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EnerLyzer

User Manual
OMICRON Test Universe

Article Number VESD4005 ̶ Manual Version: ENLY.ENU.13 – Year: 2015


© 2015 by OMICRON electronics GmbH. All rights reserved.
This manual is a publication of OMICRON electronics GmbH.
All rights including translation reserved. Reproduction of any kind, e.g., photocopying, microfilming,
optical character recognition and/or storage in electronic data processing systems, requires the explicit
consent of OMICRON electronics. Reprinting, wholly or in part, is not permitted.
The product information, specifications, and technical data embodied in this manual represent the
technical status at the time of writing and are subject to change without prior notice.
OMICRON electronics translates this manual from the source language English into a number of other
languages. Any translation of this manual is done for local requirements, and in the event of a dispute
between the English and a non-English version, the English version of this manual shall govern.

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents

1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
1.1 EnerLyzer Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5
2 Test Sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
2.1 BINARY/ANALOG INPUT (1 - 10). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7
2.2 General Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

2.3 Multimeter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8


2.4 Transient Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

2.5 Harmonic Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9


2.6 Trend Recording Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9
3 The EnerLyzer Test Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
3.1 Launching the EnerLyzer Test Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
3.2 Multimeter Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
3.3 Transient Recording Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19
3.4 Input Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22
3.5 Harmonic Analysis Mode. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
3.6 Trend Recording Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
3.7 Trend Recording Cursors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
3.8 Setting the Trend Recording Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37
4 TransView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
4.1 Fundamental TransView Operation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
4.2 Time Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .45
4.3 Harmonics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
4.4 Vector Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47
4.5 Impedance Circle Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48

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OMICRON Test Universe

5 Working with Current Clamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49


5.1 C-PROBE1 Standard Current Clamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
5.2 Current Clamps with Voltage Output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
5.3 Current Clamps with Current Output. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
5.4 Configuring an Analog Input for Current Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
6 Working with Precision Shunts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
6.1 C-Shunt 1 and C-Shunt 10 Precision Shunts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
6.2 Connecting the C-Shunt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
6.3 Configuring an Analog Input for Current Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
7 EnerLyzer Multimeter Mode Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
7.1 Zeroing the Current Clamps using QuickCMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
7.2 Launching and Configuring EnerLyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
7.3 Wiring the Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
7.4 Using the Multimeter Signals and Power Grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
8 EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
8.1 Connecting the Current Clamps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
8.2 Zeroing the Current Clamps using QuickCMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
8.3 Starting EnerLyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
8.4 Attaching the Current Clamps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
8.5 Switching into Transient Recording Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
8.6 Starting the Recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
8.7 Analyzing the Transient Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
8.8 Viewing Time Signals in TransView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
8.9 Viewing Harmonic Diagrams in TransView. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
8.10 Viewing Vector Diagrams in TransView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
8.11 Playing Back a Recorded Signal Using Advanced TransPlay . . . . . . 79
Support............................................................................................................................... 81

Index ................................................................................................................................... 83

4
Introduction

1 Introduction
EnerLyzer is a test module that allows to control the measuring features of
CMC test sets. It runs as a stand-alone test module. It has four modes of
operation: multimeter mode, transient recording mode, harmonic analysis
mode and trend recording mode.
These four modes are mutually exclusive. You can not run the multimeter
mode at the same time that you perform a transient recording or run
harmonic analysis. Switching between the four modes can be done via
toolbar icons.
The optional EnerLyzer package consists of:
• The CD-ROM that contains the EnerLyzer test module installation, the
license file and the EnerLyzer documentation (Help and PDF manual).
• The printed EnerLyzer user manual.

1.1 EnerLyzer Features


EnerLyzer allows you to individually configure any or all of the ten binary
inputs of a CMC 256, a CMC 256plus or a CMC 356 test set to become
binary inputs, counter inputs, or analog inputs for measuring voltages or
currents.
When a binary input is configured as an analog input for voltages or currents,
EnerLyzer can perform analysis and real-time monitoring of energy
components. EnerLyzer can mathematically combine and evaluate
measurement channels in order to achieve:
• DC components
• Effective values (true RMS)
• Peak values (Vpeak, Ipeak,...)
• Phase angles with reference to a given input signal
• Apparent, reactive, and real power
• Frequency harmonic diagrams
• Recording of transient input signals
The EnerLyzer test module runs as a stand-alone test module with four
modes of operation: multimeter mode, transient recording mode, harmonic
analysis mode and trend recording mode.
Note: EnerLyzer and TransPlay cannot run in parallel because TransPlay is
constantly downloading data and requires all available resources. It is
possible to run EnerLyzer and Advanced TransPlay in parallel because
Advanced TransPlay downloads the entire signal and then all further
processing is done in the test set.

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OMICRON Test Universe

6
Test Sets

2 Test Sets
Each of the ten binary inputs in the BINARY/ANALOG INPUT section of a a
CMC 256, a CMC 256plus or a CMC 356 test set can be configured through
the EnerLyzer test module to be an analog input for DC and AC voltages up
to 600 V.


Because the analog inputs of the test set deal with voltage inputs, active
current probes with voltage outputs have to be used to measure currents. All
probes must be active current probes with voltage output or current probes
with a shunt.
OMICRON offers the C-PROBE1 as a suitable current probe. This current
probe is not included in the deliverables of EnerLyzer and must be ordered
separately. The test set also supports other current probes than the named
C-PROBE1.

2.1 BINARY/ANALOG INPUT (1 - 10)


The ten binary inputs are divided into five groups of two, each group
galvanically separated from the others. The input signals are monitored using
an isolation amplifier with a time resolution of 100 µs and are then evaluated
in the measurement units.
Figure 2-1:
Binary/Analog Inputs
(of a CMC 356)

The binary inputs are configured in the Hardware Configuration component


of the OMICRON Test Universe software. When doing so, it can be specified
whether the contacts have potential or are dry. When the contacts are
potential sensitive, the expected nominal voltage and the switch threshold
can be set for each binary input.1
EnerLyzer is used to configure the inputs as analog measurement inputs.
The recording of measurement values with range switching from each two
channels occurs in an analog input stage AFE (Analog Front End) that is
galvanically separated from the other input stages.
The bandwidth on the analog inputs 1 - 10 can range from 0 Hz (DC) to
10 kHz. The sampling rate can be switched between three predefined
values: 28.44 kHz, 9.48 kHz, and 3.16 kHz

1
The binary inputs 1 - 10 can also be used as counter inputs for input frequencies up to 3 kHz.

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OMICRON Test Universe

The measured values are passed through an isolation amplifier to the


"Measurement Unit" and are digitized with an A/D converter. Further
processing occurs through a high-performance floating point digital signal
processor (DSP).
As such, apparent power, reactive power, real power, etc., can be provided
in real-time and transmitted to the computer.
The inputs are implemented as voltage inputs and have five measurement
ranges: 100 mV, 1 V, 10 V, 100 V, and 600 V. The inputs are protected in
each measurement range up to the input voltage of Vrms = 600 V and
Vpeak = ± 850 V.
For measuring current, an appropriate clamp-on probe is used. The accuracy
of the current measurement is limited to the accuracy of the clamp on probe.

2.2 General Data


The analog measurement inputs have five measurement ranges that can be
individually configured through the software:
• 100 mV
• 1V
• 10 V
• 100 V
• 600 V.
These range limits refer to the respective RMS values of the sinusoidal
shaped input signals.
Input impedance: 500 kΩ // 50 pF in all measurement ranges.
Overload protection: Vpeak = ± 850 V (Vrms = 600 V) from reference
potential GND, from another input, or protective
earth ground (PE).
The sampling rate can also be set by the software:
• 28.44 kHz
• 9.48 kHz
• 3.16 kHz

2.3 Multimeter Mode


The multimeter mode is designed for measuring steady-state signals, such
as DC or sinusoidal. Measurements such as RMS values, phase shifting,
frequency, etc. can be made.
The input signals are processed in "real-time" without any delay.

8
Test Sets

2.4 Transient Recording


In this operating mode, transient signals on up to 10 input channels can be
synchronously recorded. The recording starts whenever a trigger condition is
met. Trigger conditions are easily configured in the EnerLyzer test module.
In addition, a time offset for the acquisition window relative to the trigger time
point can be specified. The trigger delay can be
• positive (recording begins after the trigger time point)
• or negative (recording begins already before the trigger time point).
Figure 2-2:
Illustration of the
relationship between Start time for End of
Trigger time
trigger time points, trigger recording recording
delay, and recording time.

Trigger delay (negative)

Recording of input signals

Time

The maximum length of the recording depends on the settings for the sample
rate and the number of channels to be recorded.

2.5 Harmonic Analysis


Calculates the harmonic analysis of all configured inputs (up to 64
harmonics) and displays it in a bar graph and in a tabular format.

2.6 Trend Recording Mode


In Trend Recording Mode, you can make a historical plot of various
measurements over time. It is possible to measure RMS voltage, RMS
current, phase, real, apparent and reactive power and the power factor. This
mode is activated by clicking “View | Trend Recording Mode”.
The main view has a CTS Chart. Each selected measurement function
appears in a separate diagram (i.e., all frequency measurements in the
frequency diagram). RMS current and voltage appear in separate diagrams.
Time is displayed in seconds on the x-axis. The diagram is scrolled from right
to left as new data is recorded.

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OMICRON Test Universe

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

3 The EnerLyzer Test Module


EnerLyzer has four modes of operation.
Multimeter Measures phase, RMS value, frequency, and
power for both currents and voltages on up to 10
inputs. Details are provided in section 3.2 on page
12.
Transient Recording Records a transient record in the CMC and
displays it on the PC. Details are provided in
section 3.3 on page 19.
Harmonic Analysis Calculates the harmonic analysis of all confined
inputs (up to 64 harmonics) and displays it in a bar
graph and or a tabular format.
Trend Recording Measures RMS voltage, RMS current, phase, real,
power (apparent and reactive) and the power
factor and then makes a historical plot of various
measurements over time.
These four modes are mutually exclusive. You cannot run multimeter mode
at the same time you perform a transient recording, perform a harmonic
analysis or perform a trend recording. Switching between multimeter mode,
transient recording mode, harmonic analysis, or trend recording mode can be
done via toolbar icons.

3.1 Launching the EnerLyzer Test Module


Launch the EnerLyzer test module from the OMCRON Test Universe
Start Page.
Note: If the EnerLyzer test module is launched first then no other test module
can run in parallel. This is because there is only one sample buffer, which can
only be read by one test module at a time.
The solution has the following two steps:
• Launch EnerLyzer after all other test modules in order to keep the sample
buffer free and to run other test modules in parallel.
• Disable EnerLyzer from recording CMB IO-7 inputs when another test
module is running. This can be achieved through the resource locking.
EnerLyzer is able to work as normal but is prevented from recording the CMB
IO-7 inputs. This occurrence only happens when a CMB IO-7 is connected.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.2 Multimeter Mode


The multimeter mode is activated by clicking either on the icon in the toolbar
or clicking “View | Multimeter Mode”.
The multimeter mode displays the following measurements both in a grid
format and in a vector diagram:
• AC RMS and DC of both voltages and currents
• phase
• power
• system components
• line-Line voltages.
These results are displayed in two different grids: a signals grid and a power
grid.
You can change the configuration by clicking the Configuration toolbar icon,
which opens the Multimeter Configuration dialog box.

