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TRAIL

JULY 2018 / ISSUE 129 ONE DIRTY MAGAZINE

GET
OUTSIDE!
SUMMER
PHOTO
ISSUE
JORDAN
A Run Through History

THE ART OF SUFFERING


At The Barkley Marathons

FAROE ISLANDS
An Untapped Trail Paradise

GET HIGH, STAY HIGH


Running the Glacier Haute Route

SANDSTONE ODYSSEY
A Bucket-List Zion Traverse
DISPLAY THROUGH AUGUST
favorite trail   EXPLORE

Bulldog Trail
Malibu Creek State Park, California
Photographer: James Kao the ridgeline. Hop 20 feet up that chaparral-covered hill for
Runner: Claire Walla, 33, of Camarillo, California some awesome views of the Pacific Ocean. Or, turn around,
Beta: Tucked away in the giant ripples of sandstone and cross over the trail and scramble up the sandstone to the
chaparral that tower over Malibu Creek State Park, the Bulldog top of Castro Peak, which, at 2,826 feet, is the highest
Trail is a sustained climb with sweeping views of the Santa point in the middle section of the Santa Monica Mountains.
Monica Mountains. The 3.5-mile trail covers 1,700 feet of Castro Peak used to house a fire lookout tower, so it’s got
gain, but your total mileage for an out-and-back run will hit primo panoramic vistas.
double digits, as there’s a two- to three-mile approach to the Pro Tip: The Bulldog Trail is pretty easy to follow, but it does
trailhead (depending on where you start your run). branch off in a couple of places. When you get to a fork in
Once you get to the top of the Bulldog Trail, you’ll see a the road, keep in mind that the Bulldog Trail is less overgrown
sandy hill, covered in chaparral—but this is not the view you than its tributaries.
came for. While it’s tempting to turn around and fly back Distance: 11-plus miles.
down Bulldog, or take the Castro Motorway down to link-up Season: All seasons!
with the Backbone Trail … wait! Spend some time exploring More Info: trails.lacounty.gov/Trail/106/bulldog-motorway
CONTENTS
JULY 2018 / ISSUE 129

FEATURES

30
Island Escape
Trail running in the wild and rugged
Faroe Islands.
By Luke Nelson
Photos by Kelvin Trautman

38
PRO PHOTO TIP
Dan Patitucci
Shoot real runners while on real runs.
Favorite Photo: Switzerland's spectacular
Hardergrat ridge run.

40
The Art of Suffering
What it takes to survive the infamous
100-mile Barkley Marathons in the
unforgiving mountains of Frozen Head
State Park, Tennessee.
Photos by Howie Stern

50
PRO PHOTO TIP
Fred Marmsater
Bring a flexible mind and eye.
Favorite Photo: Slickrock running
in Zion National Park.

52 60 62
Melt Down PRO PHOTO TIP Running
Running the Glacier Haute Route, from Randall Levensaler through History
Chamonix to Zermatt. Break the mold and your visual rut by The inaugural run of The Jordan Trail.
By Kim Strom shooting outside of the box. Favorite
By Alfie Pearce-Higgins
Photos by PatitucciPhoto Photo: Hardrock 100 Mile Endurance Run.
Photos by Ali Barqawi

COVER: Kim Strom treads the edge, near Lac Louvie in the Valais region of Switzerland. PHOTO BY PATITUCCIPHOTO
THIS PAGE: Luke Nelson tries to keep his feet dry in the Faroe Islands. PHOTO BY KELVIN TRAUTMAN

4 JULY 2018 TRAILRUNNERMAG.COM


KRYSTLE WRIGHT © 2018 Patagonia, Inc.

W H AT I F R U N N I N G CO U L D S AV E A R A I N F O R E ST ?

The takayna/ Tarkine region of northwest Tasmania is home to one of the last tracts of old-growth Gondwanan
rainforest in the world, yet this place is currently at the mercy of destructive extraction industries, including
timber and mining. Told through the eyes of a rural doctor who runs ultramarathon distances deep into
the forest to scout logging operations, this documentary unpacks the complexities of modern conservation
and challenges us to consider the importance of our last truly wild places.

W ATC H T H E F I L M A N D TA K E A C T I O N
patagonia.com/takayna
DEPARTMENTS
JULY 2018 / ISSUE 129

PEOPLE EXPLORE PERFORM

08 02 70
editor’s note favorite trail trail tips
What we can learn from elite mom runners.
10 18 By Jonnah Perkins

making tracks adventure 72


Running the Zion Traverse, a 50-mile
What's happening in the 2018
Trail Runner Trophy Series. odyssey through Zion National Park.
By Brian Metzler
nutrition
By Megan Janssen 5 breakfast recipes, from quick bites to get
you out the door to post-long-run meals.
16 22 By Stephanie Howe Violett

take your mark great escapes 76


Floating and running Idaho’s
The race through the Sacred Valley
Middle Fork of the Salmon River.
celebrates Peru’s history of running.
By Tom Diegel health
By Monica Prelle How to assess your running readiness
before piling on the miles.
26 By Elinor Fish

everyman's exposed
THIS PAGE: Hiking up the moraine along the
Glacier du Tour on day one of the Alps' Glacier
82 Haute Route. PHOTO BY PATITUCCIPHOTO

parting shot
TRAIL

one dirty magazine


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6 JULY 2018 TRAILRUNNERMAG.COM


DURO | DYNA

Running doesn’t suck but it is


hard. Each glorious long run in
the mountains is the result of
countless hours of training; early
mornings, late nights, tired legs
and no excuses. The Duro/Dyna
makes ever y race or run easier with
bounce-free s tabilit y and options
that accommodate ever y thing from
a f t e r- w o r k j a u n t s t o l o n g d a y s i n
the mountains. So keep training.

T h a t ’s h o w t h e G o o d D a y s a r e M a d e .
editor’s note

A Picture’s Worth
WELCOME TO OUR SPECIAL
PHOTO ISSUE
By Michael Benge

One of the big reasons we love trail running is the beautiful


BUENA VISTA TO BEAVER CREEK, places it takes us, right? Our iPhones are likely clogged with
COLORADO images of ourselves and our friends on our favorite trails and
adventures. I mean who takes photos of congested Colfax
6 DAYS • 120 MILES • 20,000 FEET OF GAIN Avenue during Denver’s big marathon event? Sure, you might
OR 3 DAYS – GU RUN 3 see the Rocky Mountains peeking above the skyscrapers
through the smog, but we seek the solace and delight of a
singletrack trail, even when it is snaking through an urban
park, let alone somewhere exotic like the soaring landforms of
the Faroe Islands.
In every issue, we strive to inspire you with spectacular
imagery, and in this, our special Annual Photo Issue, we
take you around the world in a visual extravaganza that we
hope captures the beauty, adventure and comaraderie of trail
running. Speaking of the Faroe Islands, the accomplished trail
runner Luke Nelson and a small crew made an exploratory
foray there, and in just a few days confirmed its vast, untapped
potential (see “Island Paradise,” page 30). The globe-trotting
outdoor-sports photogapher Kelvin Trautman’s images
highlight a trail runner’s fairyland.
While sheer beauty is a strong motivator, so are those
images that capture the grit and determination that a tough
race wrings out of us. And races don’t get any tougher than
the crazy, quirky Barkley Marathons in the punishing hills of
Frozen Head State Park, Tennessee. For the past two editions of
the event, the prolific race photographer Howie Stern has been
on location, and in “The Art of Suffering” (see page 40) shares
RUN . RELAX . EAT . DRINK . REPEAT his up-close-and-personal photos of runners in the throes of
their own battles.
On another level, life on the trails can lead to profound
cultural experiences. In “Running Through History” (see
page 62), the UK runner Alfie Pearce-Higgins partners with a
Jordanian runner, Mohammad Al-Sweity, for an inaugural run
of the “new” 650-kilometer Jordan Trail, which, as the author
writes, travels along some of the oldest trails in the world.
Also for this issue, we asked each of three of our go-to
photographers to share a favorite image and provide a few pro
tips for taking great trail-running photos. We hope you get
inspired to bust out your camera or phone on your next trail
run and share your favorite images with us—in each issue, our
ONLY 10 SPOTS LEFT! Everyman’s Exposed section features reader-submitted photos
USE CODE “SALOMON100” TO SAVE $100. from across the globe (Info: trailrunnermag.com/people/
culture/we-want-your-amazing-photos.html).
ENTER TRANSROCKIES.COM We hope you enjoy this content-packed issue, and have a
fabulous summer on the trails, camera in hand. TR

AUGUST 14–19, 2018


ONE
DIRTY
MAGAZINE

EDITORIAL
Publisher / Duane Raleigh
draleigh@bigstonepub.com
Editor / Michael Benge
mbenge@bigstonepub.com
Assistant Editor / Megan Janssen
mjanssen@bigstonepub.com
Columns Editor / Alison Osius
aosius@bigstonepub.com
Contributing Editors / Yitka Winn, Sarah Lavender Smith, David Roche,
Garett Graubins, Bryon Powell, Rickey Gates, Meghan Hicks, Doug Mayer,
Jenn Shelton, Alex Kurt

CREATIVE
Art Director / Randall Levensaler
rlevensaler@bigstonepub.com
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OF TRANSROCKIES RUN
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AUGUST 27–31, 2018


making tracks TROPHY SERIES

CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: Crushing Alberta’s Sinister 7 Ultra with Crowsnest Mountain in the
background; a runner enjoys the view at the Bel Monte Endurance Run, Virginia; Rick Gray after the Laurel

CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: RAVEN EYE PHOTOGRAPHY; JAMES R. GILL III; RICHARD TYNER; RAVEN EYE PHOTOGRAPHY
Run Ascent 11-Miler, Tennessee; sporting a smile on one of Black Spur Ultra’s steep climbs, British Columbia.

