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BITSAT PAPER

09.09.2012 (PT-02)
PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY TEST SYLLABUS


Reaction Mechanism : SN1 of R–X, R–O–R & R–OH, E1 in Alcohols, SN2 of R–X, R–O–R & R–OH, Sni, Intramo-
lecular SN2, Sayt Zeff product, Hoffmann product, E1 CB, Comparison of E2/E1CB Physical Properties
of Alkyl halide, Alcohol & Ether.

Physical SCQ (32)


1. A solution is a mixture of 0.06 M KCl and 0.06 M KI. AgNO3 solution is being added drop by drop till AgCl
starts precipitating (Ksp AgCl = 1 x 1010 and Ksp AgI = 4 x 1016). The concentration of iodide ion at this instant
will be nearly equal to :
(A) 4.0 x 105M (B) 4 x 108M (C) 2.4 x 108M (D*) 2.4 x 107M

10 10
Sol. When AgCl Starts precipitating [Ag+] =
0.06

4  10 16
at that time conc of [S–] = = 2.4 × 10–7
10 10

2. Heat of neutralization of NH4OH and HCl is


(A) 13.7 kcal/mole (B*) < 13.7 kcal/mole (C) > 13.7 kcal/mole (D) Zero
Sol. NH4OH is a weak base. Heat of netralisation < 13.7 kcal.

3. The solubility of AgCl will be minimum in

(A) 0.001 M AgNO3 (B) Pure watera (C*) 0.01 M CaCl2 (D) 0.01 M NaCl

Sol. 0.01 M CaCl2 gives maximum Cl– ions. To keep Ksp of AgCl constant, decrease in [Ag+] will be maximum

4. A weak base BOH (0.1 mole) is titrated with strong acid HCl (0.08 mole) than the number of H+ ion is (Kb for
BOH = 10–4)
(A*) 24.08  20–3 (B) 4  10–10 (C) 6.02  1013 (D) None
Sol. BOH + HCl  BCl + H2O
t=0 0.1 mole 0.08 mole
t= eq. 0.02 mole – 0.08 mole
 as solution is buffer
so
0.02
[OH–] = 10–4 
0.08

1
[OH –] = 10–4  mole
4

+
10 14  4
 [H ] =
10  4
[H+] = 4  10–10
 No. of H+ ion = 4  10–10  6.02  1023
= 24.08  10+13

Page # 1
[HX]
5. A certain buffer solution contains X– and HX with their concentrations related as = 0.2
[X ]
If the value of Kb at 25°C for X– is 10–9, pH of the buffer at 25°C is : (log 2 = 0.3)

(A*) 5.7 (B) 8.3 (C) 9.7 (D) 4.3


Sol. Kb for X– = 10–9  Ka for HX = 10–5  pKa = 5
[X ]
pH = pKa + log10 = 5 + 0.7 = 5.7
[HX]

M
6. The pH of a solution of a weak base, if its Kb value at 25°C is 2.5  10–3, will be : [Given log 11.18 = 1.05]
20

(A) 11.95 (B*) 12 (C) 12.05 (D) 1.95


2
C
Sol. Kb =   = 0.2
1 
 [OH–] = C= 0.05  0.2 = 0.01  pOH = 2  pH = 14 – 2 = 12

7. If equal volume of following solutions are mixed, precipitation of Hg2I2 (Ksp = 2.5  10–26) will occur only with :

(A) 10–4 M Hg22 + 10–111 M I– (B) 10–5 M Hg22 + 10–10 M I–

(C) 10–11 M Hg22 + 10–7 M I– (D*) 10–6 M Hg22 + 10–9 M I–


Sol. 10–6M Hg22+ + 10–9M I–
2
10 6  10 9   24
 IP =    = 10 = 1.25  10–25 > Ksp

2  2  8
 precipitation of Hg2I2 will occur.

8. In which of the following solutions, the degree of dissociation of H2O is less than 1.8  10–7 % at 25° C :

(A) 10–6 M HCl (B) 10–7 M NaOH (C) 10–8 M HCl (D*) All of these
Sol. The degree of dissociation of pure water at 25°C = 1.8  10–7%
 any H+ or OH– ions from an external source will suppress the dissociation of H2O.

9. Three sparingly soluble salts M2X, MX and MX3 have their solubility product in the ratio of 4: 1 : 27. Their
solubilities will be in the order :
(A) MX3 > MX > M2 X (B*) MX3 > M2X > MX (C) MX > MX3 > M2X (D) MX > M2X > MX3
Sol. For M2X , 4S13 = 4x ; S1 = x1/3
For MX , 4S22 = x ; S2 = x1/2
4
For MX3 , 27S3 = 27x ; S3 = x1/4
 S3 > S1 > S2

10. Calculate the pH of a 0.1 M K3PO4 solution. The third dissociation constant of phosphoric acid is 10–12.
Given (0.41)1/2 = 0.64 ; log 3 = 0.48
(A) 12.5 (B*) 12.44 (C) 12.25 (D) 12

Page # 2
Kw 10 14 Ch 2
Sol. Kh = = = 10–2  Kh =
K a3 10 12 (1  h)

Kh 10 2
as 1 – h = 1, h = = = 0.316
C 0.1
as h > 0.1  1 – h  1

10 1  h 2
 10–2 = or 0.1 (1 – h) = h2
(1  h)
or, 0.1 – 0.1 h = h2
or, h + 0.1 h – 0.1 = 0

 0.1  (0.1)2  4  0.1


or, h = = 0.27
2
as, PO43– + H2O HPO42– + OH–
c(1 – h) ch ch
 [OH–] = ch
= 0.1  0.27
= 27  10–3
pOH = 3 – log 27 = 3 log33 = 3 – 3 log 3
= 3 – 3  0.48 = 1.56
pH = 14 – 1.56 = 12.44

11. The pKa of HCN is 9.3. The pH of a solution prepared by mixture 2.5 mole of KCN and 2.5 mole of HCN in
water and making up the total volume to 500 ml is
(A*) 9.3 (B) 7.3 (C) 10.3 (D) 8.3
[Salt]
Sol. pH = pKa + log [ Acid] = 9.3
12. Calculate the molar solubility of AgCl in 2.5 M NH3 solution. [Given : KspAgCl = 10–10 , Kf[Ag(NH3)2]+ = 106]

(A*) 0.025 mol/L (B) 0.2 L mol–1 (C) 0.4 L mol–1 (D) None of these

Sol. AgCl(s) Ag+(aq) + Cl– (aq)

Ag+ + 2NH3 [Ag(NH3)2]+


K sp
[Ag+] = .... (1)
s

s s2 s2 s
Kf = [ Ag  ](2.5  2s)2 or, Kf = K (2.5  2s)2 or, Kf  Ksp = 2 or, 10–2 =
sp ( 2 .5  2 s ) 2.5  2s

s 0.025
or, = 10–12 or, s = 0.025 – 0.02 s or, 1.02 s = 0.025 or, s =  0.025 mol/L
2 . 5  2s 1.02

13. What is the concentration of acetic acid which can be added to 0.5 M formic acid so that the % dissociation
of neither acid is changed by the addition. Ka for acetic acid is 1.85 × 10-5, Ka for formic acid = 2.4 × 10-4.
(A) Any concentration (B) There can not be any concentration
(C*) 6.66 M (D) 3.33 M
Sol. C1 1 = C2 2
K a1 C1 = K a2 C 2
1.8 × 10–5 × C1 = 2.4 × 10–4 × 0.5
C1 = 6.66 M

Page # 3
14. CH3NH2 (Kb = 5 × 10–4) 0.1 mole of CH3NH2 (Kb = 5 × 10–4) is mixed with 0.08 mole of HCl and diluted to one
litre. What will be the H+ concentration in the solution? is mixed with 0.08 mole of HCl and diluted to one litre.
What will be the H+ concentration in the solution?
(A) 8 × 10–2 M (B*) 8 × 10–11 M (C) 1.6 × 10–11 M (D) 8 × 10–5 M
 
Sol. CH3NH2 + HCl  CH3 NH3 C l
.1 .08 .08
.02 0 .08
[Base] .02
For buffer sol. |OH–| = Kb x = 5 x 10–4 x
[Salt] .08

5
|OH–| = x 10–4
4

10 14 4
so |H+| = 4 = x 10–10 = 8 x 10–111 M Ans.
x10 4 5
5

15. 10–2 mole of NaOH was added to 10 litre of water. The pH will change by
(A*) 4 (B) 3 (C) 11 (D) 7
Sol. Initially pH = 7
finally [NaOH] = 10–3 so pOH = 3
pH = 11
So, (pH) = 4

16. The sum of negative logarithm of hydrogen ion and hydroxide ion concentration at 37ºC : [Kw = 2.5 × 10–4]
(A) 14 (B*) Less than 14 (C) greater than 14 (D) Data insufficient.