3.2.1 Hardware Configuration


Launch the EnerLyzer test module from the Test Universe Start Page.
Click the Hardware Configuration toolbar icon or click
“Parameters | Hardware Configuration” to display the Hardware
Configuration dialog box.
Figure 3-1:
Voltage and current
channel definitions

Function
The channel usage can be specified in the function row with drop down
menus at each channel 1 through 10. Channels can be used as binary inputs,
counter inputs, voltage inputs, or current inputs.
Nominal Range
The nominal range can be specified for each voltage or current channel. The
nominal range is the dynamic maximum (peak value) that is expected to
appear on the channel.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

Clamp Ratio
For each current channel, the current clamp ratio can be specified. This
setting in the Hardware Configuration dialog box should match the settings
of the switches on the actual current clamp.
The inputs of the CMC test set were intended for sinusoidal signals. As such,
the nominal range can be considered Vrms. Together with a clamp ratio, it
specifies how large the peak values can be before clipping occurs. This is
important to remember for non-sinusoidal signals that may be within the Vrms
nominal range but that may have larger peak values which get clipped.
Specifying a larger range can prevent clipping. However, doing so results in
a loss of resolution, because the analog-to-digital conversion only has 12-bits
to represent the entire range.
The left-hand column of the Hardware Configuration dialog box is used to
specify the test module input signal. The index numbers n on Vn and In
represent a logical connection in subsequent power dialog boxes in order to
determine real, apparent, and reactive Power n. In other words, Power2 is
calculated from V2 and I2. It is not possible to monitor the results of, say, V1
and I3.
The second column from the left in the Hardware Configuration dialog box
is used to enter a Display Name for subsequent dialog boxes. In this example
for monitoring voltages and currents, the display names chosen are V a, V b,
and V c for the input voltages and I a, I b, and I c for the input currents, as is
shown in Figure 3-1.
The remaining portion of the Hardware Configuration dialog box is a table
for establishing logical connections between the input signals or display
names and the physical channels on the CMC test set. Each input signal can
be assigned to only one channel and vice versa.
Figure 3-1 shows an example of the logical connections and the intended
physical wiring of the voltage probes and current clamps to the CMC test set.
If the actual wiring of the current clamps is different (for instance, if the I
inputs are exchanged for the V inputs), the logical connections can be used
to make the associations instead of physically moving cables on the front
panel of the CMC test set.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.2.2 Setting up the Test Hardware


On the Multimeter dialog box, click the Configuration toolbar icon to
provide access to the channel configurations, which allows you to change the
measurement configuration as required.
Figure 3-2:
Multimeter
Configuration dialog box

In the F1 drop-down menu, select the first channel that measures frequency.
This channel is also used as reference channel for phase measurement. (By
default, it always shows 0° phase).
In the F2 drop-down menu, you can select a second channel for frequency
measurement. The averaging factor helps smooth out noisy signals. If
measuring a steady state signal, setting the averaging factor to medium or
high increases the accuracy. If the signal varies rapidly or has a complicated
wave form, it's better to switch this off.
The averaging applies to all readings (i.e., RMS, phase, frequency, and
power). The averaging works by "remembering" previous values. It uses the
equation:
result = newValue * averfact + oldValue * (1 - averfact)
newValue value of the new sample
oldValue value of the previous samples (also averaged)
result newly calculated value
averfact averaging factor.
1 for no averaging
0.6 for medium averaging, and
0.1 for high averaging.
The sampling frequency determines the accuracy of the recorded signal. If
the measured signal varies significantly in time or has a complicated wave
form, increasing the sampling rate will help measure the signal accurately.
The 9 kHz sampling frequency is adequate for normal sinusoidal signals.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

In the Refresh rate edit box, enter a value which determines how often the
information on the screen gets updated. The refresh rate refers to the screen
parameters and not to the actual sampling of signals.

3.2.3 Multimeter Signals Grid


The Signals grid displays each analog input measurement into the following
columns:
Signal: displays the user-defined name of the input. This name is
entered in the Hardware Configuration dialog box, in the
Display name field.
Channel: displays the physical channel number. (The ref. indicator
means that it is used as the reference signal and therefore
the phase angle will always be 0°.)
Value (AC): displays the RMS value of the signal. For a current input, the
values are shown in amps and for voltage inputs, the values
are displayed in volts.
Phase: displays the phase angle between this signal and the
reference signal.
Value (DC): displays the DC value of the signal. For a current input, the
values are shown in amps and for voltage inputs, the values
are displayed in volts.
Figure 3-3:
Multimeter mode dialog
box showing both the
signals grid and the power
grid

The phase, voltage, and current are updated at the specified refresh rate. If
the signal being measured is greater than the maximum range then an
"Overload" message is displayed in the corresponding cell.
If no measurement results are available, then a blank is displayed in the
corresponding cell. This happens for a short period when the measurement
is started. It also can occur for the phase and frequency if the signal is too
weak to measure.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.2.4 Multimeter Power Grid


The Power grid displays the real, apparent, and reactive power, the power
factor and the DC power for each power system.
The power systems are assigned in the Input Configuration dialog box.
The Power grid consists of the following columns:
Signal: Displays the name of the power signal.
Channel V: Displays the physical channel number of the voltage
channel.
Channel I: Displays the physical channel number of the current
channel.
DC Power: Displays the DC component of power.
AC Power: Contains the following four columns:
Real Displays the real power
Apparent Displays the apparent power
Reactive Displays the reactive power
cos Phi Displays the power factor cos Phi
(real / apparent power).

The real and apparent power values are correct for all waveforms (i.e.,
including harmonics). Reactive power will show only the correct values for
pure sine waves.
If there is more than one power system, the real, apparent and reactive
power and the DC component of each system are added together and
displayed in a separate row.
The power sum is only correct under the following conditions:
• the real and reactive powers are of the same sign for each power system,
• the waveforms are sinusoidal,
• the frequency of all power systems are the same.
A maximum of four power signals can be measured simultaneously.
If no power systems are assigned then this grid is not shown at all.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

3.2.5 Display of Error Conditions


An icon in the leftmost column of both the signals grid and the power grid
shows any errors occurring in the measurement. If no icon is shown then
there is no error.
Overload: Indicates that the magnitude is greater than the range of
the input. If you get this error then you should increase
the range of the input in the Input Configuration dialog
box.
If this error is indicated then no measured values will be
shown in the grid.
Weak Signal: Indicates that the magnitude is too weak to give an
accurate reading. (I.e., it is less than 10 % of the range of
the input). The phase angle and the frequency cannot be
measured for weak signals. If you get this error then you
should decrease the range of the input in the Input
Configuration dialog box.
Frequency
Out of Range: Indicates that the signal frequency is either too high or too
low to be measured.
If one of these errors occurs then the measurements may not be displayed
and a blank entry is shown in the corresponding cell. Blank entries are also
displayed when no measurement results are available, which happens briefly
when the measurement is first started.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.2.6 Multimeter Vector Diagrams


clicking the corresponding toolbar icon opens the three different types of
vector diagrams available in Multimeter Mode:
Signals: Displays one to four groups of vectors that can be displayed
(depending on how many systems are configured):
• All signals
• System 1
• System 2
• System 3
• System 4.
Power: Displays the power system as a power triangle diagram,
except that the power lines do not form the shape of a
triangle but meet in the center. Only one power system can
be displayed.
Symmetrical
Components: Displays the symmetrical components (V0, V1, V2 or I0, I1,
I2) of the selected 3-phase system. Only one system can be
displayed at a time. If there are no 3-phase systems
configured then you cannot open this diagram and the
toolbar icon is unavailable.

A right click any of the diagrams pops up a context menu at which the Auto
Zoom feature can be turned on or off, and the display range be zoomed in or
out manually.

3.2.7 Switching on or off Multimeter


To switch on multimeter, click “Test | Start” or click the Start toolbar icon.
Measuring is on by default. If you have manually switched off multimeter
measuring, use the start command to switch it on again.
To switch off multimeter, click “Test | Stop” or click the Stop toolbar icon.
If you switch off multimeter measuring, the last recorded measurements
remain on the screen. As such, the stop command can be used as a “hold”
button in order to view data.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

3.3 Transient Recording Mode


Click either the Transient Recording Mode toolbar icon or
“View | Transient Recording Mode” to activate that mode.
Figure 3-4:
Transient Recording mode

The Transient Recording mode lets you to capture a transient record in the
CMC test set. You can then display that record.

Trigger conditions
Set either an immediate, a power quality, or a basic trigger condition. For
power quality triggers, there are 6 types available to choose from: Sag, Swell,
Harmonic, Frequency, Frequency Change and Notch.
Note: CMB IO-71 or ISIO 200 binary input channels can be used for
recording, only, not for triggering. For triggering, use
CMC 356/CMC 256plus/CMC 256 inputs.

1
CMB IO-7 is a meanwhile discontinued product

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OMICRON Test Universe

Use GPS/IRIG-B time


Use GPS/IRIG-B time is disabled as long as no time source setting is
done in the Hardware Configuration yet.
• Click Hardware Configuration on the Home tab.
• Select the Time Source tab in the Hardware Configuration
• Specify your time source (GPS or IRIG-B).
Normally, the trigger time is calculated from the computer's clock, and
therefore not very accurate. For one single recording this is nothing to be
concerned about. If simultaneous recordings are to be made at two or
more locations, however, the results need to be synchronized to each
other; an accurate trigger becomes inevitable. In conjunction with a
CMGPS or a CMIRIG-B time synchronization device, highly accurate
reference time-synchronized triggering is possible.
When using one of these two mentioned synchronization devices, select
the Use GPS/IRIG-B time option to apply the highly-accurate
GPS/IRIG-B reference time as trigger time for all further records. A
special icon will appear in the COMTRADE file list box below File
specification indicating that the GPS/IRIG-B time was used.
Note: EnerLyzer does not support time synchronization by CMGPS 588,
PTP or NTP. Use CMGPS or CMIRIG-B instead.

Acquisition parameters
Here you specify the parameters for the signal recording to a COMRADE
file.

Saving data
Specify how and where to save the records to the COMTRADE file.
For each record
• Create new file:
Creates a new COMTRADE file for each transient record uploaded
from the PC. In this mode, each new file name has an integer
appended to the file name to make it unique (e.g., Event1.cfg,
Event2.cfg, etc.).
• Overwriting existing file:
Uses the same existing COMTRADE file each time a record is
uploaded from the CMC test set.
Saving records
• First only:
Saves the first record sent to the PC, only. After saving the record,
recording automatically stops.
• Automatically:
Continuously records and uploads the records to the PC. Each
uploaded transient record is converted to a COMTRADE file, and
saved under a unique name.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

• On demand:
The Save now button is enabled whenever there is a record available
in the CMC test set. Click Save now to upload and save that record to
the PC.
File specification
Either enter the file and the location of the generated COMTRADE file, or
click Browse to search for the file and its location.
The field below then displays the transient records. This is useful for
Advanced TransPlay and TransView.

Input configuration
Input Configuration provides a way of configuring the binary/analog inputs
of the CMC test set, of the 2 & 3-phase systems, and of the power systems.
Consider it a replacement of the Hardware Configuration, which is still
available, though. To change the input configuration, double-click any of the
ten binary/analog inputs. This opens a dialog box where you can configure
the inputs.

Virtual Inputs
In Transient Recording mode, EnerLyzer supports the use of virtual inputs.
Virtual inputs are a "virtual extension" of the number of available binary
inputs. Physically they do not exist (as an input connector at the CMC test
set); internally, however, they are handled like real inputs by the
Test Universe software. You can use these virtual inputs, for example, to
map GOOSE messages in cases where the regular BINARY INPUTs of your
CMC test set are already used up by analog input signals.
→ See the Hardware Configuration Help topic General Tab (subheading
Virtual Inputs/Outputs) for more information about defining and mapping
virtual inputs/outputs...
EnerLyzer displays used virtual inputs with an additional string, such as "+ 2
virtual binary inputs", next to the BINARY INPUT 10 symbol at the right of the
Input configuration group.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.4 Input Configuration


The Input Configuration dialog box provides a way of configuring the
binary/analog inputs of the CMC test set and the 2 & 3-phase systems and
power systems. It is a replacement for the Hardware Configuration dialog
box, which is still available.
To change the input configuration, double-click any of the ten binary/analog
inputs of the CMC test set to open a floating dialog box where the input can
be configured.

3.4.1 Input Configuration, Creating 2 & 3 Phase Systems


Dragging and dropping the Input Configuration icons from the top row of ten
inputs into the groups marked by System1, System2, and System3 can
configure a system. If only two inputs are in a system then it is considered as
a 2-phase system. If three inputs are in a system, then it is considered a 3-
phase system. Also an input can be assigned as Neutral by dropping it into
the corresponding box.
2 & 3-Phase Systems are used in the Multimeter mode to enable the
calculation of symmetrical components and Line-line voltages. (The neutral
setting is used for documenting purposes only and has no effect on any of
the calculations).
If you make a comtrade record, then the inputs in System1 and System2 are
automatically assigned to the TransView test tool “parameterized network
node”. All inputs in a system have to be the same type and only the voltage
or the current inputs are allowed.

3.4.2 Input Configuration, Creating Power Systems


Dragging and dropping icons from the top row of ten inputs into the groups
marked by Power1, Power2, etc. can configure a power system. These are
used in the Multimeter mode to enable the measurement of power systems.

