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Baker Hughes INTEQ

Field Supervisor
Surface Logging Systems

Reference Guide
P/N 750-500-070 Rev. A April 1997

Copyright © 1990 Baker Hughes INTEQ

Baker Hughes INTEQ


Training & Development
2520 W.W. Thorne
Houston, TX 77073
United States of America
713-625-4890
This material cannot be reproduced in any manner or
otherwise used in any presentation
without the express written permission of
Baker Hughes INTEQ
Table of Contents

Table of Contents

Chapter 1
Responsibilities
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Logging Unit and Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Reporting Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Supervision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2
Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Incident and Emergency Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Health and Safety. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
Finance and Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3
The Role of the Field Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Examination of the Role . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
Managerial Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4
What It Takes To Be A Field Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
Getting Things Done . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-6
Ambition and Self-Confidence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Ability To Co-Operate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7
Decisiveness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-8
Competent Assessment of Personnel Capabilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9
Mental Alertness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-9

Chapter 2
Reporting Procedures
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Types of Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
Technical Reports Required by the Client. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1
INTEQ Well Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2

Workbook i
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Table of Contents Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Initial Well Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2


Unit Monthly Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2
Unit Personnel Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Quality Assurance Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4
Personal Time and Expense Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4

Chapter 3
Communications
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Client Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1
Client Office Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Wellsite Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2
Maintaining Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3
Communications with INTEQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Personnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Equipment Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4
Shipping Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Field Supervisors and the Art of Listening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5
Empathy in Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Empathy versus Agreement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6
Advantages of Effective Listening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Problem Identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Grievances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Performance Improvement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
New Ideas. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
Listening to a Superior . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Dealing with Anger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
Listening is an Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10

Chapter 4
Leadership
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Qualities of Good Leaders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
The Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
The Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
The Situation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2

ii Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Table of Contents

Action Centered Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2


Performing the Task. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Maintaining the Team . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Develop and Support the Individuals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Management Style . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
Teamwork . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
Team Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
Individual Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Characteristics of Effective Teams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Delegation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
How to Delegate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Establishing Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Why Do People Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Certainties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8
Views of Motivation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Needs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Results . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
Instrumentality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
The Field Supervisor's Role. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-10
Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Discipline And Grievance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Types of Discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
General Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Ensuring Fair Treatment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Conclusions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12

Chapter 5
Administration
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Filing System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Personnel Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Time and Expense Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Bi-Monthly Inventory Requests. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2

Workbook iii
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Table of Contents Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Shipping Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3


Quality Assurance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3
Job Instruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Control Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4
Documentation Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Verification and Approval of New Company Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Manual Tracking and Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5
Field Documentation Changes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Shipping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-6
Inspection Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Field Surface Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Surface Equipment Checksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Surface Equipment Inspection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7
Field Equipment Inspection Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Quality Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Unit Service and Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Field Quality Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Equipment Movement Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
Retention of Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-8
First Alert Reporting System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Advice on First Alert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Concessions Arising from Non-Conformance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-9
Corrective Action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Internal Corrective Action: Repair and Overhaul. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Field Corrective Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Final Inspection of Geological Reports and Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10
Quality Control Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11
Final Well Report Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-12

Chapter 6
First Alert
Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
How Does FIRST Alert Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1
Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2
Recording an Incident on the Field Incident Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-4
First Alert Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11
SLS Familiarization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-11

iv Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Table of Contents

Chapter 7
Training
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Orienting New Employees. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1
Introducing the New Employee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
Knowledge and Skill Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3
Preparing to Teach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
How to Instruct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4
Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Reporting Procedures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5
Training Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
Job Summary Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
Field Training Report Forms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6
Training Data Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
Equipment/Task Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7
Trainees Report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7

Chapter 8
Wellsite Incidents
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Responsible On-Site INTEQ Personnel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1
Notify Corporate Office. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Report Preparation at Local Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
INTEQ Manager or Supervisor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Crew Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Logs, Logging Reports, Strip Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2
Unit Diaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3

Chapter 9
Health and Safety
INTEQ Safety Policy Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1
Field Supervisor Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-2
Travel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
Passports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
Safety Training Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
Helicopter Travel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3
Travel by Boat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-3

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Driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4
Rig Equipment and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Arrival and Departure on Offshore Installations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Field Supervisor Safety Briefing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5
Personal Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Malaria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Bites from Insects and Other Animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6
Personal Hygiene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
AIDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Unit First Aid Kit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7
Protective Clothing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Drilling Fluids . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Types of Fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8
Toxicity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9
Health Effects of OBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
Operational Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-10
Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11
Explosive Hazards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
Hazardous Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
Equipment Used in Hazardous Areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-12
Storage and Use of Compressed Gas Cylinders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13
Hydrogen Sulfide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14
Description. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14
Toxicity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14
Corrective Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-14
Ultra Violet Light. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15
Use and Storage of Chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15
Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15
Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Precautions and Handling of Chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Mixing and Diluting Chemicals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Electrical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Dangers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-16
Good Working Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17

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Unit Rig-up Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17


General . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17
Power and Utility Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
Pressure Sensors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
Electrical Torque Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18
Working at Height or Over Water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-18

Chapter 10
Finance
General. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
Financial Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1
Payment for Goods and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2
Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
Content. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
Preparation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3
Guidelines for Risk Provision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4
Risk Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4
Types of INTEQ Liability Risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4
Operational Aspects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5

Appendix A
Monthly Reports

Appendix B
Shipping Forms

Appendix C
Quality Assurance Forms

Appendix D
Field Training Reports

Appendix E
Example Contracts

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Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Chapter 1

Responsibilities

This chapter outlines the major duties and responsibilities of


the Field Supervisor.

General
Field Supervisors are responsible for the overall performance of the
logging unit and personnel under their supervision. In certain remote areas,
they may also be required to perform some Operational duties concerning
crew scheduling, client liaison, equipment expediting, and general office
administration.

Personnel
Field Supervisors will be responsible for the conduct and overall
performance of INTEQ field personnel, geologists, and service engineers
that are involved with the surface logging unit.
These responsibilities include (but are not limited to) Logging Unit Quality
Control, Field Personnel Training, Supervision, Communications,
Performance Appraisal, and Reporting Procedures.
When integrated services are provided, and being run out of an SLS
logging unit, office management will decide the limits of authority (if any)
that will be imposed on the SLS (Surface Logging System) Field
Supervisor.

Logging Unit and Equipment


Field Supervisors are responsible for the operation and maintenance of the
logging unit and related equipment for the duration of their assignment.
They are primarily responsible for the provision of INTEQ's surface
logging services to its clients, and, with the support of the local office, for
fulfilling INTEQ's contractual obligations.

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Reporting Procedures
It is the responsibility of the Field Supervisor to ensure that the required
reporting procedures are adhered to at all times. This includes internal
INTEQ reports and those reports required by the client.

Communications
The Field Supervisor has the overall responsibility to ensure that the lines
of communications between the INTEQ crew and client personnel, both at
the wellsite and in town, are maintained at a proper professional level, and
according to the client's requirements.
They will ensure that communications between INTEQ personnel at the
wellsite are maintained to the same professional standards.
Regular communication to local and regional INTEQ offices is also
required to ensure the quality of service being provided to the client is
maintained at the highest possible standard.

Supervision
Supervision of junior crew members, including trainees, is of paramount
importance. The quality of the product being provided to the client is
ultimately the responsibility of the Field Supervisor.
It is necessary to establish standard procedures with the client at the
beginning of the contract, to ensure that all crew members are familiar with
these procedures, and that they are followed at all times. This may involve
visiting the client's office in person to resolve any problems.

Administration
In order to fulfill contractual obligations, certain administrative
requirements are necessary to ensure the smooth running of the logging
unit's equipment and personnel.
These procedures include the completion and submission to the local
INTEQ office of Initial, Monthly and Final Well Reports, Bi-Monthly
Equipment Inventories, Quality Assurance Audits, and Health and Safety
Reports.
The Field Supervisor may have to check the crew’s Time and Expense
Forms before submission to the local INTEQ office.
All documentation, First Alerts, standard procedures, manuals, technical
bulletins, inventory requests, shipping and customs forms, sample and core
inventories should be properly and adequately filed within the logging unit.

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Training
Field Supervisors should ensure that all crew members are trained to fulfill
their specific duties at the wellsite, particularly with the provision of new
techniques and equipment.
Specific responsibility rests with Field Supervisors for ensuring that any
trainees assigned to their operation receive the standard of instruction and
training required under IN-FACTS (INTEQ Field Advancement and
Career Training System) and the SLS Competency System. They should
also ensure the timely submission of training reports to the Regional
Training Department (see Chapter 7).

Incident and Emergency Procedures


In the event of a wellsite incident or emergency, the Field Supervisor
should ensure that the correct reporting procedures are followed to both the
client and to the local or regional INTEQ office (see Chapter 8).

Health and Safety


The health and safety of its employees is of paramount importance to
INTEQ. It is the responsibility of Field Supervisors to ensure that the
Company's policies regarding health and safety at work are fully adhered
to, and that all personnel under their supervision are familiar with its
requirements. Those policies concerning Health, Safety, and Environment
(HS&E) are found in the Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations HS&E manual.
Any non-compliance or wellsite injury should be reported immediately to
the local INTEQ office.

Finance and Contracts


It is important that all Field Supervisors have a basic understanding of the
company's financial structure, and are aware of the implications of their
duties and responsibilities on the financial health of the Company.
Field Supervisors should also be familiar with INTEQ's contractual
obligations to its client for the particular operation to which they are
assigned. Copies of the operational aspects of the contract should, with
management approval, be securely filed in the logging unit.
Prior to taking charge of logging unit operations, the Field Supervisor
should review the contractual obligations with Operations management.

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The Role of the Field Supervisor


Introduction
The INTEQ Field Supervisor assumes the role of line management in the
field, reporting directly to the local operations management. There are, of
course, other relationships and reporting interactions which make this
initial statement somewhat more complex. Lines of communication exist
between the Field Supervisor and:
• Client Representatives
• Contractor Representatives
• Local INTEQ Operations Management
• Area INTEQ Operations Management
• INTEQ Personnel Management
• INTEQ Support Functions (i.e. Engineering, Training)
In all of these areas the Field Supervisor has reporting responsibilities,
requiring effective and efficient communications.

Examination of the Role


In order to be successful as a Field Supervisor one must examine the many
relationships and interactions that take place, and be aware of the role of
line management in terms of what is expected and by whom. It is also
important that you are aware of how your performance will ultimately be
judged. Some areas that may become problems for the first line managers
are:
• Being unclear of the limits of their authority
• Being unsure of what others expect of them
• Being unsure of how their performance is judged
• Having different expectations from their bosses as to what they
should be doing

Managerial Jobs
There are certain tasks that fall within the scope of the Field Supervisor
that can be identified as being key to the framework of the position.
• Demands placed on Field Supervisors: What anyone in this position
must do. Demands are what must be done rather than what a manager
thinks they ought to do.

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• Constraints under which they work: These are factors, both internal
and external that limit what the manager can do.
• The priorities of the organization: The priority for INTEQ is to
provide its customers with a first rate service, meeting all its
contractual requirements in a safe and economic manner, thus
providing the shareholders of Baker Hughes with a reasonable return
on their investment.
• Choices: These are activities the Field Supervisor can do but does not
have to. They are opportunities to do different jobs in different ways.

What It Takes To Be A Field Supervisor


General
Field Supervisors are extremely important in the hierarchy of INTEQ.
Besides being trained geologists, computer operators, engineers, and
INTEQ's representative on the rig site, they are first and foremost leaders.
As leaders, they should be constantly trying to better themselves and
improve their leadership abilities.
They can improve their leadership abilities only if they understand the
personal equipment available to them - their limitations and their
potentials. They should not force themselves into roles that make them feel
awkward or uncomfortable. Remember that there’s no rigidly “right” or
“wrong” way to be a leader, and people are quick to spot a phony.
This does not mean that leadership skills can’t be learned. Success as a
Field Supervisor calls for the blending of personal capabilities with sound
leadership principles, continuously applied. Studies indicate that the best
leaders, despite their many differences in personality, do practice certain
principles that helped them reach that position. This Reference Guide will
examine those principles in detail.
A basic function of a good leader is to inspire people to their best efforts.
The individual who concentrates only on details, on figures or on technical
matters may become an expert, but not a leader. Experts know what should
be done; leaders know what should be done and how to get people to do it.
Essential to your success in this area is your ability to:
• Take an interest in your subordinates - Are they working at jobs
best suited to their individual abilities? Do you know anything about
them personally - what their problems are, what makes them tick?
• Communicate clearly - Are your requests and instructions easy to
understand? Do you avoid unnecessary snags by explaining matters

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carefully in advance? Do your subordinates know why they are doing


things, in addition to what they are doing?
• Use sound training methods - Can you train your subordinates to
carry out their duties efficiently, and to take on new duties? Are you
patient when breaking in a new trainee? Are you familiar with the
company's latest technical improvements and directives?
• Handle grievances fairly - Are you close enough to your
subordinates to be able to spot trouble before it comes to a head? If a
person is obviously upset or angry, do you take them aside and let
them get it off their chest? When a grievance arises, do you side-step
the problem, or do you try to clear it up as quickly as possible? Are
you careful to give reprimands in private?
• Keep morale high - Do you encourage team spirit? Do you
compliment a person when they rate it? Do your subordinates have a
feeling of belonging, of being needed on the job? Are they briefed on
the over-all picture? Do you act promptly to kill false or potentially
dangerous rumors?
• Awaken enthusiasm - Do you make your subordinates want to do
their best? Do you encourage their desire for advancement? Do you
try to give them a sense of pride in the job, the company and the
product? Do you help those who want to learn new skills?
Everyone needs a feeling of personal worth and the knowledge that they
are appreciated. The ability to respond to this need and bring out the best in
each individual and in each group is the mark of a good leader.

Getting Things Done


The “busy guy” isn’t always the most efficient one. Some people rush
around making a lot of noise, but they never really get anywhere.
Did you ever start out for a job, run back to make out a report, stop on the
way to talk to someone, leave to answer the telephone, interrupt the phone
call to write a message? If your workday seems to be one long rat race,
perhaps it’s because you're letting your job run you, instead of the other
way around. Here are some suggestions to help you improve your ability to
get things done more efficiently:
• List all your job duties - Jot down your daily tasks, plus those that
come up periodically or irregularly. List them in their order of
importance and, if possible, figure a time allotment for each.
• Make a two week timetable - Plan your two weeks ahead of time, if
you can. Itemize what you expect to accomplish from day to day. Use
the timetable as a progress guide and revise it as required.

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• Streamline your personal contacts - Don’t waste too much time in


idle conversation or allow your meetings to stray from the original
subject. Train yourself to communicate simply and clearly - get to the
point and stick to it. Use the phone for communication, not small talk.
• Jot it down - Don’t trust yourself to remember everything that comes
up during the day. Write memos to yourself as well as to others.
They’ll often come in handy.
• Delegate work to subordinates - Make effective use of the help
available to you. Train your crew to handle new tasks. It eases your
work load and aids in their development.
These guideposts should be adapted to your own personal situation, and not
followed so rigidly that your flexibility is hampered.

Ambition and Self-Confidence


A good leader shouldn’t shy away from responsibility or hard work, and
they do not quit when faced with unexpected obstacles. The mental fuel
that motivates them is a continuing eagerness to grow and improve on all
levels. But a successful leader is also realistic about their goals. They do
not waste time reaching for the moon.
Self-confidence is an indispensable asset to a good leader, because it
communicates itself to others. People respect leaders who genuinely know
what they’re doing. When you develop your potentialities, you can base
your confidence on fact rather than on fiction. Here are some suggestions
to help increase your self-assurance:
• Take a mental inventory of your recent accomplishments and
your assets as a Field Supervisor (it’s good for your morale).
• Pick one personal deficiency or weakness and go to work on it.
• Enlarge your store of information about the company and about
your field. Knowledge builds confidence.
• Tackle an assignment you once considered too tough.
• Check your personal appearance. You’re a leader - look the part!

Ability To Co-Operate
The ability to co-operate goes hand in hand with the ability to bring out the
best in people. A good leader must know how to co-operate with those
above them and those below them, so that they can do their job properly.
No pat formula can fit every situation, but there are ways to be co-operative
and stimulate co-operation in others:

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• Use commands sparingly - Avoid orders such as “Do this!”, “Stop


it!”, or “Do it this way!” Curt commands provoke resentment. Use
them only in cases of flagrant laziness, insubordination or emergency.
• Request - don`t demand. Try saying “Let’s do this.” or “I’d like you
to do that.” Ask for suggestions from your crew when you think
they’ll be helpful. You might ask, “What do you think ought to be
done here?”, or “How would you tackle this?”
• Show respect for your associates - Your superiors and your
subordinates are equally entitled to your respect. Show the same
consideration that you would like to receive. But, don’t fake interest;
insincerity is easy to spot.
• Show faith in your subordinates - Organize, delegate, then step
aside. Be as discrete and unobtrusive as possible. Don’t over
supervise by checking constantly on every little detail.
• Encourage subordinates to speak up - Welcome suggestions and
prompt your subordinates to think creatively. If a person's work is
slipping, draw them aside to learn what their problem is.
• Express your approval - Compliment, in public, those who rate it.
But use your praise judiciously. Too little, and it’s missed. Too much,
and it’s cheapened.
• Act fairly - When work is being assigned or compliments are in order,
don’t play favorites. In disciplinary situations, be objective and
impartial.

