues with pump operation, PRV settings and adequate pressures

Note: The images in this workshop were taken from WaterCAD. The steps will be the same in WaterGEMS although the user interface may
look slightly different.

Module Prerequisites
 A fundamental understanding of Water Distribution Systems is recommended

Skills Taught
After completing this module, you will be able to:

 Apply the basic principles of water distribution modeling

 Gain essential knowledge for water system design

 Enter pump definitions and pump data

 Model PRV's and Tanks in a network

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Opening an Existing Hydraulic Model
Follow the steps below to open an existing hydraulic model in WaterCAD or WaterGEMS.

1. Open WaterCAD or WaterGEMS from the Start menu or from the desktop icon.
2. Click Open Existing Hydraulic Model on the Welcome dialog or select File > Open to open an existing hydraulic model.
3. Browse to the file PipesAndJunctions.wtg located in the Starter folder and click Open.
4. If a message dialog comes up about associating your hydraulic model with a CONNECTED Project, click OK to never prompt.
5. Select File > Save As, name the file PumpsAndTanks and click Save.
6. Your screen should look like this:

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Element Morphing
In this workshop, the data provided was intentionally left incomplete to simulate missing data. Based on system maps,
we know that: J-11 should be a pump, J-12 a tank, and J-13, J-14, and J-15 are PRVs.

You will clean up the model data by morphing existing model junctions using the Morph/Batch Morph tool.

1. Go to the Layout tab and select the Pump icon, then click on J-11

2. Select Yes in the Morph Node dialog box.


3. Select the Tank icon in the Layout tab, then click on J-12
4. Select Yes in the Morph Node dialog box.Pick the Select arrow (or Click the Esc key) to release the tank layout command.
5. Hold down the Ctrl Key and select J-13, J-14, and J-15, and then click Batch Morph (Tools > More > Batch Morph).
6. Confirm that Choose nodes to process is set to Selection

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7. Select PRV in the New Node Type drop down menu

8. Click OK.
9. Before continuing, review each PRV and make sure that they are labeled and oriented correctly (from upstream to downstream). If they
are not, use the Reverse option to orient them correctly. Junctions J-4 and J-5 are part of a lower pressure zone.

10. Double click on a PRV to bring up the Properties manager.

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11. If the Downstream Pipe field is referencing the wrong pipe, change it using the dropdown menu by selecting the correct pipe, or by
selecting Reverse, or by right clicking on the PRV and selecting Reverse.

Node Downstream Pipe


PRV-1 P-6
PRV-2 P-8
PRV-3 P-16

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Reviewing Junction Demands Using the Demand Control Center
The majority of model data has already been entered, including Junction Demands, Junction Elevations, Pipe Diameter,
Pipe Material, Pipe Hazen-Williams C and Pipe Length (user defined). In this section, you will review average daily
demand data for the junction nodes using the Demand Control Center.

1. There is only one scenario (Base) in this file. To view the demands in this scenario, select Components > Demand Center > Demand
Control Center
2. If you receive a prompt about cancel and undo being unavailable for the Demand Control Center, click Yes to continue.
3. The demands in this scenario represent the average daily demands at each junction. Your screen should look like this:

4. Click Close when done reviewing.

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Using a FlexTable to Enter PRV Data
In this section, you will use a PRV FlexTable to enter elevation, diameter and hydraulic grade setting data for the PRVs.

1. Open the PRV Table from the FlexTables manager by going to View > FlexTables > PRV Table.
2. Check the PRV FlexTable to see if Hydraulic Grade Setting (Initial) is in the table. If it is not, you will need to add the column for Hydraulic
Grade Setting (Initial) to the PRV FlexTable using the following steps.

a. Within the PRV FlexTable, select the Edit button. This opens the Table: PRV Table dialog.
b. Scroll through the Available Columns list, highlight Hydraulic Grade Setting (Initial), and select the first Add button.
c. Using the Up button, move Hydraulic Grade Setting (Initial) under Diameter (Valve).

3. Select OK to update the FlexTable with your changes.


4. Make sure Label is sorted in ascending order, and enter the PRV data from the table below.

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PRV Label Elevation (ft) Diameter (in) Hydraulic Grade
Setting (initial)
(ft)
PRV-1 820 4 935
PRV-2 830 4 940
PRV-3 830 4 940

5. Close out of the PRV FlexTable and FlexTables manager to return to the main drawing screen.

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Creating a Pump Definition and Entering Pump Data
In this section, we will:

 Create a new pump definition for a Standard (3 point) pump curve

 Enter data for the pump using the Properties manager

1. Open the Pump Definitions manager by selecting Components > Pump Definitions, or by clicking on Pump Definition menu within the
PMP-1 properties dialog box.

2. Click the New button.


3. Accept the default name and select Standard (3 Point) from the dropdown menu for Pump Definition Type.
4. Enter the following information:

Flow (gpm) Head (ft)


Shutoff 0 160
Design 1000 130
Max. Operating 1400 111

5. Click on the Efficiency tab. You will input pump’s efficiency data although efficiency is only used in energy costing which we are not doing
in this exercise. Set the following: Pump Efficiency Type: Best Efficiency Point, BEP Flow: 1,000 gpm, BEP Efficiency: 85%

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6. After you have entered the data, view the graph that gets created.

7. Click Close and save your file.


8. Back in the main drawing screen, double click on the PMP-1 to open the pump’s Properties manager.
9. Verify that the Elevation (ft) of the pump is 945.

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10. Use the dropdown menu next to Pump Definition and select Pump Definition - 1.

