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Improve your Skills: Use of English for First, Unit 2, Recognising and using phrasal

verbs, p. 14

phrasal verb (grammar) a verb combined with an adverb or a preposition, or


sometimes both, to give a new meaning, for example go in for, win over and see to
Improve your Use of English skills: recognising and using phrasal verbs
What is recognising ...?
plus prep as well as something/somebody; and also
We have to fit five of us plus all our gear in the car.
particle (grammar) an adverb or a preposition that can combine with a verb to make a
phrasal verb
In ‘She tore up the letter’, the word ‘up’ is a particle.
be composed of something (formal) to be made or formed from several parts, things
or people
The committee is composed mainly of lawyers.
get on with sb / get on (together) (also get along with somebody, get along
(together) North American English, British English) to have a friendly relationship
with somebody
She's never really got on with her sister.
She and her sister have never really got on.
We get along just fine together.
be on good, friendly, bad, etc. terms (with somebody) to have a good, friendly, etc.
relationship with somebody
I had no idea that you and he were on such intimate terms (= were such close
friends).
He is still on excellent terms with his ex-wife.
I'm on first-name terms with my boss now (= we call each other by our first
names).
get around (British English also get about)to move from place to place or from
person to person
She gets around with the help of a stick.
News soon got around that he had resigned.
work sth out (especially British English) to find the answer to something
SYNONYM SOLVE
to work out a problem
work out what, where, etc… Can you work out what these squiggles mean?
phrasal verb (grammar) a verb combined with an adverb or a preposition, or
sometimes both, to give a new meaning, for example go in for, win over and see to
1A
particle (grammar) an adverb or a preposition that can combine with a verb to make a
phrasal verb
In ‘She tore up the letter’, the word ‘up’ is a particle.
Why is recognising ...?
2B
feature C something important, interesting or typical of a place or thing
An interesting feature of the city is the old market.
Teamwork is a key feature of the training programme.
How do you recognize ...?
strategy [countable] a plan that is intended to achieve a particular purpose
the government’s economic strategy
strategy for doing something to develop a strategy for dealing with
unemployment
strategy to do something It's all part of an overall strategy to gain
promotion.
figure sb/sth out to think about somebody/something until you understand them/it
SYNONYM WORK OUT
We couldn't figure her out.
figure out how, what, etc… I can't figure out how to do this.
phrasal verb (grammar) a verb combined with an adverb or a preposition, or
sometimes both, to give a new meaning, for example go in for, win over and see to
3C
How is recognizing ...?
lexical adj [usually before noun] (linguistics) connected with the words of a language
lexical items (= words and phrases)
particle (grammar) an adverb or a preposition that can combine with a verb to make a
phrasal verb
In ‘She tore up the letter’, the word ‘up’ is a particle.
4B
Get started
Students’ own answers
in terms of something, in…terms used to show what aspect of a subject you are
talking about or how you are thinking about it
The job is great in terms of salary, but it has its disadvantages.
In practical terms this law may be difficult to enforce.
Developing your vocabulary
Ex. 1
Answers
1 in
pull in (to sth) (of a train) to enter a station and stop
2 off
drop sb/sth off to take someone or something to a place by car and leave them there
on your way to another place
I’ll drop you off on my way home.
3 away
get away to have a holiday/vacation
We're hoping to get away for a few days at Easter.
4 off
turn off/turn sth off [no passive] to leave a road in order to travel on another
Is this where we turn off?
The jet began to turn off the main runway.
5 down
underground (often the Underground) (British English) (North American
English subway) [singular]an underground railway/railroad system in a city
underground stations the London Underground
I always travel by underground.
6 round
get around (something) to go or travel to different places
We had to use public transport to get around.
It’s quite easy to get around London.
7 off 8 off
set off to begin a journey
We set off for London just after ten.
9 out of
pull out (of something) (of a train) to leave a station
10 out of
run out (of sth) to use up or finish a supply of something
We ran out of fuel.
Could I have a cigarette? I seem to have run out.
Ex. 2
Answers
powered adj (usually in compounds) operated by a form of energy such as electricity
or by the type of energy mentioned
a powered wheelchair a solar-powered calculator
battery-powered tools
1 flight
test flight a flight during which an aircraft or part of its equipment is tested
hopefully adv used to express what you hope will happen
Hopefully, we'll arrive before dark.
2 way
pave the way (for somebody/something) to create a situation in which somebody
will be able to do something or something can happen.
This decision paved the way for changes in employment rights for women.
commercial adj [only before noun] making or intended to make a profit
The movie was not a commercial success (= did not make money).
commercial baby foods
the first commercial flights across the Atlantic
3 line
down the road/line/track in the future
Cars that drive themselves are in development now, but