3.4.3 Input Configuration, Floating Configure Input


Double-clicking any of the Input Configuration icons from the top row of the
ten inputs will open a floating dialog box allowing all parameters of the input
to be configured.
Function:
– Voltage: Allows the input to measure voltages
– Current: Allows the input to measure currents
– Potential free binary: Allows the input to record binary signals via
opening and closing of a contract.
– Potential sensing binary: Allows the input to record binary signals via
a voltage going above the threshold
– Not used: Use if you do not want to make any
measurements on this input

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

Name: Name of the input. A previously entered


name can be chosen from the combo box
list.
Threshold: Only available for Potential sensing binary
inputs. Voltages below this threshold are
counted as binary 0. Voltages above this
threshold are counted as binary 1.
Clamp ratio: Only available for Current inputs. This value
specifies the clamp ratio of the current
clamp (it can also be used to specify the
ratio of a current shunt). Clinking on the
arrow button allows you to select from a list
of commonly used values.
Range: This input function has five settings. For
voltage inputs these are 100 mV, 1 V, 10 V,
100 V and 600 V. For current inputs the
values are in amps = voltage range * the
clamp ratio. You should choose the smallest
range that is greater than the signal that you
are measuring. For example, if the signal is
100 V you should use the 600 V range.
Primary transformer ratio: This is the nominal value of the primary
ratio. In combination with the secondary
transformer ratio, it is used to convert
measurements from primary to secondary
values. It is also saved in the comtrade
record.
Secondary transformer ratio: This is the nominal value of the secondary
ratio. In combination with the primary
transformer ratio it is used to convert
measurements from primary to secondary
values. It is also saved in the comtrade
record.
Back / Forth buttons: These buttons allow you to move to the
next/previous input. You can also change
inputs by clicking the corresponding icon in
the Input Configuration dialog box while
the float dialog is still open.
<Alt> + left arrow and <Alt> + right arrow are the keyboard shortcuts for these
commands.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.4.4 Setting the Trigger Conditions


In the Trigger conditions section of the transient recorder interface specify:
• the channel on which the trigger is to occur using the Channel drop-down
menu,
• a voltage/current level for the trigger by entering a value in the Level edit
box. If a binary input is selected for the trigger channel, you cannot set the
voltage/current level,
• the trigger slope edge as being either falling or rising for the trigger event.

Using basic triggers:


Channel: Select the channel on which the trigger occurs.
Level: Enter a voltage level for the trigger. If a binary input
is selected for the trigger channel, you cannot set
the voltage level.
Slope: Enter the trigger slope edge as being either falling
or rising for the trigger event.

Using power quality triggers:


Sag and Swell: Magnitude and duration has to be specified. The
duration is entered in seconds and the magnitude
is entered in percentage of the nominal. If the
“Auto-adjust resolution” option is selected,
EnerLyzer selects a value of resolution that is
appropriate for the sag/swell duration.
Frequency: Triggers when the frequency goes outside the
specified deviation. The deviation is entered as a
+/- deviation of the nominal frequency in hertz.
Frequency change: Triggers when the rate of change of frequency
increases above the specified rate. The rate is
specified in +/- hertz / second.
Harmonic: Triggers when a certain harmonic distortion goes
above a certain level. It is always calculated over a
period of two cycles (i.e., resolution is fixed at 2
cycles). You can enter the particular harmonic
(2nd - 7th), or THD and the level of harmonic. The
level is specified as a percentage of the nominal.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

Notches: Triggers after a certain number of notches of a


certain duration and amplitude occur. You can
enter the duration of the spike in seconds, the
depth of the notch in either volts or amps, and the
quantity of notches. The trigger occurs when the
number of notches detected equals the quantity
specified. This quantity has to occur within a period
of 10 cycles. This trigger can only be used in the
28 kHz sampling frequency.

3.4.5 Power Quality Trigger


The Power Quality Trigger dialog box is used to set one or more power
quality triggers. There is a maximum of six triggers allowed. A trigger is
activated when any one of the selected trigger conditions occurs.
Available: Shows a list of available power quality triggers.
The trigger is added by double clicking the item, or
by selecting a trigger and then clicking the Add
button. You can select any combination of triggers
up to a limit of six. You can delete selected triggers
by highlighting them and clicking the Remove
button.
Selected grid: Shows the power quality triggers currently
selected. One or more triggers can be removed by
selecting the trigger and clicking the Remove
button. Context sensitive help is shown for the
currently selected cell.
Nominal frequency: Selects the nominal frequency of the signal. The
choices are 16.7 Hz, 50 Hz and 60 Hz.
Auto-adjust resolution: Check this selection to automatically select the
optimum resolution for this trigger. Clear this
selection if you want to choose a specific trigger
resolution.
Note: It is recommended to keep up this selection.
Trigger channel: Sets the channel that the trigger occurs on.
Nominal: Sets the nominal RMS voltage or current for the
specified channel. The setting must be at least
10 % of the range of the input.

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OMICRON Test Universe

The following is a detailed description of each trigger.


Swell/Sag Trigger:
The Swell/Sag trigger activates when the specified magnitude is exceeded
for a time greater than the specified duration.
Typical Sag:

1. = 20 ms duration 2. = 10 % magnitude
3. = RMS = 100 % 4. = RMS = 90 %

Sag/Swell Duration: This trigger activated when the sag/swell exceeds


this duration. The smaller duration is twice the
resolution. This values is rounded to the nearest
multiple of the resolution. For instance, if the
resolution is 10 ms and you enter 19 ms then it will
be rounded up to 20 ms.
Sag/Swell Magnitude: This trigger activates when a sag/swell occurs with
a magnitude greater than this value. The
magnitude is expressed as a percentage of the
nominal. The minimum value is 1 %. A value below
this can be entered, but there is no guarantee that
the trigger will activate in that case.
Sag/Swell Resolution: CMC measures the RMS over a specified time,
which is the resolution. For example. a 2-cycle
resolution means that the RMS is measured every
2 cycles. For half the cycle setting, the RMS is
measured for one cycle, but is updated every half
cycle. A larger resolution increases the accuracy of
the measurement of the RMS magnitude, but
reduces the accuracy of the measurement of the
duration. If the sampling frequency is 3 kHz then
the minimum resolution is 2 cycles.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

Harmonic Trigger:
The CMC calculates the harmonics by means of a DFT (Discrete Fourier
Transformation) every 2 cycles and then, if the specified level is exceeded, a
trigger occurs.
The THD is calculated with the following formula:
THD = √(URMS2 / Uh12 -1)
where is Uh1 is the fundamental.
Harmonic: You can choose the specific harmonic (2nd - 7th), or the
THD (total harmonic distortion) to trigger on.
Level: This trigger activates when the harmonics distortion exceeds
this lever. It is expressed in terms of percentage of the
fundamental.
The minimum level for the harmonics is 1 %.
The minimum level for the THD trigger is 3 %, but it is
recommended to enter at least 5 % because the trigger is not
very accurate below this level.
Note: If the THD trigger is used then it is recommended that the
nominal current / voltage must be equal or above 30 % of the
input range, otherwise the measurement may be inaccurate.

Frequency Trigger:
The Frequency trigger activates when the measured frequency goes outside
the specific deviation. For example, if the nominal frequency is 50 Hz and the
deviation is 1 Hz, then it will trigger if the frequency drops below 49 Hz or
rises above 51 Hz. The frequency is measured by measuring the time of the
zero crossing for several cycles (determined by the resolution) and
calculating the average.
Deviation: The deviation from the nominal frequency that causes a
trigger.
Resolution: The resolution is the amount of cycles over which the
frequency is measured. Entering a small value allows you to
detect short variations in frequency, while entering a large
value makes the measurements more accurate and makes
it less likely to trigger on short variations.

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OMICRON Test Universe

Frequency Change Trigger:


The Frequency Change trigger measures the rate of change of the
frequency and triggers when the specified rate is exceeded.
Frequency change is calculated by making two separate frequency
measurements. First the frequency is measured for 1/4 of resolution time,
then it waits for half the resolution time, and then the frequency is measured
again for 1/4 of the resolution time. For instance, if the resolution is 16 cycles,
then the frequency change is calculated as follows.

1. = 1st measurement 4 cycles 2. = Wait for 8 cycles


3. = Resolution = 16 cycles 4. = 2nd measurement 4 cycles

Rate: This trigger is activated when the rate of frequency change


exceeds this value. The minimum value is 100 mHz/s.
Resolution: The resolution refers to the time over which the frequency
measurement is carried out. Entering a small value allows
you to detect short rates of change, while entering a large
value makes the measurement more accurate and makes it
less likely to trigger on short variation.
Note: For the trigger it is recommended that the nominal
current/voltage must be equal, or above 30 % of the input
range, otherwise the measurement may be inaccurate.
Notch Trigger
A notch is a brief reduction in the instantaneous voltage, or current. The
notch trigger detects notches of a specified duration and depth. The notch
trigger is only allowed with the 28 kHz sampling frequency.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

Typical notch:

1. = Duration 2. = Depth

Duration: The duration of the notch (see diagram). The value must be
between 106 μs and 2 ms.
Depth: The depth of the notch (see diagram).
Quantity: The trigger activates after this amount of notches have
occurred within a ten-cycle period.
Indication of invalid parameters:
Invalid parameters are marked with a red border around the
edge of the cell.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.4.6 Setting the Acquisition Parameters


The Acquisition Parameters section for the transient recorder interface has
several items to be specified.
• Enter the desired pre-trigger length in the pre-trigger length edit box. This
is the amount of samples to record before the trigger event. A negative
pre-trigger length means that recording starts at some point in time after
the trigger event.
Note: The time of the trigger event has a small “rounding error” because
of the different sampling frequencies. This error will be a maximum of 65
microseconds.
• Enter a value for the recording length in the Acquisition Length edit box.
This defines the duration for the recording.
• Select the desired sampling frequency. The sampling frequency has an
affect on the recording length. The higher the sampling frequency, the
higher the resolution of the recording at the expense of a shorter
recording time. On the other hand, the lower the sampling frequency, the
longer the recording time at the expense of a lower resolution.

3.4.7 Starting or Stopping the Recording


To start the recording, click “Test | Start” or click the Start toolbar icon. The
recording waits for the trigger event to start transient recording.
If you want to start the recording immediately without waiting for the trigger
event, first click “Immediate”, then “Play”. The recording starts immediately.
Note: If the data is recorded at a faster rate than EnerLyzer can read it, then
an Overrun message is displayed.
To stop the recording, click “Test | Stop” or the Stop toolbar icon. If you
switch off transient recording then the recording is aborted.

3.4.8 Playing Back and Analyzing the Transient Record


To playback the transient record, select the comtrade file in the list box and
click the Playback toolbar icon.
The comtrade file is sent to Advanced TransPlay.
To analyze the transient record, select the comtrade file in the list box and
click the Analyze toolbar icon or double click the comtrade file in the list box.
The comtrade file is analyzed using the TransView test tool.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

3.4.9 Saving the Data


In the Saving records section of the transient recorder interface, choose one
of the following options:
First only: Saves only the first record sent to the PC.
After saving the record, recording is
automatically stopped.
Automatically: Records and uploads the records to the PC
continuously. Each transient record
uploaded is converted to a comtrade file and
saved under a unique name.
Note: If the CMB IO-7 is used as an
extension, the comtrade file size can reach
up to 300 MB if the CMB IO-7 has 160 inputs
and the maximum recording length of
316405 ms.
On demand: Records and uploads a record to the PC
only when the “Save now” button is
activated. The “Save now” button is only
active when there is a record available in the
CMC.
The For each record portion of the section has mutually exclusive radio
buttons that can be set:
Create new file: Creates a new comtrade file for each
transient record uploaded from the PC. In
this mode each new file name has an
integer appended to the file name to make it
unique (e.g., Event1.cfg, Event2.cfg, etc.).
Overwriting existing file: Uses the same existing comtrade file each
time a record is uploaded from the CMC.
In the File specification edit box, either enter the file and the location of the
generated comtrade file or click Browse to search for the desired file name
and location.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.5 Harmonic Analysis Mode


The Harmonic Analysis mode is activated by clicking either the Harmonic
Analysis mode icon or clicking “View | Harmonic Analysis Mode”.
This mode calculates the harmonic analysis of all configured inputs (up to 64
harmonics) and displays it in a bar graph and in a tabular format.
Clicking the Start toolbar icon constantly refreshes the screen. Clicking the
Stop toolbar icon at any time will freeze the current values on the screen. The
refresh rate depends on the number of inputs configured and the number of
harmonics selected.
The main view has three different tabs:
• Bar Graph
• Summary
• Details

3.5.1 Bar Graph Tab


This tab displays a bar graph or each signal. Each signal can be shown in a
separate diagram, or all current signals can be shown in one current diagram
and all voltage diagrams in one voltage diagram.