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Entering Tank Data
In this exercise, we will enter geometry data for the tank using the Properties Manager.

1. Double click on T-1 to open the Properties manager.


2. Enter in the data given below:
Elevation Elevation Elevation (Initial) Elevation Elevation (ft) Diameter (ft)
(Base) (ft) (Minimum) (ft) (ft) (Maximum) (ft)
1010 1030 1050 1070 950 50

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Computing the Model for Average Daily Demands
In this section, you will run the model as-is for an average daily run.

1. Select Analysis > Scenarios to open the Scenarios manager.


You will be calculating the base scenario, which uses the base demand alternative, in order to generate results for an average daily
steady state analysis.

2. Rename the Base scenario to AVG Daily by right clicking Base, selecting Rename, and typing the new name.

3. Click the Compute button within the Scenarios manager.

4. Review the results and answer the questions at the end of this workbook for Run 1 - AVG Daily.

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Creating Average Daily Plus New Industry Demands
An industry wants to move into a site near junction node J-5. You have been asked to evaluate the adequacy of the
distribution system to accommodate this new demand. The new industry demand at this node is 1500 gpm, and it is
fairly steady throughout the day.

The difference between this run and the previous one is the increased demand. In this section, we will:

 Create a new demand alternative to store average daily plus industry demands

 Edit the demand alternative to include the new industry demand

1. Select Analysis > Alternatives and select the Base Demand alternative.
2. Right click and select New > Child Alternative.
3. Rename this new alternative AVG Daily + Industry. Open the new alternative by double clicking on it.
4. Change the Demand of J-5 to 1500 gpm to simulate the industry’s requirements.

Note: Notice how there is now a check mark next to J-5 indicating that its data has changed from that of the parent alternative.
5. Close the Demand dialog and exit the Alternatives manager.

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Creating the AVG Daily + New Industry Scenario
Now, we will create a new child scenario to incorporate the new demand alternative for average daily demands plus the
new industry.

1. Select Analysis > Scenarios.


2. Right click on AVG Daily and select New > Child Scenario.
3. Name the new scenario AVG Daily + New Industry.

4. Open the new scenario by double clicking on it and change the Demand Alternative to Avg Daily + Industry.

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5. Within the Scenarios manager, click the down arrow next to the Compute button and select Batch Run.

6. Check both scenarios and click Batch, select Yes to the Confirmation dialog box, then OK.

7. Review the results and answer the questions for Run 2 - AVG Daily + New Industry.
Note: Remember to switch the current scenario to the AVG Daily + New Industry scenario before you start answering Run 2 questions.

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Workshop Review
Now that you have completed this workshop, let’s measure what you have learned.

Questions – Run 1 – AVG Daily


1. What is the hydraulic grade line elevation at junction J-6? At J-4?

2. What is happening with the PRVs in the system? Why is PRV-1 closed?

3. Is tank T-1 filling or draining?

4. Are there any hydraulic problems in the system?

5. What can you say about the capacity of the system if this output is for average flow conditions?

6. If the pump is a nominal 1000 gpm pump, what can you generally say about its efficiency? (Hint: Right click on PMP-1, select Pump
Curve)

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Questions – Run 2 – Industry Demand of 1500 gpm
1. What is the hydraulic grade line elevation at junction J-6? At J-4?

2. Is the pressure adequate in the lower zone?

3. Is tank T-1 filling or draining?

4. Are there any hydraulic problems in the system?

5. What can you say about the capacity of the system if this output is for average flow conditions?

6. If the pump is a nominal 1000 gpm pump, what can you generally say about its efficiency?(Hint: Right click on PMP-1, select Pump
Curve)

7. How much more would the pump PMP-1 need to produce to keep the tank T-1 from draining?

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Answer Key

Answers – Run 1
1. What is the hydraulic grade line elevation at junction J-6? At J-4?
J-6 has HGL at 1052 ft

J-4 has HGL at 940 ft

2. What is happening with the PRVs in the system? Why is PRV-1 closed?
PRV elements control downstream pressure. The PRVs in this system are trying to protect nodes J-4 and J-5 from getting excessively
high pressures. PRV-2 and PRV-3 are throttling (lowering pressure while allowing flow to pass to the lower zone). PRV-1 is closed
because the downstream HGL is above its set value.

3. Is tank T-1 filling or draining?


Filling

4. Are there any hydraulic problems in the system?


No

5. What can you say about the capacity of the system if this output is for average flow conditions?
The system is adequate to meet capacity for average daily conditions.

6. If the pump is a nominal 1000 gpm pump, what can you generally say about its efficiency? (Hint: Right click on PMP-1, select Pump
Curve)

The pump is operating at its highest efficiency (85%) because it is operating close (within 60 gpm) to the best efficiency point on the
efficiency curve.

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Answers – Run 2
1. What is the hydraulic grade line elevation at junction J-6? At J-4?
J-6 has HGL at 1003 ft

J-4 has HGL at 935 ft

2. Is the pressure adequate in the lower zone?


Yes.

3. Is tank T-1 filling or draining?


Draining

4. Are there any hydraulic problems in the system?


Yes. The pump cannot keep up with demands.

5. What can you say about the capacity of the system if this output is for average flow conditions?
The system is not adequate to meet capacity for average daily conditions because the tank is draining.

6. If the pump is a nominal 1000 gpm pump, what can you generally say about its efficiency? (Hint: Right click on PMP-1, select Pump
Curve)

The pump’s efficiency has dropped to about 84%. It is still close to the pump’s best efficiency point.

7. How much more would the pump PMP-1 need to produce to keep the tank T-1 from draining?
At least 730 gpm

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