2018 Trophy Series Update


HALFWAY THROUGH THE SEASON, ACTION HEATS UP
By Megan Janssen
You Had
Me at The 2018 Trail Runner Trophy Series presented by Altra is well
underway. So far, 77 races have been held all over the United States and

Monday. Canada in distances from 5K to 100 miles. The points-based race series
featuring more than 130 events is Trail Runner’s way of celebrating the
widespread yet connected running community.
The outdoor industry
Now in its 15th year, the Trophy Series awards prizes in two categories: Non-
is seeking professional
Marathon, and Marathon and Ultra. The top age-group winners in the Non-
women with a passion for Marathon category and the top three male and female runners in the Marathon and
the outdoors. That’s where Ultra category receive prize packages loaded with gear from our sponsors.
you come in. Two Grand Prizes are also up for grabs: this year, the prize for the Mile Mogul—
the runner who completes the most total miles—is a guided trail-running trip of the
CamberOutdoors.org/jobs Tour du Mont Blanc in the Alps, and for the Trail Fiend—the runner who completes
the most races—a five-day, helicopter-assisted, hut-to-hut run in British Columbia.
We continue to be inspired by the humble, adventurous trail-running community
that doesn’t take itself too seriously. Below are a couple of shining examples from
recent Trophy Series races. (continued on page 14)

10 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


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is ideal for both getting around town and running through the urban
landscape. The thin, easily-adjustable strap offers several ways to
wear this headlamp. 200 lumens. www.petzl.com
making tracks TROPHY SERIES

BY THE NUMBERS
OLDEST COMPETITOR
George Border, 89, of Huntington
Beach, California

YOUNGEST COMPETITOR
Danner Osburn, 6, of Florence, Oregon

MOST MILES—150
Linda McFadden, 55, of Modesto, California

MOST RACES—6
Steve Templin, 45, of Muncy, Pennsylvania
Dale Reicheneder, 52, of Malibu, California

Standings are as of June 4, 2018.


Please go to www.trailrunnermag.com/
standings for up-to-date information.

PAUL CUTTING
The Beaver Flat 50K in Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park features a taxing 8,000 feet of climbing.

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(continued from page 10)


On April 14th, at the Laurel Run
Ascent 11-miler in Church Hill
Tennessee, Race Director Mark
Skelton thought all runners were
present, so he started the race. Little
did he know, Hank Lowe was in the
restroom. He started behind the pack
in last place but went on to finish
nearly nine minutes ahead of everyone.
He may have broken the course record
if he had started on time.
Earlier, on March 10th at the Bel
Monte Endurance Run (50M, 50K,
25K) in Lyndhurst, Virginia, the race
directors announced that there was
a nice view along the course, but it
required a detour of about 50 yards.
They expected no one would take the
extra trip. To their surprise, nearly 70
percent of runners stopped to enjoy
the panorama. Race director Francesca
Conte says, “Trail runners care more

ALI ENGIN
about the experience than their time.
Northwoods nirvana at Wisconsin’s Ice Age Trail 50, a classic race started in 1982. That’s why I love the sport.” TR

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  take your mark

Alex Grau, Edu Villanueva, Nancy Rosales, and Juan Ricardo Ferrero on Pachacutec Pass (15,419 feet).

Celebrating the
Ultrarunning Ancients The Andes Race—
THE RACE THROUGH THE SACRED VALLEY Chaski Challenge
CELEBRATES PERU’S HISTORY OF RUNNING
Race Day:
By Monica Prelle August 24-25, 2018

Website and Registration:


When Claudio Castillo started to plan a running event in Peru’s Sacred Valley of the AndesRace.pe
Incas, he knew it should honor the country’s deep history of long-distance running.
Cost: $45 to $260
“We wanted to make a race that would evoke the chaskis,” says Castillo. “Peru has a
history of ultrarunners, and we wanted to make this race a tribute to that legacy.”
Tips: For an overnight layover
in Lima, head to Miraflores or
Ancient Ultrarunning Messengers Barranco where you can do a shake-
During the Inca Empire that peaked in the 15th century, communications between out run on the beach path and try
different regions of the empire were delivered by running messengers called chaskis. the traditional ceviche for dinner.
According to lore, the complex communication relay system could cover more than 200 Be prepared for the mandatory
kilometers per day on the Inca roads. Today, trail running is in its golden era, and new equipment check before the race.
events and participation in Peru are on the rise. El Balcón (balconcusco.com)
COURTESY OF THE ANDES RACE

Castillo, 40, works between Cusco and Lima, selling outdoor equipment. He offers a discounted lodging rate for
race weekend.
partnered with Daniel Martos, who also coordinates logistics for the longstanding
Take a cab to the Cerveceria
Jungle Ultramarathon in southeast Peru, and Juan Carlos Flores, who is in charge of
del Valle—Sacred Valley Brewing
photography, design and marketing. In 2015, the first annual Andes Race—Chaski Company (cerveceriadelvalle.com)—
Challenge was born. for a tasting at the region’s only
Along the course, racers will see llama and alpaca herders tend to their animals. microbrewery.
Andean women and children dressed in bright traditional clothing watch as runners

16 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


EXPLORE
ORGANIC FUEL FOR EVERY DAY

BEFORE.
DURING.
AFTER.

Windy Arevalo climbs Ipsai Pass at 14,764 feet.

pass by. Mountain guides and caballeros Wardian. “Then you run over a plateau,
pack trekkers’ supplies to the next camp then all of a sudden there’s a village. I
with their mules. Glacier-capped peaks kept thinking, ‘Wow, these people have
loom in the distance behind alpine been living here for hundreds of years
grass- and shrub-covered hills. and it’s so cool that we get to be here.’”
Cusco, the capital of the Inca Empire Since the inaugural event, the race
until the Spanish conquest in the 16th has not only grown in participation, but
century, was the logical choice for the the competition has become fierce. In
race’s home base. Located at 11,152 2017, in the event’s third year, the race
feet in the Peruvian Andes near the grew to 470 runners from 17 countries,
Sacred Valley, the city is a destination and it was the first-ever Peruvian trail-
for international tourism because of running national championships. The
its proximity to the famous Incan male and female winners of each the
archeological site Machu Picchu. 30- and 13-kilometer races qualified to
represent Peru at the South American
A Race Is Born championships. Remigio Huaman and
In the first running of the event in Aydee Loyza Huaman won the 30K
2015, there were 90 participants from championships; Zendio Daza Huarcaya
six countries, including American and Eliona Delgado Castro won the 13K.
ultrarunner Mike Wardian. “In a few years, it is our dream this will
“I was impressed with the whole be the most important race in South
experience, and am hoping to go America,” says Castillo.
back,” says Wardian. “The Peruvian While there are ultra- and trail-
people and culture is amazing. The running events in the Cordillera Blanca
mountains are really high.” of northern Peru, the Andes Race is
With 100-, 60-, 30- and 13-kilometer the first of its kind in the Cusco region.
race distances, the point-to-point races Race organizers have high hopes of
start at various points in the Sacred becoming an Ultra Trail World Tour
Valley and finish in Ollantaytambo, event in the future, and it is currently a
a small town situated at 9,160 feet on points-qualifying race for Ultra-Trail du
the Urubamba River. The high-altitude Mont-Blanc.
mountainous terrain is challenging At the finish line of the 2017 race in
with passes as high as 4,700 meters Ollantaytambo, loud music blared in the
(15,400 feet). To celebrate the chaski plaza. After crossing the line, runners
spirit, part of the course runs on Inca kicked off their shoes and put on their
connector roads. finishers’ shirts that read in Quechua:
“You’re running above 4,000 meters Nuqa Phawarani—I ran the Andes Race.
[13,100 feet] for a lot of the race and They stayed until the end, cheering as
surrounded by huge mountains,” says each runner crossed the line. TR

O NE D IR T Y M A G A Z INE J U LY 2 0 18 17
  adventure EXPLORE

Descending toward Angels Landing and the canyon floor while traversing Zion National Park, Utah. Below: The author takes a break during his spur-of-the-
moment Zion Traverse.

Lions in Zion
RUNNING THE ZION TRAVERSE, A NEARLY 50-
“OK, I’m in!” I texted back, barely
thinking of the 10-hour drive and other
MILE ODYSSEY THROUGH THE SAND, SLICKROCK pertinent details, except that I knew I
AND CANYONS OF ZION NATIONAL PARK had a flight to catch out of Denver on
Thursday. “Let’s make it happen!”
Located in the southwest corner of
By Brian Metzler Utah, Zion National Park is one of the
true gems of the U.S. National Park
System. The 229-square-mile park is 99
It’s a cool late-October morning and my buddy Jason Smith and I years old, but native peoples have lived
have been running rhythmically and fast for an hour in the low light there as far back as 8,000 years ago.
of dawn along La Verkin Creek Trail in the remote northeastern Zion serves up breathtaking geological
corner of Zion National Park. features and the type of postcard-
worthy scenery that just cannot be
We’re on a mission to complete the 48.4-mile Zion Traverse before sunset. We have properly captured by an iPhone. Alas,
fresh legs and know we have a tall task in front of us, so we haven’t talked much or those images can merely remind you
even taken in the scenery, partially because the trail has been trending downhill for of the definition and depth of the
the first five miles or so. intricate landscape, the red and burnt-
But then, as the sun begins to shine on the upper portion of the massive stone
TOP: FRED MARMSATER; BRIAN METZLER

buttes surrounding us, we encounter the magnificent Kolob Arch—a massive red-
rock structure that looks like a replica of a manmade bridge over a river and the
sixth-largest stone arch in the world. Awed by its brilliant beauty, I find it to be a
transcendental moment that immediately melts away any lingering notion of self-
contrived haste and brings forward a feeling of being selflessly present in the moment.

