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Front Matter

Source: Proceedings of the Seminar for Arabian Studies, Vol. 36, Papers from the thirty-
ninth meeting of the Seminar for Arabian Studies held in London, 21-23 July 2005 (2006)
Published by: Archaeopress Publishing Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41223872
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OF THE
SEMINAR FOR
ARABIAN STUDIES

VOLUME 36 2006

MBI ill »irřilílPllllřPH GÒO


HX-NDATION ill UllUUU|ll GÒO

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Photographs used on the cover of this volume
Front cover

Above A tetradrachm with the name "Abiel" in Aramaic, from Mleiha, Emirate of Sha
D.T. Potts, Supplement to The Pre-Islamic Coinage of Eastern Arabia. (Cars
Institute Publications, 16). Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum, 1994: No. 279 reverse.
(Photograph courtesy of D.T. Potts).

Below A.F.L Beeston at the Oriental Institute, 1970s

Spine Impression of a seal depicting two men in a boat, from Hamad Town. Bahrain. Bahrain Nation
Museum. (Photograph courtesy of Mark Beech).
Back Cover

Left column (top to bottom)

Alabaster incense burner from Shabwa, Hadramawt, with a relief of a camel rider, and an
inscription Ddll bn whfrl (RES 4690). (Photograph courtesy of the Trustees of the British
Museum, Department of the Ancient Near East, ANE 125682).

Neolithic flint arrowhead from al-Markh, Bahrain. Bahrain National Museum. (Photograph
courtesy of Mark Beech).

Camel figurine from Muweilah, Emirate of Sharja, UAE. See P. Magee, Excavations at
Muweilah. Preliminary Report on the First two Seasons. Arabian Archaeology and Epigraphy 1
[1996]: 206-207 and Fig. 28. (Photograph courtesy of Peter Magee).

Dadanitic inscription (Jaussen & Savignac Lihyanite 49) at al-cUla, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
See An Introduction to Saudi Arabian Antiquities. Riyadh: Department of Antiquities and
Museums, 1975: 68. (Photograph by kind permission of the Deputy Ministry of Antiquities and
Museums, Riyadh).

Middle column (top to bottom)

Spouted jar from Tomb 103, Shimal, Ra3s al-Khaimah, UAE. Wadi Suq period (2000-1600 ВС).
National Museum of Ra3s al-Khaimah, UAE. (Photograph courtesy of Mark Beech).

Outline Map of Arabia, drawn by Ann Searight.

Modern pots made on the island of Soqotra and painted with "Dragon's blood", from the tree
Dracaena cinnabari. (Photograph courtesy of Miranda Morris).

Right column (top to bottom)

Wooden door with an Arabic inscription in the fort at Bahla, Sultanate of Oman. (Photograph by
Michael Macdonald).

Terracing in the hills between Manäkhah and Hajarah, Republic of Yemen. (Photograph by
Michael Macdonald).

Burj al-Macsharah. (between AD 1822 and 1864), near Jazïrat al-Hamrã3, Ra3s al-Khaimah, UAE.
(Photograph courtesy of Derek Kennet).

Anthropomorphic grave-marker (?) from north-west Saudi Arabia. See An Introduction to Saudi
Arabian Antiquities. Riyadh: Department of Antiquities and Museums, 1975: 57. (Photograph by
kind permission of the Deputy Ministry of Antiquities and Museums, Riyadh).

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Proceedings

of the

Seminar for Arabian Studies

Volume 36

2006

Papers from the thirty-ninth meeting of the


Seminar for Arabian Studies
held in London, 21-23 July 2005

Seminar for Arabian Studies

Archaeopress
Oxford

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Orders for copies of this volume of the Proceedings and for all back numbers should be sent to
Archaeopress, Gordon House, 276 Banbury Road, Oxford 0X2 7ED, UK.
Tel/Fax +44-(0) 1865-311914.
e-mail bar@archaeopress.com
http://www.archaeopress.com
For the availability of back numbers see the Seminar's web site: www.arabianseminar.org.uk

Steering Committee of the Seminar and Editorial Committee of the Proceedings


Dr D. Kennet (Chairman)
Dr M. Beech
Dr R. Carter (Joint Editor)
Dr N. Durrani
Dr R.G. Hoyland
M.C.A. Macdonald
Dr V. Porter

Dr St. J. Simpson (Joint Editor)


A. Thompson (Treasurer)
Dr. L. Weeks

Seminar for Arabian Studies


с/о The Department of Asia, The British Museum
London, WC IB 3DG, United Kingdom
e-mail seminar.arab@durham.ac.uk

Opinions expressed in papers published in the Proceedings are those of the authors and are
not necessarily shared by the Editorial Committee.

© 2006 Archaeopress, Oxford, UK.