Sol. pH + pOH = pKW = 15 – log (5)2


= 15 – 2 × .699
= 13.6

17. In the reaction : [Ag(CN)2]– + Zn  the complex formed will be :


(A*) Tetrahedral (B) square planar (C) octahedral (D) triangal bipyramidal
Sol. 2 [Ag(CN)2]– + Zn  [Zn(CN)4]2– + 2 Ag
Tetrahedral

18. All the following complexes show a decreases in their weights when placed in a magnetic balance. Then
which of the these has square planar geometry :
(A) Ni(CO)4 (B*) K[AgF4] (C) Na2[Zn(CN)4] (D) None of these
Sol. K [AgF4] is square planar because Ag() is 4d8 and complex is diamagnetic.

19. It is an experiment fact that :


DMG + Ni()salt + NH4OH  Red ppt.
Which of the following is wrong about this red ppt :
(A) It is a non–ionic complex (B) It involves intra molecular H–bonding
(C*) Ni() is sp3 hybridised (D) It is a diamagnetic complex

Sol. The complex is

Page # 4
20. Sodium nitroprusside is a diamagnetic substance and a important laboratory reagent for the testing of
sulphide ions. The metal involved in the complexation in this is present in which of the following hybridisation
state :
(A) sp3 (B) dsp2 (C*) d2sp3 (D) sp3d2

Sol. Sodium nitroprusside is Na2 [Fe(CN)5 (N O) ] ; a diamagnetic complex.
21. All the following complex ions are found to be paramagnetic :
P : [FeF6]3– ; Q : [CoF6]3–
3+
R : [V(H2O)6] ; S : [Ti(H2O)6]3+
The correct order of their paramagnetic moment (spin only) is :
(A*) P > Q > R > S (B) P < Q < R < S (C) P = Q = R = S (D) P > R > Q > S
Sol. On the basis of number of electrons the correct order is P > Q > R > S.
22. When the complex K6 [(CN)5 Co–O–O–Co(CN)5] is oxidised by bromine into
K5[(CN)5 Co–O–O–Co(CN)5]. Then which of the following statements will be true about this change:
(A) Co() is oxidised in Co() (B) The O–O bond length will increase
(C*) The O–O bond length will decrease (D) ‘A’ & ‘B’ both are correct

Sol. In the first complex ligand is O22– which is oxidised into O21– .
hence
O – O bond length decreases.

23. The octahedral complex [Rh(NO2) (SCN) (en)2]+ can exist in a total number of isomeric forms including
stereoisomers :
(A) 2 (B) 4 (C) 8 (D*) 12

Sol.

(1) NO2 / SCN (5) NO2 / SCN (9)


(2) ONO / SCN (6) ONO / SCN (10)
(3) NO2 / NCS (7) NO2 / NCS (11)
(4) ONO NCS (8) ONO / NCS (12)
24. For the reaction Ni2+ + 4NH3 [Ni(NH3)4]2+
at equilibrium, if the solution contains 1.6 × 10–4% of nickel in the free state, And the concentration of NH3 at
equilibrium is 0.5 M. Then the instability constant of the complex will be approximately equal to :
(A) 1.0 × 10–5 (B) 1.5 × 10–16 (C*) 1.0 × 10–7 (D) 1.5 × 10–17
Sol. Ni2+ + 4 NH3 [Ni(NH3)4]2+

[Ni (NH3 ) 4 ] 2 
 k=
[Ni 2  ] [NH3 ] 4

[Ni 2 ]
But = 1.6 × 10–6
[Ni2  ]  [Ni (NH3 ) 4 ] 2 

Ni 2
or  1.6 × 10–6
[Ni (NH3 ) 4 ] 2 

10 6
 k= = 107
1.6  (0.5)4
Hence instability constant = 10–7

Page # 5
6 0
25. In which of the following complex ion, the metal ion will have t 2g , e g configuration according to CFT::

(A) [FeF6]3– (B) [Fe(CN)6]3– (C*) [Fe(CN)6]4– (D) None of these


Sol. In [Fe(CN)6]4– ; Fe() is t2g6 , eg0 due to strong ligands.

26. Spin only magnetic moment of a complex having CFSE = – 0.6 0 and surrounded by weak field ligands can
be
(A) 1.73 BM (B) 4.9 BM (C*) both (A) & (B) (D) None of these

Sol. The options can give CFSE = – 0.6 0 with weak field ligands  d4 and d9.

27. Which of the following statements is not correct?


(a) [Ni(H2O)6]2+ and [Ni(NH3)6]2+ have same value of CFSE
(b) [Ni(H2O)6]2+ and [Ni(NH3)6]2+ have same value of magnetic moment
(A*) Only a (B) Only b (C) Both a and b (D) None of these
Sol. Ammonia is a stronger field ligand than water.

28. The correct IUPAC name of the complex:

H3C OH
C = N• •
CoCl2
••
C=N is :
H3C OH

(A*) Dichlorodimethylglyoximatecobalt (II) (B) Bis(dimethyglyoxime)dichlorocobalt (II)


(C) Dimethylglyoximecobalt(II) chloride (D) Dichlorodimethylglyoxime-N, N-cobalt (II)

29. Which of the following pair of complexes have the same EAN of the central metal atoms/ions?
(A) [Cu(NH3)4]SO4 and K3[Fe(CN)6] (B) K4[Fe(CN)6] and [Co(NH3)6]Cl3
(C) K3[Cr(C2O4)3] and [Ni(CO)4] (D*) all of the above

Sol. (A) [Cu(NH3)4]2+ = 29 – 2 + 8 = 35


[Fe(CN)6]3– = 26 – 3 + 12 = 35
(B) [Fe(CN)6]4– = 26 – 2 + 12 = 36
[Co(NH3)6]3+ = 27 – 3 + 12 = 36
(C) [Cr(C2O4)3]3– = 27 – 3 + 12 = 36
[Ni(CO)4] = 28 + 8 = 36

30. In the reaction [CoCl2(NH3)4]+ + Cl–  [CoCl3(NH3)3] + NH3 only one isomer of product is obtained .
Hence the initial complex must be
(A) cis isomer (B*) trans isomer (C) both (D) mixture of both
Sol. Moderate


Cl
 

symmetrical only single product

Page # 6

Cl
  two isomers product

replacable positions

Aq.
31.  ' X' product :
AgNO 3 (Major )

(A) (B) (C*) (D)

Sol. Aqueous AgNO3 catalyse SN1 reaction.

32. Consider the following reaction.

SOCl
 2

ether
In the above reaction which phenomenon will take place :
(A) Inversion (B*) Retention (C) Racemisation (D) Isomerisation
Sol. It is SNi reaction so retention takes place

33. Which one of the following has maximum nucleophilicity ?

(A*) CH3 S  (B) (C) Et3N (D)


Sol. Nucleophilicity  size (in a group).