Although Jason and I had talked about running across Zion for years, this epic
adventure came together only a few days earlier via a series of texts.
“Let’s run Zion next Tues!” Jason texted on a Thursday morning. “We can drive
down Monday, run all day Tues and drive back on Weds.”

18 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


  adventure

orange rock and pinyon and ponderosa pine trees set against an
impossibly blue sky. TRAILHEAD
Running across Zion National Park has become a bucket-list Zion National Park, Springdale, Utah
endeavor for trail runners in recent years, thanks in part to the
buzz created by a handful of elites who have continued to lower
the Fastest Known Time (FKT). (The current mark was set by Utah WHEN TO GO but regional service is also
wunderkind Hayden Hawks, who ran it in a ridiculously fast 6 Late-September to mid- available to St. George,
hours 50 minutes in April 2017.) November or late-February Utah (1 hour away), and
Although running across Zion is a longer journey than the 42-mile to early May, when shuttle services and rental
rim-to-rim-to-rim run across the Grand Canyon and back, it’s much temperatures are mild (60s to cars are available from each
70s during the day, upper-30s destination.
less brutal on the body, mind and soul because there is considerably
to mid-40s at night).
less vertical gain and loss (10,400 feet on the Zion Traverse, compared OTHER TRAILS
to about 21,000 for the Grand Canyon) and there is much less tourist WHERE TO STAY The Chinle Trail is a 15.5-mile
congestion from start to finish. And no pack-mule trains to hold you Springdale, Utah, is the most runnable roundtrip route with
up, either! convenient launch point for moderate elevation gain in
With the right amount of fitness and experience, plus a little a Zion running adventure, the southwestern corner of
bit of planning (most importantly shuttling a car or booking a offering numerous motels, Zion National Park. A side
shuttle service to the other side of the park), a Trans-Zion run restaurants, gas stations trip to The Narrows adjacent
can be an idyllic single-day, point-to-point adventure. and gear and grocery stores, to Zion Canyon is worth the
as well as the Zion Canyon trip, but it’s more of a hike
Visitor Center and the Zion than a run. Another amazing
The enlightening moment at Kolob Arch couldn’t have come at a
Human History Museum. feature is The Subway, a
better time. Soon afterward, we begin a gradual, 17-mile climb on subterranean slot canyon that
the Hop Valley and Wildcat Canyon trails, leaving the shady Lower HOW TO GET THERE requires a permit, and a bit
Kolob Plateau and heading toward the hot, sunny and exposed The closest major airport is of hiking, wading, swimming
Upper Kolob Plateau. We become more contemplative and chatty, Las Vegas (2.5 hours away), and scrambling for nine miles.
EXPLORE

and run at a more moderate speed, perhaps because we are


more engaged in the scenery and a bit less intense about our
bigger goal.
Jason has been a hard-charging partner in endurance
adventures for years. Both former collegiate track runners,
we gravitated to trail running after moving to Boulder in
the 1990s and eventually ultrarunning and mountaineering.
Since then, we’ve gone on short-and-fast trail runs, bagged
several of Colorado’s 14ers, skied in the backcountry, paced
and crewed each other in races and run across the Grand
Canyon and back.
“This place is mind-blowing,” Jason says, finally backing off
his up-tempo intensity. “And there is nobody here!”
Seriously, there is virtually no one out on the trails. Running
along the West Rim Trail on the Horse Pasture Plateau—the Jason Smith enjoys a cool spell in Echo Canyon, a beautiful slot canyon.
highest part of our journey at about 7,400 feet and also the
approximate halfway point of our run—we’re amazed that we’ve East Rim Trail for the final eight miles of our journey.
seen only seven backpackers. After a steep, 1.5-mile switchbacking climb, we wind up
As we descend, we begin to see more hikers as we in a very deep, dark-red rock slot known as Echo Canyon—a
approach the Angel’s Landing area. After dodging the natural wonder that serves up inspiration for our final push
slower-moving sightseers down the zig-zaggy concrete up to a lush high plateau along the eastern border of the park.
BRIAN METZLER

walkways into Zion Canyon, we wind up at a shuttle-bus Despite tired legs and extreme thirst, we ramble through the
stop and refill our hydration flasks, have a few snacks and final five miles under the setting sun, arrive at my truck at
look at a map. We leave the mass of humanity behind and last light and toast the day with two cold beers we’d stashed
head north on the road for two miles before picking up the early that morning. TR

FIND MOTIVATION
WHERE YOUR MUSIC
AND ADVENTURES
CROSS PATHS.

BE OPEN aftershokz.com
  great escapes EXPLORE

The author rolling along the River Trail, which parallels the Middle Fork of the Salmon River for 80 miles.

An Unlikely Pairing
FLOATING AND RUNNING IDAHO’S Middle Fork of
MIDDLE FORK OF THE SALMON RIVER the Salmon River
By Tom Diegel WHEN TO GO
The best time is mid-
summer, when the river flow
Boating—a word that most runners loathe. great rivers of the West. In addition to making is on a slow decline after
It can mean everything from floating on a for a world-class river trip, it’s an untapped peak snowmelt and the
placid lake to an ocean-sailing crossing to a trail-running heaven. weather is warm and stable.
Caribbean cruise ship. But to a trail runner, Our crew of 15 folks was able to get an ideal
OPTIONS
it pretty much means one thing: a complete launch date in early July 2016. One of the
While putting your own
lack of exercise. As a result, most runners tend great things about a river trip is that nearly
trip together is a fun
to avoid watercraft at all costs and encourage everyone can enjoy them: our trip included group effort, the permits
their families to go on more terrestrial-based some nearly retired lawyers who had barely are challenging to obtain.
vacations in order to facilitate their daily ever slept outside, teens who wondered why A surer thing is to sign
endorphin fix. they were being forced off their phones for a up with a commercial
However, what about a boating trip that not week, gung-ho millennials, crusty river rats outfitter; find a list
only offers up an unusual, fully disconnected and, fortunately, also accomplished endurance of outfitters at www.
adventure deep in one of the biggest athletes Drew Hardesty, Paul Diegel, Zinnia idahosmiddlefork.com. If
wildernesses in the United States that also Wilson and Benj Wadsworth, who were as keen you go this route, make
sure you tell them, “I want
presents the ability to run hundreds of miles to lope along singletrack and charge up steep
to do a lot of running!”
of remote singletrack and eat sumptuous climbs as they were to brave the rapids.
meals each day? GETTING THERE
A map of Idaho shows a huge swath of At the Boundary Creek put in, a simple campsite
BENJ WADSWORTH

The closest major airport


roadless green in the middle of the state, perched above the rushing waters of the Middle is Boise, which is 3.5 hours
and cutting northward for a hundred miles Fork, a ranger gave us our orientation talk. River from the put in and six
through the heart of this remote area is the newbie Zinnia gazed wide-eyed downstream hours from the takeout.
Middle Fork of the Salmon River, one of the where the river hurtles out of sight.

22 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


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  great escapes

“What have I gotten myself into?” refreshing dousing of icy water. trail dips and climbs a lot on high-
she croaked, likely speaking for a fair That afternoon, we landed at camp, quality singletrack that at times forces
number of the rest of the crew. and quickly the beach became a flurry dancing through white-granite rocks
The Middle Fork of the Salmon is of activity as everything on the rafts was yet also enables blasting along buffed
rated Class 3 to 4, depending on the yanked off and deposited on the beach pine-needle trails.
flow, and aside from peak snow runoff in an impressive gear explosion. Before our trip, Drew had studied
(typically late May to mid-June), it’s the Rafting makes for very civilized the maps and realized there are several
perfect combination of exciting but not camping—a full “kitchen” erupted out of major tributary streams that offer well-
scary. However, it does start with a bang. the sand, everyone popped open a camp established trails alongside. One day,
As our flotilla of five rafts finally chair and began consuming a plethora we ran up Loon Creek for seven miles,
pushed off the rocky beach, the of riverside beverages and appetizers. A until the lure of appetizers and beer
nervous anticipation of the crew was cook crew started making dinner. kicked in and we turned around. Near
palpable. Just a few miles below lurked Said Drew, a backcountry climbing the bottom, though, we got sidetracked
the first significant rapid: Velvet Falls, ranger in the Tetons, in the midst of the with a quick soak in the Loon Creek hot
a good Class 4 so named because it’s cooking frenzy, “On river trips you leave springs—a perfect 104-degree pool a
unusually quiet and comes up abruptly. the oatmeal and freeze dried at home!” half mile from camp.
But Paul—as the designated trip leader In addition to Loon Creek, Marble,
and king of the crusty river rats— What sets the Middle Fork apart from Pistol, Camas and Big creeks all offer
recognized the terrain as we got close other multi-day river trips is its vast reasonable climbs on great trails, some
to the lip of the rapid and we were able network of trails that beg to be run. The for up to 30 miles.
to pull over, get out and scout out our main artery is the aptly named River One afternoon, three of us started
line. The crew leapt back in the boats, Trail; for 80 miles it parallels the river up Camas Creek but detoured on
shoved off, hung on to the lines on and crosses it several times on beautiful a side trail heading up to a peak.
the raft and crashed through the edge suspension bridges. Though it traverses We motored up for 2000 feet for
of the hole unscathed, albeit with a the bank, it’s no riverfront stroll: the incredible views of the Bighorn Crags
EXPLORE

looming 5000 feet above the gorge.