Decisiveness
A leader is a person who makes decisions. Sometimes they turn out right
and sometimes they turn out wrong; but either way the decision is made.
Rig site decisions must be made quickly. Does this mean that you are
doomed to failure if you are not the type who can jump to rapid
conclusions? Not at all. Good decisions are seldom arrived at haphazardly.
They are based on sound problem solving techniques. Here are six
guideposts to help you make tough decisions:
• Make sure you understand what you’re actually expected to decide.
• Get as much background information on the problem as you can.
• Call on your crew for help, especially those with specialized training
in that area.
• Check your thinking to make sure that your attitude is free from
personal bias and irrelevant emotional factors.

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• List all your possible decisions and analyze carefully the probable
consequences of each.
• To provide helpful precedents, review the results of past decisions
Once you’ve made a decision, announce it as soon as possible and don’t be
afraid to back it up. A leader must have faith in themselves and the courage
of their convictions. On the other hand, they must be flexible enough to
admit their mistakes when they’ve been proved wrong.
Another attribute of a decisive leader is the ability to take disciplinary
action. Every now and then it may be necessary to crackdown on a trouble-
maker. Being lax and slipshod, in this respect, is just as bad as being harsh
and vindictive.

Competent Assessment of Personnel Capabilities


The Field Supervisor will be an important part in the Competency
Assessment process because they will be charged with completing the
assessment forms for their logging personnel. This assessment will include:
• Direct observation of their work
• Occasional simulations for them to react to
• Providing witness testimony (written) of tasks performed
Therefore, it is important that the Field Supervisor maintain up-to-date
records of the crews improvements during your work with them.
The Field Supervisor must assess personnel with reference to any special
needs (i.e. have they been trained sufficiently before asked to perform a
task). Any requirements concerning “special needs” must be identified and
action taken.
Assessment must take place within the Equal Opportunities Policy. Baker
Hughes INTEQ is an equal opportunities company and as such it does not
permit any kind of discrimination (sex, color, ethnic origin, nationality,
marital status, disability, etc.). Direct discrimination is defined as treating a
person less favorably than others are, or would be, in the same or similar
circumstances. This means that all candidates for assessment are treated the
same, even if you as their supervisor, work less well with some due to
personal habits.

Mental Alertness
It’s easy to grow a little lax, to get accustomed to the same old routine.
Good leaders can’t afford comfortable ruts. Company responsibility,
pressure from competitors, personal advancement - all these mean that as a
Field Supervisor you must maintain a questioning attitude.

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Responsibilities Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Here are some suggestions to help you develop your mental alertness:
• Keep up to date in your field - Put your name on the mailing lists of
equipment manufacture’s and fill out the reader inquiry cards in
professional journals. Join professional associations. Visit trade
shows and conventions. Question engineers about their methods. Start
a personal file on new methods, new equipment, new ideas.
• Study professional magazines - Read a few good technical journals
and management publications. Make mental notes and clip out items
of interest.
• Take advanced courses in your field - Don’t be shy about extra
training; learn all you can about the methods in your field. Above all,
cultivate your ability to think

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Chapter 2

Reporting Procedures

This chapter reviews the various reports which are required


during the course of a well. Reporting procedures are a
major responsibility of the Field Supervisor.

General
It is the duty of the Field Supervisor to ensure that all reporting procedures
are adhered to, and that all required reports are completed and submitted
before the required deadline.

Types of Report
There are many wellsite reports that are required from time to time, both by
the client and INTEQ management.

Technical Reports Required by the Client.


These, including end-of-well reports, may have been covered in previous
training courses (and may be given guidance notes only).
It is the responsibility of the Field Supervisor to ensure that all such reports
are written in a proper, professional manner, according to the guidelines
laid down for that particular report.
If you are unsure of the format, or content, that is required you should
check with the Operations Supervisor or the local INTEQ office.
Field Supervisors should ensure that when they leave, each member of the
crew is familiar with the reporting requirements so that the job proceeds in
a professional manner in their absence.

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Reporting Procedures Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

INTEQ Well Reports


Various reports are expected to be completed and submitted to the local
INTEQ office, for accounting and administrative purposes. Certain reports
will also be submitted to the client as invoicing backup.

Initial Well Report


This report is to be completed at the beginning of each new well. Where a
series of wells are being drilled under one contract, a separate Initial Well
Report should be submitted for each well.
This report gives important information that is used in a number of
different areas.
It should be completed at the beginning of the well and submitted to the
local INTEQ office without delay. You should not wait until the end of the
month before submitting it. Ensure that it is signed by the client's
representative. This will normally be the Company Supervisor, not the
Wellsite Geologist.
The form gives details concerning the start-up of the contract, and is thus
important for invoicing purposes in that the client has, by signing,
confirmed the date at which certain charges have begun to be applicable.
It also confirms the date of travel to the wellsite of the INTEQ crew and
gives important information concerning rig or client contact numbers,
including names and locations of client supervisory staff and crew change
information.
If the well is in a new location or working for a new client then you should
include, on a separate sheet if necessary, full details of all travel and crew
change information, so that a full set of briefing notes can be compiled.
The estimated duration of the well should be included in order to assist
personnel and equipment planning.

Unit Monthly Report


This report should be completed at the end of each month, signed by the
client representative, and returned to the local INTEQ office without delay.
It is used as the primary back-up for invoicing purposes, and is in essence,
a signed job ticket detailing the services and consumable items provided by
INTEQ during the month.

Note: Without a signed Unit Monthly Report, INTEQ will not


get paid for these services. You should be aware that your
own remuneration is a direct result of INTEQ receiving
payment from its clients.

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Reporting Procedures

The Field Supervisor, or his deputy (assistant), is required to detail the


following information:
• Unit Activity: This details the number of days that certain numbers of
INTEQ crew were present at the wellsite. This can effect the payment
received by INTEQ in terms of Logging, Holding or Standby charges
that might be applicable.
• Extra Tours: This might occur during coring operations, for
example, when extra hours are worked at the client's request. In this
case some overtime payment might be in order.
• Secondary Equipment: Such items as extra printers, CRT Displays,
QFT, or Calcimetry might be provided to the client as secondary
equipment. In this case, extra rental charges can be made to the client,
but each one has to be detailed and signed for. If you are in any doubt
as to the status of certain equipment or services, you must refer to the
original contract or contact the local INTEQ office.
• Wellsite Log Copies: Generally speaking, wellsite copies of logs, in
addition to master sheets, can also be invoiced to the client. You
should ensure that exact details of all master sheets and copies are
recorded on this form.
• Consumable: Large numbers of consumable items, including sample
bags, strapping tape, marker pens, etc. can also be rebilled to the
client. While the cost of such items might, individually, be quite
small, with the numbers involved spread over all the logging units
currently working, the total cost is very significant and should not be
thought of lightly.You should ensure, therefore, that proper records
are kept regarding the usage of such items and that they are detailed
on the report. It is vitally important that this form is completed
correctly, signed by the client's representative and submitted to the
INTEQ office no later than the 7th day of the following month.

Note: Without this form INTEQ cannot invoice the client for
goods and services that it has provided during the month.

Even when the form is submitted in good time, it is already five weeks
since some of the work has been provided. On receipt of the invoice, the
client has 30 days in which to pay.
With a few days delay here and there it is likely that, on average, INTEQ
might have to wait 100-120 days to receive payment, having already
performed the work.
Anything that can be done to speed up this process and reduce the time
delay is to be encouraged. Delays incurred in submitting this, and other,
reports to the local INTEQ office will not be tolerated.

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Reporting Procedures Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Ensure that all reports are submitted to the correct office. Delays can occur
if, for example, the report is sent to Celle only to have it redirected to
Kazakhstan, since the local manager is performing invoicing duties.

Unit Personnel Report


This report is also submitted at the end of each month to the local INTEQ
office, having been signed by the client representative.
It records the number and names of INTEQ personnel, including Service
Engineers, at the wellsite for each day of the month.
It is used for internal INTEQ administrative reasons, providing back-up for
personal Time and Expense reports, and is also submitted to the client for
invoicing purposes.
For each day of the month the Field Supervisor should record the level of
service being provided, the number and names of INTEQ personnel
present, details of crew changes, and the presence of Service Engineers and
Trainees.
This form must be submitted in the same envelope as the Unit Monthly
Report.

Quality Assurance Reports


These are required so that INTEQ continues to provide all its clients with a
quality service and the service meets its contractual requirements.
These forms should be completed as required and submitted to the local
INTEQ office. They include:
• 12 hour Routine Checks
• Weekly Activation of Gas Sensors
• Monthly Maintenance Report
• Monthly Safety Report
• First Alerts
Full details of the INTEQ First Alert System and Field Supervisors'
responsibilities are contained in this Reference Guide.

Personal Time and Expense Forms


At the end of each month every employee is required to complete and
submit to the local INTEQ office, a personal Time and Expense form.
This is used to ensure that the employee receives the correct wellsite bonus
and overtime payments together with the reimbursement of work related
expense.

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If necessary, Field Supervisors can pre-approve the Time and Expense


sheets of personnel under their supervision before the forms are submitted
to the office. This will ensure that details concerning crew changes and
local expenses are accurately documented, and that all receipts are included
wherever possible.
The Field Supervisor should ensure that the Time and Expense forms are
completed neatly and accurately by all crew members.
Certain local travel expenses can be rebilled to the client, upon receipt of
this form along with adequate back-up information. Back-up information
includes the Time and Expense Form together with all receipts.

Note: Delay in returning personal Time and Expense forms can


seriously delay the submission of invoices to the client
and the subsequent payment of monies owed to INTEQ.
Ultimately, this could affect your own salary and
expenses payments.

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•Notes•

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Chapter 3

Communications

This chapter outlines the lines of communication for the


client and INTEQ. The Field Supervisor will be required to
communicate effectively at various levels during their stay
at the wellsite.

Introduction
Of the many problems that can arise during the course of a well, by far the
most common, and usually the most critical, is that of poor
communications.
No matter how good a job is being done technically, lack of good and
continuous communication with the client, INTEQ management and other
members of the crew can seriously damage relations and lead to the
company failing to meet it's contractual requirements.
It is extremely important that the entire crew is familiar with this, and that
good communications are established at the very beginning of each well.

Client Communications
Establishing good communications with the client is vital to ensure that the
services being provided by INTEQ are of the highest possible standard.
Client communications can be established in two areas:
• Client Office Personnel
• Client Wellsite Personnel

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Communications Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Client Office Communications


Wherever possible, it is advantageous for the Field Supervisor to meet with
the oil company’s Geologist and Drilling Engineer prior to spud to discuss
logging procedures, reporting requirements, sampling requirements, log
distribution, and emergency procedures. This provides a valuable personal
link between the INTEQ crew and the client's office.
Where this is not possible, the same information must be obtained from the
local INTEQ Operations Supervisor. Written instructions are far preferable
to verbal ones. These should be read in the presence of the Operations
Supervisor to ensure that everyone understands what is expected of them.
During the course of the well you should try to visit the client's office as
often as you can when you are travelling to and from the wellsite. This is
particularly true when you are working in remote locations when regular
visits cannot be made by operations management.
A phone call beforehand may be advisable, since it may not always be
convenient for you just to “drop in.” Experience shows, however, that most
clients really do welcome such visits, as it enables them to get to know you
and your crew on a personal basis and shows them that you are taking a
real interest in their operation.
With all such visits, you must ensure that you are dressed in a manner
commensurate with your professional status. No one expects you to change
in a suit and tie, but clean, tidy casual dress is the acceptable minimum
requirement.

Wellsite Communications
Upon arrival at the wellsite, you should immediately introduce yourself
and your crew to the senior Oil Company Representative and Wellsite
Geologist.
They should be in no doubt as to the seniority and function of each crew
member, and that you, as Field Supervisor, have overall responsibility.
Names of other crew members assigned to the operation should also be
provided, together with an indication of who will be acting Field
Supervisor during your absence.
You should briefly discuss the level of service being provided, ideally with
the help of relevant brochures and technical data sheets. The Company
Representative and Wellsite Geologist should be invited to the logging unit
at an early stage in order to see the equipment and familiarize themselves
with the software, prints/plots and screen outputs.
You should discuss the well prognosis with both the Company
Representative and Wellsite Geologist as soon as possible. This should
include:

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Communications

• Sampling Requirements
• Daily Reporting Procedures
• Completion and Distribution of Logs
• Logging Procedures for;
Drill Breaks
Oil Shows
Hole Problems
HPHT Drilling Monitoring
Flow Checks
Coring Points
Night Time Procedures
• Non-Conformance Reports / First Alert

Maintaining Communications
Once lines of communication have been established, it is the responsibility
of the Field Supervisor to ensure that all crew members maintain them
under all circumstances. Every crew member should be familiar with all
verbal and written reporting procedures.
A primary part of the service that INTEQ provides is being aware of what
is happening on the rig at all times and informing others as to the status of
the well, from a geological, engineering, and safety standpoint.
The Field Supervisor must inform all crew members of their
responsibilities in this area, and impress upon them that regular visits to the
rig floor, shaker room, pit room, and the mud engineers laboratory are
essential. These visits serve a number of purposes:
• Makes the INTEQ crew an integral part of the rig team
• Makes the loggers visible to rig personnel
• Shows that INTEQ has an interest in what is happening
• Allows the checking of equipment, sensors and lines
• Promotes an exchange of information with rig and client
personnel
When dealing with client personnel, it is important to remember the
following:
• Rig people are traditionally conservative. Many will be wary of
young, academic geologists.
• Ensure that all crew members are seen striving to give the best
possible service at all times. This will enhance acceptance and
improve communications.

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• Remember that you are providing a service. You and your crew must
remain courteous and diplomatic at all times, and respond positively
to all reasonable requests.
• All instructions concerning reporting procedures, sampling, show
evaluation, and well control etc., must be followed to the letter.
• Ensure that you and every crew member are aware of the
circumstances in which the Company Representative or Geologist
wish to be called upon during the night.
• If good communication with the client is not established and
maintained, then INTEQ is not fulfilling its contractual requirements.

Communications with INTEQ


A vital part of providing a proper service to the client is ensuring that
adequate communication is maintained between the wellsite and the local
INTEQ office.
Details concerning crew changes, equipment status, and shipping
procedures must be regularly exchanged in order that the operation may
run smoothly and with the least amount of inconvenience to the client.
The Field Supervisor must give details, ideally on the Initial Well Report,
of contact names and numbers of key personnel, both at the wellsite and at
the client's or contractor's base. This information should include telephone,
telex, and fax numbers, including details of satellite or radio stations.

Personnel
Details of crew changes will normally be telexed or faxed to the operator’s
base and wellsite a few days prior to the crew change day. It is the Field
Supervisor's responsibility to ensure that all relevant INTEQ operations
management personnel are aware of crew change requirements. This is
particularly so in remote areas where transportation to the wellsite may
only take place on certain, perhaps infrequent, days or where client or
contractor charter flights may be in operation.

Equipment Status
Quality Assurance procedures are in place and are referred to in this
Reference Guide. The Field Supervisor must be fully conversant with these
procedures, and instruct other crew members accordingly.
Any equipment malfunction or non-conformance must be properly
documented and reported to both the client and INTEQ management in a
timely manner.

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Shipping Procedures
When returning faulty or unnecessary equipment to the local INTEQ
office, the required documentation must be fully completed and
dispatched, with copies correctly filed in the unit for future reference. Full
details of shipping procedures are given in this Reference Guide.
When shipping faulty equipment, it is always appropriate to include an
explanation of what is wrong with that piece of equipment. Details
concerning “what”, “when”, “how”, and “why it stopped working”, will
assist the engineers and allow it to be repaired quickly and returned to
service.
Field Supervisors must ensure that they have details of all shipping agents
etc., including telephone, telex, and fax numbers. Out of hours contact
information should also be at hand.
Whenever equipment is being returned, details must be sent beforehand to
the responsible INTEQ supervisor and, if applicable, to the shipping agent.
When equipment or other supplies are shipped from INTEQ to the wellsite,
full details will be given beforehand, and commercial invoices and customs
documentation will accompany the shipment.
Any undue delay in the receipt of expected supplies should be
communicated to the local INTEQ office. The Field Supervisor should be
aware of the responsible person at the wellsite for the receipt of such
materials.
All accompanying documentation should be properly filed in the logging
unit for future reference.

Field Supervisors and the Art of Listening


General
It is common knowledge that a good supervisor is a good listener. After all,
listening is an important part of effective communication between
managers and subordinates at all levels in an organization. Field
Supervisors, who make a point of listening, are making conscious use of an
important tool in their day-to-day dealings with others.
Effective communication does not occur automatically. In fact, the
communication process is often depicted by means of six steps: Ideation,
encoding, transmission, reception, decoding, and action.
Ideation is simply the conception of a thought or idea. Encoding is
symbolizing the idea either orally, by written word, or by electrical or
magnetic impulse. Transmission is the movement of the symbols from

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Communications Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

sender to receiver. Reception occurs when the symbols are received by the
listener. Decoding involves the listener’s interpretation of the symbols
received. Action is some behavior or activity that is induced by the
received message.
Sometimes this simply means storing or remembering the information.
You, as Field Supervisor, must be aware of blockages and distortions that
occur throughout the whole communications process. There are several
ways in which a Field Supervisor can reduce these blockages and
distortions at the listening end of communication.