a marketable product is a longway down the line.
powered adj (usually in compounds) operated by a form of energy such as electricity
or by the type of energy mentioned
a powered wheelchair a solar-powered calculator
battery-powered tools
4 ticket
just the ticket (British English also just the job) (informal, approving) exactly what
is needed in a particular situation
public a group of people who share a particular interest or who are involved in the
same activity
the theatre-going public
She knows how to keep her public (= for example, the people who buy her
books) satisfied.
5 wall
up the wall (spoken) very angry or annoyed
That noise is driving me up the wall (=making me annoyed).
Develop your Use of English skills
Ex. 1
Answers
1 d enter 2 j exit
exit [intransitive, transitive] (formal) to go out; to leave a building, stage, vehicle, etc.
(+ adv./prep.) The bullet entered her back and exited through her chest.
We exited via a fire door.
exit something As the actors exited the stage the lights went on.
3 n collect from a specific place
pick sth up to collect something from a place
I picked up my coat from the cleaners.
4 l chase 5 b offer for free
give sth away to give something as a gift
He gave away most of his money to charity.
(informal) Check out the prices of our pizzas—we're virtually giving them
away!
6 p find
come across sb/sth [no passive] to meet or find somebody/something by chance
I came across children sleeping under bridges.
She came across some old photographs in a drawer.
bargain a thing bought for less than the usual price
I picked up a few good bargains in the sale.
The car was a bargain at that price. bargain prices
7 f look at
take sth in to visit a place while you are in the area
They continued a few miles further to take in Hinton House.
8 a take someone to a place and leave them there
drop sb/sth off to take someone or something to a place by car and leave them there
on your way to another place
I’ll drop you off on my way home.
9 k survive
get by (on/in/with something) to manage to live or do a particular thing using the
money, knowledge, equipment, etc. that you have
How does she get by on such a small salary?
I can just about get by in German (= I can speak basic German).
10 h stay level
keep up (with somebody/something) to move, make progress or increase at the same
rate as somebody/something
Slow down—I can't keep up!
I can't keep up with all the changes.
Wages are not keeping up with inflation.
level adj having the same height, position, value, etc. as something
Are these pictures level?
level with something This latest rise is intended to keep wages level
with inflation.
She drew level with (= came beside) the police car.
11 c return money owed 12 m do, make sth happen
carry sth out to do and complete a task
to carry out an inquiry/an investigation/a survey
Extensive tests have been carried out on the patient.
13 e shout
call [intransitive, transitive] to shout or say something loudly to attract somebody’s
attention
I thought I heard somebody calling.
call (out) to somebody (for something) She called out to her father for help.
call (something) out He called out a warning from the kitchen.
call something Did somebody call my name?
+ speech ‘See you later!’ she called.
14 o enter without permission 15 i cause
16 g start doing something seriously
get down to business to start dealing with the matter that needs to be dealt with, or
doing the work that needs to be done
Let’s get down to business right away—we’ll stop for coffee later.
Ex. 2
give sth up (to sb) to hand something over to somebody else
We had to give our passports up to the authorities.
He gave up his seat to a pregnant woman (= stood up to allow her to sit
down).
elderly adj (of people) used as a polite word for ‘old’
an elderly couple elderly relatives
hold sb/sth up (often passive) to delay or block the movement or progress of
somebody/something
An accident is holding up traffic.
My application was held up by the postal strike.
co-pilot a second pilot who helps the main pilot in an aircraft
stand in (for somebody) to take somebody’s place
SYNONYM DEPUTIZE
My assistant will stand in for me while I'm away.
run somebody/somethingover (of a vehicle or its driver) to knock a person or an
animal down and drive over their body or a part of it
Two children were run over and killed.
get through (to sb) to make contact with somebody by telephone
I tried calling you several times but I couldn't get through.
conductor (British English) a person whose job is to collect money from passengers
on a bus or train or check their tickets
a bus conductor
give sb sth back/give sth back (to sb) to return something to its owner
Could you give me back my pen?
Could you give me my pen back?
keep up (with somebody/something) to move, make progress or increase at the same
rate as somebody/something
Slow down—I can't keep up!
I can't keep up with all the changes.
Wages are not keeping up with inflation.
Ex. 3
Answers
2
give sth up (to sb) to hand something over to somebody else
We had to give our passports up to the authorities.
He gave up his seat to a pregnant woman (= stood up to allow her to sit
down).
3
hold sb/sth up (often passive) to delay or block the movement or progress of
somebody/something
An accident is holding up traffic.
My application was held up by the postal strike.
5
run somebody/somethingover (of a vehicle or its driver) to knock a person or an
animal down and drive over their body or a part of it
Two children were run over and killed.
7
give sb sth back/give sth back (to sb) to return something to its owner
Could you give me back my pen?
Could you give me my pen back?