NaCN
34. 

In the given reaction rate is fastest, when (X) is :

O O
|| ||
(A) –OH (B)–NH2 (C)  S  O CH3 (D*)  O  S  CH3
|| ||
O O

Sol. Leaving group ability  Stability of anion.

35. In the following reaction the most probable product will be :

Page # 7
(A) (B*) (C) (D)

Sol. 

36. When the concentration of alkyl halide is tripled and the concentration of ion is reduced to half, the rate
of SN2 reaction increases by:
(A) 3 times (B) 2 times (C*) 1.5 times (D) 6 times
Sol. Rate of SN2  [R – X ] [Nu ]

r2 [3RX] 21 OH – 
r1 =
[RX] [OH – ]
r2 = 1.5 r1

37. In which of the following reaction the product obtained is t-butyl methyl ether ?

conc.H2SO4
(A) CH3OH + HO —CH2—CH3  (B)
   

(C*) (D)

Sol. t-butyl methyl ehter is a mixed ether and for the preparation of mixed ethers in high yield the essential
condition is the use of primary alkyl halide.
Thus,

 
NaBr

This reaction is williamson's synthesis.

5 PCl alc KOH


38. CH3CH2CH2OH    A   B
B is identified as :
(A) propanal (B) propane (C) propyne (D*) propene
5PCl or SOCl or
Sol. ROH     2  RCl
PX3 ( X Cl, Br, I) or
ZnCl2 / HCl

5 PCl
CH3CH2CH2OH   CH3 CH  CH2
HCl Alkene
B is an alkene (propene)

Page # 8
39. The only alcohol that cannot be prepared by the indirect hydration of alkene is :
(A) ethyl alcohol (B) propyl alcohol (C) isobutyl alcohol (D*) methyl alcohol
Sol. Methyl alcohol cannot be prepared by hydration of alkene as simplest alkene has two carbons so alcohol of
at least two carbon atoms can be formed.

H H3 C
HSO4
H2C = CH2 
 |  
(H2SO 4 )
H2 C 

H3 C
| HOH
 H2SO 4  CHCH2OH
CH2OSO 3H Ethanol

H2C = CH – CH3
HOH
 H3 C  CH  CH3  HO  CH 2  CH 2 CH3
H2SO4 | Minor product
(Markowniko ff 's OH
rule) Major product

40. Lucas reagent reacts fastest with :


(A) butanol–1 (B) butanol–2 (C*) 2–methyl–propanol–2 (D) 2–methyl–propanol–1
Sol. The order of reactivity with alcohols with lucas reagent is -
3º > 2º > 1º
 Lucas reagent reacts fastest with 3º alcohol.
(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

 choice (C) is the answer as it is 3º alcohol and rate of reaction is fastest for 3º alcohol.

Page # 9
BITSAT- PT - 2 - XII - (09-09-12)
Syllabus : Sequence&Series, P&C, Binomial Theorem, Mathematical Induction, Determinant, Straight lines

1. For every natural number n, n(n + 3) is always


(A*) even (B) odd (C) multiple of 4 (D) multiple of 5
Sol. Let P(n) = n(n + 3), then
P(1) = 1(4) = 4 which is even and multiple of 4.
P(2) = 2(5) = 10 which is even and multiple of 5.
P(3) = 3(6) = 18 which is even.
Hence it is clear that P(n) is even  n  N

2. The greatest positive integer which divides 32n – 2n – 1  n  N is


(A) 1 (B*) 2 (C) 4 (D) 8
Sol. Let P(n) = 32n – 2n – 1, then
P(1) = 32 – 2 – 1 = 6
P(2) = 34 – 4 – 1 = 76
P(3) = 36 – 6 – 1 = 722
Obviously 2 is the greatest positive integer which divides P(n)  n  N.

3. If the 9th terms of an A.P. be zero, then the ratio of its 29th and 19th term is
(A) 1 : 2 (B*) 2 : 1 (C) 1 : 3 (D) 3 : 1
Sol. Given that 9th term = a + (9 – 1) d = 0  a + 8d = 0
Now ratio of 29th and 19th terms
a  28d (a  8d)  20d 20d 2
= = = =
a  18d (a  8d)  10d 10d 1

4. The solution of the equation (x + 1) + (x + 4) + (x + 7) + ....+ (x + 28) = 155 is


(A*) 1 (B) 2 (C) 3 (D) 4
Sol. We have (x + 1) + (x + 4) + (x + 7) + ....+ (x + 28) = 155
Let n be the number of terms in the A.P. on L.H.S.
Then x + 28 = (x + 1) + (n – 1)3  n = 10
 (x + 1) + (x + 4) +.....+ (x + 28) = 155
10
 [(x + 1) + (x + 28)] = 155 x = 1
2

5. If the arithmetic and geometric means of a and b be A and G respectively, then the value of A – G will be
2
a–b ab  a – b 2ab
(A) (B) (C*)   (D)
a 2  2  ab

ab
Sol. Arithmetic mean of a and b = A =
2
and geometric mean G = ab
2
ab a  b – 2 ab ( a ) 2  ( b ) 2 – 2 ( a )( b )  a – b 
Then A – G = – ab = = =  
2 2 2  2 

6. In series 1,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3,3, 4,...........the 400th term is


(A) 9 (B) 10 (C*) 11 (D) 12
th
Sol. Number 11 starts at (12  22  .....  10 2 )  1
  position
i.e. 386th position.

1 2 3
7. The sum of the series 2 4
 2 4
  ......... to n terms is
1 1  1 1 2  2 1 3  34
2

n (n 2  1) n (n  1) n (n 2  1) n2  n
(A) 2
(B*) 2 (C) 2 (D)
n  n 1 2(n  n  1) 2(n  n  1) 2
Page # 1
Sol. Let Tn be the nth term of the series
1 2 3
2 4
 2 4
  .........
1 1  1 1 2  2 1 3  342

n n n 1 1 1 
Then Tn = = 2 2 2 = 2 2 = – 2
1 n  n 2 4 (1  n ) – n (n  n  1)(n – n  1) 2  n – n  1 n  n  1
 2

1 1 1 
= 2 1  (n – 1) n – 1  n(n  1) 
 
n
1 1 1  1  1 1  1  1 1  1 1 1 
Now T
r 1
r 
2
 1 – 1  1 .2  +
  2
 1  1 .2 – 1  2 . 3  +
  2
 1  2.3 – 1  3.4  +...+ 2 1  (n – 1) n – 1  n(n  1) 
   

1 1  n (n  1)
= 2 1 – 1  n (n  1)  =
  2(n 2  n  1)

8. The number of common terms to the sequence 17, 21, 25, .......417 and 16, 21, 26,.....466 is
(A) 21 (B) 19 (C*) 20 (D) 22
Sol. Common terms are 21,41,61,......(d = LCM of 4,5 = 20)
tn  417
 21 + (n – 1)20  417
 n  20.8
 max value of n = 20

9. If a, b, c are in A.P. as well as in G.P., then


(A) a = b  c (B) a  b = c (C) a  b  c (D*) a = b = c
ac
Sol. As given b = ......(i)
2
and b2 = ac
 (a + c)2 = 4ac  (a – c)2 = 0  a = c
putting a = c in (i) we get b = c
 a=b=c

1 1
10. If G be the geometric mean of x and y, then  =
G2 – x 2 G2 – y 2

1 2
(A) G2 (B*) 2 (C) (D) 3G2
G G2

Sol. As given G = xy

1 1 1 1
  = +
G2 – x 2 G2 – y 2 xy – x 2 xy – y 2

1  1 1 1 1
= x–y  –   = = 2
 x y  xy G

11. If a1, a2, a3,........ are in A.P. such that a1 + a5 + a10 + a15 + a20 + a24 = 225, then
a1 + a2 + a3 + ..... + a23 + a24 is equal to
(A) 909 (B) 75 (C) 750 (D*) 900
Sol. a1 + a5 + a10 + a15 + a20 + a24 = 225
 3 (a1 + a24) = 225 (sum of terms equidistant
from beginning and end are equal) a1 + a24 = 75
Now a1 + a2 + ........ + a23 + a24