Empathy in Communication
The boundaries for understanding expand when empathy exists. In fact, the
key to effective listening is empathy - the ability to see an idea or concept
from another’s viewpoint. You must be aware of another’s background,
values, and attitudes when you listen to what they are saying. It means
putting yourself in another person’s shoes. When you practice empathy,
you listen non-evaluatively. You listen without arguing or passing
judgement on what is being said at the time. You listen to gain
understanding of how the problem looks to the speaker in view of their
information sources, goals, background, and attitudes. Under these positive
conditions, the speakers defense mechanisms usually relax, since they no
longer find it necessary to argue with their listener.

Empathy versus Agreement


Keep in mind that empathy is understanding and doesn’t necessarily
involve agreement. Try to recognize that people are often afraid to try to
understand what is being said because they are afraid that they might agree
with it. If a newly agreed piece of information conflicts with your attitudes
and beliefs, a condition can arise within you known as cognitive
dissonance. Cognitive dissonance is a system of non-fitting attitudes or
beliefs that bring about internal psychological conflict. In trying to avoid
this condition, you as a listener, might refuse to try to understand
information that is in conflict with what you already believe. In this case,
you must have enough confidence in the logical consistency and validity of
your own beliefs and attitudes so that you can relax any defensiveness and
try to understand new information.You should realize that you do not
necessarily have to agree with the information just because you understand
it.
If the speaker interprets empathy and understanding as agreement by the
listener when agreement is not intended, the listener can make his position
clear by giving whatever explanation is necessary. Remember, you can
disagree without being disagreeable.

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You might say, for example, when the listening process is completed,
“John, I understand what you are saying and you have some very good
points - but I don’t agree with them. Here are my reasons.”

Advantages of Effective Listening


Among the pluses for effective listening is that it fosters beneficial
interpersonal relationships. It indicates a willingness to understand another
person. This implies a respect for the other person. And this respect
maintains and builds the other person’s ego and own sense of self-respect
and dignity. It also often results in a reciprocal feeling of respect between
two people. Let’s look at several situations in which maintaining beneficial
interpersonal relationships through effective listening is especially
important.

Problem Identification
Identifying problems is a difficult task because Field Supervisors are often
aware of a problem only through its symptoms. Symptoms are clues to, or
manifestations of, more basic problems that usually are hidden. Through
effective listening, various symptoms may be dealt with to uncover the
basic problem.
To identify a problem, repeat what a person says. Express it in your own
words. Reflecting feeling is a valuable technique for identifying problems.
For example, you might say “John, you feel that because you are a senior
logger, you should have been assigned to a DrillByte unit. Is that correct?”
The point is that the words used are not as important as the attitude
reflected. Genuine interest in what the other person is saying is a necessity
and must be conveyed in a casual, conversational way.
Naturally, this technique can be overdone. Excessive repetition may
indicate to the speaker that the listener is not paying close attention or that
he is mocking him. To be effective, the technique must be practiced
consistently.

Grievances
Establish a definite time to listen to grievances. Then, devote your
undivided attention to listening to the grievance or complaint. Avoid
glancing at papers on the counter or allowing excessive interruption from
phone calls or intercoms. Make sure that the grieving person feels that you
are interested in listening to their grievance. And remember, what may
have been a simple question may prove to be the beginning of a serious
grievance.

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Performance Improvement
The logging unit’s goals require specific types of effort by the loggers. It
matters little whether it’s a specific level of profitability, a desired quality
level, or the delivery of a specified service. When these goals are not being
reached, it is because the crew’s efforts are not what they should be.
As the Field Supervisor, you must identify which crew members have not
performed adequately and why, so that the performance can be corrected.
Consider whether the crew member knows the specific instructions. Do
they know how their responsibilities and individual duties are integrated
with the unit’s goals? Are they committed to these goals? Do they know
what is required of them in their job? And do they have adequate training,
so that they can perform their job properly?
Phrase your questions so that the crew member will explain why they’re
doing what they’re doing. For example, you might say, “Dilbert, look at
this log. We can’t send something like this to the client. Let’s get it
corrected.” But this might be better phrased: “Dilbert, look at this log. Do
you think we should send something like this? What seems to be the
problem? Perhaps we should briefly review how you are running the job.”

New Ideas
An extremely difficult yet important time to practice effective listening is
when one is presented with a new idea. Here, the intended message can be
distorted by the listener because of cognitive dissonance. This happens in
several ways. People listen selectively. They interpret what they hear in
light of their own attitudes and beliefs. They tend to eliminate what does
not fit and to reshape what does seem to fit, to make it fully confirm to their
preconceptions. This process is called selective perception. Everyone
practices it to some extent when they listen to new ideas.
If the listener finds that they consistently disagrees with the ideas, they
might reject the validity and truthfulness of the source and stop listening.
They are now practicing selective exposure: that is, listening only to
sources that have tended to reinforce their preconceptions.
Beware of selective retention - the final manner in which a new idea is
often distorted. Here a person remembers only what seems to fit their
existing structure of attitudes and beliefs. That which does not fit is
forgotten. Thus, new ideas are not acted upon because they are quickly
forgotten by the listener.
Conscious self-discipline and practice to overcome these obstacles are
essential to effective listening. A Field Supervisor should think of ways in
which a novel idea might work instead of rejecting the idea immediately.
They should understand the idea before evaluating it, and should try to
avoid such negatives as “It won’t work,” or “It’s been tried before.” The

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positive approach, “It may have possibilities: tell me more,” might turn an
ordinary suggestion into an unexpected treasure.

Listening to a Superior
Three difficulties often occur when a crew member listens to you.
• They might resent interference in an area for which they feel
responsible.
• They might welcome the suggestions or commands, but not fully
understand them.
• They might understand the recommended course of action, but
disagree with it.
In the first case, any suggestion you make might be interpreted by the crew
member as criticism of their present performance or, worse yet, a criticism
of themselves as a person. Usually, the crew member can do very little to
correct this feeling. Instead, the Field Supervisor must modify his message
and their manner of communicating. In the second case, if the crew
member is in doubt about what they are being asked to do, they should
repeat in their own words what they thinks they have been told. For
example, they might say, “To make certain that I don’t misunderstand, you
want me to.” Tell crew members to ask for more information even if it’s a
simple question they are in doubt about. The third situation requires a great
deal of tact. An effective Field Supervisor will give crew members plenty
of opportunity to express their opinions, to facilitate communication, and
to generate new and better ideas through discussion. Let them tell you
about their disagreements and give you specific reasons for it.

Dealing with Anger


When you’re dealing with someone who is angry, be sure to listen before
you talk. Let the person talk and try to understand them. Before you
respond to them, give sufficient thought to what they said. Many people
wrongly believe that hesitation and reflection are signs of weakness. They
take great pride in telling people off, especially in an emotional and angry
situation. This usually leads to further angry exchanges and frustrations,
which often become manifest in other forms of behavior.
Your reply depends on the nature of their complaint. But you could say, for
example, “This thing really has you upset,” and take it from there. Or you
could say, “You feel that you’ve been mistreated,” or, “You feel that you
shouldn’t do it because it’s not part of your job.” In any case, encourage
them to talk it out. Statements such as, “Don’t make a fool of yourself,” or
“You shouldn’t talk like that,” only add fuel to the fire. If they are angry
with you, say, “You feel I have been unfair,” or “You feel I’m being
unreasonable,” depending on the situation. The important thing is to

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respect their feelings and give them an opportunity to talk. You gain
control when you use this method properly.

Listening is an Art
Listening is an active, engaging process of working with the speaker to
develop ideas and achieve understanding. It requires concentration and a
focus of attention and energy. Field Supervisors must work actively in the
art of listening to be sure that what is said is fully understood.

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Chapter 4

Leadership

This chapter provides the basics of leadership skills. This is


a primary trait of the Field Supervisor.

Introduction
The goals of this section of the Reference Guide are:
• To give Field Supervisors an understanding of leadership.
• To examine the implications of this role and the relationship with
other INTEQ crew members.

Qualities of Good Leaders


There are four characteristics that are generally agreed upon that are
necessary for an individual to become a good leader:
• Intelligence
• Initiative
• Self-Confidence
• Helicopter Effect (raising others up to your level)

The Leader
Almost everyone placed in a leadership role will develop an approach to
leadership in which they feel comfortable. Some may be stern, remote and
formal while others may stress openness and informality.
Naturally, if the leader's approach is too inflexible it will only work in
particular circumstances. Flexibility is an important trait to learn.

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The Team
Different teams must be led in different ways. Logging crews are made up
of intelligent, university-educated, people who are likely to have their own
ideas of what should be done, and how it should be accomplished.
A crew that has been together for a reasonable amount of time will need
different treatment from a new one, or one which has seen a reasonable
number of changes.

The Situation
Teams in crisis have different needs from those running a smooth routine.
As a result, logging crews in different geographic locations, or drilling
situations will need varying styles of leadership.
They may be running with a technology that tends to dominates them, or
the resources which a team commands may be scarce.
Field Supervisors should recognize that the nature of good leadership
depends on a combination of their own inclinations, the make-up of their
team, and the situation they must manage.

Action Centered Leadership


The Field Supervisor's responsibilities for action can be described as:
• Performing the task
• Maintaining the team
• Developing and supporting the individuals.

Performing the Task


It is the Field Supervisor's job to ensure that the task which the group has
been given is performed to the best of their abilities.
It is important that the task is defined correctly, and not confused with the
Field Supervisor's, or other crew member's, perceptions of it.
• the leader must initiate and define the task.
• the leader must provide the group with needed information.
Members of the group generally have information which will be useful and
this resource should be sought by the Field Supervisor. To this end:
• Problems in performing the task must be analyzed
• Decisions must be made.
• Performance must be monitored and evaluated.

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Maintaining the Team


The reason teams are put together is because the tasks they have to perform
are beyond the means of the individuals.
A leader must ensure that the team works as a team, bringing the skills of
individuals to bear on the task, managing any conflict and building team
loyalty.
• It is the Field Supervisor's job to set the standards. It is not enough for
a crew to know what they are supposed to be doing. They need to
know what standards they are expected to achieve.
• Crews need values to guide what they do. Not everything at the
wellsite can be measured and defined. There must be reason and
consistency in the way tie-breaking decisions are made between
legitimate, but conflicting objectives.
• It is the example that the leader provides, much more than
exhortation, which is crucial in establishing values. If the Field
Supervisor shirks their responsibilities, the group will set its own
standards which may be at odds with the company's requirements.
• Consultation and involvement are essential ingredients in holding a
team together
• Conflicts often arise in groups of people working together to achieve a
common goal. These conflicts can produce richer ideas, but need to be
managed if they are not to become destructive.
Goals need to be clarified to resolve uncertainty, should it arise.

Develop and Support the Individuals


Crew members will have different skills, knowledge, and experience. What
one person sees as welcome encouragement may look like unwarranted
interference to another.
First line managers have the considerable advantage over those responsible
for larger groups in that it is possible for them to get to know each member
of their work groups very well.
As a result, the support and development of crew members will depend on
the Field Supervisor's individual style.

Management Style
It has been suggested that there are two types of behavior that a leader can
use in different amounts, at different times:
Directive Behavior
• Setting objectives for others

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• Deciding how the work should be done


• Issuing instructions for those doing it
• Organizing the resources needed
• Setting deadlines
• Stipulating working methods
• Checking performance
Supportive Behavior
• Seeking suggestions
• Encouraging problem solving
• Providing encouragement and praise
• Disclosing information
• Listening
• Communicating

Teamwork
General
It is important that Field Supervisors have an understanding of how teams
develop, the different roles that each crew member can play, and the
characteristics of effective teams.
The major characteristics of effective teams can be summarized as:
• Success
• Clear objectives
• Well defined individual roles
• Good Communications
• Growth and Development
• Good relationships, both inside and outside the team
In many industries, first line managers are usually responsible for teams
that are already established. It is commonplace within INTEQ; however,
for Field Supervisors to be given a group of people who have never worked
together before, and be asked to turn them into a team. It is also a fact that
some members of the logging crew will perhaps never meet each other
except on the heli-deck.

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An awareness of how teams develop is very important in turning those


individuals into an effective logging unit team. Most established crews are,
in part, a product of their own history. You will be familiar with the phrase,
“but we've always done it that way.” The reasons for that style of group
behavior needs to be understood in terms of team development.

Team Development
Teams will generally pass through four stages of development:
• Forming - There is, initially, some uncertainty about how to proceed.
Individuals will begin to assert themselves and attempt to impose their
own ideas on how the group should work.
• Storming - Working methods will not be established without
discussion and argument. At this stage there may be a certain amount
of conflict which, so long as it does not threaten to become
destructive, should be tolerated. The objectives and agreements that
emerge at the end of this stage are often more workable for having
evolved without the disagreement being suppressed. Some mistakes
which teams make at this stage are:
• Assuming that objectives are known and agreed upon
• Lack of planning
• Ignoring suggestions from quieter members of the group
• Norming - Eventually, some consensus will be reached. Initially, this
may be about how the group should work rather than the content of
decisions, which is based on shared values.
• Performing - It takes time and patience to get to this stage. It is,
though, the task of Field Supervisors to ensure that this is reached as
quickly as possible, since the INTEQ crew have, in reality, to start
performing from day one.
Do not expect the team to work immediately, because as teams form there
is inevitably a slight slow down as normalization occurs and personal
boundaries within the group are explored. Therefore, leaders can expect
pressure from their supervisors to “make that team work” as soon as
possible. Sometimes due to the strengths of the characters involved, some
groups do not work as a team. When this happens, show your leadership
and ask for assistance from the office. It may be necessary to change out
some group members in order for the group to work as a team.

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Individual Roles
Individual roles within a team are varied, but tend to fall into three distinct
categories:
• Doers - Are action-oriented and constantly urge the team to get on
with the task. They are concerned with what has to be done, rather
than how. They dislike waffle and tend to swing into action without
thinking things through thoroughly enough.
• Thinkers - Are good at producing carefully thought out ideas, from
themselves and others. They tend to be quiet and are often not listened
to.
• Carers - Are people-oriented and care about relationships within the
team. They are good at cheering people up, easing tensions, and
promoting harmony.
Good leaders will never fall exclusively into any of these groups. They will
embody the best aspects of each and be both a leader and a team member.

Characteristics of Effective Teams


The keys to producing effective teams are summarized below:
• Success
• Objectives
• Individual Roles
• Communications
• Growth
• Team Relationships
• External Relationships
Delegation
Most INTEQ crew members have talents, skills, and abilities that are never
used because of restricted views concerning who should do what type of
work. Involvement in decision making through delegation is an effective
way to use these untapped resources.
There should be no debate about whether to delegate or not, merely how
much and to whom. It is the only way to broaden your span of influence
beyond your ability to do the work yourself. Delegation is often the most
difficult part of good management, yet the ability to do so is one of the
most important tools Field Supervisors have, to ensure that their work is
done efficiently and effectively.

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How to Delegate
Delegation is both personal and individual. As such, it depends to a large
degree on the relationship between the Field Supervisor and the crew
members, together with their abilities and interest. Some general guide-
lines are:
• Delegate by results expected, not by method
• Set standards of performance
• Give adequate instruction and information beforehand
• Delegate only to qualified personnel, even if this means prior training
• Establish controls for ensuring performance standards

Getting Started
Initially, Field Supervisors must analyze their involvement in the work of
the crew. Three levels of work should be identified:
• Work that can only be done by the Field Supervisor
• Work that can be delegated immediately
• Work that can be delegated during the course of the well
Each crew member should then be evaluated for their own ability to take
extra responsibility. Typical questions might be:
• Do they have the ability and interest to do the work
• Have they done this type of work before
• If so, what was the outcome
• Was their performance adequate
If you have identified work that can be delegated, but that no one is ready
to perform, then you have identified a training need in your crew. Begin a
training program as soon as possible and proceed to delegate by degrees
until full delegation has been achieved.

Establishing Controls
Before delegation, Field Supervisors must provide performance standards
and controls. Crew members should be told what to do, but be left alone to
decide how to do it. Controls provide the opportunity to examine actual
performance against standards, and to subsequently take any action that is
necessary. Some controls might be:
• Personal Inspection
• Visual Displays (e.g. FEL Format)

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• Status Reports
• Crew Meetings

Conclusions
One of the most important effects of delegation is the feeling of self-
respect it gives the crew members. By delegating, the Field Supervisor is
making it clear that they believe the individual is capable of taking
increased responsibility.
The Field Supervisor also gets a direct benefit in that they have more time
to devote to planning future requirements, coordinating crew efforts,
developing new and better techniques, and establishing better relationships
with the client and contractor personnel.