In the Middle Fork’s last 20 miles, we
hit the ominous-sounding Impassable
Gorge. Red granite walls soared straight
out of the river; there is no River Trail in
this section. But Paul simply turned his
gaze upward and declared: “Who needs
trails! Let’s just go up!”
Since there’s very little vegetation to
get in the way due to the open, arid and
fire-ravaged terrain, going straight up the
grassy hillside provided a glute-busting
effort that was rewarded with sublime
views down the river corridor.
It’s also in this lower section that we
encountered some of the most exciting
rapids: Rubber, Tappen Falls, Haystack
and Webber were all exciting Class 4s that
Zinnia exclaimed, “created the most fun
I’ve ever had sitting down!”
Eventually, the Impassable Gorge ended
BENJ WADSWORTH

at the confluence of the Middle Fork and


the Main Salmon, where the takeout
loomed. There, we packed up the boats,
and kicked back to rest our legs! TR The Middle Fork’s rapids are fun and not hair raising, and being on the river is a great way to rest between long runs.
everyman’s exposed   EXPLORE

Enjoying expansive views in the rocky, mostly treeless


Cap de Creus Natural Park, Costa Brava, Catalonia.
PHOTO BY GUILLEM CASANOVA BOSCH

26 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


EXPLORE  everyman’s exposed 
EXPLORE

O NE D IR T Y M A G A Z INE J U LY 2 0 18 27
everyman’s exposed  EXPLORE

A cruise beneath Middle Cathedral Rock, Yosemite National Park, California.


PHOTO BY HERNAN DE LAHITTE

28 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


ISLANDESCAPE
TRAIL RUNNING IN THE WILD AND RUGGED FAROE ISL ANDS

30 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
By Luke Nelson

P h o t o s b y K e l v i n Tr a u t m a n

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 31


As I struggled to take off my pants, I lost my balance and hit the partition of the bathroom stall. The space was small, and I was
trying to change into running clothes in the men’s bathroom in the Vágar Airport. Moments prior, Inga and I had gotten off of
our flight from Iceland and, with one glance outside at the gorgeous day, knew that Kelvin would be itching to get out to shoot
photos before the sun set.
The Faroe Islands are a small island chain in the North Atlantic, partway between Iceland and Scotland. In October 2017, Inga
Fanney, 35, of Reykjavik, Iceland, Kelvin Trautman, 34, of Cape Town, South Africa, and I, 37, of Pocatello, Idaho, traveled from
various parts of the globe to explore the running potential of the rugged islands, where jagged cliffs shoot straight out of the sea
and low vegetation covers any surface it can cling to.
Barely six miles from the airport, we pulled off the two-lane highway at a small trailhead. As we ran from the car, legs heavy
from travel, we were immediately met with wonder as we ran along the edge of a lake surrounded by mountains resembling rocky
molars. Climbing away from the lake, we were greeted by a thousand-foot drop straight to the sea and a view of the edge of the
lake itself tumbling off a cliff into the ocean. The light turned golden and then faded to blue as we witnessed the crashing ocean
waves reach up for the freshwater falling to the sea. We had only been in the Faroe’s for a few hours and the beauty of the place
had already exceeded expectations.
OPENING SPREAD: From
Slaettaratindur, the Faroe’s highest
peak, the islands and fjords feel as
dramatic as they look.

RIGHT: Mulafossur waterfall, near


Gasagalur, best seen by approaching via
the historic Postal Route.

BELOW: The mixing of fresh water and


the sea creates an endless playground
for technical running.

The following day, after a bout of fitful, jet-lagged sleep, we drove through a
combination of under-fjord tunnels to a neighboring island. We parked at a small
church that overlooked an amazing bay, which was once a busy harbor until the
entrance became too shallow for boats. An ascent past a small farm on a narrow
path led us to broad, glacier-carved valleys surrounded by jagged peaks and rolling
ridges. Our run led us to Tjørnuvik, a small city plucked straight from a postcard. It
had an incredible surf break, hundreds of waterfalls as a backdrop and high peaks on
three sides. Fish dried on the eaves of the houses, and grass sprung from the gutters.
Our amazement grew as we traversed a small path back toward Saksun, where
we had started the day. The route has been used by shepherds for centuries, and it
led us to the edge of the precipice forming the boundary of land and sea, which we
followed for several miles as we looped back to the car.
One particular mountain, with a long narrow summit, dominated the skyline
and would be a familiar feature for the days to come. As we neared the car, I
stopped at a small bench and sat listening to the mixture of crashing waves and
waterfalls, a cacophony more soothing than perhaps any combination of sound I
had ever experienced.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 33


CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT
It was worth getting up early to catch sunrise over
Tindhólmur.

Layers of mountains on separate islands divided


by fjords and the sea.

Standing on the edge of the world during the


group’s first run in the Faroes, near Traelanípan.

The Faroes feel of history and struggle; it’s even


seen in the twists and turns of its rivers.

A roadside waterfall offered an invigorating


shower prior to rushing to the airport.
CLOCKWISE FROM
UPPER LEFT
Dizzying exposure above
mossy cliffs, with the
Risin and Kellingin (the
Giant and the Witch) in
the background.

The islands are relatively


small, with a very large
landscape; Mylingur
Peak in the background.

The hardest challenge


map reading was trying
to pronounce the names.

36 J U LY 2 0 1 8 
TRAILHEAD:

Faroe Islands,
The objective for the next day was Slættaratindur, the tallest peak of the islands at Kingdom of Denmark
2,890 feet. Ocean, mist, waterfalls and peaks, arranged in impossible combinations,
surrounded us, but views were limited by an incoming storm that also led to a hasty GETTING THERE
descent to the car. We drove to another island, where we explored an historic harbor From Iceland, Europe or the UK, use
and the tallest sea stack of the Islands, Búgvin. Large fulmars flew by the hundreds Scandinavian Airlines or Atlantic
around the 620-foot tower. We wrapped up the run with hot chocolate and pancakes Airways to access Vágar Airport.
at a quaint hotel back in Gjógv.
ACCOMMODATIONS
Up until 10 years ago, the community of Gasadalur was only accessible by foot Hotel Føroyar near Tórshavn
or by sea. That changed when a tunnel connected the town to the roads of the rest offers nice accommodations in a
of the island. On our last full day in the Faroes, we opted to visit the town via the centralized location.
historic Postal Route, on which the postman would travel several times a week to
deliver supplies and mail to the town. The trail climbed up and over a steep pass before
dropping back down to near the ocean. TRAIL INFO
The town of maybe 100 buildings was quiet with the exception of a few bleating visitfaroeislands.com is a great source
sheep. We ran past Mulafossur, an incredible waterfall that dropped straight to for trail information, including maps.
the sea, while only a couple of farmers noticed our passing. We took an alternate
route back to the car, and Inga showed superior navigating skills in a thick fog
RACE
that engulfed us. Útilív Adventure Festival, September
Our short trip ended too soon, and after rinsing off in a small waterfall, we bolted 8, 2018, 13K, 21K, 42K and 65K trail
to the airport to depart for our separate corners of the world. The trip was brief, but races, www.visitfaroeislands.com/
our travel by foot allowed us to connect to the Faroes more intimately than via any event/utiliv-adventure-festival/
other form of travel. TR
+
PRO
PHOTO
TIP
By Dan Patitucci of
PatitucciPhoto

Shoot real
runners while
on real runs.
The difference between
real and set up just for
the shot usually shows.
People tune into real.
Color is critical, in order to separate the
runners from the landscape.

While on real runs, I watch people


move through the landscape and
try to identify what catches my
eye. Sometimes it’s beauty, or grit,
or emotion, or conceptual. But if it
resonates with me and I can make an
image, it’ll probably be something other
runners will appreciate.

Be ready to shoot at all times. Your


camera needs to be something easy to
access and never a pain to get to. You
need to want to shoot. I switched to the
Sony a6500 and RX100s for running and
it revolutionized my running work. Light,
simple and great quality.

PatitucciPhoto is the unique combination of Dan and Janine Patitucci’s vision as professional photographers and mountain-sport
athletes producing content for the global outdoor industry.
Based in the Swiss Alps, Dan and Janine have access to some of the world’s most beautiful mountain locations. As real athletes,
each has a thorough understanding, high level of technical skill and passionate enthusiasm for the subjects they photograph.
PATITUCCIPHOTO

In 2016, the couple created ALPSinsight, a site dedicated to communicating the Alps’ mountain-sport lifestyle through inspiring
experiences, photography, stories and tips.

38 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


Brody Leven on the Hardergrat, a 20-kilometer traverse that connects Interlaken to Brienz, Switzerland. The image is strong, because it features a small runner
in a big, dream-like landscape and a unique ridge-line trail.