3.5.2 Summary Tab


This tab displays the overall statistics of the harmonic analysis.
Signal: Displays the user-defined name of the input.
(The term “ref.” means that it is used as the
reference signal and therefore the phase
angle will always be 0°).
Channel: Displays the physical channel number.
Fundamental Magnitude: Displays the RMS value of the fundamental.
Fundamental Phase: Displays the phase angle of the
fundamental.
Overall Signal Frequency: Displays the frequency of the signal.
Overall Signal RMS: Displays the total RMS of the whole signal.
Overall Signal THD: Shows the total harmonic distortion of the
signal.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

3.5.3 Details Tab


This tab displays detailed data about each harmonic:
• Name and channel of the input (The term “ref.” means that it is used as
the reference signal.)
• Harmonic 1 (i.e., fundamental): Shows the magnitude of the fundamental.
• Harmonic 2...64: Shows the magnitude relative to the fundamental, the
absolute magnitude and the phase shift of each harmonic. The phase shift
is relative to the fundamental.
It may not be possible to calculate the phase angle and/or the magnitude of
all harmonics. For example, if the frequency of the signal is too high, then a
blank entry is shown in the cell. If the harmonic magnitude is very low, then
it may not be possible to calculate the phase angle.

3.5.4 Snapshot View


Click the Snapshot Launch toolbar icon to open the Snapshot View.
This view displays the waveform that the current harmonic analysis is based
upon.
Note: The harmonic analysis will be stopped while this view is visible.
There are two diagrams, one for voltage and one for currents.
There is a context sensitive menu for this diagram, which has the following
commands:
Zoom: Enables zooming of the diagram with the mouse.
Optimize: Returns the x and y axis to their original state.
View: Sets magnification level.
Signals: Enables / disables the signals to display in the current
diagram.

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OMICRON Test Universe

3.5.5 Display of Error Conditions


An icon in the leftmost column of both the details tab and the summary tab
shows any errors occurring in the measurement. If no icon is shown, then
there is no error.
Overload: Indicates that the magnitude of the signal is
greater than the range of the input. If you
get this error then you should increase the
input range in the input configuration dialog.
If this error is indicated then only the
frequency will be shown in the grid.
Weak Signal: Indicates that the signal is too weak to give
an accurate reading. (i.e., it is less than
10 % of the range of the input.) If you get this
error, only the fundamental magnitude and
the RMS measurements are shown. If you
get this error you should decrease the range
in the Input Configuration dialog box.
Frequency Out of Range: Indicates that the signal frequency is either
too high or too low to be measured.
If one of these errors occurs then the measurements may not be displayed
and a blank entry is shown in the corresponding cell. Blank entries are also
displayed when no measurement results are available, which happens briefly
when the measurement is first started.
These errors are also indicated in the Bar Graph tab as a footnote in the
diagram.

3.5.6 Setting the Harmonic Analysis Configuration


To set the harmonic analysis configuration:
1. Click the Harmonic Analysis toolbar icon to open the Harmonic
Analysis dialog box.
2. Click the Configuration toolbar icon to open the Harmonic Analysis
Configuration dialog box.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

3.6 Trend Recording Mode


The Trend Recording Mode is activated by clicking either the Trend
Recording Mode toolbar icon or clicking “View | Trend Recording Mode”.
In Trend Recording Mode, you can make a historical plot of various
measurements over time. It is possible to measure RMS voltage, RMS
current, frequency, phase, real, apparent and reactive power and the power
factor. The main view has a CTS Chart. Each selected measurement
function appears in a separate diagram (i.e. all frequency measurements in
the frequency diagram). RMS current and voltage appear in separate
diagram. Time is displayed in seconds on the x-axis. The diagram is scrolled
from right-to-left as new data is recorded.
Clear: Clears all data from the graph.
Auto scale: If selected, the Y-axis is scaled automatically as
each new measurement is added to the graph.
Time started: Shows the start time of the recording.
Status: Shows the current status. Can be offline, running
or stopped.
Diagram menu: Right-clicking any diagram opens a sub-menu and
the following menu items can be selected:
Zoom Enables zooming of the
diagram with the mouse.
Optimize | All Optimizes both the X-axis
and the Y-axis.
Optimizes | X-axis Causes the data to be
shown for the entire
recording period.
Optimizes | Y-axis Scales the Y-axis optimally.
View Sets magnification level.
Diagrams Enables / disables the
diagrams to display.
Signals Enables / disables the
signals to display in the
current diagram.
Diagram Error Status: The following error can occur: “RMS and Power
measurements can have an overload error:”
When the channel is overloaded, small circles
appear on the plotted line where the overloading
occurs. Also the word “Overload” is displayed in
the diagram legend.

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OMICRON Test Universe

Frequency and phase measurement can have a weak signal error:


When the input signal is below 2 % of the input range then the weak signal
error appears. If there is a weak signal condition at the start of the recording
then the signal is not plotted at all. If the signal is initially okay, but then goes
below the threshold, small x’s are plotted in the diagram at the point where
the weak signal occurred. Also the word “Weak signal” is displayed in the
diagram legend.
For phase measurement, it is considered to be a weak signal if either the
channel is measured, or the reference channel has an input signal below 2 %
of the input range.
Diagram Stop/Start Indication:
If you click Stop, a small red square appears in all the diagram indicating
where the measurement has stopped. If you click Start, then a small green
square appears in all the diagrams indicating where the measurement
started. If you switch to another mode, then the recording is stopped
automatically. The recording starts again when you return to the Trend
Recording Mode. Similarly, if the Trend Recording Configuration dialog
box or the Input Configuration dialog box is opened then the recording is
stopped until the dialog is closed again.
Configuration Change:
If any configuration in the Trend Recording Configuration or the Input
Configuration is changed then all previous recorded values are removed.
Recording Limit:
Trend recording can be run for long periods of time, but there is a limit of 4
million samples. After this limit is exceeded then the oldest samples are
deleted from the diagrams. This happens depending on the amount of
measurements and the refresh time. For example, measuring RMS on 6
channels with a 1 second measurement rate means that you can record for
4 000 000 / 6 x 60 x 60 = 185 hours. If you want to record for a longer time,
increase the measurement rate.
Chart Cursors:
These cursors allow you to make precise measurements of the recorded
signal. Select the Cursors checkbox, then select the signal that you want to
measure in the Signal column of the cursor grid to display the cursors. Move
the blue and red cursors to the point in the graph that you want to measure.
The time and the value of the signal are shown in the grid for each cursor.
The time is shown both as calendar date and time and seconds since the
start of the recording. Also the time difference and the measurement value
difference between the two cursors positions is shown in the last row of the
grid.
A "go to min" and "go to max" button is provided for each cursor. When these
buttons are pressed the cursor moves to the min or to the max of the selected
signal.

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The EnerLyzer Test Module

The bottom row of the grid has a button "Calculate Average". When this
button is pressed the average value of the selected signal is calculated. Only
the sample points that fall between the two cursors are used to calculate the
average.
The total recording time is shown to the right of the grid.

3.7 Trend Recording Cursors


Click the Cursor check box to display the Cursor Data table.
The Time column displays the exact position of the two cursors along the
time axis.
The Signal column displays an analog signal, which can be assigned to each
cursor. Click the field and select the signal from the combo box.
The momentary value of the selected signal is displayed in the Value column.
If the signals assigned to the two cursors are of the same physical quantity
(e.g. two voltages), then the difference is shown in the third line C2-C1.

3.8 Setting the Trend Recording Configuration


This mode allows you to make a historical plot of various measurements over
time. It is possible to measure RMS voltage, RMS current, frequency, phase,
real, apparent and reactive power and the power factor.
Clicking the Configuration button opens the Trend Recording
Configuration dialog box. This dialog box allows you to configure the
measurements you want to record. The following elements are found in the
dialog box.
Frequency 1, Frequency 2:
Select channels for recording frequency measurement.
RMS:
Select check box to record the RMS of all configured inputs.
Phase:
Select this check box to record the phase of all configured inputs.
Reference channel for phase:
Selects the reference channel for the phase measurement.
Real power:
Select this check box to record the real power for all configured power
systems.
Apparent power:
Select this check box to record the apparent power for all configured power
systems.

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OMICRON Test Universe

Reactive power:
Select this check box to record the reactive power for all configured power
systems.
Cos Phi:
Select this check box to record the power systems.
Note: Cos Phi also displays the power factor for a three-phase system. If
more than two power systems are configured than the power sum will also
be plotted for real, apparent, reactive and Cos Phi.
Capacity remaining:
This shows you how many resources are available to make measurements.
There are 13 tasks available initially and this number will be reduced
depending on the amount of channels configured and the amount
measurements selected. Also the 28 kHz sampling frequency allows more
tasks to be used.
Measurement rate:
This is the rate at which the data is plotted. For example if the measurement
rate is one second, then a new point will be plotted on the graph each
second.
Sampling frequency:
The sampling frequency determines the accuracy of the recorded signal.
Normally the 9 kHz sampling frequency is sufficient, however for phase
measurement at a 60 Hz nominal frequency, the 28kHz sampling frequency
is recommended.

38
TransView

4 TransView
The TransView test tool assists you with the analysis of fault records. In
addition to the values measured and recorded in the fault record, the program
can also be used to calculate other variables, such as impedances, RMS
values, etc.
The TransView test tool is accessible from EnerLyzer only after a record has
been acquired in the transient recording mode of EnerLyzer.
Figure 4-1:
Transient Recording
dialog box

Analyze
The Analyze button is used to start up the TransView test tool with the
selected record.

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OMICRON Test Universe

The TransView test tool offers a graphical display of the measured and
calculated values and the binary signals.
These include:
• Time signal diagrams (refer to section 4.2 on page 45).
• Harmonics charts (refer to section 4.3 on page 46).
• Vector diagrams (refer to section 4.4 on page 47).
• Impedance “Circle” diagrams (refer to section 4.5 on page 48).
It is possible to assign any number of diagrams to the different views and any
number of signals to the different diagrams. Signal assignment is performed
with the help of the Assign Signals matrix.

4.1 Fundamental TransView Operation


Each diagram view has a set of scroll cursors available (orange and blue)
that aid in tracing the signal along the time axis. When the cursors are
moved, the signal specific values of the displayed variables are changed.
Moreover, all views are modified at the same time.
If the analysis of a fault event requires the data from another fault record, e.g.
from the remote end of a line, this data can be added and the two fault
records synchronized in time.
The TransView test tool can process all fault records which are available in
COMTRADE format, if necessary, the parameters are to be adapted to the
TransView test tool conventions in the corresponding dialog box.

4.1.1 Common Diagram Elements


The TransView test tool has several elements that are identical in the
different diagram views.
Cursor 1 / Cursor 2 Are assigned to the time axis. Moving a cursor
(orange or blue) along the time axis changes the times
in the corresponding tables of all views. Cursor 1 and
cursor 2 are shown as vertical lines across all
diagrams in the Time Signals view and as cross-hairs
in the circle diagram view.
Table Contains fields for entering enter time values for the
cursors. The signal name, the value, and the point in
time are then shown in the table.
Status line Shows the function of the toolbar icon presently
selected, the frequency, the primary and secondary
data of primary current and voltage transformers and
the sampling rate.
View properties Permits specification of all parameters which are
applied to all diagrams of a view, e.g. the display of
auxiliary lines or the text font.

40
TransView

Diagram properties Permits specification of the properties of a diagram,


such as the background color, the axis name, grid
lines, and the axis scaling.
Signal properties Permits specification of how the individual signals are
displayed, such as the line color, line width, line type,
and markers. The status signal display which mark the
time for significant events can be a triangle, circle,
square, or cross.
Zoom Permits specification of the ideal display size for the
value profiles in each type of view. You can either
maximize or minimize the whole diagram or selected
parts of it. You can also optimize the display scaling.
The zoom optimization function can be used
separately for the X and the Y-axis. Furthermore, the
display sizes of various diagrams can be adapted to
each other by clicking Match.