Motivation
Why Do People Work
It is important for Field Supervisors to understand why people work and
what motivates them to perform, so they can successfully manage and
supervise the unit crew members effectively. Motivation is, of course, very
complex and varies for different individuals. Many theories have been put
forward to explain motivation and to identify the cause of that motivation.
Herzberg and Maslow are two of the most well known authors who will be
considered here and, along with Charles Handy who suggested that, when
deciding whether to take a particular action people consider:
• Their needs
• The result they think the action will bring about
• The extent to which they think the result will satisfy their needs

Certainties
There are two certainties that are worth considering:
• Belief: The way in which we treat each other at work is based on what
we believe about people. If we believe that people can, in general, be
trusted then we will tend to trust them. If we don't, then we won't.
Field Supervisors should remember this when responding to requests
to make their work groups more effective. People are quick to spot
attempts to secure their commitment by the cynical use of
motivational tricks, which will result in reduced, not enhanced
motivation.
• Philosophers Stone: In the early days of chemistry, philosophers
searched for a material that would turn base metal into gold. In the

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early days of the study of motivation, the search was on for the one
combination of psychological levers that would cause people to
joyfully work their fingers to the bone. The latter quest has long been
abandoned, and man is too complex to be enticed with one carrot.

Views of Motivation
There are three commonly held views on motivation:
• The Scientific View: Intuitively, we all know that most people
respond to rewards. However, the reward must be seen to be worth the
extra effort and it must be possible to measure the achievement so that
the reward may be fairly given.
• The Paternalistic View: A paternalistic approach may make people
happier, it may make recruitment easier and it may reduce attrition,
but it does not necessarily make them more productive.
• The Participative View: It is suggested that people are motivated by
having control over what they do. However, some people do not want
extra responsibility and technology can severely limit the scope for
increased decision making.
All these views are too simplistic on their own. Each individual probably
makes their own calculations concerning motivation, and these calculations
are probably very different for each person. Charles Handy has described a
motivation “calculus,” which contains needs, results, and instrumentality.

Needs
There have been many attempts to describe the needs which all individuals
have in their work supplies. The best known of these attempts is that of
Maslow, who produced a needs hierarchy as follows:
• Self Actualization needs
• Self Esteem needs
• Social needs
• Safety needs
• Physiological needs
Maslow suggests that as each need in the hierarchy is satisfied, the
individual turns to the needs at the next level.
Needs, therefore, only motivate when they are unsatisfied.

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Results
People have to be able to judge the effects and outcomes that will occur
from their additional efforts.

Instrumentality
Will the results meet the needs?
As well as being different from other people, each individual also has
differences and contradictions within themselves. For example,
independence is valued, but many people also want to belong to a group.
There are also external and internal forces that drive us, such as:
• Most people believe that they are above average performers
• Most people tend to attribute success to their own efforts and blame
others for failure.

The Field Supervisor's Role


The following list gives some of the concrete steps that Field Supervisors
can do to help motivate their crew.
• Communicate work targets
• Seek ideas on how to better perform the tasks
• Explore constraints
• Agree upon a strategy
• Provide feedback to the crew
• Seize opportunities
• Protect the group
• Address any problems that may arise
• Tackle the house keeping chores
• Talk to individuals both on and off tour
• Be positive
In order to do this successfully, Field Supervisors should remember the
following:
• Knowledge of the job: Everyone has to be clear about what is
important and what needs to be achieved.
• Ownership: The more interest and responsibility the job contains, the
more the person doing it will feel they own the job and the more
motivated they will be. However, ownership has to be real, some

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employees get all the interest and responsibility they need outside
work.
• Technology: May present real barriers to increasing job interest. Field
Supervisors have to be aware that if people are treated as if they have
no interest in their job, then that is what they will display.
• Provide reinforcement: You should be specific and have achievable
goals. Try to be unpredictable and get to know the individuals.

Conclusions
There is much that Field Supervisors can do to help motivate the crew.
However, motivation is a complex issue that is quite different for each
person. Herzberg's theory on motivation contains elements that are worth
reflecting upon:
Herzberg's Hygiene Factors Herzberg's Motivators
Working Conditions Promotion
Discomfort Achievement
Rules Recognition
Relationships Job Interest
People have to be able to judge the effects which their additional efforts
will produce.

Discipline And Grievance


Occasionally, someone in the crew will do something that requires
disciplinary action. It might be substandard performance, violation of a
request, rule or procedure, or some illegal act. Facing these kinds of issues
and handling them in a way that has a positive effect on crew performance
is a real challenge.
Any disciplinary action taken by Field Supervisors at the wellsite should be
detailed to the local operations/personnel department.

Types of Discipline
• Feedback can help your crew know how you view their performance.
• Coaching can substantially improve performance.
• Oral reprimands are required when an immediate change is
necessary. Be clear and specific, do not debate side issues and do not
be derogatory.

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• Written reprimands can be given when it is felt to be more


appropriate. This typically has more effect than an oral reprimand. It
is used for more severe problems, or when an oral reprimand has not
resulted in the necessary improvement. With any written reprimand,
specific deadlines and performance targets should be set and
monitored. Termination from the crew should be considered when it is
obvious that performance cannot be brought up to satisfactory levels,
or when client personnel lose confidence in the individual's ability to
perform.

General Guidelines
To increase the chances of getting positive results following disciplinary
action, the guidelines listed below may help:
• Be sure of the facts
• Listen
• Control your feelings
• Avoid entrapment
• Keep records
• Know the limits of your authority
• Keep superiors advised

Ensuring Fair Treatment


Five criteria can be used to evaluate fair disciplinary action. They are:
• Advance Warning
• Relate rules and orders to the business
• Investigate the facts
• Be equitable
• Match discipline to the offence

Conclusions
Discipline is a rational action by the Field Supervisor that helps correct
behavior that interferes with the crew achieving its purpose in an orderly
manner. The normal steps in the progression are:
• Feedback and Coaching

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• Oral Reprimand
• Written Reprimand
• Probation
• Termination

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•Notes•

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Chapter 5

Administration

This chapter deals with the administration of the logging


unit and the logging crew.

General
Field Supervisors are responsible for ensuring the smooth operation of the
logging unit and its personnel. These responsibilities include a certain
amount of administration and paperwork which provides an adequate flow
of information to the regional and district offices. It is also important to
maintain accurate records at the wellsite on personnel and equipment
movements, QA procedures, geological samples, and inventory requests.

Filing System
Field Supervisors are responsible for initiating and maintaining a filing
system in the logging unit to ensure that all the records listed above are
kept current and accessible. All documentation arriving at, or leaving the
wellsite should be filed in a manner that enables easy access to the
information, and which is understood by all members of the crew.

Personnel Records
Copies of the Personnel Status Report should be filed at the wellsite for
future reference. As detailed in Chapter 2, this report lists all movement of
logging crew personnel, trainees, and field service engineers to and from
the wellsite. It provides valuable back-up material for managers when
checking individuals' Monthly Time and Expense Form

Time and Expense Forms


Field Supervisors are responsible for checking and signing the monthly
Time and Expense forms submitted by each crew member.

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Crew changes and days spent at the wellsite should be verified with
reference to the Personnel Status Report, to make sure that there are no
anomalies. Travel and other refundable expenses should be checked
thoroughly, particularly with respect to those expenses incurred locally or
outside the employee's country of residence.
Ensure that receipts are included. Where taxis have been shared by two or
more people, ensure that only one claim is submitted. If any claims are
submitted that appear to be excessively large because of local conditions, a
note should be sent to the operations or personnel department explaining
the circumstances. It may not be possible to check all crew members forms
every month because of conflicting work schedules, but with some forward
planning it is possible to see most of them personally, or by the Field
Supervisor's designated deputy (assistant).

Bi-Monthly Inventory Requests


In order to maintain an adequate supply of spare parts and consumable
items, an inventory request is submitted to the regional INTEQ office on a
bi-monthly basis. Once the inventory request is received by the stores and/
or shipping department, it is logged and joins the queue of other inventories
currently being processed. The inventory is checked by a senior field
service engineer, in order to verify part numbers, deleted or non-applicable
items, on-hand requirements etc. The required items are then located in
stores and packed ready for shipment.
Certain restricted articles may require special arrangements to be made
before being shipped. In some areas, certain chemicals, computer material,
or other restricted items may be better purchased locally. You should check
with your local operations office for advice on this. Once the required
items have been packed they are made ready for shipment. Notification is
sent to the wellsite giving details of date, method and expected arrival of
the shipment, and any shipping agents that may be involved.
When the inventory is received at the wellsite it should be checked to
ensure that all the requested items have been included. There will be times
when items are out of stock. Make note of items not included and reorder
them. Even though it is INTEQ practice that any out of stock items will be
automatically back-ordered, do not assume this. The receipt of shipment
form should be completed and returned to the regional INTEQ office
without delay. It should normally take no longer than fourteen days from
receipt of the inventory request form at the regional office to dispatch of
the goods. There will normally be some further delay before receipt at the
wellsite depending on geographical location and other logistical problems.
It should not normally be necessary to request shipment of spare parts,
chemicals, or other consumable items at times other than during the bi-
monthly inventory request.

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There may be occasional circumstances, due to the failure of a piece of


equipment for example, when an emergency shipment or hand-carry may
have to be made. Please bear in mind that such emergency shipments and
hand carries are expensive and take shipping, stores, and engineering
personnel away from their routine duties, which creates a good deal of
extra administration and paperwork. Such request should only be made for
emergency reasons and never for routine spares or consumables.

Shipping Procedures
Field Supervisors are responsible for maintaining records of all goods that
are shipped to or from the wellsite. They should be aware of all relevant
shipping agents and have their addresses, telephone, fax, telex, and out of
hours contact information readily at hand. When returning goods to the
local or regional INTEQ office, they should ensure that:
• Full Commercial Invoices (CI) accompany all shipments and copies
are kept at the wellsite
• The correct address of the recipient is listed on the CI. This may be a
shipping agent, not the INTEQ office.
• Anti-boycott laws are not infringed upon.
• Part numbers and serial numbers of all equipment are included. This is
necessary to maintain worldwide equipment tracking records and to
comply with import/export laws.

Quality Assurance
Policy
Full Quality Assurance procedures have been established in order to ensure
INTEQ's contractual obligations to its clients and to provide for the health
and safety of its employees.
Field Supervisors are responsible for implementing these procedures at the
wellsite and for ensuring full compliance at all times. During periods away
from the wellsite, a senior crew member should be designated to assume
these responsibilities.
To ensure that the system is structured to meet INTEQ requirements all
employees are encouraged to offer input into the expansion and
maintenance of the Quality System.

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Job Instruction
Information on all aspects of production, operation, maintenance or repair
of all INTEQ equipment is covered by clear and detailed instructions.
These instructions can be in the form of manuals (for equipment
operation), technical drawings and specifications (for production and
repair), detailed procedures covering manuals and drawings (for overhaul
and maintenance), and Inspection and Test procedures (for acceptance of
new or repaired equipment).
Certain types of equipment or activity will require specific job instructions
to be produced and these will be highlighted as additional QA plans. Once
produced, these instructions must be approved by the relevant supervisor
before the procedure is used.
For all field operations, detailed instructions are available as to how the
formation evaluation process is performed. These instructions are
presented during training of field personnel.
Due to the nature of the field work performed by INTEQ, it is important
that correct actions are taken to prevent dangerous incidents. It is also
important that field personnel have access to information regarding
reporting of incidents while on drilling or completion locations. To help
field personnel make valid judgements, INTEQ issues to each unit a set of
“action/reaction” notes for certain critical occurrences.

Control Procedures
To ensure that the level of service provided by INTEQ is meeting the
desired quality, detailed control procedures are in place to complement the
work instructions detailed above.
These procedures ensure that specific routines, which are often required by
clients and authorities, are carried out regularly to enable the level of
service to be monitored and controlled. Methods used within the INTEQ
field operations include:
• Daily Equipment Status Reports
• Weekly Activation of Gas Sensors
• Monthly Equipment Maintenance Reports
• Monthly Safety Reports
• First Alert
These reports form the basis of the information flow between the field
operators and the support staff, and as such are fundamental to the
improvement of service quality.

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Control methods used internally within the support functions include:


• Stage and final inspection for unit overhaul and build.
• Monitoring of all contractual aspects during the production or
overhaul cycle.
• Formal acceptance of the completed unit or tool to ensure that the
product will meet customer expectations.
• Records of all activities which have a bearing on product quality.
• Use of detailed check-out and acceptance procedures for key parts of
equipment.

Documentation Control
In order to have confidence in the information available to all INTEQ staff,
a system of documentation control exists. Company-wide documentation is
distributed and updated by INTEQ, Inc. in Houston, Texas. They publish
lists of the latest revisions of manuals, procedures, and drawings on a
periodic basis.
These master lists are distributed to each entity office and a printout
produced. Evaluation of this information is performed by the responsible
person in each location to ensure that the status level of information is
correct.

Verification and Approval of New Company Documents


All equipment released for production or subsequently revised must have
the associated engineering documentation approved by the Engineering
Review Board. This Board comprises representatives of the Q.A., R&D,
Marketing, Field Support, Purchasing, and Production Sections. Entity
office representatives are on the distribution list for releases.

Manual Tracking and Changes


Each Department Supervisor maintains a record of all serialized manuals
issued under their control, together with revision level. They are
responsible for ensuring these documents are updated, as revisions become
available.
Company-wide manuals have the following change records:
• Transfer - Each serialized manual includes a transfer document for
logging the current assignee and method for tracking any subsequent
reallocation.
• Revision Record - Lists all changes to the manual together with
affected pages or sections.

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Regional manuals such as the QA manual are controlled by the Senior


Quality Engineer. Records are maintained for all assigned copies so that
periodic updates are issued to the responsible person.

Field Documentation Changes


In support of the above system, it is important that field staff are informed
of documentation changes that may affect the work being performed. Such
information takes the following format:
• Field Support Bulletins: Which provide basic details about the
changes and the terms of design or procedure.
• Field Change Orders: These give detailed instructions for changing
equipment. Where critical, these orders require the acknowledgment
of the field change to be returned to the Corporate Office.
• Manual Updates: The updated pages replace the old in each manual.
An acknowledgment of change being written on the revision record at
the front of each manual.

Shipping
All items which leave the workshop or stores for shipment are to be
properly packaged by the stores organization taking into account the means
of transport, the expected handling, and the route and destination.
Allowance must also be made for specific handling requirements (e.g.,
chemicals).
The Senior Storeman is to be informed of any changes or special
circumstances which have an impact on any aspect of the shipping
procedures. These changes will be approved by the relevant supervisor
with assistance from the Senior QA Engineer.
Packaging will at all times take into account the type of equipment being
shipped, and the stores organization will liaise with the Traffic Supervisor,
and if necessary, the supplier to ensure that the level of product quality is
preserved.
All shipments which leave an entity office are to be accompanied by a
commercial invoice which gives full details of the shipment’s contents,
thereby making shortages traceable, and providing information to the
computer-based Inventory Management System.
Upon receipt of the product within the field, information will be sent back
to the shipping department with details concerning the condition of goods.
This will enable the packing to be modified to suit conditions in the field.

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Inspection Status

Field Surface Equipment


Inspection of all items that could affect product quality is to be performed
in order to confirm suitability. All items will be identified to show the
inspection status of the item. This is achieved by using IDENT labels and
the appropriate inspection and test checksheets.

Surface Equipment Checksheets


The relevant checksheets should accompany all equipment through the
various stages of production and assembly. These are attached to, or are
placed with the item, inside a plastic bag. Each inspection stage has a sign
off section for the engineer or technician who is performing the task and
also for QC approval. Product will not be accepted for further processing
until the previous stage has been completed.

Surface Equipment Inspection


The following IDENT tags are used to show the status of the equipment,
while at the CSC (Customer Service Center). Many times, whenever a
service engineer assists in the rig-up of a logging unit, the engineer will
remove all tags from the equipment.
• TESTED TAG (GREEN) This tag indicates that the item is tested
and accepted for use. Once this tag is completed and affixed, the item
is deemed fit for use without further inspection.
• REJECTED TAG (RED) This tag indicates that the item has been
tested or inspected and found to be unfit for use.
• SPECIAL REMARKS TAG (WHITE) This tag is used where the
inspection status of an item is in a state pending action or special
attention before use (e.g. quarantine). An example of its use is for an
item which is out of standard specification and is awaiting further
tests or information before sanctioning as accept or reject.
• CALIBRATED TAG (BLACK) This tag is affixed to INTEQ test
equipment and also, if applicable, to fully calibrated equipment
offshore. The label states when the next calibration is due.
• BLUE / ORANGE TAG This is the customs tag in use in the CSC
(Customer Service Center).
If equipment is not accompanied by either paperwork or a tag, it is assumed
to be awaiting inspection.

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Administration Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Field Equipment Inspection Status


Items within the field, that are a critical part of the services provided, must
be identified to ensure that the field crew are aware of the status of the
equipment at all times.
Use is made of the reports to highlight the requirement for inspection and
test. Once completed it is important that the equipment status be recorded
and signed within the relevant section of the form. If this is not possible,
then the item should be marked with the labels as defined above.
All equipment should, therefore, be recorded and be individually marked to
reflect its status.