O NE D IR T Y M A G A Z INE J U LY 2 0 18 39
THE
ART

40 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
OF
SUFFER
W H A T
T H E
I T
I NG
T A K E S
I N F A M O U S
M A R A T H O N S
M O U N T A I N S
S T A T E P A R K ,
I N
O F
T O

T H E
S U R V I V
1 0 0 - M I L E
U N F O R
F R O Z E N
B

H E
T E N N E S S E E .
E
A R K L E Y
G I V I N G
A D

P H O T O S B Y H O W I E S T E R N

The somber reality of the Barkley Marathons in the moments before the race begins.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 41


SUFFERI NG

42 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
The cruel brainchild of its race director, Gary “Lazarus Lake (aka Laz)” Cantrell, the Barkley Marathons takes
place each spring in the punishing mountains of Frozen Head State Park, Tennessee. Now garnering even mainstream
notoriety for its near impossibility, the once-obscure 100-mile event, fondly referred to as The Race That Eats Its
Young, began in 1986 and, in the ensuing 32 years, has seen a grand total of ... drum roll, please ... 18 finishes!
With 66,000 feet of climbing, the 20-mile, five-loop event dishes out double the pain and suffering as the renowned
Hardrock 100 in Colorado’s San Juan Mountains. The cutoff time for each loop is 12 hours—yes, just 20 miles in 12
hours. But what sets Barkley apart aside from its brutality are its quirks.
Featuring a $1.60 entry fee, the race kicks off (between midnight and noon on the closest Saturday to April Fools’
Day) when Laz fires up a smoke at the famous yellow gate in the campground basecamp, and 40 runners cast off in
search of their first “book.” Laz places nine to 11 paperback books strategically throughout the course, and racers
must find the books in sequence and rip out the pages corresponding to their race-bib numbers.
And aspirants are not traipsing along a well-marked, flagged course on flowy singletrack. Rather, the route cross-
countries up and down the steep, sawbriar-infested hillsides, and racers must navigate by their own reckoning and
good ol’ map and compass. If a racer taps out—highly likely—he or she is treated to a live bugle rendition of “Taps.”
Herewith, we feature the photographer Howie Stern’s graphic images that capture the Art of Suffering required to
endure Barkley. Says Stern, “The biggest challenge to shooting Barkley is understanding the race and how to capture
it in a way that brings forth its difficulty, both physically and mentally. Having run the race myself really helps to
bring those elements together to tell the story.”

LEFT: Gary Robbins gritting out the brutally steep and muddy terrain of the Testicle Spectacle.
BELOW: The infamous briars leave behind their tell-tale signature on John Kelly’s limbs.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 43


John Kelly successfully went where few before him have gone, the full five-loop Barkley experience.

44 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
2018 BARKLEY
Runner: Jamil Coury, 33, of Phoenix, Arizona. Tapped out after loop 1, 8:58:55 elapsed.

What’s the first thing you think of when you think of of runners and was spot on. That gives me a lot of
Barkley? It’s impossibility. I also think of the mood of the confidence going into future editions should I be
woods—it feels gray and cold. I love it. fortunate enough to return.

Is Barkley important in the running world? Yes, it gives Worst moment? Getting lost in the fog and dark near
you something to strive for where no one is holding your Indian Knob and then having to take shelter from the rain
hand. The Barkley puts you out there in the elements and because I was losing body temperature.
sees what you are made of.
Life lessons from running Barkley? Learning to take each
Best moment? Nailing the navigation on loop 1 this year as a step forward while also legitimately enjoying
year. I helped find the new book 5 with the lead pack the hunger that failure brings.

THE
ART

Jamil Coury tending to the damage from a Barkley loop.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 45


The emotional pain and disappointment of high expectations and a failed attempt to complete even one loop sinks in.

46 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
OF
OF
Maggie Guterl and Eoin Keith keep the faith after spending a long day and part of the night in the rain, as Laz verifies they in fact found all of the books on the course.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 47


+
PRO
PHOTO
TIP
By Fred Marmsater

Bring a flexible
mind and eye.
Do your homework on
locations and lighting,
be ready to adapt to
conditions, light and
athletes and always be
willing to make a Plan B
on location.
Regarding gear, bring only what you
really need. That might be a full rig in a
big pack, or just a small DSLR and one
lens in a running vest. But always carry
sharp-quality glass, and an extra battery,
card(s) and a lens wipe.

Be ready to get through the day in an


efficient manner, i.e. bring water, food,
jacket, sunglasses, shoes that fit, etc.
Also, try to be a partner to the athletes
you’re shooting, and give yourself
enough time to get to your location when
the light is right.
JAMES HARNOIS, FRED MARMSATER

A reformed former scientist in the pharmaceutical industry, Fred Marmsater has catapulted into the outdoor-photography biz as one
of its busiest shooters. His work has been regularly featured in Trail Runner, and includes a recent feature on his adventure to the wild
King’s Trail in his homeland, Sweden, and several cover images. He specializes in shooting in remote locations and capturing athletes
pushing their limits. During expedition skiing and long trail runs, he gets into beautiful and seldom-seen locations to bring back fresh
images. Good luck keeping up with him, even when he’s loaded down with an extra 40 pounds of camera gear.

50 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


Joe Grant running in east Zion National Park. I really like the light, stride and depth of the background, and how the light strikes the sandstone ridges and fins.
Joe has a great stride, so, in terms of the runner, it was just a matter of capturing the right part of the stride.
Getting really good light in Zion can be a challenge; scenic locations are often in canyons or other places where you do not get the very first or last light. I knew
that this area gets first light and has really fun slickrock ridges and domes for good adventure running. Joe and I were down in Zion for a few days, and this was
our last sunrise before hitting the road—I think it worked out.

If you would like to learn how to shoot great outdoor images or take your photography to the next level, consider joining us in beautiful Bishop, California,
this fall (October 30-November 2) for our annual Trail Runner Photo Camp, where Fred will be the lead instructor. Info: trailrunnermag.com/photocamp.

O NE D IR T Y M A G A Z INE J U LY 2 0 18 51
On the last day, after leaving the Stockjigletscher, the route is all trails and mostly running all the way to Zermatt.

52 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
MELT
DOWN
RUNNING THE GL ACIER
HAUTE ROUTE , FROM
CHAMONIX TO ZERMAT T
By Kim Strom / Photos By PatitucciPhoto

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 53


“If he starts to slide, jump into that crevasse,” says Dan. on a glacier in the Alps.
The counterweight would be the best way to keep us all from But rather than the classic summer hiking Haute Route,
skidding into the next slit below. which can take up to two weeks to trek, we’re travelling
I look down into a bottomless hole, blue and terrifying. For the Glacier Haute Route—a more direct line through the
a second, or maybe even two, I imagine drinking coffee, a cat French and Swiss Alps. It stays higher without huge ups and
on my lap, running shoes waiting on the doormat. I would give downs into the valleys, following much of the Haute Route
anything to be there. To be any place other than tied between ski itinerary. Originally known as the summer “High Level
two guys on a melting glacier. Route,” the 55-mile journey can be hiked in six days. It moves
I want off this nerve-racking glacier, the last before our frequently over glaciers (30 to 40 percent of the route), crosses
final destination of Zermatt, but the only way off is to keep many high passes and allows us to overnight in mountain huts.
moving, not to have a melt down. We
are weaving our way through the
seemingly endless maze ahead of us, ORIGINALLY KNOWN AS THE SUMMER “HIGH LEVEL ROUTE,”
navigating the least risk, backtracking. I THE 55-MILE JOURNEY CAN BE HIKED IN SIX DAYS. IT MOVES
stamp my crampons harder into the ice,
FREQUENTLY OVER GLACIERS (30 TO 40 PERCENT OF THE ROUTE),
CROSSES MANY HIGH PASSES AND ALLOWS US TO OVERNIGHT IN
ready to dive onto my ice axe or even
jump into that abyss as Pascal inches his
way forward, probing the snow bridge MOUNTAIN HUTS.
ahead of him.
“This is not good,” I hear him mutter to himself as he scans As for the ski route, a solid knowledge of the Alps, weather and
the crevasses to piece together our path. how to travel on glaciers is necessary. Due to crevasses, it’s a
serious route in good weather, potentially deadly in bad. An
Just a few weeks earlier, on a run with Dan, we had looked itinerary full of “what ifs.”
up at the Arolla glacier, as he pointed to a line across the As a trail runner, I want to go higher, tackle more technical
ice, recalling memories of multiple trips skiing and hiking terrain, even trespass into spaces reserved for mountaineers.
the famous Haute Route from Chamonix to Zermatt. Dan Many mountaineers, too, are moving faster and lighter, even
excitedly interrupted his own story with this question: “What trading burly alpine boots for the easy mobility of running
if we run it?” shoes. The distinctions between mountain athletes are
I knew before he finished the sentence that we would. So blending, as we start taking only the essentials.
many adventures begin this way: a “what if ” grows excitedly My partners have more high-mountain experience, and I rely
into a plan, and pretty soon you’re roped up to two friends on their knowledge to learn the skills required to undertake a

54 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT
• Peering into a glacier moulin, a vertical
shaft of ice in which surface water flows.
Summer Glacier Haute Route Stats
• Descending the Stockjigletscher on the
way to Zermatt on the final day with the THE ROUTE: START: Chamonix (Le Tour) FINISH: Zermatt DISTANCE: ~88km VERTICAL: ~6000m
Matterhorn and Dent d’Hérens in the
Chamonix to Champex > DISTANCE: 23km / VERTICAL: 2127m+ 2156m-
background.
• Heading up the 12,474-foot Títe Blanche Champex to Mauvoisin > We took a car shuttle as skiers do on the route.
with the Matterhorn in the background Mauvoisin to Chanrion > DISTANCE: 13km / VERTICAL: 872m+ 255m-
on the way to Zermatt on the final day.
Chanrion to Bertol > DISTANCE: 26km / VERTICAL: 1955m+ 1127m-
• On the first day, rappelling a serac to
reach the Plateau du Trient. Bertol to Zermatt > DISTANCE: 26km / VERTICAL: 1033m+ 2645m-
• Climbing ladders to the Bertol Hut.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 55


