Sie sind auf Seite 1von 46

Genomes

 and  Gene*cs
Lecture  3  
Biology  W3310/4310  
Virology  
Spring  2014

“...everywhere  an  interplay  between  nucleic  acids  


and  proteins;  a  spinning  wheel  in  which  the  thread  
makes  the  spindle  and  the  spindle  the  thread”  
!
-­‐-­‐ERWIN  CHARGAFF
Virology  breakthrough  in  the  1950’s:  
!
The  viral  nucleic  acid  genome  is  the  gene;c  code  
 

Hershey-­‐Chase  
experiment  with  
phage  T4

Fraenkel-­‐Conrat’s  work  with  TMV


Alfred Hershey & Martha Chase, 1952
The  bigger  surprise:  thousands  of  different  virions,  
seemingly  infinite  complexity  of    infec*ons  
!

But  a  finite  number  of  viral  genomes


Key  fact  makes  your  life  easier:  
   
   
Viral  genomes  must  make  mRNA  
 that  can  be  read  by  host  ribosomes  
   
!

All  viruses  on  the  planet  follow  this  rule,  no  


excep*on  to  date
David  Bal*more  (Nobel  laureate)  used  this  insight  to  
describe  a  simple  way  to  think  about  virus  genomes

The  original  Bal*more  system  missed  one  


genome  type:  the  gapped  DNA  of  the  
Hepadnaviridae
Defini*ons

• mRNA  is  always  the  plus  (+)  strand  


• DNA  of  equivalent  polarity  is  also  the  (+)  strand  
• RNA  and  DNA  complements  of  (+)  strands  are  
negaQve  (-­‐)  strands  
• mRNA  is  ribosome  ready:  it  can  be  translated  into  
protein  
• Not  all  (+)  RNA  is  mRNA!
The  elegance  of  the  Bal*more  system  

Knowing  only  the  nature  of  the  viral  genome,  



one  can  deduce  the  basic  steps  that  must  take  place

 to  produce  mRNA
The  seven  classes  of  viral  genomes

•  dsDNA  
!
•  gapped  dsDNA  
!
•  ssDNA

•  dsRNA    
!
•  ss  (+)  RNA  
!
•  ss  (-­‐)  RNA  
!
•  ss  (+)  RNA  with  DNA  
intermediate
Viral  DNA  or  RNA  genomes  are  
structurally  diverse
• Linear  

• Circular  

• Segmented  

• Gapped  

• Single-­‐stranded  (+)  strand  

• Single-­‐stranded  (-­‐)  strand  

• Single  stranded,  ambisense  

• Double-­‐stranded  

• Covalently  aVached  proteins  

• Cross-­‐linked  ends  of  double-­‐stranded  DNA  

• DNA  with  covalently  aVached  RNA


Is  there  a  purpose  for  such  diversity?  

• Does  it  tell  us  something  about  virus  


biology  or  viral  evoluQon?  
• Is  one  configuraQon  more  advantageous  
than  another?  
• Do  we  have  to  memorize  this  stuff?
Some  of  these  ques*ons  are  difficult  to  answer

What  is  the  purpose  of  a  given  structure?  


-­‐ The  structure  and  composiQon  of  the  genome    is  a  
reflecQon  of  the  method  of  replicaQon  and  packaging  
-­‐ The  selecQve  advantage  isn’t  always  clear
Some  of  these  ques*ons  are  difficult  to  answer

• Why  have  DNA  or  RNA  based  genomes?  


-­‐ RNA  genomes  appeared  first  in  evoluQon  (The  RNA  
World)  
-­‐ Only  RNA  genomes  on  planet  today  are  viral  
-­‐ Relics  of  an  ancient  RNA  world?  
• When  and  why  was  there  a  switch  to  DNA  for  genomes  for  
all  life  forms  except  some  viruses?
Yes,  you  need  to  memorize  this

Parvovirus

HepaQQs  B  virus
Retrovirus
Adenovirus  
Herpes  simplex  virus

Reovirus  
Poliovirus
Rotavirus

Influenza  virus  
Ebola  virus
Memorize  the  7  genome  types  and  the  
key  virus  families  that  use  them

• Do  not  wait  unQl  the  first  exam!  


• If  you  know  the  genome  structure  you  
should  be  able  to  deduce  
-­‐ How  mRNA  is  made  from  the  genome  
-­‐ How  the  genome  is  copied  to  make  more  
genomes
What  informa*on  is  encoded  in  a  viral  genome?

Gene  products  and  regulatory  signals  for:  


-­‐ ReplicaQon  of  the  viral  genome  
-­‐ Assembly  and  packaging  of  the  genome  
-­‐ RegulaQon  and  Qming  of  the  replicaQon  cycle  
-­‐ ModulaQon  of  host  defenses  
-­‐ Spread  to  other  cells  and  hosts
Informa*on  NOT  contained  in  viral  genomes

• No  genes  encoding  the  complete  protein  synthesis  


machinery  
• No  genes  encoding  proteins  involved  in  energy  producQon  or  
membrane  biosynthesis  
• No  classical  centromeres  or  telomeres  found  in  standard  
host  chromosomes  
• Probably  we  haven’t  found  them  yet
The  giant  virus  conundrum

• Over  90%  of  genes  encoded  by  giant  DNA  


virus  genomes  are    novel  
• Some  encode  components  of  protein  
synthesis  machinery
Viral  DNA  genomes