Quality Records

Unit Service and Support


Records are maintained of all information regarding logging unit service
and support, including rig-up reports, details of components shipped,
records of inventory issue and receipt, copies of non-conformance reports,
daily, weekly, monthly equipment reports, and general correspondence.
Retention of these records shows historical activity within that unit and
may aid future engineering visits.

Field Quality Records


Records of all activities within the field which affect the quality of service
are maintained by each logging unit crew. These include copies of all
reports concerning equipment status and the overall level of service to the
client. These records, combined with the support records in each office,
enable deficiencies to be highlighted and corrected.

Equipment Movement Records


Movement of all items within INTEQ is under the control of a
computerized stock management system. Use is also made of the
Equipment Tracking System which allows items to be recorded and traced
within the field.

Retention of Records
All records shall be maintained in accordance with INTEQ policy.
Exceptions to this will be with the agreement of the Senior Manager in
each area. Certain records may also be required by the client and
contractual requirements for document retention will be invoked if longer
than the INTEQ policy statement.

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Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Administration

First Alert Reporting System


At any time during the work period of the logging unit, if an item is found
to be defective, it shall be noted using the First Alert reporting System (see
Chapter 6).
This reporting system is designed to highlight to the entity engineering
support function any problem that is affecting the level of service supplied
to the client. It can also be used to report matters affecting safety and other
general problems with that logging unit.
All field staff are encouraged to use First Alert with the intention of
ensuring good communication between the field and the engineering
section of the entity offices.
The First Alert Report should also be completed by the unit crew for
problems that they have solved within the unit. This will enable the
engineering department to distribute solutions to other units and will also
stand as a permanent record of all defects and solutions within the
individual logging unit.

Advice on First Alert


All employees are encouraged to use the First Alert Reporting System to
report non-conformances in products or procedures to the corporate office,
if they have control over such products or procedures.
Much of the research and design work performed by INTEQ originates
from these documents and therefore great emphasis should be placed on
their proper completion and use.

Concessions Arising from Non-Conformance


Where a non-conformance is noted that would not affect the overall
performance or quality of the finished item, this non-conformance maybe
acceptable providing a concession application is completed.
This concession will contain sufficient information about the fault to
enable a valid engineering decision to be made and will concern itself with
all matters affecting safety, fit, form, function, certification, etc.
The decision on whether an item is deemed usable operationally while non-
conforming, must be recorded on the above form and lies with the
Supervisor of the relevant department and entity engineering manager. In
the cases of doubt, the Senior Q.A. Engineer should be consulted.

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750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Administration Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Corrective Action

Internal Corrective Action: Repair and Overhaul


Once a non-conformance has been raised for repair and overhaul, it is
important that the necessary corrective actions are taken. The format of the
First Alert report allows for follow up action to be recorded within the
form. This information will be reviewed on a regular basis, allowing a list
of non-conformances to be produced which can be distributed to other
entity engineering functions to try to prevent recurrence and to make all
staff aware of the corrective actions taken.

Field Corrective Action


Once a non-conformance has been raised in the field, it is important that
the necessary corrective actions be taken. The format of the field First Alert
Report allows for follow up action to be recorded on the form. This
information will be reviewed by the responsible Engineering Supervisor
who will make arrangements for sending replacement equipment, give
advice, and/or send a Service Engineer to the rig, as appropriate. Upon
completion of the repair work, the Service Engineer tests and, where
necessary, calibrates the equipment. If the equipment cannot be repaired
offshore expediently, it is replaced and the faulty equipment returned to the
entity Office.
In order to ensure that field First Alert Reports are logged correctly and are
resolved by the entity engineering function, a report is produced to show
the amount of incidents outstanding. This report highlights the non-
conformances and allows discussions to take place to agree the corrective
actions that must be taken.

Final Inspection of Geological Reports and Data


All logs prepared by INTEQ crews are inspected by the Field Supervisor,
or their representative, on board the rig before being handed over to the
client. The Field Supervisor, or their representative, ensures that the
standards regarding the logs conforms to that laid down in the Applications
Manual, which is kept in each logging unit.
The quality of the log directly reflects the service provided to our clients by
the SLS (Surface Logging System) Product Line. Any failure in this matter
may have to be rectified by the Field Supervisor at their own time (and
possible expense).
Final Well Reports are checked by the Field Supervisor, or their
representative, before being sent to the entity office. Staff Geologists in the
Regional office check the reports and arrange for copying and binding.
Reports and logs are then returned to the entity office for onward shipment

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Administration

to the client. When the client confirms acceptance of the copies, the master
set is then forwarded.

Quality Control Guidelines


The following guidelines outline the main areas of responsibility for
Quality Control at the wellsite:
Unit Position: The unit must be positioned in a safe, accessible, area close
to the rig floor and shale shakers. There should be at least 1 meter (3 feet)
of space all around the unit and there should be reasonable means of escape
from both the main door and the escape hatch.
Unit Exterior: The unit exterior should be kept clean and periodically
inspected for damage.
Lines and Sensors: These should be inspected regularly to ensure that they
are installed neatly, safely, and comply with all applicable regulations.
Unit Interior: The unit interior should be kept clean and tidy. The floor
and work-surfaces should be kept free of mud and dirt. Table tops should
not be cluttered. There should be no posters on the wall except for
operational fact sheets, diagrams, or sample lists. The unit is an area where
professional work is being done and must look like it.
Equipment: All pieces of equipment should be in operational order. Non-
Conformance reporting has been detailed in Chapter 6. Field Supervisors
should also ensure that all operational conditions are met, that calibrations
are properly performed, and that all crew members are familiar with all
equipment operating procedures.
Logging and Sampling Requirements: All crew members should be
familiar with the logging and sampling requirements.
• Sample bags should be marked, with waterproof pens, well in
advance. Labelling of bags should conform to client requirements.
• Sample collection and processing should be monitored to ensure that
it is being done correctly.
• Lag time calculations should be made regularly and carbide checks
made as frequently as possible.
• Oil and Gas show evaluation procedures and requirements should be
detailed and adhered to.
• Procedures on encountering drill breaks and pit volume changes
should be discussed with the client and detailed to each crew member.
• Sample manifests and shipping details should be made and recorded.
• Storage of samples at the wellsite should be checked.

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750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Administration Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Logs:
• Worksheets should be completed neatly and accurately.
• Log formats should be agreed with the client and adhered to at all
times.
• All logs should be accurate and neat.
• All abbreviations should be consistent.
• Logs should contain all the required information.
• Lithology information should correspond to gas and ROP data.
• Scales should be appropriate.
• Logs should be kept up to date as much as operations allow.
• All crew members should be aware of the number of log copies
required and when they should be presented to the client.
Client Reports: These should be presented accurately and neatly at the
times requested by the client
INTEQ Reports: These should be presented accurately and neatly at the
end of each month, signed by the client representative at the wellsite.
Personnel: The Field Supervisor is responsible for maintaining work
standards of all crew members, training new and experienced personnel,
and providing feedback on performance to the local and regional INTEQ
operations/personnel and training departments.

Final Well Report Preparation


Field Supervisors are responsible for ensuring that the Final Well Report is
completed according to the guidelines laid down by the local INTEQ
operations department. The report should be written as the well progresses
and should include input from all crew members. It should be prepared on
the logging unit word processing equipment, if available, and be presented
as hard copy and disks to the local INTEQ office for checking, binding,
and presentation to the client. All logs, plots, and printouts should be
included.
Failure to supply a complete Final Well Report may be deemed
unacceptable by the local office and corrective action may be requested of
the Field Supervisor in the local office during their field breaks or time-off.

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Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Chapter 6

First Alert

This chapter describes INTEQ’s First Alert reporting


system and how it relates to the Field Supervisors
responsibilities at the wellsite.

Introduction
FIRST Alert is INTEQ’s worldwide system for identifying, responding to,
and analyzing incidents. It is a simple, user friendly computerized system
designed to eliminate duplicate paperwork and the costs associated with
maintaining older systems. FIRST Alert provides its primary users,
Operations, Marketing, and Engineering with an integrated, global
perspective on the types of problems occurring in the field.
To reduce field failures, it is essential that they are recognized and
reported. FIRST Alert is part of a systematic attack on when, where, why,
and how problems occur. The information gathered through FIRST Alert
will aid in efforts to assess the root causes of incidents and develop means
for eliminating them. FIRST Alert is a tool to facilitate continuous
improvement in performance through the proper notification, investigation,
documentation, and evaluation of all incidents.

How Does FIRST Alert Work


An observer reports an “Incident” or “Near Miss” which fits the criteria
established in the incident definition. The details of the incident are
recorded on either the FIRST Alert Field Incident Report form or, if
available, on a computer on the FIRST Alert “Site” version software.
The observer reports this incident to the appropriate supervisor/
coordinator who, if possible, resolves the incident. The incident
information is then relayed to the designated local system administrator by

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First Alert Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

whatever means available. This can be done by phone, modem, fax, or


electronic mail.
The local FIRST Alert administrator acknowledges receipt of the incident
and enters the information on the local FIRST Alert database, via the
FIRST Alert “OPS” software. If the incident has not been resolved and is a
“Request for Help,” the administrator notifies a designated caseworker.
The local caseworker responds and attempts to resolve the incident by
using whatever resources available.
The intention of INTEQ is to develop a Quality Assurance system which
conforms fully to all recognized standards including BS5750/ISO9000
documents. Conformance with these publications represents minimum
standards and, where applicable, specified contract requirements will be
applied to attain the desired level of quality. This system is for use by the
employees of INTEQ and their clients.
This policy will apply to all employees of INTEQ and to all persons or
organizations engaged to carry out work on behalf of the company.
It is the policy of INTEQ to provide services of the highest quality to its
clients. All equipment and services supplied by INTEQ are to be inspected
and monitored in accordance with a formal Quality Assurance System.
This system provides for the inspection, testing, and monitoring of quality.
Quality Assurance procedures will cover all aspects of goods and services
provided by INTEQ. This will include goods manufactured by suppliers
outside of INTEQ, and also services which are provided to clients on a long
term basis. The Quality Assurance System, which details all procedures,
routines, and standards, is defined by the “Quality Assurance Manual”.

Responsibilities
It is the responsibility of the Regional Manager to ensure that the Quality
Assurance system is being implemented. This responsibility, which may be
delegated to either an Area Manager or the most senior manager in each
location, is to ensure that the day to day activities are conforming to the
requirements as defined in the “Quality Assurance Manual”.
Each designated manager will appoint an individual as responsible for the
Quality activities in their area. This individual will have direct access to the
designated Manager, or to the most senior manager in the company. This
communication link ensures that matters affecting the quality of the
services and goods provided by the company receive effective attention.

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Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems First Alert

First Alert Field Incident Report Form


Date: Time: JDE Job #: Doc. Type:
Reporting Incident Follow Up
Name: Name:
Phone: Phone:
Fax: Fax:
Network: Network:
Mail-ID Mail-ID
Business Unit: Area:
Region: District:
Operator Field
Lease/Block
Client: Well Name/No.
Classification Impact:
Sub Class 1: Status:
Sub Class 2: Specific Action
Sub Class 3:
Problem: Locale
Prob Sub. 1:
Subject:
Description

Details
Suggestion

Resolution

Customer Contact at Wellsite Customer Contact at Office


Name Name
Phone Phone
Fax Fax
Additional Incident Cost Rig Downtime Hours:
Rig Cost per Day ($):

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750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
First Alert Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Recording an Incident on the Field Incident Report


The following definitions of the Field Incident Report fields have been
included to ensure that the information is recorded accurately. Most of the
required information needs no explanation. It is important to use the
definitions and categories included here when documenting the type of
problem and product associated with any incident.
1. DATE: Fill in the date when the incident occurred.
2. TIME: Fill in the time at which the incident occurred.
3. JDE JOB #: Fill in the 5-digit JDE job number (if applicable).
4. DOC. TYPE: Fill in the two-letter JDE document code (if
applicable).
5. REPORTING INCIDENT: Fill in the name, phone number,
and fax number of the INTEQ employee who reported the
incident (known as the observer). In the Network space, specify
whether or not the person can receive messages via e-mail (“e-
mail” or “Not on a Network”). If the person reporting can receive
e-mail, then provide the correct e-mail recognized name in the
Mail-ID space.
6. FOLLOW UP: Fill in the name, phone number, and fax number
of the observer’s supervisor/coordinator. In the Network space,
specify whether or not the person can receive messages via E-
mail (“e-mail” or “Not on a Network”). If the follow-up person
can receive e-mail, then provide the correct e-mail recognized
name in the Mail-ID space.
The coordinator is the link between field personnel and the
INTEQ office. The supervisor fulfills a similar function in the
maintenance depot/workshop. The coordinator/supervisor is
responsible for the following:
• ensuring that field/workshop personnel report all relevant
information on all incidents;
• ensuring the accuracy of the information in the report;
• verifying all information relating to cost;
• forwarding incidents to the local system administrator if the
observer is unable to do so;
• establishing the “Request for Help” criteria with the caseworker;
• ensuring that feedback gets to the observer if the observer cannot
be contacted by e-mail.

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems First Alert

7. BUSINESS UNIT: Fill in the business unit, region, area, and


district in the spaces provided.
8. OPERATOR: If an incident affects a customer, fill in the
customer’s information (Operator and Client) in the spaces
provided.
9. WELL DATA: Fill in the well location information (Field,
Lease/Block, and Well Name/ No.).
10. CLASSIFICATION: Fill in the appropriate classification for
the incident. The Sub Class should be completed to the lowest
available level. If a particular tool/option is not available, use the
next highest sub class. This is the space where the specific
product or system can be identified. The classification of
products and systems is arranged using a main product line
category with three sub categories for further clarification. For
example:
Classification: Evaluation
Sub Class 1: Product Line (SLS)
Sub Class 2: Service (DrillByte)
Sub Class 3: Component (Block Height)
The technology groups, wellbore construction group, and HS&E
have been divided into a similar category structure.
11. IMPACT: Fill in the incident’s impact at the time it was
reported using the definitions listed below.
Client Aware - Well Delayed: Immediate action is needed to
resolve the incident as the client is unable to proceed with the
wellsite operations.
Client Aware - Well Not Delayed: Action is needed to resolve the
incident. However, wellsite operations are continuing and/or
were not affected.
Client Unaware - Well Not Delayed: Action is needed to resolve
an incident. However, wellsite operations are continuing and/or
were not affected.
Near Miss: A situation was observed or existed that could have
caused an incident and all personnel should be made aware of it.
Notable Success: Used to call attention to an incident where
INTEQ has had noteworthy success. The experience is valuable
and needs to be documented and communicated to all personnel.

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750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
First Alert Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

12. STATUS: Provide the incident’s status at the time it was


reported using the definitions listed below.
Closed Out: Incident has been fully resolved and no action is
required from other personnel. The incident report must be fully
completed and include a description of the incident, how it was
resolved, and the steps necessary to prevent recurrence.
Request for Help (RFH): The observer or the follow-up person
requires assistance in resolving the incident. The observer must
always contact the supervisor/coordinator and review the
incident in an attempt to resolve it. The supervisor’s input may
be sufficient to resolve the incident so that it can be submitted as
“Closed Out” (as per closure standards).
If an incident cannot be resolved either locally or within the
region, an RFH can be submitted to the local system
administrator who can route it to the most appropriate area of
technical expertise such as the local maintenance facility,
Customer Service Center (CSC) or Technical Services.
13. SPECIFIC ACTION: When a “Request for Help” is selected,
fill in the Specific Action space using the appropriate definitions
listed below. This communicates what help is actually needed
and provides the caseworker who is assigned to the incident with
clear instructions on what the needs are. If more than one specific
action is required, then select the primary need here and fill in the
additional action(s) in the Suggestion space.
Inter-Facility Product Returns: Action is requested for
disposition of products that are discrepant. A statement of
disposition is needed concerning field returns, scrapped parts
adjustments, or warranties. This includes returns to vendors.
Equipment/Parts/Procedures: Due to operational circumstances,
action is required to provide additional equipment/parts/
procedures to meet contractual obligations. Such requests are
normally handled by the local operations support/supply base,
but can also be used to communicate problems to other internal
suppliers.

Note: FIRST Alert is not to be used to replace normal ordering


procedures for equipment or supplies.

New Product: A review and decision is required concerning an


idea for a new product or service. The review should be
performed at the Operations level first, and then valid, innovative
ideas can be sent to Marketing (Technical Services).

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Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems First Alert

Note: No new product or service suggestion will be considered


by Marketing if it is not accompanied by a completed
CPD form. This is available as an Excel spreadsheet on
the Network Bulletin Board for Concurrent Product
Development.