24
= [a1 + a24] = 12 × 75 = 900
2
Page # 2
12. There are n distinct points on the circumference of a circle. The number of pentagons that can be formed
with these points as vertices is equal to the number of possible triangles. Then the value of n is-
(A) 7 (B*) 8 (C) 15 (D) 30
n
Sol. C5 = n C3
n
C 5 = n Cn – 3
5=n–3
n=8

13. A question paper consists of two parts A and B. Part A has 4 questions in which each question has an
alternative and part B has 3 questions without any alternative. The number of ways to attempt paper when
at least one question must be attempted for each part is (are)
(A) 561 (B*) 560 (C) 648 (D) 127
Sol. Required ways = (34 –1)(23 – 1) = 560

14. Number of ways such that 6 boys and 3 girls can be seated such that there is exactly one boy in between
any two girls
(A) 50400 (B*) 21600 (C) 10800 (D) 36000
Sol. Number of ways = 6! × 5 × 3!

15. All letters of the word 'RACHIT' are permuted in all possible ways and the words so formed (with or without
meaning) are written as in dictionary, then the 484th word is-
(A) RACHIT (B*) RACITH (C) RACTHI (D) RACIHT
Sol. ACHIRT  5!
CAHIRT  5!
HACIRT  5!
IACHRT  5!
RACHIT is 481th word RACHIT
RACHTI is 482th word
RACIHI is 483th word
RACITH is 484th word

16. The number of ways in which 6 different red roses and 3 different white roses can form a garland so that all
the white roses come together is
(A*) 2160 (B) 2165 (C) 2155 (D) 4320
(7 – 1)!  3 !
Sol. ways = = 2160
2

17. There are 10 points in a plane of which no three points are collinear and 4 points are concyclic. The number
of different circles that can be drawn through at least 3 of these points is
(A) 116 (B*) 117 (C) 120 (D) 115
Sol. Total number of solutions = 10C3 – 4C3 + 1 = 117.

18. How many different arrangements can be made out of the letters in the expansion A2B3C4, when written
in full length ?
9! 9! 9!
(A*) 2! 3 ! 4 ! (B) (C) 2 ! 3 ! – 4 (D) 2!  3 !  4 !
2. 3 . 4
Sol. Here A, B, C are repeated twice, thrice and four times respectively
(2  3  4)! 9!
 No. of arrangements = 2! 3 ! 4 ! = 2! 3 ! 4 !

19. Number of positive integral solutions of x1. x2 x3 = 210 is-


(A) 25 (B) 26 (C) 27 (D*) 81
Sol. We have
x1 x2 x3 = 210 = 2.3.5.7
 Total no. of solutions of the equation x1x2x3 = 210 is 3 × 3 × 3 × 3 = 81

Page # 3
20. Total number of ways in which 15 identical blankets can be distributed among 4 persons so that each of
them gets at least two blankets, equal to
(A*) 10C3 (B) 9C3 (C) 11C3 (D) none of these
Sol. Let 4 persons recieve B1, B2 , B3, B4 number of blankets
 B1 + B2 + B3 + B4 = 15 {B1,B2 , B3 ,B4  2}
Thus number of ways = 10C3

21. Let S (k) = 1 + 3 + 5 +.......+ (2k – 1) = 3 + k2. Then which of the following is true ?
(A) S(1) is correct
(B*) S(k)  S (k + 1)
(C) S(k) S(k + 1)
(D) Principle of mathematical induction can be used to prove the formula
Sol. S(k) = 1 + 3 + 5 + ..... + (2k – 1) = 3 + k2
put k = 1 in both sides, we get
 LHS = 1 and RHS = 3 + 1 = 4
 LHS  RHS
Put (k + 1) in both sides in the place of k
LHS = 1 + 3 + 5 + .... + (2k – 1) + (2k + 1)
RHS = 3 + (k + 1)2 = 3 + k2 + 2k + 1
Let LHS = RHS
1 + 3 + 5 + .......... + (2k – 1) + (2k + 1)
= 3 + k2 + 2k + 1
 1 + 3 + 5 + ...... + (2k – 1) = 3 + k2
If S(k) is true, then S(k + 1) is also true.
Hence, S(k)  S(k + 1).

22. If the coefficients of second, third and fourth terms in the expansion of (1 + x)2n are in A.P., then which of the
following is TRUE.
(A) n2 – 9n + 7 = 0 (B) 3n2 – 9n + 7 = 0 (C) 3n2 + 9n + 7 = 0 (D*) 2n2 – 9n + 7 = 0
2n 2n 2n
Sol. C1 , C2 , C3 are in A.P.
 2n2 – 9n + 7 = 0
9
3 2 1 
23. The term that is independent of x in the expansion of  x   is
2 3x 
5 4 3 4 5 6 6
9 3  1 9  1 9 3   1 9  3   13 
(A) C 6      (B*) C3   (C) C 4      (D) C 6     
2  3 6 2  3 2  3 
9 9 9 r r
3 2 1  9 3   1 
Sol.  x   =  Cr  x 2  – 
2 3x 
r 0 2   3x 
For the term that is independent of x
18 – 2r – r = 0  r = 6
3 6 3
3  1  1
Required term = C 6      = 9 C 6  
9
2
   3  6

24. In the expansion of (21/5 + 3 )20, the sum of all rational terms is equal to
(A) 21 (B) 84 (C) 97 (D*) none of these
20
Sol. Tr+1 = Cr (21/5)20–r ( 3 )r
r r
20 4
= Cr . 2 5 . 32

r r
As 2 and 3 are relatively primes. Tr+1 is rational, if and are integer’s
’s
5 2
 r is multiple of 10
 0  r  20
r = 0 ,10, 20
Thus sum of rational terms = T1 + T11 + T21 = 20C0 24 + 20C10 22. 35 + 20C20 . 310
This is more than 21, 84, 97
Page # 4
 3 2003 
25. The value of  28  where {.} denote the fractional part, is equal to
 

15 5 19 9
(A) (B) (C*) (D)
28 28 28 28
2003
Sol. 3 = 32001.32
= 9(27)667
= 9(28 – 1)667
= 9[ 667 C0 28667 + 667
C1 (28)666 + ...... + 667 C 667 (–1)667]
that means if we divide 32003 by 28, remainder is 19
 3 2003  19
Thus  28  =
  28

10
 1
26. The middle term in the expansion of  x   is
 x

10
1 10 10 10
(A) C1 (B*) C5 (C) C6 (D) C 7x .
x
5
T10  2  1
Sol. Middle term = = T5 + 1 = 10C5x10 – 5   = 10C5.
2 x

27. If |x| < 1, then the coefficient of xn in the expansion of (1 + x + x2 + x3 .......)2 is


(A) n (B) n – 1 (C) n + 2 (D*) n + 1
2
2
 1  2
Sol. (1 + x + x + ...) =   = (1 – x)–2
 1– x 
(–2)(–3)......(–2 – (r – 1))
 Tr +1
= r! (–x)r

(–1)r 2. 3......(r  1)(–1)r r


= x
r!