4.1.2 Zoom Operations


The zoom operation in the TransView test tool permits changing the diagram
scaling interactively.
After activation of the zoom mode, the mouse pointer changes its shape to
different symbols depending on its position within the different views. The
different symbols represent various functions.
You can activate the Zoom mode either:
• by clicking “View | Zoom | Zoom” from the menu bar, or
• by clicking the Zoom icon in the tool bar, or
• by choosing Zoom from the context menu.
The magnifying glass can be used to enlarge a specific area of any diagram.
Press and hold the left mouse button in one of the corners of the area of
interest and drag a rectangle. When the mouse button is released, the
section marked by the rectangle is zoomed in on.
The axes can be enlarged by clicking them while the magnifying glass is
enabled.
A particular view can be optimized.
1. Mark all diagrams to be displayed at maximum size in the selected view.
2. Click “Zoom | Optimize” from the context menu or the “View” menu.
The X-axis and the Y-axis scaling are optimized. If only individual axes are to
be optimized.
Optimize X-Axis Click “Zoom | Optimize X Axis” from the context menu
or “View | Zoom | Optimize X Axis” from the menu
bar. The scaling of the time axis of all diagrams in a
view is optimized; the Y-axis scaling remains
unchanged.

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Optimize Y-Axis Mark all diagrams to be displayed at maximum size


along the Y-axis in the selected view. Click
“Zoom | Optimize Y Axis” from the context menu or
“View | Zoom | Optimize Y Axis” from the menu bar.
The Y-axis scaling is optimized; the X-axis scaling
remains unchanged.
The Match zoom function can be used to achieve a uniform scaling of
several diagrams displayed in one view.
1. Mark in all diagrams the scaling that should be matched.
2. Set the focus on the master diagram (broken line around the diagram last
marked).
3. Click “Zoom | Match” from the context menu or “View | Zoom | Match”
from the menu bar.
The scaling of the selected diagrams (along the Y-axis) is matched to the
scaling of the diagram that was defined as the “master diagram.”

42
TransView

4.1.3 COMTRADE Files


Transient Signals can be retrieved with the OMICRON Software EnerLyzer
and stored in a COMTRADE format. The TransView test tool prepares this
fault record for the graphical analysis and display in various views, such as
(time signal diagrams, vector diagrams, circle diagrams and harmonics
charts).
Note: If the CMB IO-7 is used as an extension, the comtrade file size can
reach up to 300 MB if the CMB IO-7 has 160 inputs and the maximum
recording length of 316405 ms.
You can edit the display of your fault record individually with the help of
various dialog boxes (view properties, diagram properties, signal properties
analog signals, binary signals, status signals).
The recorded measurement values may need to be adjusted to the
TransView test tool conventions (calculations, reference arrow system).
Use the Parameterize Channels and Parameterize Protected Object dialog
boxes to specify the settings required to achieve compatibility with the
TransView test tool.
One fault record is made up of several files which are stored under the same
name but with different extensions as follows:
CFG COMTRADE configuration file holding the description of the
fault record channels (signal names, sampling rates, etc.)
This file is generated, for example, by EnerLyzer.
DAT COMTRADE file containing sampling values of the fault
record channels (measured variables). This file is generated,
for example, by EnerLyzer.
RIO Available as an option. Protection device settings (e.g. earth
impedance factors)
DG4 Available as an option. This file contains TransView-specific
settings related to a fault event, e.g. cursor positions, color
settings of the last analysis session, etc..
These fault record files must be saved or transferred as a whole.

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4.1.4 Comtrade Options


The Comtrade Options dialog box allows special comtrade options to be
set:
Comtrade Format: ASCII: The comtrade data file is written as ASCII.
This makes the file much larger, but it may be
needed under special circumstances.
Binary: The comtrade data file is written as a
binary file.
Nominal Frequency: Determines the comtrade nominal frequency
setting. It is used by the TransView test tool to
calculate the harmonic analysis of the comtrade
report.
Comtrade Comment: Is text that can be entered for reference purposes.
This is normally the substation name.
Note: If you change the default time in a new
recording, all recorded files will get that default
time entry. The default time values reset
themselves when EnerLyzer is reopened.

44
TransView

4.2 Time Signals


The Time Signals view is used to visualize measuring and calculation
variables, as well as binary signals as a function of time. In this view you can
define any number of the following diagram types:
• status diagrams
• analog curve diagrams or
• binary track diagrams.
Any number of measuring and calculation variables, binary, or status signals
(time marks) can be assigned to each diagram.
The values can be displayed either as instantaneous- or as RMS values.
Figure 4-2:
Time signals in the
TransView test tool

In addition to the graphical display, individual values can be entered in a table


which also displays the current positions of the scroll bar cursor 1 and cursor
2 on the time axis. The data at specific points in time can be acquired by
either moving the scroll bar cursors to the time or by entering the time in the
respective time fields. The signal name, the value and the point in time will
then be shown in this table.

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4.3 Harmonics
The Harmonics view shows the RMS values of harmonics of selected
measuring values in the form of bar charts. The harmonics are determined
with the help of a DFT (Discrete Fourier Transformation).
Figure 4-3:
Harmonic diagrams in the
TransView test tool

The measuring window is always placed to the left of the reference point
(cursor position) and its length corresponds to one period of the nominal
frequency TN (e.g., 20 ms at 50 Hz, 16.6 ms at 60 Hz).
The calculated variables are valid only if no status change (fault inception,
disconnection, etc.) occurs within the measuring window. A separate
diagram is created for each measured and calculated variable to be
analyzed.
The RMS value and the percentage of the fundamental component are
displayed above each bar.
In a table you can read the current position of cursor 1 on the time axis. To
position the cursor at a specific point in time, enter the desired time value in
this table. TransView then moves the cursor automatically to the
corresponding point on the time axis.

46
TransView

4.4 Vector Diagrams


The Vector Diagrams view is used to see measured values at a specific
point in time in the form of complex vectors. The left diagram is always
assigned to cursor 1 and the right one to cursor 2.
The vectors of the measuring variables are RMS values of the fundamental
component (nominal frequency). The absolute value and the angle of the
vectors are determined by means of a full-cycle DFT (Discrete Fourier
Transformation).
Figure 4-4:
Vector diagram in the
TransView test tool

The measuring window is always placed to the left of the reference point
(cursor position) and its length corresponds to one period of the nominal
frequency TN (e.g., 20 ms at 50 Hz, 16.6 ms at 60 Hz).
The calculated variables are valid only if no status change (fault inception,
disconnection) occurs within the measuring window.
The vector angle for currents and voltages always refers to a standard vector
e j2πfN rotating at nominal frequency (fN).
In addition to the graphical display, individual values can be entered in a
table. In this table you can also read the current positions of cursor 1 and
cursor 2 on the time axis.
The data at specific points in time can be recorded by either moving the scroll
bar cursors to the time or by entering the time in the respective time fields.
The signal name, the value, and the point in time are then shown in this table.

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4.5 Impedance Circle Diagrams


The impedance circle diagrams shows the calculated impedances in a circle
diagram. This view is used to visualize complex impedances in the form of a
circle diagram in relation to time.
In addition to the graphical display, individual values can be entered in a
table. In this table you can also read the current positions of cursor 1 and
cursor 2 on the time axis.
The data at specific points in time can be recorded by either moving the scroll
bar cursors to the time or by entering the time in the respective time fields.
The signal name, the value, and the point in time are then shown in this table.
You can choose between the following possibilities to position the cursor on
the sampling point:
• Approach the intersection of the cursor lines with your mouse pointer. The
mouse pointer change its shape to a hand symbol. Holding down the right
mouse button, move the hand symbol to the desired sampling time.
• Enter the sampling point in the table (by typing the value directly or by
using the up/down arrows of the spin control in the t-in-ms cell).
The signal name, the value, and the point in time are then shown in the table.
Note: For easier identification of the individual sampling points, provide the
signal to be edited a marker by using the Object Properties dialog box. There,
you can mark each sampling point with a symbol (triangle, circle, etc.).
High-frequency components are usually damped by filters which are
integrated in the protected device. These device-specific factors are not
considered by the TransView test tool. For further information, please refer
to the corresponding device manual.

48
Working with Current Clamps

5 Working with Current Clamps


The BINARY/ANALOG INPUT channels of the CMC test set always measure
voltages. When a given channel is configured to be a current input, a voltage
is still expected on the channel.
The Hardware Configuration settings for the current input inform the
EnerLyzer test module that the measured voltage corresponds to a current.
This information can then be used for performing the calculations for real
power, apparent power, and reactive power.
The specific conversion from the measured voltage to the corresponding
current is given by the clamp ratio.

5.1 C-PROBE1 Standard Current Clamp


The C-PROBE Standard Current Clamp from the OMICRON accessory list
is a recommended device for current measuring. It is called an “active
clamp,” because it has a built-in signal conditioning unit that converts the
measured current into a congruent voltage. The signal conditioning unit is
powered by a battery.
Figure 5-1:
Current clamp C-PROBE1

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OMICRON Test Universe

C-PROBE offers two current ranges:


80 A The magnetic saturation limits the current that can be
measured to 80 A. The conversion factor is 10 mv/A. This
corresponds to a full range output voltage of 800 mV.
These are RMS values for sinusoidal waveforms. As such,
the peak value of the output voltage would then be about
1.13 V. A range of 1 V for the measuring input perfectly
matches this case.
10 A The conversion factor is 100 mV/A. The measured current is
limited to 14 A (RMS, sinusoidal) before the clamp starts
clipping, because the output voltage range of the signal
conditioning unit is limited to ±2 V. This limit only applies to
the clamp itself. If the measuring input is set to a range of
1 V, the analog-to-digital converter clips at peak values of
±1.5 V. Thus, the corresponding current that can be
measured without distortion is only 10 A (RMS, sinusoidal).
If the full swing of the clamp (±2 V) is to be used, the range
for the measuring input can be set higher in exchange for a
loss in resolution.
The C-PROBE is able to transfer DC. If DC components are superimposed
on the measured current, the associated settings need to take this into
consideration. It is always best to verify that the permissible peak values are
not exceeded.

Technical Data on the C-PROBE1


Table 5-1:
Technical data for the Measurement Range 10 A 80 A
current clamp C-PROBE1.
Max. voltage of the Vrms = 600 V to GND Vrms = 600 V to GND
current conducting wire
(isolation voltage)
Frequency bandwidth 0 (DC) ... 10 kHz 0 (DC) ... 10 kHz
Nominal Arms = 10 A Arms = 80 A
(sinusoidal) (sinusoidal)
Peak Apeak = 20 A Apeak = 113 A
(corresponds to
Vpeak=2 V output
voltage)

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Working with Current Clamps

5.2 Current Clamps with Voltage Output


The CMC test set and the EnerLyzer test module also support other “active”
current clamps. When working with other current clamps, their documented
limitations must be taken into consideration regarding peak values and
saturation effects.
The parameters for a current clamp must be set in a manner similar to what
is described in section 5.1 “C-PROBE1 Standard Current Clamp” on page
49.
In any case, it is advisable to read the technical data of the clamp carefully.

5.3 Current Clamps with Current Output


Conventional current clamps are simply transformers that convert from one
current level to another. Therefore, they cannot be connected directly to an
analog input of the CMC test set because a voltage is expected.
To convert the secondary current of the clamp into a voltage, a shunt resistor
has to be used. The value of the shunt resistor should match the nominal
burden of the current clamp to ensure the rated accuracy of the current
transformation.
Figure 5-2:
Converting currents from a
current clamp into a
voltage

To analog
input of
Shunt R CMC test
set

Current clamp

WARNING
Death or severe injury caused by high voltage or current
► Do not open the current loop!

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A current clamp has a transfer ratio of r = I1 / I2.


The current I2 produces a voltage of U = I2 * R at the shunt resistor.
The voltage U is fed to the analog input of the CMC test set. The clamp ratio
to be specified in the Hardware Configuration is U / I1. The clamp ratio can
be calculated as follows:
Clamp Ratio (HCC) = R / r

Example:
The clamp data is often specified as a real current ratio.
Therefore, 500 A:5 A means r = 100. Let’s say the nominal burden is
R = 200 mΩ. The clamp ratio in EnerLyzer then is
200 mV/A / 100 = 2 mV/A.
The optimal voltage range for a 50 A current range would then be 100 mV.

52
Working with Current Clamps

5.4 Configuring an Analog Input for Current


Signals
1. Launch the EnerLyzer test module from the OMICRON Test Universe
Start Page.
2. Start the Hardware Configuration in the EnerLyzer test module either by
clicking the icon or clicking “Parameters | Hardware Configuration”.
3. The Multimeter Configuration dialog box appears when the
Configuration button is clicked on from Multimeter Mode dialog box.
4. In this example, configure the Binary/Analog Inputs. Figure 5-3 shows
part of the Hardware Configuration dialog box to emphasize settings
that need to be made.
Figure 5-3:
Partial view of Hardware
Configuration dialog box
for analog current channel.