Problem Analysis/Labwork: Analysis is required to determine


the failure cause of a product, system, or software. The analysis
may involve physical inspection to be done either at a
maintenance facility or laboratory, depending on the incident
circumstances.
Product/Service Enhancement: A review and decision is required
concerning a suggestion to improve a product or service. The
review should be performed at the Operations level first, and
then valid, innovative ideas can be sent to Marketing (Technical
Services).
Technical Advice/Documentation: Technical advice or
documentation is required either to resolve an incident or to
notify the rest of the organization of a technical situation that
needs attention, or is a potential problem.
14. PROBLEM: Complete the Problem category and the
appropriate Sub Class using the definitions listed below.
HS&E: Any incident where wellbore construction equipment or
software or the performance of processes/procedures/operations
to support products does not meet Baker Hughes INTEQ’s
Health, Safety, and the Environment Standards. Identify the
product line associated with the HS&E incident by filling the
information in the HS&E Problem Sub Class space from the list
below:
Coil Tubing Surveying
Coring Multi-Lateral
Drilling MWD
Fluids Non-Service Related
Surface Logging Re-Entry
Product: Product problems include any incident where wellbore
construction equipment or software does not meet Baker Hughes
INTEQ’s technical expectations.
Application: Product was not capable of or suitable for the
job with which it was used, e.g., using a low

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750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
First Alert Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

temperature tool in a high temperature well or a


non-inhibitive mud in a reactive shale wellbore.
Configuration: Product was configured incorrectly for the
manner in which it was used or deployed.
Damage: Product was damaged and would not function
properly.
Defect: Product manufactured did not meet design
standards.
Electrical: Electrical failure of product.
Mechanical: Mechanical failure of product.
Maintenance: Problem associated with the product
maintenance system.
Performance: Product did not perform as expected, even
though it was operated within specified
operating parameters.
Software: Product failure due to software bug.
Unconfirmed: Subsequent technical investigation cannot
reproduce a problem experienced at the
wellsite.
Service: Service problems including any incident where the
performance of processes/procedures/operations to support
products does not meet Baker Hughes INTEQ’s technical
expectations.
Billing/ A problem with documents used in the
Purchasing: billing and purchasing process.
Client A problem caused by poor or lack of
Communication: communication with clients.
Documentation: The information provided to support the
wellbore construction process was incorrect.
Data Management problem of produced or support
Management: data.
Equipment/ Wellbore construction equipment
Technical or material information needs not met.
Support:
Human Error: A genuine mistake has caused an incident.
Integrated A problem with integrating wellbore
Services: construction services.

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Logistics: Late or wrong delivery of equipment or


service. This includes all logistics issues.
Responsiveness: A problem in responding to changing
circumstances.
Third Party A problem with a third-party vendor
Service: providing services to INTEQ.
Training: The inability to perform the job function due to
improper or lack of training.
Wellsite A problem with executing
Execution/ service due to wellbore situations or
Procedures: conditions.
15. LOCALE: Provide the locale where the incident was observed
(i.e., Rigsite, INTEQ Facility, During Transit, Client’s Office, or
Manufacturing/Engineering).
16. SUBJECT: Fill in the Subject space using the guidelines below:
For non-MWD incidents, fill in the Subject space with a brief
title describing the nature of the incident. Whenever possible, the
description in the Subject space should include Tool Size/Type/
Serial Number and Type of Failure.
e.g. 11-1/4 Navidrill M1P/HF #123456 - stator chunked 12-1/4
Adjustable Stabilizer #233333 - unable to set
For MWD incidents, complete as follows: Job #, Run #, Hours to
Failure, Failed Module, Serial #, and Failure Code (e.g., "NOR
616 Run 2 @ 15,4 MNP 6412 606").
17. DESCRIPTION: Fill in a full and complete description of the
incident in the Description space provided. You must provide as
much technical detail as possible so that any investigation into
the incident can be commenced immediately without the need for
further communication with the observer.

Note: If you are reporting an incident, all necessary technical


details must be reported by completing the appropriate
additional incident information.

18. DETAILS: The details of the incident should be recorded in a


consistent manner using the Failure Information report. The
additional detail information is required for Evaluation/MWD,
Drilling/NaviDrill, and HS&E incidents. Complete the additional
report as applicable.

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First Alert Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

19. SUGGESTION: In the Suggestion space, provide any ideas or


suggestions you may have for resolving the incident or for
preventing any recurrence.
20. RESOLUTION: When reporting an incident which has been
resolved, fill in the Resolution space with all necessary technical
details of how you managed to resolve the incident. Wherever
possible, structure your resolution to address the following
topics:
• Cause of failure
• Probability of recurrence
• Action required to prevent similar failures
• Action taken
• Rationale for closure of incident
21. CUSTOMER CONTACTS: Complete the details (name, phone
number, and fax number) of the client's representative at the
wellsite and the client’s office. This information is necessary for
updating the client of the steps being taken to resolve the
incident.
22. ADDITIONAL INCIDENT COST ($): If you are aware of any
additional costs incurred by INTEQ as a direct result of the
incident, fill in the appropriate cost fields. (However, do not
include the cost to the client.) All cost information must be in
$US. Cost data is mandatory for all incidents. The observer or
person completing the incident report must estimate the cost of
the incident based on the information available.
Incident cost must include all additional costs to INTEQ for
resolving the incident (e.g., manhours for investigation, internal
and external rental costs, shipping additional/replacement parts,
preparing failure reports/manhours for analysis, etc.).

Note: Unbooked revenue is not part of the incident cost.

23. RIG DOWNTIME HOURS: Fill in the rig downtime hours as a


consequence of the incident. This information is normally
available from the operator/drilling contractor’s daily reports.
24. RIG COST PER DAY ($): Fill in the Rig Cost per Day ($). This
can usually be obtained from the client’s representative at the
wellsite.

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems First Alert

First Alert Standards


Baker Hughes INTEQ have several guidelines and standards which can be
used for reference. These have been published by the First Alert Group and
are available from Technical Publications or can be downloaded from BHI
On-line or Internet. Those available are:
• “FIRST Alert SITE Guidelines” (P/N 750-500-050) - This is a users
guide to the “SITE” electronic incident reporting software which will
be used to document all incidents for the FIRST Alert Database.
• “FIRST Alert OPS Guidelines” (P/N 750-500-054) - This is the
“OPS” database software users guide that will be used by all INTEQ
personnel to process, view, respond and resolve incidents.
• “Field Users Manual” (P/N 750-500-053) - This report is used to
document incidents by all employees that do not currently have access
to a computer and the FIRST Alert SITE software.
In addition to the above manuals, there are two publications outlining the
standards behind FIRST Alert. They are:
• FIRST Alert: Roles & Standards (FA960223.ppt) - a PowerPoint
presentation
• FIRST Alert “Approved Practices” (P/N 750-500-052)

SLS Familiarization
The Field Supervisor should be familiar with these standards and
guidelines. Once familiar with FIRST Alert, the Field Supervisor can
ensure that all wellsite incidents are correctly reported to the FIRST Alert
database. They will also be able to track any incidents progress and
monitor their resolution.
When fully conversant with FIRST Alert, the Field Supervisor will be able
to explain the system and its procedures to the logging crew.
In addition, the Field Supervisor should familiarize themselves with First
Alert database interrogation facilities. They can then find out the recent
problems (local and world-wide) which involve the clients before jobs start
up. Remember - Forewarned is better than Forearmed!

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First Alert Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

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Chapter 7

Training

This chapter details the methods to be used by the field


Supervisor in providing On-the-Job Training (OJT) to
members of the Surface logging crew.

General
Training is an important responsibility of every Field Supervisor. They
may not actually train each member of the crew, but they must see that
each is trained.
Training responsibilities fall into three categories:
• Orientation to the company and crew for new employees
• Training in the knowledge and skills required to do the present job
successfully
• Training in the knowledge and skills required to advance in the
company
Each is important. However, orienting new employees and seeing that all
members of the crew know how to do their present job take priority.

Orienting New Employees


An employee’s first hitch on the rig is an opportunity to set a positive tone
and thereby avoid problems that might occur later. The way an employee is
treated during this period conveys an impression of you and the company.
Prepare in advance to make a positive impression.
Do not keep a new employee waiting. If you are busy at the start of your
shift, assign someone else to meet the new person and cover the following
points. When time permits, get acquainted and welcome the trainee to your
crew.

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Training Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Points to cover during this initial orientation are:


1. The Rig - Make sure the trainee has first completed all necessary
documentation and site entry procedures.
2. Hours of Work - Explain starting and stopping times, how much
time is allowed for overlap at the end of the shift, and what are
the rules concerning leaving the unit and meal periods. Since
shift work is involved, must the trainee stay on duty until
relieved? What are the rules on overtime? What about days off,
and do they change? Are schedules subject to change? What are
the rules on reporting no-shows or absences.
3. Facilities - It is helpful to have a tour of the rig. Point out:
• Location of INTEQ sensors
• Location of Pit Room, Shale Shakers, etc.
• Washrooms and Locker facilities
• Recreation Rooms
• First-aid and Evacuation Stations
• Galley facilities
• Location of Tools and Supplies
• Smoking areas
• Use of Telephones
4. Rules and Procedures - New trainees should be given a list of
rules and procedures they are expected to follow. Points include:
• Use of Personal Protection Equipment (P.P.E)
• After-shift work procedures
• Restrictions on leaving the rigsite or unit during work hours
• Loading and unloading of packages or samples from the
premises
• Health and Safety at Work
5. Job Assignment - The final orientation step should focus on the
trainees work group and job assignments. Cover:
• The functions of the logging unit
• Where the data comes from and where it goes
• Quality and quantity standards
• Safety precautions

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Training

• Housekeeping requirements

Introducing the New Employee


After covering these points, the trainee should be introduced to the other
crew members and should be assigned to an experienced Logging
Geologist to continue the orientation process. The experienced person
should be carefully chosen and briefed to ensure that a positive attitude is
reflected and that the trainee’s questions can be answered.

Knowledge and Skill Training


Knowledge is acquired by reading, listening, and observing. New skills are
also learned in several different ways, such as trial and error or copying
someone else. However, the most efficient training is accomplished with
the help of a good instructor. The Field Supervisor can become a good
instructor by understanding and being guided by general principles of
learning, preparing for the job as instructor, and following a four-step
instruction procedure.
The following basic principles apply to all learning experiences. When
training crew members, use these principles in the design of the training
effort and your expectations of the trainees.
1. A skill must be used to be remembered - One must continue to
do something to remain proficient. Therefore, schedule the
training close to the time the knowledge or skills you are
teaching will be needed.
2. Learning is based on what is already known - Begin with
some assessment of what your trainee knows about what you
plan to teach. Because learning can be transferred from one
situation to another, during this assessment do not limit yourself
to just what is known about the precise operation.
3. Learning progresses from the simple to the complex - When
designing training, break the total job down into fairly simple
steps. Then progress through each step until the whole job is
learned. This provides an opportunity for the trainee to
experience success along the way, to remain interested, and to be
motivated to learn the whole operation. When you do not break
the job down, you run the risk of overwhelming and thereby
frustrating the trainee.
4. Everyone is different - Some people learn quickly; others take
longer. Learning does not progress at a steady rate even for the
fast learner. There will be breakthroughs where understanding is
achieved, but there will also be times when seemingly no
progress is made. Repetition is required to master almost any

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Training Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

task. Do not expect anyone to learn something with just one


demonstration.

Preparing to Teach
Good instructors are prepared. Most instructors have experience in the
operations they teach; therefore, they know the material. However, more
than that is required. Other items to prepare include procedures, to be sure
that nothing is left out and support material or training aids to illustrate and
clarify the material being taught.
1. The Job Training Breakdown - When an experienced person
teaches job details, significant points may be left out.
Assumptions are made that “everybody knows that,” or some
detail is so routine that it is overlooked during the training
period. To overcome these potential problems, prepare a job
breakdown.
In completing a job breakdown, think through and record each
step required to complete each logging job. Do not assume
anything. List the information required to do each step properly;
where something is located, how to annotate, or how to record
data.
2. Training aids - Training is much easier when oral instructions
are supplemented with appropriate training aids. Consider these
possibilities:
• Training manuals
• Equipment
• Brochures that describe the job and show what is to be done
Trainees can study these in advance and can be prepared to move ahead
more quickly in learning the details of the job. Other “office” training aids
that are helpful include pieces of equipment that trainees can practice on
before actually taking over a job, slides of equipment or procedures they
will operate, and samples and forms they will have to look at or complete.
Finally, some flow diagrams showing where things come from, what is
done to them, and where they go.

How to Instruct
With a job breakdown completed and training aids prepared, you are ready
to begin instructing. Using the learning principles discussed earlier, the
following four-step process will lead to effective and efficient results:
Prepare the trainee - During this step, develop interest in learning by
pointing out the value of being able to perform the task. Also, find out what

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Training

the trainee knows about the task from prior experience so you do not
duplicate anything.
Present the operation - Tell, show, and illustrate the operations, one step
at a time. As you present each step, stress each key point associated with
that step.
Involve the trainee - Have the trainee perform each step in the operation
and explain the key points. Correct any errors you observe and continue the
process until you are satisfied the trainee knows the operation. This step
must not be omitted. Both demonstration and practice must be provided to
verify understanding.
Follow up - When you are satisfied with what you see, turn the operation
over to the trainee. Check back frequently to answer questions, correct
errors, and praise accomplishments. Taper off this coaching activity as the
trainee’s ability to handle the operation is verified.

Conclusion
Too often, training is handled in a haphazard way. New employees are
either assumed to know how to do the work, or are left on their own to
learn by trial and error. This does not provide for a knowledgeable, skilled
crew. Alternatively, Field Supervisors should pick up their responsibilities
to see that training is well planned and carried out.
The purpose of training should always be to improve individual
performance and thereby improve total crew performance. This can be
achieved through increased knowledge or improved skills. Telling
someone something will increase knowledge; however, it will not improve
skills. Skills are improved through practice. Therefore, training must be
designed to allow hands-on experience in order to bridge the gap between
knowing how to do something and actually being able to do it.

Reporting Procedures
During the probationary period, it is important that detailed feed-back on
the trainee is received by the regional INTEQ operations and training
departments. On completion of the OFF (Oilfield Finalization) School, the
trainee is issued a Training Package. This document enables the trainee to:
• Keep a record of their field training
• Provide information to the regional training department about rig
operations, logging procedures and tasks that they have witnessed
• Provide evaluation and assessment forms for the Field Supervisor to
complete.

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Training Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

The Training Package includes the following:


• Training Exercises
• Job Summary Forms
• Field Training Report Forms
• Training Data Cards
• Equipment/Task Checklist

Training Exercises
These are a series of questions that the trainee is required to complete and
return to the regional training department for evaluation. These are
designed to get the trainee to consult documents that they would not have
come across during their initial classroom training and to seek the help of
other personnel at the wellsite, such as the mud engineer. There is also a
requirement for the trainee to complete a fictitious Formation Evaluation
Log, using computerized methods.
The questions are structured into two sections. Section A should be
returned after on site training, and Section B prior to confirmation. The
assignments are an integral part of the L2 module and must be completed
satisfactorily before the trainee can attempt the L2 Evaluation
Examination.

Job Summary Forms


These forms are completed by the trainee at the wellsite and provide a
record of daily rig activity and the tasks/equipment that have been checked.
The form provides the information that the trainee needs to complete the
training data card that is returned to the regional training department.

Field Training Report Forms


These reports, completed by the Field Supervisor or the senior INTEQ
representative, are directly involved with instructing the trainee. If more
than one person has been instructing the trainee, then a separate form
should be completed by each individual.
It is imperative that these reports be submitted without delay since the
trainee's next rig visit will depend, partially, on the content of this report.
Try and be as frank and explicit as possible when completing this report.
Yes or no answers are not satisfactory, as they do not give sufficient
information. Remember that trainees might be sent out to your operation
for their first logging job, so exaggerated claims as to their ability are not in
their, yours, or the client's best interests.

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Training

If you have problems with a trainee, explain to them what those problems
are, their rout to success in the company, and why they should develop
their logging skills.

Training Data Card


This card summarizes the rig activity and equipment/tasks checked during
each training visit. It is completed by the trainee and returned to the
regional training department immediately following the rig visit.
This information is used to evaluate the training visit and to help plan the
next assignment. The reverse of the card also enables the trainee to
comment on the training they have received.

Equipment/Task Checklist
Each time the trainee witnesses a different rig operation, instructed in a
particular logging technique, or in the operation of a piece of equipment,
the instructor should update the equipment/task checklist at the rear of the
book. This ensures that the trainee experiences a variety of tasks and is
trained in as many techniques as possible during his probationary period.

Trainees Report
Trainees are usually asked by Operations and the Technical Training
Department to report on the standard of the training they have received. Be
advised that this is their view of your management skills, which you may
be asked to explain to office personnel.

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Training Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

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Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Chapter 8

Wellsite Incidents

This chapter provides information concerning the Field


Supervisors response to serious injuries or incidents that can
occur at the wellsite.

Policy
Company-wide procedures must be followed in the event of serious injury,
property damage, or wellsite disaster in which the company is potentially
involved. Some such incidents may be summarized as follows:
• Injury to an INTEQ employee
• Injury to other wellsite personnel, where involvement or liability of
INTEQ is a possibility.
• Serious Incidents, such as kicks, blow-outs, fire, or other occurrences
causing personal injury/death, or property damage to equipment being
utilized by INTEQ, other service companies, contractor or the client.
• Injury or serious incident caused by political unrest, terrorism, change
of government, etc.