(–1)2r 1.2. 3......r (r  1) r


= x = (r + 1) xr
r!
 coefficient of xr = r + 1
 coefficient of xn = n + 1

2m 2m
1 r
28. If a2m = 
r 0
2m
Cr
, then 
r 0
2m
Cr
equals

m
(A) (2m – 1) a2m (B) 2ma2m (C*) ma2m (D) am
2
2m 2m 2m 2m
r 2m – r r  2m – r 1
Sol. E= 
r 0
2m
Cr
= 
r 0
2m
Cr
 2E = 
r 0
2m
Cr
= 2m 
r 0
2m
Cr

29. Last three digits of the number N = 7100 – 3100 are


(A) 100 (B) 300 (C) 500 (D*) 000
Sol. N = 7100 – 3100
= (10 – 3)100 – 3100 = (100C0. 10100 – ........... – 100C99. 10.399) + 3100 – 3100
= (1000)N + 3100 – 3100
= (1000) N
last 3 digits = 000

Page # 5
30. If the lines represented by x2 – 2pxy – y2 = 0 are rotated about origin through an angle , one in clockwise
direction and other in anticlockwise direction, then the equation of the bisectors of the angle between the
lines in new position is
(A) px2 + 2xy + py2 = 0 (B) px2 – 2xy + py2 = 0 (C) px2 – 2pxy – py2 = 0 (D*) px2 + 2xy – py2 = 0
x2 – y2 xy
Sol. Bisectors of x2 – 2pxy – y2 = 0 is =
2 –p
px2 + 2xy – py2 = 0
Lines in new position will also have same angle bisectors.

31. If 3a + 2b + 6c = 0, then the family of straight lines ax + by + c = 0 passes through a fixed point whose
coordinates are given by
 1 1  1 1
(A*)  ,  (B) (2, 3) (C) (3, 2) (D)  , 
2 3 3 2

 – 3a – 2b 
Sol. ax + by +   =0
 6 
6ax + 6by – 3a – 2b = 0
a(6x – 3) + b(6y – 2) = 0
x = 1/2, y = 1/3

32. The distance between the lines 3x + 4y = 9 and 6x + 8y = 15 is


(A) 3/2 (B*) 3/10 (C) 6 (D) none of these

15
9– 3
2
Sol. Distance = =
32  42 10

33. A ray of light passing through the point A (1, 2) is reflected at a point B on the x-axis and then passes
through C (5, 3) . Then the equation of AB is-
(A*) 5x + 4y = 13 (B) 5x – 4y = – 3 (C) 4x + 5y = 14 (D) 4x – 5y = – 6

Sol.

AB will pass through C.


5
 equation of AB is y+3= (x – 5)
–4
 4y + 5x = 13

34. If bx + cy = a, where a, b, c are the same sign, be a line such that the area enclosed by the line and the
1
axes of reference is unit2, then
8
(A) b, a, c are in G.P. (B) b, 2a, c are in A.P.
a
(C) b, , c are in A.P.. (D*) b, –2a, c are in G.P.
2

Page # 6
]Sol. bx + cy = a
b c
x+ y=1
a a

x y
+ =1
a a
   
b c

1
Area of OAB = (given)
8

1 a a 1
 . . =±
2 b c 8

a2 1

bc 4
 4a2 = ± (bc)  (2a)2 = ± bc

b, ±2a, c are in G.P.

35. In a ABC if A is (1, 2) and equation of the medians through B and C are x + y = 5 and x = 4 respectively
then B is
(A) (1, 4) (B*) (7, – 2) (C) (4, 1) (D) (–2, 7)

Sol.

point of intersection of x + y = 5 and x = 4


G  (4, 1)
1 b  4
 =4  b=7
3
So B  (7, – 2)

36. Let B1 = 3x + 4y – 7 = 0 & B2  4x – 3y – 14 = 0 are angle bisectors of the angle between the lines L1 = 0 &
L2 = 0 in which L1 is passes through the point (1, 2) then
(A*) B1 is acute angle bisector (B) B2 is acute angle bisector
(C) B1 & B2 both are right angle bisector (D) Data is insufficient
Sol. Let d1 & d2 are the distance of point (1, 2) from the bisector B1 & B2.
387 4
d1 = =
5 5

4  6  14 16
d2 = =
5 5
 d1 < d2
 B1 is an acute angle bisector

37. If P is a point (x, y) on the line y = – 3x such that P and the point (3, 4) are on the opposite sides of the
line 3x – 4y = 8, then
8 8 11 1
(A*) y < – (B) y > – (C) y > – (D) y < –
5 5 5 5

Page # 7
Sol. Since 3.3 – 4.4 – 8 = – 15 < 0
 y
 3x – 4y – 8 > 0  3  –  – 4y – 8 > 0
 3

8
 5y < – 8 y<–
5

38. If the lines ax + 12y + 1 = 0, bx + 13y + 1 = 0 and cx + 14y + 1 = 0 are concurrent, then a, b, c are in-
(A) H.P. (B) G.P. (C*) A.P. (D) None of these
Sol. Since the given lines are concurrent,
a 12 1 a – b –1 0
b 13 1 b 13 1
 =0  =0
c 14 1 c –b 1 0
[Applying R3  R3 – R2, R1  R1 – R2]
 a – b + c – b = 0or 2b = a + c
 a, b, c are in A.P.

39. A line passes through the point (2, 2) and is perpendicular to the line 3x + y = 3. Its y-intercept is-
1 2 4
(A) (B) (C) 1 (D*)
3 3 3
Sol. Equation of the line through the point (2, 2)
1
and  to line (1) is (y – 2) = (x – 2)
3
 3y – 6 = x – 2
 x – 3y + 4 = 0
4
Its y-intercept = . [Putting x = 0]
3

40. The line segment joining the points (1, 2) and (k, 1) is divided by the line 3x + 4y – 7 = 0 in the ratio
4 : 9, then k is-
(A*) – 2 (B) 2 (C) –3 (D) 3
Sol. L : 3x + 4y – 7 = 0
– L (1, 2) : L (k, 1) = 4 : 9
 – (3 + 8 – 7) : (3k + 4 – 7) = 4 : 9
 – 4 : (3k – 3) = 4 : 9  k = – 2.

x 2  3x x 1 x  3
41. If px4 + qx3 + rx2 + sx + t = x 1 2x x  3 then t is equal to
x3 x4 3x

(A) 33 (B) 20 (C) 15 (D*) 21

x 2  3x x –1 x 3
Sol. 4 3 2
px + qx + rx + sx + t = x 1 2–x x–3
x–3 x4 3x

Putting x = 0

0 –1 3
t= 1 2 – 3 = 21
–3 4 0

42. If the system of linear equations x + 2ay + az = 0, x + 3by + bz = 0, and x + 4 cy + cz = 0 has a non-zero
solution, then a, b, c
(A) are in AP (B) are in GP (C*) are in HP (D) satisfy a + 2b + 3c = 0
Page # 8
Sol. The system of linear equations has a non-zero solution, then

1 2a a
1 3b b
=0
1 4c c

Applying R2  R2 – R1, R3  R3 – R1

1 2a a
0 3b – 2a b – a = 0
0 4c – 2a c – a

 (3b – 2a) (c – a) – (4c – 2a) (b – a) = 0


 3bc – 3ba – 2ac + 2a2 = 4bc – 2ab – 4ac + 2a2
 4ac – 2ac = 4bc – 2ab – 3bc + 3ab
 2ac = bc + ab
On dividing by abc, we get
2 1 1
= +
b a c
Hence, a, b, c are in HP.

log a p 1
43. If a, b, c are pth, qth and rth, terms of a G.P., then log b q 1 equals -
log c r 1

(A*) 0 (B) 1 (C) log abc (D) pqr


Sol. If A be the first term and R be the c.r. of G.P., then
a = ARp–1, b=ARq–1, c=ARr–1
log a = logA + (p – 1)log R

log A p 1 (p  1) logR p 1
log A q 1 (q  1) logR q 1
 = +
log A r 1 (r  1) log R r 1

p 1 p 1 1
q 1 q 1 1
= 0 + log R =0 [by C2 – C1]
r 1 r 1 1

1 logx y log x z
44. For positive numbers x, y, z, the numerical value of the determinant log y x 1 log y z is
logz x logz y 1
(A*) 0 (B) 1 (C) 2 (D) None of these

1 logx y log x z log x log y log z


1 1 1
Sol. Value of determinant log y x 1 log y z = log x . log y . log z log x log y log z = 0
logz x logz y 1 log x log y log z

45. The number of values of ' r ' satisfying the equation, 39 C3r 1 39C = 39 Cr 2 1 39C3r is
r2
(A) 1 (B*) 2 (C) 3 (D) 4

Page # 9
39
Sol. C 3r  1  39 Cr 2  39 C r 2 1  39 C 3r  39
C 3r 1  39C3r =
39
C r 2 1  39 Cr 2

40 40
C2r = Cr 2

r2 = 3r or r = 0, 3
2
or r + 3r = 40  r = 5, –8

Page # 10
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 1

BITSAT–XII/XIII
PT–02
1. The average velocity of molecules of a gas of molecular weight M at temperature T is:

3 RT 8RT 2RT
(A*) 0 (B) (C) (D)
M M M
Sol. Average velocity of a molecule at any temperature is zero because of its random motion.