5. Function
Specify in the function row that the channel is being used to measure
currents. This is accomplished using a drop-down menu as is shown for
binary channel 5 in Figure 5-3.
6. Nominal Range
Enter the nominal range for the current clamp. The nominal range is the
dynamic maximum (peak value) that is expected to appear on the channel
from the current clamp.
7. Clamp Ratio
Enter the current clamp ratio. This setting in the Hardware Configuration
dialog box should match the settings of the switches on the actual current
clamp. The clamps used in this example have a clamp ratio of 100 mV/A
nominal range, as is shown for channel 6 in Figure 5-3.

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OMICRON Test Universe

8. The left-hand column of the Hardware Configuration dialog box is used


to specify the test module input signal. Select the name from the drop-
down menus.
9. The second column from the left in the Hardware Configuration dialog
box is used to enter a “Display Name” for subsequent dialog boxes. Enter
the display name.
10.Assign the signals. The remaining portion of the Hardware
Configuration dialog box is a table for establishing logical connections
between the input signals or display names and the physical channels on
the CMC test set. Each input signal can be assigned to only one channel
and vice versa.
11.Physically connect the test object connectors to the binary/analog inputs
on the front panel of the CMC test set.

54
Working with Precision Shunts

6 Working with Precision Shunts


The C-Shunt is a precision shunt for current measurements. It can be
inserted directly into the BINARY/ANALOG INPUT channels of a CMC 356
with ELT-1 hardware option, a CMC 256plus, or a CMC 256-6.
From the EnerLyzer point of view, the C-Shunt operates similarly to the
C-Probe. The difference lies on the physical interface while measuring
currents. While the C-Probe measures currents without opening the circuit,
the C-Shunt must be placed in series with the circuit just like an ammeter.
The C-Probe measures higher currents, but is battery dependent. The
C-Shunt measures lower currents, but features an higher accuracy.
The Input Configuration on the EnerLyzer does not offer specific options for
the C-Shunt. You continue working with settings meant for the current clamp,
such as the clamp ratio.

6.1 C-Shunt 1 and C-Shunt 10 Precision Shunts


C-Shunt 1 and C-Shunt 10 from the OMICRON accessory list are recom-
mended devices for current measuring. Three of each kind are supplied
along with the EnerLyzer and you can also purchase additional units.
Figure 6-1:
Precision shunt C-Shunt 1

C-Shunt 1 and C-Shunt 10 offer two current ranges, respectively:


32 A This corresponds to a full range output voltage of 32 mV.
In Configure Input on the EnerLyzer module, from
Clamp ratio, you will choose 1 mV/A.
12.5 A This corresponds to a full range output voltage of 125 mV.
In Configure Input, on the EnerLyzer module, from
Clamp ratio, you will choose 10 mV/A.

Technical Data of C-Shunt 1 and C-Shunt 10


Table 6-1:
Technical data of C-Shunt 1 C-Shunt 10
C-Shunt 1 and C-Shunt 10
Electrical resistance 0.001 Ω 0.01 Ω
Resistance tolerance 0.1 % 0.1 %
Temperature coefficient ≤ 30 ppm/K in range ≤ 15 ppm/K in range
0 ... +70 ºC 0 ... +70 ºC
(+32 ºF ... +158 ºF) (+32 ºF ... +158 ºF)
Maximum current 32 A continuous 12.5 A continuous
Order number VEHZ0080 VEHZ0081

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OMICRON Test Universe

6.2 Connecting the C-Shunt


The C-Shunt is inserted directly into the BINARY/ANALOG INPUT channels
of the CMC test set. Figure 6-2 shows three C-Shunt inserted at inputs 5, 7,
and 9 to ensure isolation. When measuring different phases, please make
sure that each phase is connected to a galvanically separated group.
Otherwise, the measurement result is erroneous. To learn about CMC test
set inputs, please refer to Section 2.1 ”BINARY/ANALOG INPUT (1 - 10)” on
page 7.
Figure 6-2: C-Shunts
inserted at separated
groups

The measuring circuit is connected at the inputs of the C-Shunt. When


placing the C-Shunt in series with the measuring circuit, you must open the
circuit so that the current may flow through the C-Shunt. Before doing so,
observe the safety precautions in the following message.

DANGER
Death or severe injury caused by high voltage or current
► Do not disconnect the measuring circuit from its load while current is still
flowing!
► A typical use case is working at the secondary of a transformer.
Opening the measuring circuit at the secondary of a transformer, while
there is current in the primary, will cause the transformer secondary to
continue driving current across the effectively infinite impedance up to
its core saturation voltage. This may produce a high voltage across the
open secondary into the range of several kilovolts, causing arcing,
compromising operator and equipment safety, or permanently affecting
the accuracy of the transformer.

56
Working with Precision Shunts

6.3 Configuring an Analog Input for Current


Signals
1. Launch the EnerLyzer test module from the OMICRON Test Universe
Start Page.
2. Start the Hardware Configuration in the EnerLyzer test module either by
clicking the icon or clicking “Parameters | Hardware Configuration”.
3. In this example, configure the Binary/Analog Inputs. Figure 6-3 shows
part of the Hardware Configuration dialog box to emphasize settings
that need to be made.
Figure 6-3:
Partial view of Hardware
Configuration dialog box
for analog voltage and
current channels.

4. Function
Specify in the function row that the channel is being used to measure
currents. This is accomplished using a drop-down menu as is shown for
binary channel 5 in Figure 6-3.
5. Nominal Range
Enter the nominal range for the C-Shunt. The nominal range is the
dynamic maximum (peak value) that is expected to appear on the channel
from the C-Shunt.
6. Clamp Ratio
Enter the current ratio in Clamp Ratio.
7. The left-hand column of the Hardware Configuration dialog box is used
to specify the test module input signal. Select the name from the drop-
down menus.
8. The second column from the left in the Hardware Configuration dialog
box is used to enter a “Display Name” for subsequent dialog boxes. Enter
the display name.
9. Assign the signals. The remaining portion of the Hardware
Configuration dialog box is a table for establishing logical connections
between the input signals or display names and the physical channels on
the CMC test set. Each input signal can be assigned to only one channel
and vice versa.
10.Physically connect the C-Shunt connectors to the binary/analog inputs on
the front panel of the CMC test set.

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58
EnerLyzer Multimeter Mode Example

7 EnerLyzer Multimeter Mode Example


The CMC test set and the EnerLyzer test module are to be used to measure
the voltages and currents going into a three phase grounded motor. Having
these inputs then permits real-time measurement of real power, reactive
power, and apparent power.
Figure 7-1:
Measuring currents and
voltages on a three-phase
motor

Fixed connection
Current probe

If the physical wiring to the various channels differs from the wiring here, the
logical connections can be changed in the Hardware Configuration dialog
box (refer to Figure 7-4 on page 63).

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7.1 Zeroing the Current Clamps using QuickCMC


A total of three current clamps are required for measuring the input currents
to the motor, M. For best results, the clamps should all be of the same type.
Because the analog inputs of the CMC test set deal with voltage inputs,
active current probes with voltage outputs have to be used to measure
currents.
The C-PROBE1 can be used to measure AC and DC currents from the
analog inputs of the BINARY/ANALOG INPUT. C-PROBE1 is an active, DC-
capable current probe and has two switchable measurement ranges.
Regardless of the brand-name on the current probe, it must be adjusted for
the correct zero level.
1. Launch the QuickCMC test module from the OMICRON Test Universe
Start Page.
2. Place the current switch on the current clamp to the appropriate range. In
this example, the setting is 100 mV/A. We are assuming that the current
clamp is the C-PROBE1 which has an LED that should light when turned
on.
3. Connect positive and negative terminals of the current clamp to the
appropriate ANALOG DC INPUT 0 ... ±10 V sockets of the CMC test set.
Do not put the clamp around any live wires.
4. While observing “Vdc” at the Analog Inputs area of the main QuickCMC
dialog box, turn the zero adjustment knob on the current clamp until the
zero level is reached.

5. Repeat these steps for each of the three required current clamps.
6. When finished with all current clamps, exit the QuickCMC test module.

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EnerLyzer Multimeter Mode Example

7.2 Launching and Configuring EnerLyzer


1. Connect up the CMC test set to the computer that is to be used and where
the OMICRON Test Universe is installed.
2. Launch the EnerLyzer test module from the OMICRON Test Universe
Start Page.
3. Start the Hardware Configuration in the EnerLyzer test module either by
clicking the icon or clicking “Parameters | Hardware Configuration”.
4. In this example, configure the BINARY/ANALOG INPUTs for channels 1
through 3 and 5 through 7. Figure 7-2 shows part of the Hardware
Configuration dialog box to emphasize settings that need to be made.
Figure 7-2:
Partial view of Hardware
Configuration dialog box
for analog voltage channel

5. Function
For each input channel 1 through 3, specify in the function row that the
channel is being used to measure voltage (instead of as a binary input,
counter input, or current input). This is accomplished using a drop-down
menu as is shown for binary channel 1 in Figure 7-2.
6. Nominal Range
For each voltage channel, enter the nominal range for the voltage. The
nominal range is the dynamic maximum that is expected to appear on the
channel. The voltage channels In this example have a 600 V nominal
range, as is shown for channel 2 in Figure 7-2.

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OMICRON Test Universe

Figure 7-3:
Partial view of Hardware
Configuration dialog box
for analog current channel

7. Function
For each input channel 5 through 7, specify in the function row that the
channel is being used to measure currents. This is accomplished using a
drop-down menu as is shown for binary channel 5 in Figure 7-3.
8. The binary/analog channel 4 is not being used in this example. These
channels are divided into five groups of two with respect to being
galvanically isolated from one another. Therefore, channels 3 and 4 share
the same ground. In order to keep the three phase voltages separated
from the ground used to measure the currents, the current inputs are
placed on channels 5 through 7 and channel 4 and channel 8 are not
used.
9. Nominal Range
For each current channel, enter the nominal range for the current clamp.
The nominal range is the dynamic maximum that is expected to appear
on the channel from the current clamp. The clamps used in this example
have a 1 V nominal range, as is shown for channel 6 in Figure 7-3.
10.Clamp Ratio
For each current channel, enter the current clamp ratio. This setting in the
Hardware Configuration dialog box should match the settings of the
switches on the actual current clamp. The clamps used in this example
have a clamp ratio of 100 mV/A nominal range, as is shown for channel 6
in Figure 7-3.
11.The inputs of the CMC test set were intended for sinusoidal signals. As
such, the nominal range can be considered Vrms. Together with a clamp
ratio, it specifies how large peak values can be before clipping occurs.
This is important to remember for non-sinusoidal signals that may be
within the Vrms nominal range but that may have larger peak values which
get clipped.

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EnerLyzer Multimeter Mode Example

12.Specifying a larger range can prevent clipping. However, doing so results


in a loss of resolution, because the analog-to-digital conversion only has
12-bits to represent the entire range.
Figure 7-4:
Voltage and current
channel definitions

13.The left-hand column of the Hardware Configuration dialog box is used


to specify the test module input signal. In this example, there are three
voltages and three currents that are to be measured, so their names V1
through V3 and I1 through I3 are selected from the drop-down menus, as
is shown in Figure 7-4.
14.The index numbers n on Vn and In represent a logical connection in
subsequent power dialog boxes in order to determine real, apparent, and
reactive Power-n. In other words, Power2 is calculated from V2 and I2. It
is not possible to monitor the results of, say, V1 and I3.
15.The second column from the left in the Hardware Configuration dialog
box is used to enter a “Display Name” for subsequent dialog boxes. In this
example for monitoring voltages and currents, the display names chosen
are V a, V b, and V c for the input voltages and I a, I b, and I c for the input
currents, as is shown in Figure 7-4.
16.The remaining portion of the Hardware Configuration dialog box is a
table for establishing logical connections between the input signals or
display names and the physical channels on the CMC test set. Each input
signal can be assigned to only one channel and vice versa.
Figure 7-4 shows the logical connections for this example and the
intended physical wiring of the voltage probes and current clamps to the
CMC test set. If the actual wiring of the current clamps is different (for
instance, if the I inputs are exchanged for the V inputs), the logical
connections can be used to make the associations instead of physically
moving cables on the front panel of the CMC test set.
17.Verify that the configuration is correct. On the Multimeter Mode dialog
box, click the Configuration toolbar icon to display the Multimeter
Configuration dialog box, as shown in Figure 7-5.

