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Table of Contents

Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................ 1


1. Selected Article........................................................................................................................ 2
2. About the Article ..................................................................................................................... 2
3. Research Process ..................................................................................................................... 2
3.1. Types of Data Collection.................................................................................................. 3
3.2. Sample Frame ................................................................................................................... 3
3.3. Method of Analysis .......................................................................................................... 3
3.4. Ethical Considerations...................................................................................................... 3
3.5. Research Findings ............................................................................................................ 4
4. Critical Analysis ...................................................................................................................... 4
1. Selected Article

“Are working children’s rights and child labour abolition complementary or opposing realms?”

Okyere, S., (2013). Are working children’s rights and child labour abolition complementary or
opposing realms?. International Social Work,56(1), pp.80-91.

2. About the Article

The selected article takes into consideration a specific group of children working in artisanal

gold mine. The researcher takes into account the essential complication of financial gain attained

by child labour which can then be utilized for their education and other purposes. He argues that

although child labour deprives the children of their basic right of freedom, welfare, dignity and

childhood however, in some cases the financial increment attained through this means can serve

as the economic way through which they can access their right to education and other

opportunities. Moreover, the aims of the study have been clearly stated as the exploration of

ways in which children were involved in mining work and the factors leading to their

participation and environmental as well as work specifications. The main objective according to

the researcher was to take views of the children participants on their engagement in an

occupation which is considered as the worst form of child labour.

3. Research Process

The research process comprises of qualitative data derived from various teenagers working at the

artisanal goldmine Ghana. Qualitative studies are employed where the data cannot be expressed

in terms of numerical and the study is designed to explore impacts, reasoning and justifications

presented in a theoretical way. On the other hand, quantitative study holds value when the data

can be presented in the form of numerical values which can in turn be analysed through various

statistical tools and procedures. In the current research the author has used qualitative research
methods through the utilization of unstructured and semi-structured interviews from various

artisanal miners.

3.1.Types of Data Collection

The data collection methods can be sub-divided into primary and secondary data. Primary data in

this research was conducted through various mining workers whereas the secondary data

collection was characterized by the utilization of previous literature sources, findings and

implementations from various regulatory bodies such as United Nations Convention on the

Rights of the Child (UNCRC), International Labour Organization (ILO) etc.

3.2.Sample Frame

The artisanal gold mining site where the study was conducted employs more than 4000 men,

women and children of the local area of Ghana. Hence, the sample frame was relatively

extensive. The researcher conducted a 12 week detailed ethnographic study taking specific

demographics such as age limits 18 and below and a total number of 57 children correspondents

aged between 14-17 which comprised of 30 girls and 27 boys. Moreover, other informants also

include other artisanal miners, guardians and parents as well as the community leaders.

3.3.Method of Analysis

The author employed thematic scheme of qualitative data analysis. The data analysed was

presented through theoretical statements and interpretations derived from the research

participants and researcher’s observations.

3.4.Ethical Considerations

The ethical considerations include informed consent from the participants of the study. In this

study however, the research includes children and the researcher also narrates that much of the
children were enthusiastic about their participation and sharing of personal information with the

researcher. Moreover, the provided article has all the necessary conditions fulfilled regarding the

concept and rule of plagiarism. Proper acknowledgement and references of the publications and

cited authors have been made and no content has been copied directly from any source or

publication.

3.5.Research Findings

The study concluded an unexpected and unpredictable result narrating that in contrast to the

conventional notion that childhood labour hauls the educational and recreational activities of

children, majority of the participants i.e. 50 out of 57 were either in school or had been in school

at some point or had already completed their compulsory education in Ghana. Moreover, the

correspondents also included children from the same locality as well as migrants. Those within

the local area worked around their school timings or at the weekends whereas migrants only

came to work during school vacations. Furthermore, it was also observed that 80% of the

research correspondents contributed somehow to their family income and few were the only

bread winners of their family.

4. Critical Analysis

In the study selected the researcher has developed interpretations on the basis of results

obtained from research correspondents however, there is no evidence of the researcher’s critical

examination over the findings and contrasting views and phenomenon of child labour. This could

result in the suspicion of the study being potentially biased and may limit the authenticity of the

research. According to Kumar (2010) an authentic research is characterized by un-biasness,

objective orientation and validity. The study is significantly objective oriented, valid but lacked

the potential aspect of un-biasness. Moreover, the paper has highlighted a significant issue and
lag in the current child labour regulations and the issues which have not been previously

addressed and researched. The topic holds strength and uniqueness however, the study lacks in

generality as well as an extended scope. The author has only taken the region of Ghana in his

study and only one such location where children were employed in easy labour work was

selected, this limits the scope of study. Hence, the study is confined to the psyche and findings of

one area only and fails into take into consideration the variable employment and child labour

practices in different regions.

The biggest strength of the chosen research is the researcher’s effort and increasing

concern to assess and evaluate the behaviour and psyche of children working in Ghana mine. The

researcher has lived in the field and along with the research participants which served as the

basic behavioural and child labour interpretation tool. This also helped the author to analyse the

working environment and conditions of the artisanal mines which he considered significantly

favourable. Among the ethical considerations informed consent is the core principle (Soiferman,

2010). Although the researcher declares that all the children were willing to share their personal

information and experiences, but being immature they were not in a position to give consent

moreover, no such evidence is provided that written or verbal consent was taken from the parents

or guardians. Furthermore, limited budget and time constraints may also serve as the basic

limitations for this study.


References

Kumar, R., (2010). Research Methodologies: a step-by-step guide for beginners. 2nd.

Soiferman, L.K., (2010). Compare and Contrast Inductive and Deductive Research
Approaches. Online Submission.