2. The ratio of r.m.s. speed to the r.ms. angular speed of a diatomic gas at certain temperature is:
(assume m = mass of one molecule, M = molecular mass,  = moment of inertia of the molecules)

3 3I 3I
(A) (B) (C*) (D) 1
2 2M 2m

1 3
Sol. mV 2  kT
2 2
1 2 2
  kT
2 2

V 3

 2m

3. A gas mixture consists of 2 moles of oxygen and 4 moles of argon at temperature T. Neglecting all
vibrational modes, the total internal energy of the system is:
(A) 4 R T (B) 5 R T (C) 15 R T (D*) 11 R T
f
Sol. In an ideas gas internal energy = nRT
2
5 3
U= × RT + 4 × RT = 11 RT.
T.
2 2

4. Maxwell’s velocity distribution curve is given for the same quantity at two different temperatures. For
the given curves.

(A) T 1 > T 2 (B*) T 1 < T 2 (C) T1  T2 (D) T 1 = T 2


Sol. Higher is the temperature greater is the most probable velocity.

5. In a process the density of a gas remains constant. If the temperature is doubled, then the change in
the pressure will be:
(A*) 100 % Increase (B) 200 % Increase (C) 50 % Decrease (D) 25 % Decrease
PM
Sol. We have =
RT
P1M P2M P1 P2
= 
RT1 RT2 T1 2T1
P2 = 2P1

6. 12 gm He and 4 gm H 2 is filled in a container of volume 20 litre maintained at temperature


300 K. The pressure of the mixture is nearly :
(A) 3 atm (B) 5 atm (C*) 6.25 atm (D) 12.5 atm
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 2

Sol. PV = n RT
 12 4 
nRT     8.31 300
P= =  4 2 = 6.25 × 105 Pa
V
20  10 3

7. In an experiment the speeds of any five molecules of an ideal gas are recorded. The experiment is
repeated N times where N is very large. The average of recorded values, is :

2RT 8RT 3RT RT


(A*) (B) (C) (D)
M M M M
Sol. When speed of 5 molecules which are selected randomly, then the average is most likely to be equal to
the most probable speed.
2 RT
 The average of these values is most likely equal to .
M

8. P-V diagram of a cyclic process A  B  C  A is shown in figure. The temperature of the gas will be
maximum at :

(A) A (B) B
(C*) a point between A and B (D) a point between B and C
Sol. Temperature at points A and B are equal. A to B temperature first increases then decrease.

9. On an X temperature scale, water freezes at – 125.0° X and boils at 375.0° X. On a Y temperature


scale, water freezes at – 70.0°Y and boils at – 30.0°Y. The value of temperature on X-scale equal to the
temperature of 50.0°Y on Y-scale is :
&
(A) 455.0° X (B) – 125.0° X (C*) 1375.0° X (D) 1500.0° X
X  ( 125 ) Y  ( 70 )
Sol. =
500 40
For Y = 50
X = 1375.0°X

10. The amount of heat supplied to decrease the volume of an ice water mixture by 1 cm 3 without any
change in temperature, is equal to : (ice = 0.9, water = 80 cal/gm)
(A) 360 cal (B) 500 cal (C*) 720 cal (D) None
Sol. x gm ice convert into x gm water
x 0 .9
–x=1 x= =9
0 .9 0 .1
 Q = 9 × 80 = 720 cal

11. n moles of a gas filled in a container at temperature T is in equilibrium initially. If the gas is compressed
slowly and isothermally to half its initial volume, the work done by the atmosphere on the piston is:
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 3

nRT nRT  1
(A*) (B)  (C) n R T   n 2   (D)  n R T l n 2
2 2  2
Sol. Work done by atmosphere = Patm V
V
= Patm ................(i)
2
As ; Initially gas in container is in thermodynamic equilibrium with its surroundings.
 Pressure inside cylinder = Patm
& PV = nRT
nRT
 PatmV = nRT or V= P
atm

Putting in (1),
nRT
W=
2

12. In the figure shown the pressure of the gas in state B is:

63 73 48
(A) P (B*) P (C) P (D) none of these
25 0 25 0 25 0

Sol.

AN = 3v0 cos2 37º


P0  16 
PB =  v 0  3v 0  
v0  25 

 48 
= 1  
 25 
= P0(73/25) Ans. (B)

13. A vessel contains an ideal monoatomic gas which expands at constant pressure, when heat Q is given
to it. Then the work done in expansion is:
3 2 2
(A) Q (B) Q (C*) Q (D) Q
5 5 3
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 4

.Sol. For process at constant pressure


5 2
Q = nCp T = nR T and W= PV = nRT = Q
2 5

14. A therm odynam ic process of one m ole ideal m onoatom ic gas is shown in figure. The
efficiency of cyclic process ABCA will be :

100
(A) 25% (B) 12.5% (C) 50% (D*) %
13
1 1
Sol. W= P V = RT 0 .
2 0 0 2
13
Heat absorbed = QAB + QBC = CVT 0 + CP2T 0 = RT 0
2

1
P0 V0
2  13 13 
 Efficiency = 13 × 100  P0 V0  RT0 
P0 V0  2 2 
2

1
= × 100 = 7.7 % Ans.
13

15. 1 mole of an ideal gas undergoes an isothermal expansion as energy is added to it as heat Q. Graph
shows the volume V versus Q. The gas temperature is nearly equal to : (use R = 8.31 J/K.mole)

(A) 208.4 K (B) 268.2 K (C*) 312.6 K (D) 353.8 K


Sol. For isothermal process
v2
Q = nRT n
v1
1800 = 1 × 8.3 T n z
get T = 312.6 K

16. Curve in the figure shows an adiabatic compression of an ideal gas from 15 m3 to 12 m3, followed by an
isothermal compression to a final volume of 3.0 m3. There are 2.0 moles of the gas. Total heat supplied to
the gas is equal to : (n2 = 0.693)
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 5
p(Pa)

400

3
V(m )
3 12 15
(A) 4521 J (B) –4521 J (C*) –6653 J (D) –8476 J
Sol. There is no heat transfer in adiabatic compression. In isothermal process
pwafd : ) ks"e laihMu esad ksbZm"ekLFkkukUrj.k ughagksrk gSA lerkih izfØ ;k esa
V2
Q=W = P1V1 ln
V1
1
= 400 x 12 ln = –6653 J
4
17. Two bodies A and B have emissivities 0.5 and 0.8 respectively. At some temperatures the two bodies
have maximum spectral emissive powers at wavelength 8000 Å and 4000 Å respectively. The ratio of
their emissive powers at these temperatures is:
5 5
(A*) (B) 10 (C) (D) None of these
128 16
Sol. Let the body have temperatures T 1 and T 2 respectively at wavelength  1 = 8000Å and  2 = 4000Å.
 From Wien’s displacement law
 T = constant
 1T1 = 2T2 or 8000 × T 1 = 4000T 2
T1 1
or T2 = 2
Emissive power = e AT 4
 Ratio of emissive powers at these temperature is

e1T14 0 .5  1
4
5
= 4 = ×   =
e 2 T2 0 .8 2 128

18. N(< 100) molecules of a gas have velocities 1, 2, 3........ N km/s respectively. Then
(A) rms speed and average speed of molecules is same.
(B) ratio of rms speed to average speed is (2N + 1)(N + 1)/6N
(C) ratio of rms speed to average speed is (2N + 1)(N + 1)/6