All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system,
or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or
otherwise, without the prior permission of the publisher.
ISSN 0308-8421
ISBN 1-905739-0 1-Х

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The Steering Committee of the Seminar for Arabian Studies is most grateful to
The Sheikh Mohamed Bin Issa Al Jaber Foundation

for its continued generosity in making a substantial grant to the running costs of the Seminar and
the editorial expenses of producing the Proceedings

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Contents
Transliteration vii

Editors' Foreword ix

In Memoriam Brian Doe 1

Part One: A Celebration of A.F.L. Beeston (191 1-1995)


Michael Macdonald, Introductory Remarks Ъ-^

Geert Jan van Gelder, An experiment with Beeston, Labid,


A rabic verse 7- 1 5

James E. Montgomery, Beeston and the singing-girls 1 7-24


Clive Holes, The Arabic dialects of Arabia 25-34
Janet Watson, Bonnie Glover Stalls, Khalid al-Razihi & Shela
A rabic or something else ? 35 - 41
Christian Robin, L'institution monarchique e
ď A.F.L. Beeston réexaminées à la lumière des découvertes les plus récentes 43-52
Mohammed Maraqten, Legal documents recently discovered by the AFSM at Mahram Bilqïs,
near Mãrib, Yemen 53-67

Serguei A. Frantsouzoff, A M

Alessandra Avanzini, Ancient South Arabian anthroponomastics: historical remarL· 79-85


Michael J. Zwettler, "Binding on the crown " 87-99
Manfred Kropp, Burden and succession: a proposed Ar amaicism in the
or the diadochs of the Arabs 101-109
Part Two: Additional New Research on Arabia

Soren Fredslund Andersen & Mustafa Ibrahim Salman, The Ty los Burials in Bahrain 1 1 1-124
Djamel Boussaa, A future to the past: the case of Fareej Al-Bastakia in Dubai, UAE 125-138
Paolo M. Costa, Dank archaeological project: a preliminary report 139-149
Rémy Crassard, Joy McCorriston, Eric Oches, cAbd ΑΙ-Aziz Bin cAqil, Julien Espagne & Mohamma
Sinnah, Manayzah, early to mid-Holocene occupations in W adi Sana (Hadramawt, Y
Roland de Beauclair, Sabah A. Jasim & Hans-Peter Uerpmann, New results on the Neolithic jeweller
from al-Buhais 18, UAE 175-187

Ronald W. Hawker, Tribe, house style


Moawiyah Ibrahim, Report on the 2005 A
Bilqís/Mãrib: preliminary report 1 99-2 1 6
Mutsuo Kawatoko & Risa Tokunaga, Arabic rock inscriptions of south Sinai 2 1 7-227
M. Mouton, A. Benoist, J. Schiettecatte, M. Arbach & V. Bernard, Makaynun, a South Arabian site
in the Hadramawt 229-242

Adrian Parker, Caroline Davie


some recent evidence from lacustrine sequences in eastern and south-western Arabia 243-255

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T. Steimer-Herbet, G. Davtian & F. Braemer, Pastoralists' tombs and settlement patterns in
Wãdí Washcah during the Bronze Age (Hadramawt, Yemen) 257-265
Yosef Tobi, The Subayrï Collection in the Harvard Peabody Museum and Harvard Sem
Donatella Usai, A fourth-millennium ВС Oman site and its context: Wadi Shab-GASl 275-288
Eric Vallet, Yemeni "oceanic policy" at the end of the thirteenth century 289-296
Papers read at the 2005 Seminar 297-299

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Transliteration

Quotations, single words and phrases from Arabic or other languages written in non-Roman
alphabets, are reproduced in "strict" transliteration according to the systems set out below.
However, unless an author insists on a particular transliteration in all circumstances, place-
names and words from languages written in non-Roman alphabets, which have entered English
or French in a particular form (e.g. Mecca, Mocha, Dhofar, qadi, imam/iman), are reproduced in
that form when they are part of an English or French sentence, rather than part of a quotation in
the original language or of a correctly transliterated name or phrase. For example
• "the settlement was built in the wadi bed" BUT "the settlement in Wadï Mayfacah";
• "the mosque in Medina" BUT "the mosque in al-Madïnat al-Munawwarah";
• "the imam went to the mosque" BUT "Imam cAlï went to the mosque";
• "he travelled in Dhofar" BUT "he visited the Himyarite capital Zafar".
Place-names and personal names which do not have a generally accepted conventional
spelling in English/French, but which occur within an English/French context, are given in
"strict" transliteration but using th (ώ), kh (£), dh (i), sh (ofy gh (£), rather than U Λ, d, s, g,
respectively, so that they are consistent with names with established spellings (e.g. Dhamär, Ibn
Khaldün) and are more easily recognizable to non-linguists.
Note that h is used for t and that h is used only in transliterations from Akkadian.
Such a policy inevitably involves a degree of subjectivity and inconsistency, but it seeks to
avoid pedantry and to leave these words, personal names and toponyms in forms which are
recognizable by linguists and non-linguists alike.
The "strict" transliteration systems used in PSAS are as follows:
(a) Arabic
* D С У * d up š Ji z (i q òn
м b Z Ь J r o^ ? t c ^ к * h
^ t t b J z lP3 d t ë <J / J w
& t * d o* s -I» / **-* f ? m Я? У
Vowels: a, i, и, п, ï, п. Diphthongs aw, ay.
Таэ marbutah (S) is rendered by -Ã, except in construct (e.g. bi
zakãt al- für).
(b) Ancient North and South Arabian as for Arabic, except that g is used instead of y, and the
non-emphatic unvoiced sibilants are rendered by s1, s2 and s3.
(c) Other Semitic languages appear in the transliteration systems outlined in the Bulletin of the
American Schools of Oriental Research 226 (1986), p. 3.
(d) Persian, Urdu and Ottoman Turkish as for Arabic with the additional letters transliterated
according to the system in the Encyclopaedia of Islam (New Edition) except that z is used
instead of zft.

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Obituary

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