Procedures
Responsible On-Site INTEQ Personnel
The Field Supervisor (or the Senior Logging Geologist in their absence)
must notify the local INTEQ manager or supervisor immediately, by
telephone, telex, or fax.
If you are asked questions about a serious incident, be honest and report
only known facts. Apportion no blame to anyone and refuse to answer such
questions. In addition, report that you were asked those types of questions.

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Wellsite Incidents Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Note: Approval must be obtained before any statement


whatsoever concerning an injury, emergency or disaster
is made to anyone. This includes the press, local officials,
other client and related service companies'
representatives or other parties, unless an INTEQ
appointed attorney is present.

Notify Corporate Office


If local area or other regional management are not available the responsible
employee will contact Baker Hughes Legal Council within the operating
region or by contacting Houston, USA.

Report Preparation at Local Office


As soon as possible, the responsible employee should leave the wellsite,
with client permission, for debriefing by local INTEQ management and for
report preparation. The unit diary should be brought to the local office.

INTEQ Manager or Supervisor


INTEQ Management will immediately notify, by telephone, INTEQ Legal
Council within the region or Houston, USA.

Crew Safety
In the event of any incident as described above, Field Supervisors should
place the safety of all INTEQ personnel at the wellsite at the top of their list
of responsibilities. Before notifying the local INTEQ office of the incident,
you should be in possession of as much factual information as possible.
You should have accounted for every INTEQ employee who was present at
the wellsite at the time of the incident, or who were in the country on days
off, or while making a crew change.

Logs, Logging Reports, Strip Charts


In the event of a kick or a blow-out, the client will wish to have copies of
all logs, logging reports and strip charts. It is important that such
information is always kept as up-to-date as possible and that all strip charts
are fully annotated with date, time, explanations of activity, and parameter
variances.
Maintain security of this data at all times. Master copies of logs should
never be handed out. Computer-based logs can be generated easily and
those copies can be provided whenever necessary.

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Wellsite Incidents

Unit Diaries
Each logging unit is supplied with a desk diary. This diary should be used
only to record rig operational activity, logging unit status and activity,
personnel status and crew change information, and hand-over notes. Under
no circumstances should the unit diary contain any personal comments or
information or express opinions concerning the operation, or contain
references to client, contractor, or other service company personnel.
In the event of an incident as described above, the unit diary may be called
upon in a court of law as material evidence. It should be a professional
document recording factual information as detailed above.

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Wellsite Incidents Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

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Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Chapter 9

Health and Safety

This chapter contains the information concerning the


various health and safety aspects of wellsite work. The Field
Supervisor should familiarize themselves with all the
information provided in this chapter.

INTEQ Safety Policy Statement


Note: It is the intention of INTEQ to provide all employees
with a safe working environment.

Each employee at every level is responsible for the prevention of accidents,


loss or damage to equipment, personal injury to fellow employees,
customers, and the general public.
The object of this safety policy is to reduce injuries and the resultant cost to
the injured, the contractor, and the oil industry in general. This is based on
a clear and concise declaration of company policy towards the safety effort.
The basic elements of such a policy are these:
• The safety of employees in all drilling, workover, and completion
operations is paramount.
• Safety will take precedence over expediency or short cuts.
• Every attempt will be made to reduce the possibility of accident
occurrence.
• INTEQ intends to comply with all safety laws relevant to the areas in
which they are working.
To promote general safety awareness, and to instill safe working practices
in the staff of INTEQ, safety programs will be developed to:
• Provide necessary training to ensure that all employees perform their
assigned tasks in a safe manner.

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Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

• Provide the necessary safety equipment for accident prevention and/or


survival under emergency situations.
• Provide the necessary incentive for all employees to follow and
promote safe working practices.
• To provide meaningful measures to monitor safety standards.
• Provide detailed information, where reasonably practicable, on all
hazards associated with the services of INTEQ.

Field Supervisor Responsibilities


It is the responsibility of the Field Supervisor to ensure the Health and
Safety of all crew members under their supervision.
Specifically, this includes:
• Familiarization with, and adherence to, oil company Health and
Safety Policies and Procedures
• Familiarization with, and adherence to, contractors Health and Safety
Policies and Procedures
• On-site training of all INTEQ personnel in these procedures
• Hold regular safety meetings and attend client/contractor meetings
• Familiarization with the required reporting procedures for wellsite
injury or other incident/emergency to the Client, Contractor, and
INTEQ
• Familiarization with Medivac contact numbers, where applicable
• Ensure that all safety notices and procedures are correctly filed and/or
displayed
• Ensure that the logging unit first aid kit is properly maintained
• Ensure the correct storage and handling of all hazardous materials
• Ensure the proper use of all safety equipment and protective clothing
• Ensure that all tools and equipment used are in a safe working
condition
• Ensure that the logging unit and sensors are installed and functioning
correctly and meeting all the required safety regulations
• Promote safety awareness in all personnel under their supervision

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Health and Safety

Travel
All employees are obliged to comply with the client oil company and
contractor's safety regulations, in addition to any statutory legislation,
when travelling to, or present at, any wellsite location.
Offshore, the entire installation is considered to be a hazardous zone, with
the exception of specially designated safe areas.

Passports
All personnel should have with them at all times a valid passport, and any
necessary visas and work permits. This requirement is also for British
subjects travelling to offshore installations in the UK sector of the North
Sea.

Safety Training Documentation


All personnel should ensure that their medical and offshore safety and
survival training are current and valid and that renewal dates are brought to
the attention of their Personnel Supervisor in good time, so that refresher
courses can be arranged.
For example, all personnel working in the Netherlands should carry with
them a personal safety log book containing details of medical examinations
and attendance at offshore safety and survival courses. These “green
books” are issued to each employee prior to their first visit to the
Netherlands.

Helicopter Travel
Detailed instructions regarding transfer by helicopter are given in the
Health and Safety Manual. You will also be instructed in all aspects of
helicopter travel during your Offshore Safety and Survival Training.
Before travelling, ensure that you have at least the following information:
• The helicopter company transferring you to the rig
• Airport/Heliport of departure, including correct terminals
• Check in at least one hour prior to departure

Travel by Boat
In certain circumstances transfer to the rig will be by boat and not by
helicopter. In this case you will be conveyed from the boat to the rig by
Personnel Basket.
Remember the following points and ensure that junior crew members are
instructed accordingly:

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Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

• Not more than four persons may use the basket at one time.
• Wear an approved life jacket
• Ensure that you understand what to do before the operation takes
place
• Place small items of baggage in the center of the basket
• Stand on the outside of the basket, facing inwards
• Do not get off the basket until it lands on the deck

Driving
In onshore situations, and in certain other circumstances, transfer to the rig
will take place using a hire vehicle or company provided car.
Personnel should:
• Obtain clear instructions as to the wellsite location and directions for
reaching it before travelling
• Familiarize themselves with the vehicle, particularly four wheel
drives
• Ensure the road-worthiness of the vehicle, including condition of fuel,
water, tires, oil, windscreen wash/wipe, and de-icing equipment
Vehicles on long term lease must be kept clean and the above items
checked on a regular basis.
• If you are driving in desert or other remote locations, ensure you are
properly briefed beforehand, and are familiar with breakdown/
survival procedures.
• Always drive carefully and in accordance with local motoring laws.
• Carry your driving license with you at all times. In certain countries
you will need a foreign language translation. It may be beneficial to
obtain an International Drivers License. In other countries you will
need to obtain a local driving license before driving any vehicle.
• If the vehicle is fitted with seat belts, they must be worn.
• Before driving the vehicle you must be certain that full insurance is
current and valid.
• Driving with headlights on is safe policy, providing it does not break
local motoring laws.

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Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Health and Safety

Rig Equipment and Procedures

Arrival and Departure on Offshore Installations


Upon arrival, you should report to the responsible person for check in
formalities. You should:
• Study the Station Bill and follow the general instructions.
• Find locations of survival craft, extinguishers and breathing apparatus
• Familiarize yourself with all rig facilities, including meeting points,
escape routes and procedures for evacuating accommodation,
workplace, or logging unit areas.
• Check life jacket and survival suit availability and storage.

Field Supervisor Safety Briefing


This briefing should be given to all new personnel, as soon as possible
following their arrival at the wellsite. The briefing should include, but not
be limited to the following points:
• Rig Station Bill
• Use of Protective Clothing and Equipment.
• Escape Routes
• Reporting of Injuries and Emergencies
• Smoking
• Location and use of Fire Extinguishers.
• Location and use of Breathing Equipment
• Location and Operation of Survival Craft
• Hot Work and Entry Permits
• Location, content, and use of unit first aid kit and rig medical
facilities.
• Storage and use of tools and equipment
• Housekeeping and tidyness
• Fall protection and use of tugger lines
• Working over water
• Logging Unit shutdown system and procedures
• Special requirements and reporting procedures
• Potential H2S hazards

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750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Personal Health

General
All personnel should ensure that their required vaccinations are kept up to
date, and that the necessary documentation is carried with them at all times.
These include, but are not necessarily limited to
• Yellow Fever
• Typhoid
• Cholera
• Polio

Malaria
You will be advised by your personnel supervisor which tablets to take.
These will not be the same for all at risk areas, and will vary as certain
strains become resistant.
You should be aware that the continued taking of anti malarial medication
for a number of years can result in certain undesirable side effects. If in
doubt, consult your Operations/Personnel Management or your own family
physician.

Precautions
When travelling in Africa, it is wise to carry a small personal first aid kit
comprising adhesive dressings, sterile needles, insect repellent, antiseptic
cream, and water sterilization tablets. This is in addition to the first aid kit
carried in the unit.
Check that drinking water, and the water used for cleaning teeth is safe. If
in doubt, it should be boiled or otherwise sterilized.
Avoid heat exhaustion by taking salt tablets and plenty of non-alcoholic
liquids.

Bites from Insects and Other Animals


In tropical areas, some diseases are spread by insects and ticks. Use
repellent creams and cover arms and legs with appropriate clothing.
Bites from other animals may set up infection and can be seriously
disabling. You should be wary of all “tame“creatures.

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Personal Hygiene
It is important both for your own well being and for the comfort of
colleagues that your personal hygiene is maintained at the very highest
standards.
Daily showering is a requirement, together with the washing of all work
clothing and coveralls.

AIDS
AIDS is now present worldwide, and is particularly widespread throughout
Africa. It can be prevented by following safe practices.
Try to avoid medical and dental treatment involving surgery, blood
transfusions, or injections in countries where there may be a risk that
infections such as HIV could be spread.
In some countries, blood for transfusions is not screened for the presence of
the virus, but there may be arrangements for obtaining screened blood.
Needles and other equipment may not be adequately sterilized.
To assist you in medical emergencies, each unit operating in high risk areas
is provided with an AIDS emergency kit. In addition, you can obtain
personal emergency kits to carry with you. Please contact your personnel
supervisor for further details.

Unit First Aid Kit


Each logging unit is supplied with a First Aid Kit. This comprises the
following:
• Nonwoven triangular bandage x2
• Medium unmedicated dressing x6
• Large unmedicated dressing x2
• Extra large unmedicated dressing x2
• Eye pad unmedicated dressing x2
• Airstrip plaster pack x1
• Safety Pins x6
• Health and Safety Regulations Card x1
The Field Supervisor should ensure that this kit is fully stocked and that
crew members are instructed in its use.
It is the Field Supervisor's responsibility to ensure that any other items
required because of local conditions, or any other health precautions are
brought to the attention of the local or regional operations management.

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Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Protective Clothing

General
The following clothing is issued to all employees upon joining the
company:
• Safety Helmet x1
• Rig Boot x1 pair
• Coveralls x1 pair
• Safety Glasses x1 pair
When being issued with this clothing you should ensure that boots and
coveralls are the correct fit.
Boots should be treated regularly to ensure continued water repellency.
Coveralls should be kept clean by making use of the rig laundry facilities.
The coveralls have recently been upgraded to ensure continued compliance
with safety requirements.
Safety helmets are unisized and may be adjusted to fit. The helmet and
rigging should be regularly inspected for signs of damage. Following any
significant impact, it should be replaced even if superficial inspection
reveals no sign of damage. Metal helmets are no longer allowed in any
operations due to potential electrical hazards. Some helmets have
expiration dates labeled inside and should be discarded accordingly.
Other clothing and equipment is available in the logging unit as follows:
• Goggles
• Ear protection
• Safety gloves
• Oil Based Mud Safety Kit
If the Field Supervisor feels that other clothing or equipment should be
provided to suit local conditions, then this should be brought to the
attention of the local operations management. Be aware that damage can be
“long term” in effect and cummulative (i.e. hearing disorders)

Drilling Fluids

Types of Fluid
The three main types of drilling fluid that you will encounter are:
• Water-Based Muds
• Oil-Based Muds

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• Work Over Fluids


Water-Based Muds (WBM) contain the following ingredients:
• Water Fresh or Saline
• Weighting Material Barite, Heamite, etc.
• Viscosifiers Clays, Starches, CMC, PAC
• Deflocculants Lignosulfonate
• pH/Salinity Control NaCl, KCl, NaOH, KOH
• H2S Scavengers Iron, Zinc
• Oxygen Scavengers Ammonium Bisulfite
• Lubricants, Detergents, Defoamers
Oil-Based Muds (OBM) contain, in addition, the following:
• Emulsifiers
• Filtration Control
• Base Oil
• Organic Polymers
• Mineral Oils
In the past Diesel was used as the base oil for OBMs. This is now rarely
used, and never in Europe. The Poly-Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) from
diesel muds were potentially harmful. With prolonged and repeated skin
contact, these can cause skin tumors. Modern OBMs are de-aromatized,
which, while it can make them more of an irritant, has removed the
carcinogenic properties.
Work Over Fluids are used in the post drilling phase during production,
testing, and work over operations. They are usually clear, water based
fluids that may look innocuous but are far more detrimental to health than
drilling fluids.
They may contain heavy minerals, iron or zinc products together with
various acids for stimulation.

Toxicity
This term is used to describe substances and mixtures that are detrimental
to health.
Toxicity varies according to:
• Dosage
• Method and Duration of Exposure

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Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Toxicity may be:


• Acute-Immediate or Rapid
• Chronic-Cumulative
In order to determine the toxicity of a substance, you need to know:
• Physical and Chemical properties
• Effect on eyes, skin and mucous membranes
• Sensitizing potential
Manufacturers and suppliers of all mud chemicals provide safety data
sheets, including information concerning any health effects.

Health Effects of OBM


• Under normal operating conditions, <150oC, thermal cracking and the
production of PAH's should not take place in modern OBMs.
• Modern OBMs are produced from de-aromatized hydrocarbons which
are environmentally safe.
• Contact with OBM during normal working conditions is almost
inevitable, via skin contact and airborne contamination (mist and
vapor).
• Most effects are straightforward mechanical problems: Irritation of
skin, eyes, or alimentary mucosa is caused by low pH mud, surfactant,
or nuisance dust.
• Repeated and continued contact can remove natural fats and oils
causing redness, drying, and cracking of the skin
• Respiratory irritation can be caused from bentonite and mica dust.
• Sensitization may be caused by the use of biocides, but these should
not be needed if the pH is kept above 10.
• Carcinogenicity should not be a problem now that PAHs and Asbestos
are no longer used.

Operational Procedures
You should read the INTEQ Manual “Logging Techniques in Oil Based
Drilling Fluids, P/N 25351”, for further information. However, the
following points should be kept in mind
• Use rubber gloves and barrier cream when handling samples or
working on equipment near to OBMs.
• Do not use abrasive industrial hand cleaners- these can enhance
irritation.

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Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Health and Safety

• Change out of oil soaked clothes at once.


Ensure that the correct oil resistant safety boots are worn at all times.
Safety Kits are provided to all logging units likely using OBMs. Each kit
contains:
• Reinol Hand Cream
• Barrier Cream - Rosalex “Wet Guard”
• Reconditioning Cream - Rosalex Lanolin
• Disposable Gloves
• Green Nitrile Gloves
• Goggles
• Eye Wash Bottle
• Eye Wash Lotion - Optrex

Gas

General
All logging units have a vacuum system which draws a continuous stream
of ditch gas into the unit. Modern units have the vacuum pump in the
middle of the system, so that the sample is drawn into the unit and then
pumped through to the gas detection equipment.
Gases routinely analyzed are:
• Hydrocarbons Methane to Pentane, Acetylene
• H2S
Specialized detectors that are available:
• CO2
• H2, He

Note: All gases which are present in concentrations which


impact breathing air, have a hazard potential.

In a non-restricted area, ignition sources and oxygen are freely available.


The potential fire hazard is therefore determined by the nature of the
potentially hazardous gas or liquid present.