Leaving Le Tour in the narrow Chamonix valley, I feel the
weight of my pack as we start up the steep forested switchbacks
to Albert Premier Hut in our headlamps. We carry only what
we need: enough warm clothing and equipment for glacier
safety, crampons, ice axe and a Petzl RAD System (an ultralight
crevasse-rescue system). It isn’t much, but heavier than what
you’d carry on a typical running day. With the extra weight,
the starting pace feels fast for me. Dan and Pascal run ahead.
I start to worry I’ll drag behind the entire time, but at least on
the glaciers we’ll be tied together.
Soon after the hut, the trail disappears, and we rope up to
cross the Glacier du Tour. I’d run to the edge of the icefield
many times, but always returned by the same trail I’d come up.
Today, I step onto the ice for the first time to continue beyond
the trail. For better or worse, we’re bound within 20 feet of
each other as we step over gaping holes on the way to Col
du Tour.
We soon meet the first real challenge posed by the receding
run like this. They both know the route, have hiked it before in glaciers—the col we planned to climb is dry, littered with fallen
summer and skied it in winter. Pascal Egli, 30, of Leysin, is one rock and impassible. We are forced to re-route and climb up to
of Switzerland’s top skyrunners, a ski mountaineer and PhD another col, where we find a fixed rope to abseil down to the
student in glaciology. Dan Patitucci, of Interlaken, Switzerland, Plateau du Trient.
has decades of alpine experience from climbing, skiing and Once we’re off the rope, and back on the glacier, a
running. They both know how to read the terrain, assess the few boulders f ly past us. We don’t dally, and haul down
risks and make safe decisions. They are the right people to have the ice, quickly moving away from the rockfall and into
knotted to either end of my rope. the sea of grey ice split with gaping black crevasses.
In August 2017, we are taking advantage of a window of good Dan and Pascal recognize the change in the level of
weather. We know the glaciers will be in poor condition after the glacier.
a dry winter and a hot summer, so if we want to do this tour, “I’m shocked,” says Dan. “The plateau is usually covered in
it’s the time to go. enough snow that you just walk across it.”

56 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
CLOCKWISE FROM FAR LEFT
• Moving up the Glacier d’Otemma on solid ice.
• On the long uphill trail to the Bertol Hut.
• Heading up the moraine along the Glacier du Tour on day one.
• Crossing a crevasse on the Glacier d’Otemma.
• Savoring the well-earned view from the Bertol Hut.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 57


Today we must zigzag our way over the broken surface. Before continuing up the grit-covered ice ramp, we stop
Finally off the glaciers, we run down a trail into Champex. We briefly to stare down into a gaping moulin, a beautiful blue
planned to continue to Chanrion Hut to spend our first night, unknown. We move efficiently, but it’s running the trail
but the conditions have been worse than expected and the sections between crossings that cuts the most time off our
weather is shifting. We wonder whether we should continue journey. Trekkers seem surprised, even concerned with our
at all. The crevasses are enough of a challenge without adding small packs and lack of ankle support as we skim across the
rain and poor visibility. We sit by Champex Lac, check weather rocky trails.
forecasts, call friends and guides who might have tips on the “Nice shoes,” a guide mocks after us at one point, more than
condition of the glaciers ahead. They all say the same. “The a hint of disapproval in his tone.
glaciers are in bad shape,” and “It’s not good, but some people We pass his group and a few others before reaching the next
are going.” hut. Our speed doesn’t give us false confidence or security,
We’re close to calling it off, but decide it’s worth a look for but allows us to move away from danger and to spend less
ourselves. When we reach the Chanrion

WE’VE TRAVELED THROUGH AN ENVIRONMENT THAT’S ENORMOUS


Hut, after an easy uphill trail run, the hut
keeper confirms: “The glaciers are shit.”
The next day will be big. From AND POWERFUL AND FADING. I’D CALL IT A TRUE ADVENTURE, AN
Chanrion, over Glacier d’Otemma, EPIC EVEN, AND A GLIMPSE AT SOMETHING BIGGER THAT LEAVES
Glacier d’Arolla, Haut Glacier d’Arolla,
Glacier de Bertol and finally a steep
ME ASKING, “WHERE ELSE CAN RUNNING SHOES TAKE ME?”
climb up to Cabane de Bertol—for a
total of 16 rugged miles. time in deteriorating conditions. We are a strong team, fit,
In the morning shade, we cross the Otemma Glacier, before experienced, multi-faceted, cautious; we know and trust each
the sun is high enough to reach us. We stop to visit the glacier- other. We aren’t a group of strangers tied behind a single guide
measuring station that Pascal helped install and now monitors. depending completely on one person, and accept that it comes
This enormous glacier, almost five miles long and 850 feet at down to personal responsibility, knowing our own abilities and
it’s thickest, is melting at an alarming rate of four inches per limits, and making smart decisions to minimize risk.
day in the summer. On average, glaciers in the Alps are losing As we discuss our plan for the final day, Bertol to Zermatt,
13 feet annually. By 2050 most small glaciers will be gone and hiking tours arrive at the hut and bulky boots fill the shelves
the remaining glaciers will be insignificant. By 2100 even the around our running shoes.
largest glaciers like the Aletsch, the Alps’ longest glacier at 14
miles, will barely exist, only their highest parts remaining. In the early morning, we descend the ladders from our bunks
“In the future, I may prefer to only travel the glaciers in and then the ladders from the Bertol hut to the glacier’s surface.
winter,” says Pascal. “They’re getting dangerous and ugly.” We start running between the contrast of a black sky and

58 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
white ground—both full of holes. Stars illuminate silhouettes
of mountains, headlamps from climbers light the way up Dent
Blanche and an increasing glow fills the sky. We climb to Tête
Blanche over Glacier du Mont Miné in time to see sunrise on
the Matterhorn.
This is the first time I see the iconic summit, but the
mountain’s not the famous Toblerone chocolate shape from
this angle. It stretches out of the glacier below and into the pale
sky, one of the first to reach the morning sun. The view stops us
for a moment, but we have to keep moving towards Zermatt. It
is already warm as we make our way over the Stockjigletscher,
the final glacier traverse.
“It might be the last day the route is passable,” a guide
who had come from the other direction mentioned the night
before, and even his tracks have melted by the following
morning. We move carefully, jumping over narrow crevasses,
and zigzagging our way through the puzzle with more “what
ifs” intruding our thoughts.
We step off the ice with huge relief, remove our crampons
and harnesses and coil the rope. Rocky moraine and sublime
trail lead the final 12 miles to Zermatt. A contrast to the last
hours maneuvering over the ice, heat and dust rise up from
the crevasse-free trail. We speed along like finishing any
other run, but with a greater relief, gratitude and a swelling of
accomplishment. We’ve traveled through an environment that’s
enormous and powerful and fading. I’d call it a true adventure,
an epic even, and a glimpse at something bigger that leaves me
asking, “Where else can running shoes take me?”
CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: Glacier Haute Route accoutrements;
Kim Strom is an outdoor and adventure writer, and co-author of descending the Haut Glacier d’Arolla; running to the Chanrion Hut; cleaning
Run the Alps Switzerland: 30 Must Run Trails. She is a partner up outside the Chanrion Hut.
at ALPSinsight.com helping to expand its trail and peak-
running resource Elevation.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 59


+
PRO
PHOTO
TIP
By Randall Levensaler /
Art Director at Trail Runner

Keep your creative stoke.


Break the mold and your
visual rut by shooting
outside of the box.
Variety is the spice of life. When
shooting for editorial, tell the story by
providing a variety of perspectives. Have
a shot list that incorporates portraits,
lifestyle, sports action and scenics.

Be original! Take the time to discern your


personal creative vision and refine your
post-processing style.

Learn from your work and evolve. Ask


yourself why an image is successful or
not. If you are unsure, ask your friends to
help critique your work.

RANDALL LEVENSALER

Over the past 15 years, Randall has gained a reputation as a top art director and designer in the outdoor
industry, and has served as Trail Runner and Rock and Ice magazines’ art director for the past six years.
Randall’s creative career started in photography before becoming a designer.

60 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


James Bonnett can taste the finish line at the 2017 Hardrock 100, Silverton, Colorado—mile 86, day two, 8 a.m. As I hiked up to my location in the twilight of
dawn, I decided to focus my efforts on one thing: the runners’ faces and their expressions as they ran backlit in the morning light of day two.
Shooting with one lens, an 85mm/1.4 at f2.8, I stood facing the runners head on from a distance. The lighting was good and the colors were vibrant, but it was
the runners’ faces that told epic stories of perseverance and battles waged during the cold, wet night. I knew these photographs were destined to be shared in
black and white.

O NE D IR T Y M A G A Z INE J U LY 2 0 18 61
Running Through History

62 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
The Inaugural Run of the Jordan Trail
BY ALFIE PEARCE-HIGGINS PHOTOS BY ALI BARQ AWI

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 63


There are few better ways to
understand a country, its culture,
its history and its dogs, than by
running across it.