(D*) ratio of rms speed to average speed of molecules is 2 ( 2N  1)


6(N  1)

V12  V22  ..........VN2 12  22  ..........  N2 N(N  1) (2N  1)


Sol. Vrms = = = 6N
N N

(N  1) ( 2N  1)
 Vrms =
6

V1  V2  ........  VN 1  2  ........  N N (N  1) N1


Vavg = = = 2 N = 2
N N

Vrms ( 2 N  1)
2
Vavg = 6 (N  1)
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 6
19. A solid spherical black body of radius r and uniform mass distribution is in free space. It emits power
‘P’ and its rate of colling is R then
1
(A) R P  r2 (B*) R P  r (C) R P  1/r2 (D) R P 
r
Sol. Rate of radiation per unit area is proportional to (T 4)

 P  AT 4
 P  r 2.
dT dT 1
Also ms T4 
 AT =R
dt dt r
(because m = (v)  r3 and A  r2)

20. A black body emits radiation at the rate P when its absolute temperature is T. At this temperature the
wavelength at which the radiation has maximum spectral emissive power is 0. If at another temperature

T the power radiated is P and wavelength at maximum spectral emissive power is 0 then
2

(A*) P T = 32PT (B) P T = 16PT (C) P T = 8PT (D) P T = 4PT

Sol. For a black body, wavelength for maximum intensity :


1
 & P  T4
T
1
 P  P = 16 P.  P T = 32PT
4

21. Thermal coefficient of volume expansion at constant pressure for an ideal gas sample of n moles having
pressure P0, volume V0 and temperature T 0 is
R P0 V0 1 1
(A) P V (B) (C*) T (D) n T
0 0 R 0 0
Sol. [Easy]
PV = nRT
PdV = nRdT
1 dV dV nR 1
 = and   =
V dT dT P T
1
For given temperature T0 ,  = T
0

22. A solid sphere of iron at 2°C is lying at the bottom of a bucket full of water at 2°C. If the temperature of
the water is increased to 3°C, the buoyant force on the sphere due to water will
(A*) Increase (B) Be unchanged (C) Decrease
(D) Increase or decrease depends upon the numerical values of coefficient of expansion of water and
iron.

Sol. As the temperature of water is increased from 2°C to 3°C the density of water increases (remember
anamolous behaviour of water), also the volume of sphere increases. Therefore bouyant force on sphere
due to water shall increase.

23. The lengths of two metallic rods at temperatures  are LA and LB and their linear coefficient of expansion are
A and B respectively. If the difference in their lengths is to remain constant at any temperature then
(A) LA/LB=A/B (B*) LA/LB=B/A (C) A=B (D) AB=1
Sol. Change in LA = change in LB
i.e. LA = LB
 AT LA = BTLB
or ALA = BLB .
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 7
24. Two identical long, solid cylinders are used to conduct heat from temp T 1 to temp T 2. Originally the
cylinder are connected in series and the rate of heat transfer is H. If the cylinders are connected in
parallel then the rate of heat transfer would be :
(A) H /4 (B) 2H (C*) 4H (D) 8H
R
Sol. (B) Initially effective resistance = 2R. In parallel effective resistance =
. It has reduced by a factor of
2
1/4 so rate of heat transfer would be increased by a factor of 4, keeping other parameters same.

25. A pendulum clock (fitted with a small heavy bob that is connected with a metal rod) is 5 seconds fast
each day at a temperature of 15°C and 10 seconds slow at a temperature of 30°C. The temperature at
which it is designed to give correct time, is
(A) 18°C (B*) 20°C (C) 24°C (D) 25°C
1
Sol. Fractional loss of time per second = T
2
1
Therefore  (T 0 – 15) × (24 hrs) = 5
2
1
and  (30 – T 0) × (24 hrs) = 10
2
on solving T 0 = 20°C

10 9
26. A shell, made of material of electrical conductivity (-m)–1, has thickness t = 2 mm and radius R = 10 cm.

In an arrangement, its inside surface is kept at a lower potential than its outside surface. The resistance
offered by the shell is equal to -

+
-

(A) 5 x 10–12  (B) 2.5 x 10–11  (C) 5 x 10–12  (D*) 5 x 10–11 


1 t
Sol. R= .
 4R 2
Using values R = 5 x 10–11 

27. In the given network of four resistances, the equivalent resistance is

(A) 20  (B) 5.4  (C) 12  (D*) 4.5 

Hint : Given circuit is equivalent to

solve it can be calculated


BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 8
28. In the figure shown:

(A) current will flow from A to B


(B*) current may flow from A to B
(C) current will flow from B to A
(D) the direction of current will depend on r.
Sol. current through resistance will be from
A to B if
20 –  >    < 18
and from
B to A if
20 –  < 2   < 18

29. The terminal voltage across a battery of emf  cannot be:


(A) 0 (B) > 
(C) <  (D*) none of these is correct
Sol. Termianal potential across battery is :
–ir  If battery works as a source
 + ir  If battery works as a local
  Ideal battery or if i = 0.

30. In the circuit shown the readings of ammeter and voltmeter are 4A and 20V respectively. The meters are non-
ideal, then R is

(A) 5  (B) less than 5


(C*) greater than 5 (D) between 4 and 5.

Sol. Effective resistance in the branch of R and voltmeter is ;


20
Reff = = 5
4
Also in parallel effective resistance is less than the individual resistance.
 Value of R must be greater than 5.

31. For an adiabatic process graph between PV & V for a sample of ideal gas will be :

(A) (B*) (C) (D)

Sol. PV T
for adiabatic process,
TV–1 = constant
32. The maximum current in a galvanometer can be 10 mA. It’s resistance is 10. To convert it into an ammeter
of 1 Amp. a resistor should be connected in
(A) series, 0.1 (B*) parallel, 0.1 (C) series, 100 (D) parallel, 100.

Sol. G = 10 mA
G = 10
S ( – G) = G G where S is shunt in parallel
 G G 10  10 3  10
S=  = 0.1
  G 1  10  10 3
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 9

33. Battery of internal resistor ' r ' and e.m.f.  is connected to a variable external resistance AB. If the sliding
contact is moved from A to B, then terminal potential difference of battery will :

(A) remain constant & is independent of value of external resistance


(B*) increase continuously
(C) decrease continuously
(D) first increase and then will decrease.
Sol. Terminal potential difference across battery will be
=  – ir
If resistance increases then ‘i’ will decrease
So, potential will increase.

34. Two cells of emf 1 and 2 (2 < 1) are joined as shown in figure :

When a potentiometer is connected between x and y it balances for 300 cm length against 1. On connecting
2
the same potentiometer between x and z it balances for 100 cm length against 1 and 2. Then the ratio 
1
is :

1 3 1 2
(A) (B) (C) (D*)
3 4 4 3
Sol. 1 = 300  ..........(i)
–2 + 1 = 100  ..........(ii)
where,  is the potential gradient
2 2
 1 = 3 .

