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Lesson Plan 2- Day 3- Wednesday July 11

Date Taught: Wednesday July 11th

Topic: Measurement tools

Standard: CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.A.1
Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers,
yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.

Objectives: Students will be able to use different measurement tools to find the lengths of
objects.

Student-Friendly Objective: Today we will learn about all the different units and things that we
can measure with.

Assessment Plan: Start by asking questions about what they know about measurement. Then at
the end of the lesson go over the same questions to see if they know the answers. Use white
boards to help assess the children in a way that is fun and exciting but still shows us what they
know.

Materials Needed:
 Rulers
 Measuring tapes
 Yard sticks
 Straws
 Pencils
 Pens
 Stuffed animal
 Boxes

Key Vocabulary:
 Inches
 Feet
 Yards
 Centimeters
 Meters
 Ruler
 meter /yard stick

Anticipatory Set (Gain attention/motivation/recall prior knowledge):


· 3-5 minutes
Talk about the clocks from last time. We talked about time and now we are going to talk about
measurement. Does anyone know something that we can measure things with? What ways can
we measure things?
Instructional Inputs:
Today we will be learning about the different materials that we use to measure and the different
units that we measure in. We can use rulers, yardsticks, and measuring tapes. We can measure
using inches, feet, centimeters, and even meters. If it is to difficult for the students to understand
both inches and centimeters just stick with one of the to start.
What is bigger an inch or a foot?
How many inches are there in one foot?
How many feet are there in a yard?
Where do we use inches and feet to measure?
What is bigger a centimeter or a meter?
How many centimeters does it take to make a meter?
Where do we use centimeters and meters?

Modeling:
Model how we can measure different objects. Holding them up and showing the children what
end to start at and how to line it up to measure. Then do a few where you start in the middle to
help illustrate how to important it is to start at the beginning or else we will get a different
number. Help them to understand that different measurements are needed for different things.
We don’t want to measure the table with a ruler or a straw with a big measuring tape. Talk to the
students about how we will need different measuring tools to measure different things.

Guided Practice:
Give each student a bag with different objects in it such as straws, stuffed animals, a book, pens,
pencils.
Have then measure each of these objects in different ways with centimeters, yards, or inches.
They will need to record their findings on paper in whatever way they chose.
Help the children find and explore other things in the gym that they will be able to measure.

Closure:
Talk to the children about their finding and what they were able to measure. Have each child tell
of an example of something they measured, how long it is, and what they used to find that
answer. Then go over the questions from the beginning of the lesson.
What is bigger an inch or a foot?
How many inches are there in one foot?
How many feet are there in a yard?
Where do we use inches and feet to measure?
What is bigger a centimeter or a meter?
How many centimeters does it take to make a meter?
Where do we use centimeters and meters?

Independent practice/application:
Have a paper ruler cut out for each child to take home and practice measuring things. Invite them
to find something at home, measure it, and report their findings the next time we meet.