From Umm Qais, cloudless biblical It was on this site that the Bible describes toward the horizon basking the hills in
views stretch out over the Sea of Galilee, Jesus casting out the demons of two golden light. After months of expectation,
Mount Hermon and the Golan Heights. men. Judging by the expressions of a sense of relief that our expedition is
One can see Syria, Israel, the Palestinian the bemused onlookers, some might finally underway washes over me.
Territories and, on a good day, Lebanon consider us in need of our own exorcism. Sweit y and I are an improbable
in the distance. Heading south, 390 miles Lena Annab, the charismatic Minister running pair. More than 20 years
of trails lead all the way to the Red Sea at of Tourism and architect of Jordan’s my s en ior, he h a s c h i ld ren a nd
the far end of the Hashemite Kingdom resurgence as an adventure-travel grandchildren. He speaks little English
of Jordan. destination, finishes her speech: “We and my words of Arabic can be counted
A “Start” banner is strung incongru- wish you the very best of luck; you’re on two hands, but we somehow manage
ously between a pair of 2,000-year-old going need it.” The klaxon sounds. to communicate when it mat ters.
stone pillars amidst the Greco-Roman With each early step, I concentrate Even our running paces are rarely
ruins. The sense of history is palpable as on not tripping over the unforgiving synchronised: although he is the better
Mohammad Al-Sweity and I are set for Roman cobbles, conscious that to fall in runner, he struggles with fatigue and
our attempt to become the first people the first few hundred yards would be an injuries, while I somehow discover
to run the Jordan Trail. inauspicious start. unexpected reserves of energy.
Waiting nervously as the midday sun I first attempted to visit Jordan in 2016.
beats down, I wonder what the countless A LONG TIME COMING After booking flights and pouring over
people who have stood in the same spot We leave the hilltop settlement and drop hiking maps, a chance visit to a doctor
over the past millennia would have into the first of many valleys that span the in Kathmandu revealed a congenital
made of two men, clad in short shorts, arid hills of northern Jordan. Olive trees heart defect. I spent the Easter of that
tight shirts and minimalist packs, about pepper the steep slopes; we see children year undergoing open-heart surgery in
to embark on a 12-day fun run, an perched precariously on makeshift London, but Jordan continued to lurk
indulgence of 21st-century proportions. ladders collecting fruit. The sun dips at the back of my mind. So when, a few

64 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
Left: The author plotting a route through the wadis. Right: A night sky while camping in Majdaline.

A L AND OF REFUGE being built in modern-day Jordan and


A few hours later, we reach the top of a neighboring Syria.
pass and catch a glimpse of a red Ford U n t i l t h e m i d -2 0 t h c e n t u r y,
pick-up in the distance. Our crew, journeys such as ours were a common
generously provided by the JTA, enables occurrence across Europe and the
us to cover the 35 to 45 miles each day M idd le E a s t . S old ier s , pi l g r i m s ,
carrying just water, a few energy bars migrants and even students would
months later, I first stumbled across the and a windbreaker. frequently cover hundreds or even
Jordan Trail website, the decision to try In charge is the highly efficient thousands of miles on foot, living off
to run it was an easy one. George Inkababian with his ever- the generosity of locals.
Sweit y a nd I have si mply been cheerful sidekick Sanad Al Hawamdeh. An oasis of stability in the Middle
brought together by a love of running, Mohammad and Mohammad (we soon East, modern Jordan has long been a
a shared ambition and a coincidence of resort to surnames) grew up as shepherds refuge for those f leeing neighboring
timing. We independently contacted and know the trails intimately. On some conflicts. Following successive waves
the Jordan Trail Association (JTA), and of the trickier sections, they join us, of immigration since 1948, two million
they helped to coordinate and support somehow managing a gentle jog while Palestinians now account for nearly 20
an Anglo-Jordanian joint attempt. simultaneously talking on the phone percent of Jordan’s population. Most
Three hundred and ninet y miles and smoking. Ali Barqawi, a leading recently, as many as a million Syrians
would be the farthest I have ever run Jordanian adventure photographer, is have escaped from the neighboring
and initially I suffer from the fear of there to chronicle the figurative and conflict and sought sanctuary in Jordan.
failure. But soon I realize what many literal ups and downs. All of them The majorit y live in camps on the
already know: that without the pressure continually ply us with tea, pastries and eastern border but we see occasional
of racing, running can be a much more good humor. United Nations tarpaulins fluttering in
comfortable experience. Although I Although one hears little of Jordan, the breeze.
have never been a serious contender there may be few countries with a more It’s hard to escape the cruel irony that
in competitive ultramarathons, I am interesting story. Northern Jordan sits endurance challenges are an indulgent
incapable of resisting the urge to try at the heart of the “fertile crescent,” hobby for us but a necessity for many
to catch the person in front or hold off an area that hosted the development others. The self-harm and self-help of
those behind. The Jordan Trail teaches of the earliest human civilizations. ultrarunning has never made much
me how to take a mature, mindful While Britain was still populated by rational sense, but for me it forms a vital
approach to endurance. hunter-gatherers, the first libraries were physical and psychological outlet.

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 65


I lie on a carpet
in the sand beside
the fire, muscles
satisfyingly sore,
stomach gratifyingly
full, tea and tobacco
in hand, listening to
the soporific notes
of a Bedouin flute.

Above: One of many tea breaks on the trail. Right: The author at Jabal Kharazeh.

RUNNING THROUGH HISTORY learned to recognize the motion of a


The route may pass along some of the stone being picked up. We soon perfect
oldest continuously used paths in the the art of swooping down mid-stride to
world, but the Jordan Trail is a relatively arm ourselves.
recent concept. In the 1990s, the British The hospitalit y of the Bedouin
climbing duo Tony Howard and Di Taylor contrasts with the hostility of their dogs. After gorging myself, I lie on a carpet
were working on a trekking guidebook Wizened old men beckon us to join them in the sand beside the fire, muscles
when they conceived of the idea. for sweet tea and unfiltered cigarettes satisfyingly sore, stomach gratifyingly
“We were lying in sleeping bags by a in their temporary camps—makeshift full, tea and tobacco in hand, listening
campfire under the stars when we had tarpaulin tents thick with smoke and to the soporific notes of a Bedouin flute
our eureka moment,” says Howard. “If smelling of the animal skins needed to and looking up at a sky full of stars and
we could complete a few missing jigsaw insulate against the night’s cold. Children experience a rare level of contentment.
pieces, we could create a country-length wave and shout excitedly, although for Never have I slept as well as on the
trail that would not only pass through some it proves too much, and they burst Jordan Trail.
most of Jordan’s best antiquity but also into terrified tears at the sight of us. The
link village communities along the way.” incongruous ring of a mobile phone and THE ROAD TO PETR A
The pioneering couple were among a rusting Toyota pick-up truck are the Waking early, I struggle to force myself
the first hikers to complete the Jordan only signs of modernity in this timeless out of the comfort of the sleeping bag
Trail and remain heavily involved in nomadic lifestyle. and into the bitter cold. Sweity is already
its development. Each evening, we have the luxury up, engaged in his dawn prayers: his
Even in remote areas, we are never of arriving in our camp to find the fire mat unfurled on the sand facing toward
alone for long. Harsh barking usually already smoking. Local communities Mecca, his body bowed to the ground.
marks the first sign of inhabitation. I’ve deliver gigantic pots of food swaddled in Breakfast is another culinary delight, and
been chased by everything from Tibetan blankets to keep them warm: mountains I soon become addicted to the crumbly
Mastiffs in the Himalayas to street of maqluba (an upside-down rice casserole sweetness of halaweh, a fudge-like food
dogs in West Africa, but the Canaan combined with vegetables and spices), made from tahini and pistachio—an
dogs in Jordan inspire a new level of rich juicy hummus, succulent spiced ideal running fuel.
terror. Wary of strangers and wearing chicken, fresh unleavened bread and finely The trails are both a dream and
nail-studded collars, these canines chopped lemon-soaked salads. That I a nightmare for a runner. They are
have been trained over the centuries succeed in replacing the estimated 80,000 constantly changing, winding their
to protect livestock from wild wolves calories burned on the trail is a testament way around mountains and dropping
and hyenas. Fortunately, they have also to the delights of Jordanian cuisine. sharply down steep slopes to cross dry

66 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
wadis (ephemeral riverbeds), before an and invigorated. Like Moses, we scale time. We dip the warm and wonderful-
inevitable, grueling climb back out. The the side of Mount Nebo and survey the smelling bread into olive oil and salt as
rocks are unpredictable, sometimes fertile plains of the “Promised Land” to we sip our tea and, as always, smoke.
crumbling, sometimes slipping and the west, although my milk and honey After eight days, we arrive at Petra.
sometimes holding firm. Particularly on take the form of Coke and Snickers. Of all Jordan’s historic cities, the
tired legs and in fading light, they can be As the days pass by and the distance ancient Nabatean city is the most iconic.
treacherous. My legs are soon bruised accumulates, the scenery evolves. After Having seen countless images of the
and bloodied from numerous clumsy 250 miles, we reach Dana, where all four famous buildings carved into red cliffs,
falls, and several times I come close to of Jordan’s biogeographical zones meet: I wonder if there is much that the real
tumbling over precipices. Sweity, on Mediterranean, Irano-Turanian, Saharo- thing can add. But from the moment I
familiar home territory, proves to be the Arabian and Sudanian. Villages nestle first set eyes on the intricate 2,000-year-
nimbler of us and survives unscathed. precariously on rocky mountainsides old architecture, I am transfixed. I
Inevitably, there are moments when I speckled with greenery and white flowers spend our rest day wandering the
long for the day to be over. The midday sprouting from inhospitable ground. narrow alleyways and with each hour
heat can be oppressive. On a few Occasionally, I stumble across a stream the changing light reveals new beauty
occasions, I deviate from the GPS track and immerse my head in the clear, in the preserved dwellings.
and am forced to climb treacherous cliffs refreshing water.
to correct my course. But each day also At times, a gap opens between us, RUNNING OUT OF TR AIL
promises new and unexpected delights. and I rest with the support crew while From Petra we emerge into the deserts
At the King Talal Dam, our camp on an Sweity catches up. When time permits, of Southern Jordan. By this point, both
exposed hillside overlooks the pristine they make Arbood bread, a simple of our bodies are beginning to feel the
water of the reservoir, and I wake to a combination of flour, salt and water. The effects of 350 undulating miles: heavy
spectacular sunrise. In the Zubia forest stretched dough is fully submerged in legs, sore backs and disintegrating feet.
we run through idyllic glades and catch the smoking embers of a fire for a few The first few miles each morning are
f leeting glimpses of wild boar. Near minutes and then removed and the ash the hardest but soon we settle into a
Rasoun we hack our way through thick shaken off. Bedouin shepherds can thus familiar routine. When tiredness sets
bushes and emerge scratched, muddy travel light in the mountains for weeks at in, we search eagerly for the sight of

ONE DIR T Y M A G A ZINE J U LY 2 0 1 8 67


Slow travel
enables one
to gain a true
appreciation of
distances. The
tranquillity
of the trail
makes space
for reflection
and often
unearths new
perspectives.