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OMICRON Test Universe

Figure 7-5:
Multimeter Configuration
dialog box

18.In the Multimeter Configuration dialog box:


• Verify that channels 1 - 3 are configured for voltages V a, V b, and V c.
• Verify that channels 5 - 7 are configured for currents I a, I b, and I c.
• Verify that channel 4 is not used for the currents, because it shares a
ground with channel 3.
• The F1 frequency measurement establishes which channel to use as
the reference for both frequency measurement and the reference
phase. Only the channels that have been configured can be selected.
The F2 frequency measurement setting is only used to measure a
frequency on a given channel and is not used as reference for any
other measurement.
• Averaging is not required for this example. If measuring a steady state
signal, setting the averaging factor to medium or high increases the
accuracy by "smoothing" out noise. If the signal varies rapidly, it's
better to switch this off.
• The sampling rate determines the accuracy of the recorded signal. If
the measured signal varies in time greatly or has a complicated wave
form, increasing the sampling rate will help measure the signal
accurately. If the signal a low frequency sinusoidal, the sampling rate
can be set to a lower rate. The minimum sampling rate has to be two
times higher than the highest expected frequency in the measured
signal.
• In the Refresh rate edit box, enter a value which determines how often
the information on the screen gets updated. The refresh rate refers to
the screen parameters and not to the actual sampling of signals.

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EnerLyzer Multimeter Mode Example

7.3 Wiring the Hardware


Once the software has established all of the proper settings to control the
hardware, the appropriate cables can be connected to the front panel.

WARNING
Death or severe injury caused by high voltage or current
► Do not attach wires between the CMC test set and the motor while
power is still being supplied to the motor on its input lines.
► Turn off voltage and currents to the motor before attaching probes.

In this example, the plan was to monitor the voltages and currents going into
a three phase, grounded motor. Figure 7-6 shows the intended wiring for the
front panel BINARY/ANALOG INOUTs of the CMC test set. Channels 1
through 3 are to measure the phase voltages going into the motor, while
channels 5 through 7 have use current clamps to measure the currents going
into each of the motor’s windings.
Figure 7-6:
Measuring currents and
voltages on a three-phase
motor

Fixed connection
Current probe

Note that channel 4 is not being used, because it shares a ground with
channel 3. Likewise, channel 8 is also not being used. If the physical wiring
to the various channels differs from the wiring here, the logical connections
can be changed in the Hardware Configuration dialog box (refer to Figure
7-4 on page 63).

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OMICRON Test Universe

7.4 Using the Multimeter Signals and Power Grid


Once the CMC test set has the appropriate wiring connections and the
EnerLyzer test module is configured, the power can be restored to the three
phase inputs to the motor.
The CMC test set has to be told by the EnerLyzer test module when it should
monitor the signals that are wired to the voltage and current inputs.
To switch on multimeter measuring, click “Test | Start” or the Start toolbar
icon.
Measuring is on by default. If you have manually switched off multimeter
measuring, use the start command to switch it on again.
To switch off multimeter measuring, click “Test | Stop” or the Stop toolbar
icon.
If you switch off multimeter measuring, the last recorded measurements
remain on the screen. As such, the stop command can be used as a “hold”
button in order to view data.
Figure 7-7:
Multimeter Signals grid

66
EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example

8 EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example


The CMC test set and the EnerLyzer test module are going to be used to test
the operation of a differential relay in the specific case of in-rush current to a
YD5 transformer when the transformer is first switched on.
Figure 8-1:
Measuring in-rush currents Current transformer
to a YD5 transformer YD5 Current probe
controlled by a differential
relay

IB3 IB2 IB1


Differential relay

Figure 8-1 shows the schematic of the YD5 transformer and its differential
relay. According to the specifications for the YD5 transformer, the output
currents are 5 x 30° (or 150°) out of phase with the input currents in addition
to any transformer current scaling.
The relay is attached to the input and output side of the transformer using
current transformers. The input currents of the differential relay IB1, IB2, and
IB3 are proportional to the input currents of the transformer. Likewise, the
input currents on the other side of the differential relay IA1, IA2, and IA3 are
proportional to the output currents of the transformer.1
Under normal operating conditions, the differential relay trips when an input
current, such as IB2, is different from its associated output current, in this
case IA2. The differential relay already takes into consideration the effects of
transformer current scaling and phase shifts between input and output.
Differences that trip the relay can be the result of, say, additional ground
currents in a phase or line to line currents, neither of which should be present
for sound operation of the transformer.

1
The currents in Figure 8-1 are shown going into the differential relay. Actual current direction
depends on wiring for the current transformer and settings for differential relay.

67
OMICRON Test Universe

However, when the transformer is first turned on line, the expected


relationships between input and output currents observed in normal
operating conditions are not present. Start-up is noted for having in-rush
currents that magnetize the coils of the transformer. Without additional
criteria to handle the in-rush currents in the differential relay, the relay would
always trip in every attempt to bring the transformer on line.
The start-up of a transformer has many measurable characteristics resulting
from the in-rush currents. The most noticeable is the presence of significantly
high amplitudes in the second harmonic waveforms for the currents. This
characteristic can be used by the differential relay to detect a normal start-up
phase of the transformer when the relay should not trip.
In this example, the CMC test set and the EnerLyzer test module monitor the
input and output currents to the differential relay. They record the in-rush
currents and their transient waveforms to verify that the differential relay is
operating within specified parameters and that it handles the unique case of
in-rush currents.

8.1 Connecting the Current Clamps


A total of six current clamps are required for measuring the in-rush currents
on both the primary and secondary side of the transformer. For best results,
the clamps should all be of the same type. Because the analog inputs of the
CMC test set deal with voltage inputs, active current probes with voltage
outputs have to used to measure currents.
The C-PROBE1 can be used to measure AC and DC currents from the
analog inputs of the BINARY/ANALOG INPUT. C-PROBE1 is an active, DC-
capable current probe and has two switchable measurement ranges.

68
EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example

8.2 Zeroing the Current Clamps using QuickCMC


Regardless of the brand-name on the current probe, it must be adjusted for
the correct zero level.
1. Launch the QuickCMC test module from the OMICRON Test Universe
Start Page.
2. Place the current switch on the current clamp to the appropriate range.
We are assuming that the current clamp is the C-PROBE1 which has an
LED that should light when the current range is selected. In this example,
the setting is 100 mV/A.
3. Connect positive and negative terminals of the current clamp to the
appropriate ANALOG DC INPUT 0... ±10 V sockets of the CMC test set.
Do not put the clamp around any live wires.
4. While observing the Analog Inputs area of the main QuickCMC dialog
box, turn the zero adjustment knob on the current clamp until the zero
level is reached.

5. Repeat these steps for each of the six required current clamps.
6. When finished with all current clamps, exit the QuickCMC program.

8.3 Starting EnerLyzer


1. Connect up the CMC test set to the computer that is to be used and
where the OMICRON Test Universe is installed. Turn on the test set.
2. Launch the EnerLyzer test module from the OMICRON Test Universe
Start Page.
3. Start up the Hardware Configuration in the EnerLyzer test module either
by clicking the Hardware Configuration toolbar icon or
“Parameters | Hardware Configuration”.
4. In this example, configure the BINARY/ANALOG INPUTs for channels 1
through 6. Figure 8-2 shows part of the Hardware Configuration dialog
box to emphasize settings that need to be made.
Figure 8-2:
Partial view of Hardware
Configuration dialog box

69
OMICRON Test Universe

5. Function
For each input channel 1 through 6, specify in the function row that the
channel is being used to measure currents (instead of as a binary input,
counter input, or voltage input). This is accomplished using a drop-down
menu as is shown for binary channel 1 in Figure 8-2.
6. Nominal Range
For each current channel, enter the nominal range for the current clamp.
The nominal range is the dynamic maximum that is expected to appear
on the channel from the current clamp. The clamps used in this example
have a 1 V nominal range, as is shown for channel 2 in Figure 8-2.
7. Clamp Ratio
For each current channel, enter the current clamp ratio. This setting in the
Hardware Configuration dialog box should match the settings of the
switches on the actual current clamp. The clamps used in this example
have a clamp ratio of 100 mV/A, as is shown for channel 2 in Figure 8-2.
The inputs of the CMC test set were intended for sinusoidal signals. As
such, the nominal range can be considered Vrms. Together with a clamp
ratio, it specifies how large peak values can be before clipping occurs.
This is important to remember for non-sinusoidal signals that may be
within the Vrms nominal range but that may have larger peak values which
get clipped.
Specifying a larger range can prevent clipping. However, doing so results
in a loss of resolution, because the analog-to-digital conversion only has
12 bits to represent the entire range.
Figure 8-3:
The completed
configuration of the input
current clamps

8. The left-hand column of the Hardware Configuration dialog box is used


to specify the test module input signal. In this example, there are six
currents that are to be measured, so their names I1 through I6 are
selected from the dialog box, as is shown in Figure 8-3.

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EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example

9. The second column from the left in the Hardware Configuration dialog
box is used to enter a “Display Name” for subsequent dialog boxes. In this
example for measuring the in-rush currents, the display names chosen
are IB1 through IB3 for the input currents and IA1 through IA3 for the
output currents, as is shown in Figure 8-3.
10.The remaining portion of the Hardware Configuration dialog box is a
table for establishing logical connections between the input signals or
display names and the physical channels on the CMC test set. Each input
signal can be assigned to only one channel and vice versa.
Figure 8-3 shows the logical connections for this example and the
intended physical wiring of the current clamps to the CMC test set. If the
actual wiring of the current clamps is different (for instance, if the IA inputs
are exchanged for the IB inputs), the logical connections can be used to
make the associations instead of physically moving cables on the front
panel of the CMC test set.

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OMICRON Test Universe

8.4 Attaching the Current Clamps


The current clamps need to be plugged into the appropriate
BINARY/ANALOG INPUT channel of the CMC test set. If this is performed
after EnerLyzer is configured, the expected wiring connections can be
determined from Figure 8-3, which shows the Hardware Configuration
dialog box.
Likewise, the probe portion of the current clamps need to be attached to the
appropriate current lines of the relay being tested. Figure 8-1 on page 67
shows the desired wiring of the current clamps from the leads of the relay to
the BINARY/ANALOG INPUT channels of the CMC test set.
If the actual wiring of the current clamps to the CMC test set differs from this
example, the logical connections can be changed in the Hardware
Configuration dialog box instead of physically moving cables. Figure 8-3
shows the logical connections for this example and the intended physical
wiring.
More details on attaching current clamps are provided in section 5 on page
49.

8.5 Switching into Transient Recording Mode


1. The transient recording mode is activated by clicking either the Transient
Recording Mode toolbar icon in the toolbar or clicking
“View | Transient Recording Mode”. This mode of operation allows you to
record a transient record by the CMC, to display it on the PC, and to save
it as a data file. It is possible to:
• Set the trigger conditions which start the transient recording.
• Adjust the acquisition parameters. This includes the pre-trigger length
and recording length.
• Specify how the records are to be saved in the comtrade file. This
includes the name and location for the comtrade file.
• Rename the recorded comtrade files.
Note: If the CMB IO-7 is used as an extension, the comtrade file size
can reach up to 300 MB if the CMB IO-7 has 160 inputs and the
maximum recording length of 316405 ms.
• Display the transient records. This is useful for the Advanced
TransPlay test module as well as the TransView test tool.

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EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example

Figure 8-4:
Transient Recording dialog
box

2. To change the input configuration:


• double-click the channel inputs labeled with a user-defined name
• click the Input Configuration toolbar icon
• or click “Parameters | Input Configuration”.
Details are provided in section 3.2.1 on page 12.
3. Set the trigger conditions by specifying:
• The channel on which the trigger is to occur using the Channel drop-
down menu. The trigger is on channel I1 for this example.
• A current level for the trigger by entering a value in the Level edit box.
If a binary input is selected for the trigger channel, you cannot set the
voltage level. The current level is 1 A for this example.
• The trigger slope edge as being either falling or rising for the trigger
event. The slope is rising for this example.
4. Set the parameters in the “Acquisition parameters” section.
• Enter the desired pre-trigger length in the pre-trigger length edit field.
This represents the number of samples to record before the trigger
event. A negative pre-trigger length means that recording starts at
some point in time after the trigger event. The pre-trigger length is
90 ms for this example.