35. The equivalent resistance of the circuit across points A and B is equal to :

A B 15 10

10 15

30 20

20 30

(A) 22.5  (B) 25  (C*) 37.5  (D) 75 


Ans. (C)
Sol. Equivalent circuit is
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 10

10 15

A 10 20 30 15 B

20 30

= 37.5 

36. In the circuit shown in figure find the current in branch AB of the circuit :

B
20 V
(A*) 5 A (B) 0.5 A
11
(C) A (D) None of these
3
Sol. Here in this circuit its equivalent 1.5A
resistance across battery can be given as

A
40
Req = 
11 20 V 4A
1.5A

Thus current through battery is B


5.5A

20
I = 40 = 5.5 A.
11

Thus current 1.5A (from figure) will be divided in 10 & 5 in inverse ratio thus

1.5 10
I5 = = 1A
[rP] Vivah - 01 - Mujhe Haq Hai.mp3 15

Thus current is branch AB is


IAB = 1 + 4 = 5A Ans.

37. What should be value of E for which galvanometer shows no deflection :

(A*) 10 V (B) 5 V (C) 15 V (D) 20 V


E  10
Sol. =
20
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 11

E  10
10 = E – ×5
20
40 = 4E – E + 10
30 = 3E
E = 10 V.

38. In the circuit shown in the figure, the potential difference between B and C is :

(A) 0.1 V (B) 2V (C) 0.5 V (D*) 4.25 V


Sol. Apply K.V.L.
K.V.L.
i.5 + 2 + i.3 + i.6 + i.2 – 4 = 10
16i = 12
3
i= A
4
Potential difference between B and C is
3
2+3× = 4.25 V
4

39. An ideal gas is taken through cyclic process as shown in the figure. The net work done by the gas is:

(A) zero (B*) PV (C) 2 PV (D) 3 PV

40. Heat energy absorbed by a system in going through a cyclic process is shown in the figure [ V in litres
and p in kPa ] is:
BITSAT(XII)_PT-2_Pg.No # 12

(A) 107  J (B) 104  J (C*) 102  J (D) 107  J n2 =


1/ 2
T2  n4 
a  T=  
2  a 
BITSAT PAPER (PT-02)_DATE : 09-09-12_CLASS-XII
Instructions (Q.1 & 2) Choose the alternative which can replace the italicized word :

1. He is a candid politician
(A*) frank (B) faithful (C) soft spoken (D) fearless

2. He was punished for shirking his official work :


(A) solving (B*) avoiding (C) delegating (D) postponing

Instructions (Q. 3 & 4) Choose the correct antonym :

3. Quell
(A) Anger (B) Query (C) Suppress (D*) Aggravate

4. Soporific
(A) Inducing (B) Inciting (C) Consoling (D*) Vigorous

Instructions(Q 5 & 6) Fill in the blanks with the most appropriate word from the given options.

5. They have decided to meet the prime minister in order to have their _______ heard.
(A) agony (B) suffering (C) sorrow (D*) woes

6. The pleasures of the world are _________ as they are not permanent.
(A) tangible (B) existent (C) corporeal (D*) illusory

Instructions (Q 7 to 9) Pick up the correct synonyms :

7. Facsimile
(A) laughter (B) not genuine (C) epithet (D*) exact copy

8. Tenable
(A) actual (B) valuable (C*) defensible (D) ever-lasting

9. Stellar
(A) glorious (B) stolen (C) outstanding (D*) starry
Instructions(Q 10 to 13) Read the following passage and answer the questions carefully.
The world of today has achieved much, but for all its declared love for humanity it has based itself far more
on hatred and violence than on the virtues that make man human. War is the negation of truth and
humanity. Sometimes, war may be unavoidable but its progeny are terrible to contemplate. Not mere
killing, for man must die, but the deliberate and persistent propagation of hatred and falsehood, which
gradually become the normal habits of the people.
It is dangerous and harmful to be guided in our life's course by hatreds and aversions, for they are
wasteful of energy and limit and twist the mind, and prevent if from perceiving the truth.

10. The achievements of the world are not impressive because


(A) there is nothing much to boast of (B) they are mostly in the field of violence
(C*) its love of humanity is a pretence (D) the world hasn't made any achievement
11. War is the negation of truth means
(A) wars do not exist (B) wars are evil
(C) wars kill human beings (D*) wars spread and advertise falsehood
12. The world's declared love of humanity is
(A) false (B) true (C) non-existent (D*) not to be taken seriously

1
PT-02_XII_BITSAT_PAGE # 1
1
13. Man should be guided by
(A) scientific discoveries (B) practical wisdom
(C*) generous human feelings (D) materialism
Instruction (Q. 14 & 15) Select the option which has same relation as the given pair of words.

14. “Heart’ is related to ‘Blood’ in the same way as ‘Lung’ is related to


(A*) Oxygen (B) Chest (C) Purification (D) Air

15. ‘Face’ is related to ‘Expression’ in the same way as ‘Hand’ is related to


(A*) Gesture (B) Work (C) Handshake (D) Pointing

Directions (16 to 19): Find the missing numbers/letter/terms :

16. 2.5, 3.5, 15, 72, 352, ?


(A) 1785 (B*) 1885 (C) 1925 (D) 1980
Sol. Even number cube + cube’s digit’s multiplication

17. CK 10 5 JR
OF 7 3 TX
KM ? ? PV
(A) 4, 6 (B) 6, 8 (C*) 6, 11 (D) 10, 12
Sol. Sum of alphabets numbers and then add their digits.

10 54 ?

18. 7 45 32
24 144 68

(A) 42 (B) 36 (C) 6 (D*) 4


Sol. (D) Half of the difference of top & bottom is the middle number in that column.

19. At a dinner party every two guests used a bowl of rice between them, every three guests used a bowl of
dal between them and every four used a bowl of meat between them. There were altogether 65 dishes.
How many guests were present at the party?
(A) 60 (B) 65 (C) 90 (D) None of these
Sol. (A) Let the number of guests be x. Then,
x x x
number of bowls of rice = ; number of bowls of dal = ; number of bowls of meat = .
2 3 4
x x x 6x  4x  3x  65  12 
    65   65  13 x  65  12  x     60.
2 3 4 12  13 

20. If the following scrambled letters are rearranged to form the name of a city, the city so formed is famous
for its :
ACGHHIORRTT
(A) Locks (B*) Cement Plant (C) Temples (D) Pottery
Sol. (B) The city is CHITTORGARH and it is famous for Cement Plant.

21. DRAMA is coded as 73 and STAGE as 25. How will you code ACTOR ?
(A) 56 (B) 50 (C*) 75 (D) 67
Sol. (C) DRAMA = (4 + 18 + 1 + 13 + 1) = 37
STAGE = (19 + 20 + 1 + 7 + 5) = 52.
ACTOR = (1 + 3 + 20 + 15 + 18) = 57

2
PT-02_XII_BITSAT_PAGE # 2
2
22. What was the day on 24th October, 1984 ?
(A) Monday (B*) Wednesday (C) Thursday (D) Friday

23. Three positions of the same dice are given below. Observe the figures carefully and tell which number will
come in place of ?

5 4 5
2 1 ?
6 2 4
(i) (ii) (iii)
(A) 1 (B*) 3 (C) 2 (D) 6

24. Ram is to the South-East of Mukesh, Shyam is to the East of Mukesh and North-East of Ram. If
Suresh is to the North of Ram and North-West of Shyam, in which direction of Mukesh is Suresh
located ?
(A) North-West (B) South-West (C*) North-East (D) South-East

Directions : (25) In the following questions, some figures are given in a sequence. Find out the figure from the
alternatives, which will come in place of the question mark to continue the sequence.

Problem Figure

25.

(1) (2) (3) (4) (5)


Answer Figure

Ans. D

(A) (B) (C) (D)

BITSAT_PT-02 (CLASS-XII)

Ques. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Ans. A B D D D D D C D C D D C A A
Ques. 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
Ans. B C D A B C B B C D

3
PT-02_XII_BITSAT_PAGE # 3
3