Workbook 9-11
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Explosive Hazards
Explosive limits for some commonly encountered gases are:
• Methane 5.3 - 14.0%
• Hydrogen 4.0 - 7.5%
• Acetylene 2.5 - 81.0%
Flash Points (the lowest temperature at which a liquid will give off a vapor
sufficient to form an ignitable vapor with air) for certain liquids are:
• Petrol -43oC
• Acetone -18oC
• Ethyl Alcohol -14oC
Vapor Densities of common substances are:
• Hydrogen 0.069
• Ammonia 0.59
• Air 1.00
• Acetone 2.00
• H2S 1.189

Hazardous Areas
A hazardous area is one in which explosive gas - air mixtures are, or may
be expected to be, present in quantities such as to require special
precautions for the construction and use of electrical equipment.
Classification of hazardous areas:
• Zone 0 -In which an explosive gas - air mixture is continuously
present for long periods.
• Zone 1 - In which an explosive gas - air mixture is likely to occur in
normal operation
• Zone 2 - In which an explosive gas - air mixture is not likely to occur,
and if it does, will only exist for a short period of time.

Note: Every installation will be so classified by the pertinent


certification authority.

Equipment Used in Hazardous Areas


• Flame Proof Enclosures - will withstand, without injury, any
explosion of the prescribed flammable gas under normal conditions of

9-12 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Health and Safety

operation, and will prevent transmission of flame such as may ignite


the flammable gas present in the surrounding area.
• Explosion Proof Enclosures - as above, but will not transmit heat.
• Gas Tight Equipment - is sealed so that it will not admit gases from
the surrounding atmosphere.
• Intrinsically Safe Circuits - are those in which any sparking that may
occur during normal working conditions is incapable of causing an
ignition of flammable gas.
• Galvanically Isolated Devices - are interface units that fall into the
category or “associated electrical apparatus”. They are component
assemblies designed to transfer electrical signals between safe areas
and hazardous areas in both directions while limiting the amount of
energy which can be transferred from a safe area to hazardous area
even under fault conditions.
• Pressurized Equipment - is continuously purged with air from a safe
area or a non flammable gas so that flammable gases are unable to
enter the equipment.
• Barrier Diodes - are devices containing zener diodes and fuses which
are designed such that when a fault occurs in the line to which they are
connected, the zener diode is short circuited to earth, drawing a
current which blows the fuse, thus preventing a potentially large
current from reaching the point of the fault. In other words, the barrier
prevents the accumulation of enough energy during a fault condition
to ignite a prescribed flammable atmosphere.

Storage and Use of Compressed Gas Cylinders


Gas bottles should be stored in a safe manner and used with caution at all
times. Specifically:
• Before use, you should check the label to ensure that it contains the
proper contents for the job at hand.
• Keep bottles securely fastened away from heat sources.
Keep valves clear of oil, grease, water, and grit.
• Damaged threads, valves, or gauges should be replaced.
• Empty bottles should be checked, ideally by bubbling through water,
before being shipped from the wellsite.

Workbook 9-13
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Hydrogen Sulfide

Description
H2S is a toxic, colorless, flammable gas with an offensive odor similar to
rotten eggs.

Toxicity
H2S is both an irritant and an asphyxiation. Concentrations from 20-150
ppm in air cause irritation of the eyes. Higher concentrations cause
irritation of the upper respiratory tract and if exposure is prolonged may
cause pulmonary edema (fluid producing a swelling of the lungs).
With higher concentrations, the action of the gas on the nervous system
becomes more prominent and a 30 minute exposure to 500 ppm gas in air
results in headache, dizziness, excitement, staggering gait, diarrhea, and
painful urination, sometimes followed by bronchitis.
With very high concentrations, the respiratory center may become
paralyzed, causing asphyxiation. Exposures of 800-1000 ppm may be fatal
in 30 minutes and even higher concentrations may be instantly fatal. With
repeated exposure to low concentrations of conjunctivitis, photophobia,
corneal bullae, pain, and blurred vision are the main symptoms.
Because of the possibility of gas entering the respiratory system through
perforated ear drums, personnel with this condition are not allowed at
wellsite locations when an H2S hazard exists.

Corrective Action
Hydrogen Sulfide often acts so quickly on the lungs that there is no time to
call a doctor before beginning to revive a victim. The following measures
should be taken:
• Move the victim at once to fresh, clean air.
• If the victim is unconscious and not breathing, apply an approved
method of artificial respiration and continue, without interruption,
until natural breathing is restored or until the victim is certified dead
by a qualified medical practitioner.
• Keep victim warm.

Note: A would be rescuer must protect himself first. Without


certified breathing apparatus, no one can assist another
who has been exposed to high concentrations of H2S
while it is still in the atmosphere.

9-14 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Health and Safety

H2S Health and Safety Summary

Effects from Prolonged


Concentration-ppm
Exposure

10 Maximum for safe working


75-150 Irritation within hours
Death at 48 hours
170-300 Maximum for 60 minutes work
Death at 4-8 hours
400-600 Dangerous after 30 minutes
>600 Possible immediate death

Note: H2S is a potential fire hazard Explosive range: 4.3 - 4.6%


in air. Fight fire with CO2, Dry Chemical or Water
Spray.

Ultra Violet Light


The INTEQ UV Box is used routinely for the examination of oil shows.
Standard INTEQ equipment is a monochromatic 3660 Å (UVA) source,
close to visible violet.
Some companies use a 3660/2540 (UVC) switchable source. The shorter
wavelength is over 1000 times more likely to cause skin burns after
exposure owing to the higher photon energies involved, and will harm
unprotected eyes.
You should be very careful whenever you are using non INTEQ standard
boxes. This will particularly concern those Consultant Wellsite Geologists
working with other mud logging companies.
When using the Quantitative Fluorescence Technique (QFT) instrument,
never look at the fluorescence bulb when the instrument is on. Looking
directly into the bulb can cause eye damage, which is akin to sunburn.

Use and Storage of Chemicals

Storage
All chemicals should be stored in regulation, sealed containers in a manner
that is secure and which will prevent movement or damage during
transportation.

Workbook 9-15
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

All containers should be clearly labelled, and stored in an upright position.

Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)


Data sheets are available for all chemicals stored or used in the logging
unit. These sheets should be filed in the unit and be immediately available
for use should an incident occur. Copies of all Data Sheets should be given
to the Rig Medic.
You should ensure that all INTEQ personnel read, and are familiar with the
data sheets concerning any chemical the user will work with or be near.

Precautions and Handling of Chemicals


In order to minimize any problems when using chemicals, you should
observe the following points:
• Avoid Skin Contact.
• Avoid Inhalation:- always use in well ventilated areas,
particularly when transferring/mixing.
• Minimize spillages when transferring/mixing.
• Use rubber gloves and goggles when transferring/mixing.
The handling procedures for the chemical used during Surface logging
operations can be found in the “SLS Training Guide, Appendix C”, P/N
80910.

Mixing and Diluting Chemicals


Special care needs to be exercised when mixing or diluting chemicals. This
includes, for example, diluting a 30% solution of HCl down to a 10%
solution.

Electrical Systems

Dangers
Electricity damages the human body by burning and by causing contraction
of muscles, especially the heart.
Nerves in the body are operated by small electrical currents. When a
voltage source comes into contact with a human body the current flowing
through the body is dictated by the resistance of the body.
Two factors affect the resistance of the human body:
• Moisture reduces resistance
• Resistance drops once electricity is conducted

9-16 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Health and Safety

Burning is caused by the heating effect of current, usually on the skin,


being drawn through the body. As the amount of current is increased,
which it does rapidly, to a level at which it can operate the muscles in it's
path, these muscles contract. This is why, when a person grabs an electrical
conductor which is live, he is often unable to release it.
The current passing through the heart muscles causes them to contract
resulting in heart failure and death.

Note: All voltages above 30 volts are potentially very


dangerous.

Good Working Practice


• Be aware of the regulations governing the classification of equipment
used in hazardous areas.
• Obtain a work permit from the Rig Superintendent before doing any
work outside the unit which may involve welding.
• Never open the enclosures on 440 volt, 3 phase circuits.
• Refer all main power, 110, 220 or 440 volt faults immediately to the
rig electrician.
• Do not interfere with any rig cables or breakers without the
permission of the rig electrician.
• Do not join cable without proper cable joints.
• Do not bypass barrier diodes.
• Do not switch off the unit pressurization system.
• Ensure that sensor cables have the screen earthed at the barrier box.

Unit Rig-up Procedures

General
INTEQ personnel are responsible for preparing, supervising, and executing
the installation of INTEQ equipment at the wellsite.
This includes supervision to ensure that the installation complies with the
appropriate national safety standards and the registering authority for the
rig, if offshore.
You are directed to INTEQ information created at the FMD for more
detailed information. Certain points, however can be reinforced here.
• Locate the unit so that a 1 meter (3 feet) wide service gangway exists
on all sides.

Workbook 9-17
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

• Ensure a safe, 1 meter (3 feet) wide, gangway to the shale shakers is


provided.
• Ensure a clear exit from the emergency escape hatch.
• Face the doors inwards and away from the shale shakers and BOPs
where possible.
• Have a welder tack down the unit, cable trays and grounding studs.
• Ensure the unit is protected against being damaged by heavy rig
equipment, (e.g., crane booms and drillpipe).
• Do not allow equipment to be stored on the logging unit roof.

Power and Utility Connections


The two electrical power connections to the logging unit, main AC power
and pressurization blower, are to be performed by an INTEQ Service
Engineer or the rig electrician.
Any work performed inside the master service box should be performed by
qualified personnel.
The master circuit breaker must be off before the input voltage selector
plug is moved.

Pressure Sensors
Due to the high operating pressures in the standpipe, the pressure sensor
should be installed by qualified personnel, after receiving permission from
the appropriate rig authority.
When tightening such sensors, ensure that you are standing on a secure
platform and are using the correct tools for the job. A Stilson wrench that
can slip may not be adequate.

Electrical Torque Sensor


Because of the high voltages encountered during installation of electrical
torque sensors, the system should be installed by qualified personnel only.

Working at Height or Over Water


When working at height or over water, you must ensure that proper safety
precautions are exercised.
• You should use a safety belt or other approved fall protection
equipment when working at heights of more than 2 meters, when
sound scaffolding with hand railing is not present.
• Only authorized or trained operators should operate hoisting
equipment.

9-18 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Health and Safety

• Personnel should keep clear of overhead loads, and warn others


entering the danger area.
• Hands should not be placed on any moving rope or cable.
• When working over water, ensure that adequate fall protection
equipment is used and always wear a life jacket.

Workbook 9-19
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Health and Safety Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

9-20 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Chapter 10

Finance

This chapter provides the Field Supervisor with information


concerning the financial objectives of wellsite work. It
stresses the importance of the contract between INTEQ and
the client.

General
Field Supervisors should have an understanding of the financial
organization of INTEQ and how the company gets paid for the goods and
services it provides.
They should also be aware of the service agreements and contracts that are
made and executed between INTEQ and its clients, with particular
reference to the operational requirements of such a contract.
Information concerning contractual and financial agreements will be given
to the Field Supervisor by the local Operations Coordinator

Financial Considerations
INTEQ is part of the Baker Hughes group of companies. As such, the
President of INTEQ reports to the Baker Hughes directors. Part of the
Baker Hughes Mission Statement reads:
“Financial - Maintain a sound financial base while achieving rates of
growth and returns on investments that rank among the highest in the
industries served.”
INTEQ has a responsibility, therefore, to contribute to those rates of
growth and returns on investment that are required by Baker Hughes. Each
INTEQ operating region reports quarterly to the Vice-President in
Corporate, Houston. He, in turn, reports to the President who reports to
Baker Hughes. This quarterly report gives an indication of planned

Workbook 10-1
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Finance Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

activity, revenue, personnel requirements, and expected profits over the


following twelve months.
Each region's plan is reviewed by corporate before being presented to
Baker Hughes. Guidelines are issued by Baker Hughes beforehand, giving
indications of what they expect INTEQ to achieve. If the plan is not
accepted because it falls outside these guidelines, then revisions have to be
made before it can be finally presented. Once the plan is accepted, monthly
reports are generated by each region to see how actual results compare to
the original plan. Any variances in activity, revenue, profits, or headcount
have to be explained and justified.
The continued well being of Baker Hughes, and therefore INTEQ, depends
on trying to maximize profits and reduce costs wherever practicable. This
is achieved by providing its clients a quality service, using well trained
professional personnel and technically reliable equipment, and by keeping
tight control of its costs.
Field Supervisors are responsible for ensuring the provision of a high
quality service from both personnel and equipment. They are also
responsible for ensuring that all well reports and crew members time and
expense sheets are completed and authorized as necessary at the end of
each month in order to facilitate speedy payment.

Payment for Goods and Services


INTEQ receives payment for the goods and services it provides by
submitting an invoice to the client at the end of each month. These invoices
are prepared by operations management personnel in district and regional
offices. In order to prepare invoices, the following documentation is
required:
• Initial Well Report (if applicable)
• Monthly Well Report
• Final Well Report (if applicable)
• Personnel Status Report
• Crew Members Time and Expense Forms
These forms should be signed by the INTEQ Field Supervisor and client's
representative as appropriate. All well reports and timesheets should be
posted to the local or regional INTEQ office, without delay, at the end of
each month. The reports serve as an authorized record of the provision of
goods and services to the client and are, therefore, an integral part of the
invoice. The invoice cannot be prepared until this documentation has been
received by the relevant office.

10-2 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Finance

Upon receipt of this documentation, the invoices must be prepared,


checked and mailed to the client, who then has up to 30 days in which to
pay. Please remember that it is this money that pays all personnel salaries
as well as other company expenses. It is in everyone's interests therefore,
that the invoices are prepared and issued as soon as possible after the
month end. Each invoice can represent many thousands of dollars.
The total monthly revenue for each operating region can be very large and
represents a not insignificant amount of interest, if payment is received
promptly and the money paid into the bank. A delay of only a few days in
receiving this money can make a big difference to INTEQ's revenue and
cash flow situation. On certain jobs, it could be the difference between
making a profit or not.

Contracts
Policy
It is company policy that, in high risk environments, a written contract or
Indemnity letter is required. This document has to be signed by both
INTEQ and the client. High risk areas are those that, in the event of a
catastrophe, might lead to the company having a large liability.

Content
Primary areas of emphasis are:
1. Risk Management
Indemnity
Insurance
Force Majeure
2. Economic Provision
Term
Escalation of Prices
Prices
Payment Terms
Interest
Costs paid directly by the client
Costs reimbursed by clients

Preparation
Contracts are prepared and negotiated by operations management
personnel at a regional and district level. They are then reviewed by the
Management Committee and Legal services in corporate.

Workbook 10-3
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Finance Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

Following any recommended changes, the contract is approved and sent to


the President for signature. Contract negotiation with the client is based on
the following criteria:
• Status of work
• Need for INTEQ services
• Equipment and Personnel availability

Guidelines for Risk Provision


In negotiating the risk provision and liability sections of the contract, some
points that are considered are as follows:
• Who is in control
• Who can best bear the risk
• INTEQ is not paid to assume abnormal risks
• INTEQ has limited information regarding operations
• INTEQ cannot bear risk

Risk Management
1. Minimize the risk of liability
Trained personnel
Equipment Design
Equipment maintenance and service
2. Limit Liability by contract
Limit financial responsibility for losses
Limit insurance exposure
Set out clearly the financial and operating conditions of both
parties
3. Insurance
Pay someone else to assume risks of liability
Pay someone else to assume risks of loss
4. Minimize Financial Risks
Force Majeure
Payment terms and interest
Letters of credit

Types of INTEQ Liability Risk


• Blow-out and pollution protection
• Protection from consequential damages

10-4 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems Finance

• Limit on Professional Liability


• Limit on Non-Professional Liability
• Injury to INTEQ employees
• Loss or injury to INTEQ equipment

Operational Aspects
The parts of the contract that are of primary concern to Field Supervisors
are those dealing with operational requirements. That is, the level of
service that is being provided, personnel requirements, and any secondary
equipment that may be added at a later stage.
This section may also include information on personnel transportation to
the wellsite, local subsistence payments, logging, standby and holding time
charge definitions, special service charges, final logs, printouts and reports,
and geological sampling schedules. Before going to a new job, Field
Supervisors should familiarize themselves with these operating provisions
and, with prior approval of management, take a copy of these provisions
with them to the wellsite.

Workbook 10-5
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Finance Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

10-6 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Appendix A

Monthly Reports

This space is available for the inclusion of regional “Monthly Reports”

Workbook A-1
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Monthly Reports Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

A-2 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Appendix B

Shipping Forms

This space is available for the inclusion of regional “Shipping Forms”

Workbook B-1
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Shipping Forms Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

B-2 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Appendix C

Quality Assurance Forms

This space is available for the inclusion of regional “Quality Assurance


Forms”

Workbook C-1
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Quality Assurance Forms Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

C-2 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Appendix D

Field Training Reports

This space is available for the inclusion of regional “Field Training


Reports”

Workbook D-1
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Field Training Reports Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

D-2 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997
Appendix E

Example Contracts

This space is available for the inclusion of example regional “Contracts”

Workbook E-1
750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997 Confidential
Example Contracts Field Supervisor - Surface Logging Systems

•Notes•

E-2 Baker Hughes INTEQ


Confidential 750-500-070 Rev. A / April 1997