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OMICRON Test Universe

• Enter a value for the recording length in the Acquisition Length edit
box. This defines the duration for the recording. The acquisition length
is 1000 ms for this example. Note that the acquisition length includes
the pre-trigger length.
• Select the desired sampling frequency. The sampling frequency has
an effect on the maximum acquisition length. The higher the sampling
frequency, the higher the resolution of the recording at the expense of
a shorter maximum recording time. On the other hand, the lower the
sampling frequency, the longer the maximum recording time at the
expense of a lower resolution. The maximum recording time can only
be modified by changing the sampling frequency. The sampling
frequency is 9 kHz for this example.
5. In the “Saving records” section of the transient recorder interface, choose
one of the following options:
First only Saves only the first record sent to the PC. After
saving the record, recording is automatically
stopped.
Automatically Records and uploads the records to the PC
continuously. Each transient record uploaded is
converted to a comtrade file and saved to a unique
name.
On demand Records and uploads a record to the PC only when
the “Save now” button is activate. The “Save now”
button is only active when there is a record
available in the CMC.
The settings should be for First only for this example.
6. The “For each record” section of the dialog box has mutually exclusive
radio buttons that can be set:
Create new file Creates a new comtrade file for each transient
record uploaded from the computer. In this mode
each new file name has an integer appended to the
file name to make it unique (e.g., Event1.cfg,
Event2.cfg).
Overwriting
existing file Uses the same existing comtrade file each time a
record is uploaded from the CMC.
The settings should be for “Create new file” for this example.
7. In the File specification edit field, either enter the file and the location of
the generated comtrade file or click Browse to search for the file name
and location. For this example, the location and file name are:
C:\Program Files\OMICRON\Test Universe\Test Library\
Samples\Record.cfg.

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EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example

8.6 Starting the Recording


1. To start the recording, click “Test | Start” or the Start toolbar icon. The
status bar displays “Waiting for trigger,” the event that starts the transient
recording.
If the status bar displays “Offline,” the CMC test set is not attached
properly to the PC. This connection must be established before proper
operation can continue.
If you want to start the recording immediately without waiting for the
trigger event, select the “Immediate” trigger condition and click the
Start toolbar icon. This causes a trigger event and starts the recording
process.
To stop the recording, click “Test | Stop” or the Stop toolbar icon. If
you switch off transient recording, the recording is aborted.
2. While EnerLyzer is waiting for the trigger, turn on the switch for the
transformer.
3. If EnerLyzer was configured properly, the status bar should change to
“Acquiring.” This means that the specified trigger conditions were
received by the CMC test set and it can record the signal.
If the status bar remains “Waiting for trigger,” the Hardware
Configuration in EnerLyzer program may not match either the
physical wiring to the CMC test set or the requirements of the
transformer.
4. Shortly after a signal is recorded, the status bar should change to “Saving
Record CMC -> PC.” This means that the signal data that the CMC test
set recorded is being passed to the hardware and is stored as a file.
5. If the “First only” mode was enabled, the status bar changes to “Stopped”
once its data set has been transferred to the PC.
If the “Automatic” mode was enabled, the status bar changes to
“Waiting for Trigger.” In such an event, the transformer needs to be
turned off and then back on in order to have the proper trigger
conditions for in-rush current.
Warning: The switch to the transformer is still on at this point in time.
Be careful when adjusting the wiring.
6. The transformer and the CMC test set are not needed for any further
tests. All subsequent analysis can be done offline.

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OMICRON Test Universe

8.7 Analyzing the Transient Record


EnerLyzer uses the TransView test tool to explore the properties of a
recorded signal. This can be done offline with the EnerLyzer test module
alone. Thus, detailed analysis of a given transformer’s can be performed off-
site once on-site testing has created the appropriate data files.
1. Analyze
Select a data record in EnerLyzer’s Transient Recording dialog box. In
this example, the recorded data is saved to the file Record.cfg.
2. To view the recorded data in more detail, click the Analyze button while
the data file is highlighted. The Analyze button launches the TransView
test tool.
Figure 8-5:
Transient Recording
dialog box

Note: The TransView test tool is accessible from the Transient Recording
dialog box after a record has been acquired in the EnerLyzer test tool.
TransView offers a graphical display of the measured and calculated values
and the binary signals. These include time signal diagrams, vector diagrams,
harmonics charts and impedance “circle” diagrams

76
EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example

8.8 Viewing Time Signals in TransView


1. When theTransView test tool is started for the first time with a created
data record, it is generally in the Time Signals mode, as is shown in
Figure 8-6.
If TransView did not start-up in Time Signals mode, it can be started by
clicking its icon or selecting it from the “View” menu.
The Time Signals view is used to visualize measuring and calculation
variables, as well as binary signals as a function of time.
2. Use the orange and blue cursors to scroll to specific points in time, whose
value is displayed in the time fields.
3. Specific points in time can be entered into the fields of the table, which
cause the appropriate cursor to move in all active views.
Figure 8-6:
Time Signals view in the
TransView test tool

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OMICRON Test Universe

8.9 Viewing Harmonic Diagrams in TransView


The harmonic diagrams are much more useful for studying the in-rush
currents into a transformer.
1. Select the harmonic analysis either by clicking its icon or starting it from
the “View” menu.
Figure 8-7 shows the TransView window for the recorded signal.
2. The orange and blue cursors can be used to scroll to specific points in
time, whose value is displayed in the time fields.
The harmonic diagram can be displayed at the same time as other
TransView diagrams. As such, use one of the cursors in the Time View
and drag the time cross-hairs to a point in time immediately following the
turning on of the transformer.
3. While dragging one of the cursors left and right (forward and backward in
the time domain), observe how the magnitude of the second order and
higher harmonics change. Specific points in time can be entered into the
fields of the table, which cause the appropriate cursor to move in all active
views.
The second harmonic is the third bar from the left after the DC component
and the fundamental frequency. As can be observed in this recorded
sample, the start-up of this transformer has significantly high amplitudes
in the second harmonic waveforms for the in-rush currents.
Figure 8-7:
Harmonics view in the
TransView test tool

The harmonic diagrams show the RMS values of harmonics of selected


measuring values in the form of bar charts. The harmonics are
determined with the help of a DFT (Discrete Fourier Transformation).

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EnerLyzer Transient Mode Example

8.10 Viewing Vector Diagrams in TransView


1. Select the vector analysis either by clicking its icon or starting it from the
“View” pull-down menu.
Figure 8-8 shows the TransView window for the recorded signal.
2. The orange and blue cursors can be used to scroll to specific points in
time, whose value is displayed in the time fields.
Figure 8-8:
Vector Diagrams in the
TransView test tool

8.11 Playing Back a Recorded Signal Using


Advanced TransPlay
Once the CMC test set and the EnerLyzer test module in transient recording
mode have recorded a comtrade file of the in-rush currents to a transformer
at start-up, future testing of relays can be simplified.
Specifically, the transformer is no longer needed to test other differential
relays that are to work with that (type of) transformer. Relays can be tested
for proper operation under in-rush off-line by using a CMC device and the
Advanced TransPlay test module. The transformer itself is not required.

79
OMICRON Test Universe

80
Support

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81
Support

82
Index

Index Cos Phi (Trend Recording Conf.) . . . . . . . . . 38


C-PROBE1 current clamp . . . . . . . . 49, 50, 55
Current clamp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 68, 72
current output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51, 56
voltage output . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
A Cursor 1 / Cursor 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

acquisition
of transient records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
setting parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Adv. TransPlay test module . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
D
analog input Depth (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
configuring current signals . . . . . . . . . 53, 57 Deviation (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . . 27
analyze DFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46, 47, 78
the Analyze button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Diagram elements
Apparent power (Trend Recording Conf.) . . . 37 zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
ASCII (Comtrade option) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Diagram Error Status (Trend Recording
Auto scale (Trend Recording mode) . . . . . . . 35 Mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Auto-adjust resolution (power quality trigger) . . 25 Diagram line (diagram element) . . . . . . . . . . 40
available (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . . 25 Diagram menu (Trend Recording Mode) . . . 35
averaging (Multimeter Conf.) . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Diagram properties (diagram element) . . . . . 41
Diagram stop/start indication (Trend
Recording Mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Diagrams
B impedance circle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Duration (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . . 29
basic trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Binary (Comtrade option) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
BINARY/ANALOG INPUT of CMC . . . . . . . . . 7
E
error
C display of error conditions (Harmonic
Analysis mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Capacity remaining (Trend Recording display of error conditions (Multimeter
Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Channel (trigger conditions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 overload error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Chart cursors (Trend Recording Mode) . . . . 36
Clamp ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13, 52
clamp ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Clear (Trend Recording Mode) . . . . . . . . . . . 35
CMC (suitable test sets for EnerLyzer) . . . . . . 5
F
Comtrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Frequency (Trend Recording Conf.) . . . . . . . 37
comment (Comtrade options) . . . . . . . . . 44 Frequency (trigger conditions) . . . . . . . . . . . 24
format (Comtrade options) . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Frequency and phase measurement (Trend
options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Recording Mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
configuration Frequency change (trigger conditions) . . . . . 24
analog input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53, 57 Frequency change trigger (power quality
test hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 trigger) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
trend recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 frequency trigger (power quality trigger) . . . . 27
Configuration change (Trend Recording
Mode) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

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OMICRON Test Universe

H O
Hardware Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Optimize
Harmonic (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . . 27 x-axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Harmonic (trigger conditions) . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 y-axis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
harmonic trigger (power quality trigger) . . . . 27 overload error . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

I P
Input configuration Phase (Trend Recording Conf.) . . . . . . . . . . 37
creating 2 & 3 phase systems . . . . . . . . . 22 playback
creating power systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 transient record (Advanced TransPlay) . . 30
floating configure input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 power
Invalid parameters (power quality trigger) . . . 29 meas. real/apparent/reactive power . . . . 59
Power (Multimeter vector diagrams) . . . . . . 18
power quality trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Primary transformer ratio (Input
L Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Level (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27


Level (trigger conditions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
license for EnerLyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Q
Quantity (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . . 29

M
Measurement rate (Trend Recording Conf.) . 38
Multimeter
R
configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 53 Range (Input Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
power grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Rate (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
signals grid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ratio
vector diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 current clamp ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Multimeter mode . . . . . . . . . . . 8, 11, 12, 18, 53 primary transformer ratio . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
secondary transformer ratio (Input Conf.) . . 23
Reactive power (Trend Recording Conf.) . . . 38
Real power (Trend Recording Conf.) . . . . . . 37
N recording
of transient records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Name (input configuration) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 setting parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Nominal Recording limit (Trend Recording Mode) . . . 36
frequency (Comtrade options) . . . . . . . . . 44 Reference channel (Trend Recording Conf.) . . 37
frequency (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . 25 Resolution (power quality trigger) . . . . . . 27, 28
power quality trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 RMS (Trend Recording Conf.) . . . . . . . . . . . 37
range (Hardware Configuration) . . . . . . . 12
Notch trigger (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . 28
Notches (trigger conditions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

84
Index

S W
sag weak signal error (Trend Recording Mode) . 36
typical sag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Sag and swell (trigger conditions) . . . . . . . . . 24
sampling frequency (record accuracy) . . . . . 14
Sampling frequency (Trend Recording
Conf.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Y
secondary transformer ratio (Input Conf.) . . . 23 YD5 transformer (Transient mode example) 67
Selected grid (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . 25
Signal properties (diagram element) . . . . . . . 41
Signals (Multimeter vector diagrams) . . . . . . 18
Slope (trigger conditions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Z
Snapshot view . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 zoom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Status (Trend Recording Mode) . . . . . . . . . . 35 Zoom (diagram element) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Swell/Sag (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . . . 26
Symmetrical components (Multimeter vector
diagrams) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

T
Table (diagram element) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
test sets suitable for EnerLyzer . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Threshold (Input Configuration) . . . . . . . . . . 23
Time Signals
viewing time signals in TransView test
tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Time started (Trend Recording Mode) . . . . . 35
transient record playback (Advanced
TransPlay) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
transient recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9, 11
TransView . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40, 77, 79
Trend recording mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 35
trigger
basic trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
power quality trigger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Trigger channel (power quality trigger) . . . . . 25
Typical notch (power quality trigger) . . . . . . . 29

V
Vector diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
View properties (diagram element) . . . . . . . . 40

85
OMICRON Test Universe

86