• The  host  geneQc  system  is  based  on  DNA  


• In  large  part,  DNA  viruses  emulate  the  host  
• However,  almost  all  viral  DNA  genomes  are  
NOT  like  cell  chromosomes  
• Unexpected  tricks  have  evolved
dsDNA  genomes

• Mammalian  viruses:  

-­‐  Adenoviridae  

-­‐ Hepadnaviridae  

-­‐ Herpesviridae  

-­‐ Papillomaviridae  

-­‐ Polyomaviridae  

-­‐ Poxviridae
dsDNA  genomes    

Genomes  copied  by  host  DNA  polymerase Genomes  encode  DNA  polymerase

Papillomaviridae (8 kbp)
Gapped  dsDNA  genomes    

reverse  transcriptase

protein RNA

Hepadnaviridae  
This  genome  cannot  be  copied  to  mRNA
Hepa;;s  B  virus
ssDNA  genomes

TT  virus  (ubiquitous  human  virus) B19  parvovirus  (fifh  disease)


RNA  genomes

• Cells  have  no  RNA-­‐dependent  RNA  polymerase  (RdRp)  


• RNA  virus  genomes  encode  RdRp  
• RdRp  produce  RNA  genomes  and  mRNA  from  RNA  
templates  
• mRNA  is  readable  by  ribosomes
ssRNA:  (+)  sense

Viruses  from  eight  families  infect  mammals:  


!
                       -­‐Picornaviridae  (Poliovirus,  Rhinovirus)  
                       -­‐Caliciviridae  (gastroenteriQs)  
                       -­‐Astroviridae  (gastroenteriQs)  
                       -­‐Coronaviridae  (SARS)  
                       -­‐Arteriviridae  
                       -­‐Flaviviridae  (Yellow  fever  virus,  West  Nile  virus,  Hepa;;s  C  virus)  
                       -­‐Retroviridae  (HIV)  
                       -­‐Togaviridae  (Rubella  virus,  Equine  encephali;s  virus)
ssRNA:  (+)  sense
ssRNA  (+)  sense  with  DNA  intermediate

One  viral  family:  Retroviridae


!
Two  human  pathogens:
!
Human  immunodeficiency  virus  (HIV)
Human  T-­‐lymphotropic  virus  (HTLV)
The  remarkable  retroviral  genome  strategy

provirus
ssRNA,  (-­‐)  sense  
Mammalian  viruses:
!

•Paramyxoviridae  (Measles  virus,  Mumps  virus)


•Rhabdoviridae  (Rabies  virus)
•Bornaviridae
•Filoviridae  (Ebola  virus,  Marburg  virus)
•Orthomyxoviridae  (Influenza  virus)  
•Arenaviridae  (Lassa  virus)
!

     
ssRNA,  (-­‐)  sense  
ssRNA,  (-­‐)  sense  
Reassortment  –  a  consequence  of  
segmented  genome
A  curious  twist  with  ss(-­‐)  RNA

• Some  viral  genomes  are  ‘ambisense’  


• Contain  both  (+)  and  (-­‐)  RNA  
• Arenaviridae,  Bunyaviridae
Ambisense  RNA  genomes
Gene*c  methods

Wild-­‐type  
-­‐ Original,  ofen  laboratory-­‐adapted,  from  
which  mutants  are  selected  
-­‐ May  not  be  idenQcal  to  a  virus  isolated  
from  nature  
-­‐ New  virus  isolates  from  the  natural  host  =  
field  or  clinical  isolates
Gene*c  methods

DNA-­‐mediated  transformaDon  
-­‐ The  introducQon  of  foreign  DNA  into  cells  
-­‐ Not  to  be  confused  with  oncogenic  
transforma;on  of  cells
Gene*c  methods

TransfecDon  
-­‐ ProducQon  of  infecQous  virus  afer  
transformaQon  of  cells  by  viral  DNA,  first  
done  with  bacteriophage  lambda  
-­‐ TransformaQon-­‐infecQon  
-­‐ Unfortunately  the  term  has  come  to  be  
used  synonymously  with  DNA-­‐mediated  
transformaQon
Gene*c  methods

MutaDon  
-­‐ Change  in  DNA  or  RNA  comprising  base  
changes  and  nucleoQde  inserQons,  
deleQons,  and  rearrangements  
-­‐ Include  nonsense  and  missense  
mutaQons  
-­‐ Should  not  be  used  to  describe  changes  
in  protein
This  method  allowed  the  applica*on  of  
gene*c  methods  to  animal  viruses
How  were  viral  mutants  isolated?

• RNA  viruses:  present  in  stocks.  Error-­‐prone  


RNA  polymerases,  1  misincorporaQon  in  
104  -­‐  105  nucleoQdes  polymerized  
• DNA  viruses:  1  misincorporaQon  in  108  -­‐  109  
nucleoQdes  polymerized  
• Chemical  treatments  
• Screen  for  desired  phenotype,  eg  ts,  plaque  
size,  drug  resistance
Engineering  muta*ons  into  viral  
genomes  -­‐  the  modern  way

• InfecQous  DNA  clone:  transfecQon  


• A  modern  validaQon  of  the  Hershey-­‐Chase  
experiment  (1952)  
• DeleQon,  inserQon,  subsQtuQon,  nonsense,  
missense
Resurrec*ng  the  1918  influenza  virus