The Monastery at Petra.

the red pick-up, often accompanied by and reach the outskirts of the town we physical: I learned to slow down, to focus
the sounds of ’70s rock, a favorite of the are joined by several other Jordanian on the present and to appreciate my
crew. The combination of good food, runners who have been following our surroundings. From the airplane window
plenty of sleep and the ability to listen to progress. The atmosphere is jubilant, the following day, I see the terrain that
our bodies and vary our pace accordingly and I can feel the accumulation of two took days to cover, pass by in a matter
help to prevent any real issues. I’ve weeks of supressed emotions building of minutes.
suffered more in 50-mile races than on within me: relief that the goal is within Slow travel enables one to gain a
the entire Jordan Trail. reach, disappointment that the journey true appreciation of distances. The
It was in these deserts, almost exactly will soon be over, gratitude at my good tranquillity of the trail makes space
a century previous, that Lawrence of fortune and, already, a desire to find a for reflection and often unearths new
Arabia made his name. The British new challenge on which to focus. perspectives. Far from being small,
archaeologist and soldier was just 28 It has become a tradition among the the world is vast; we just often choose
when he joined forces with the Arab handful of walkers who have completed to confine ourselves to a small part of
revolt against the Ottoman occupiers. the Jordan Trail that the journey it. And seeing the gradual transitions
I brought a copy of Seven Pillars of culminates with a symbolic emersion of culture and terrain help to dispel
Wisdom with me and, although I rarely in the Red Sea. On the beach, a crowd the notion of borders as absolute and
have the energy to read more than a few has formed to welcome us. We pause countries as distinct.
pages at a time, his accounts of crossing briefly for photographs before plunging
the deserts on camel-back and planning fully clothed into the cool salty water. I Information about the 650-kilometer
guerrilla raids against the Turks are hold my head under the surface for a few Jordan Trail, including tour operators,
the perfect accompaniment. Much seconds to allow the situation to sink in. organized groups, accommodation and GPS
may have happened in the intervening After a cumulative total of 80 hours of routes, can be found at http://jordantrail.
hundred years, but the scenery remains running, I have finally run out of trail. org/. Sweity and Pearce-Higgins were the
i m med iately recog n i zable f rom A day in Aqaba provides a brief but first to run the Jordan Trail.
Lawrence’s evocative descriptions. important buffer between life on the
Gradually, the town of Aqaba inches trail and the return to reality. I spend Alfie Pearce-Higgins is a British runner
closer on the map. After 12 days of much of it staring vacantly out to sea. and writer. More information on Alfie’s
running, we crest the final hill and catch More so than any race I have done, expeditions can be found @jogonalfie on
sight of the Red Sea glimmering on the the Jordan Trail felt like a personal Instagram and Strava. Ali Barqawi can be
horizon. As we descend the last slope journey and its effects go far beyond the found on Instagram at @alibstudios.

68 J U LY 2 0 1 8  T R A I L R U N N E R M A G . C O M
H20
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Go farther, move faster, find your freedom

SCARPA Athletes: Joe Grant & Katie Bono | Salida, CO | Photo: Mike Thurk
trail tips

Having built-in breaks has given me


time to emotionally and physically take
a step back. Respecting the cycle of our
child-bearing years is so important as a
mother in this sport.”

—JEN BENNA, 38, of Reno, Nevada, has


raced over 50 ultras in the last 15 years. She
has wins at Zion 100 and American River 50
as well as podium finishes at Leadville 100
and Angeles Crest 100. Benna has continued
racing competitively while raising two
children, now ages seven and three.

What kind of role


model are you?

Children witnessing their mothers
dedicating themselves to a sport,
regardless of success, is valuable.
Liza Howard recalls her concerned
son as she came through a 100-mile-
race aid station not in the lead: “Mom, is
it OK that you’re not winning?”
“I’m 46 now,” she says. “That makes it
easier to let go of things that used to
be important.”

—LIZA HOWARD, of San Antonio, Texas,


began running at 35, after her son was born
and quickly racked up several wins including

CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: LISA KRANTZ, ANDREW VARGO, CAROLINE BOLLER, RANDALL LEVENSALER
A family running affair: Liza Howard training with her kids, 10-year-old Asa and four-year-old Ruby. Leadville 100, Rocky Raccoon 100 and Javelina
Jundred. Howard holds multiple USATF
Championship ultra wins.

Moms on the Run


WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM ELITE
MOM RUNNERS
By Jonnah Perkins

There’s a breed of trail runner not only finishing out front at nationally
competitive races, they’re raising their children along the way. The challenge of
being a mom may not lend itself to the elite runner’s life, but this bold class of Boundaries become
women is rewriting what it means to be a mother athlete. ever-more important.

“My training is non-negotiable. My
Create your own values. routine is really important to me and my
husband supports it.
“People will judge you and you need to ignore that I do my critical speed workouts in
judgment. The outside pressure of what motherhood the morning so I can be home with the
looks like doesn’t apply. You just need to do what’s right family. You can’t get these years back.”
for you and your family. The longevity of my running is in 
—CAROLINE BOLLER, 43, of Solvang,
large part due to taking time off for my pregnancies.
California, has a long list of top finishes,

70 JULY 20 18
PERFORM

B A R
I S E THE
RA
including 8th at Western States 100 and
1st at the Black Canyon 100K. Boller holds
the American record for 50 miles on trail,
and has logged hundreds of miles on her
garage treadmill while her two- and four-
year-olds napped.

Trim the fat.


“I’ve realized that through very specific
training I can still do really well and Your workout nutrition could be
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Intentions are everything.


Having kids can lead moms to discover
that competitive running pales in
comparison to home life.
“My training needs to be intentional
and purposeful, because I am taking time
away from my baby. It can’t be flippant.
Being a mom is going to make me a better
runner because of that intentionality.
Most runners want to do more than is
productive. I’m not getting greedy to train
more, because I need to do what’s right
and healthy—no more, no less.”

—ALICIA VARGO, 35, of Flagstaff, Arizona,


has placed 1st at Dirty 30 50K and holds
the Fastest Known Time for the Grand
Canyon Rim-to-Rim. After the R2R, her
husband met her on the north rim so she
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You've heard it before: breakfast is the most important meal of the day. And I
agree—it can make or break your day, and workout.
Have you ever eaten the wrong thing before heading out to run? It’s the worst.
Or not fueled adequately and almost gnawed off your arm mid-morning? That’s not
fun either. Here are five recipes to help you nail breakfast, and the day ahead.

RED BEET Toast! Smoothie Bowl


EAT THIS: Before a hard workout. EAT THIS: When it’s hot as heck outside.
CRYSTALS WHY: When it’s tough to imagine eating
WHY: It is quick and simple, and will give
for vitamin C you quick energy for a hard workout. And, anything but ice cream for breakfast, this
and energy it won’t sit heavy in your stomach. Choose smoothie bowl has you covered. Not only
high-quality bread; my favorite is sourdough does it taste like ice cream, but it also looks
from a local bakery—it has few ingredients pretty and has lots of healthy nutrients.
and will sit well. Avoid bread with a lot of
fiber and/or seeds and additions, as it may Ingredients
not agree as well with your stomach. 1 frozen banana
½ c frozen blueberries
Plant-Based | Non-GMO Ingredients ½ c cooked sweet potatoes
2 slices sourdough bread 1/3 c plain, whole-fat greek yogurt
2 T almond butter 1 handful spinach
STEPHANIE HOWE VIOLETT

1 banana, sliced ½ avocado


2 t honey
Directions
Directions Add to blender and process until creamy and
*THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND
DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, Toast bread and slather with almond butter. smooth. Top with fresh berries, banana slices,
TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.
Slice a banana on top and drizzle with honey. shredded coconut, chia seeds and granola.
Yeah, toast!
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#BeFloraHealthy | 1.888.436.6697 72 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M
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Available in natural health food stores, select grocery stores, and pharmacies.
nutrition PERFORM

¼ t baking soda
Steel-Cut Oats ½ t baking powder
EAT THIS: Before a long run or race. 1 egg
WHY: The nutritional value of steel-cut vs. ¼ c milk
rolled oats is the same, but you can make a 1 T lemon juice
large batch of steel-cut oats ahead of time, 2 bananas, ripe and mashed
and reheat them in the morning, saving time. ¼ c coconut oil or butter
1 t salt
Ingredients ½ c chopped walnuts (optional)
1 c steel-cut oats ½ c chocolate chips (optional)
3 c water
Directions
Directions Add lemon juice to milk and set aside. Mix dry
Add oats and water to a large saucepan. Bring ingredients in a large bowl. Melt coconut oil
to a boil and reduce heat to a simmer. Cook or butter over low heat and add to a medium
for 20 to 30 minutes until oats are soft. Cool bowl. Stir in banana, egg and curdled milk.
to room temperature and store in the fridge. Stir wet and dry ingredients together and
fold in nuts and chocolate (if using). Grease
To Reheat a bread pan and add banana-bread mixture.
2/3 c cooked oats Top with sliced banana if desired. Bake at 350
½ c milk for 40 minutes, or until the top of the bread is
1 t coconut oil browned. Allow to cool before serving.

Directions
Add oats, milk and coconut oil to a small
saucepan. Heat over medium heat for 5
minutes, or until warm.

Top with one of the following:


½ avocado and sea salt
1 T peanut butter and sliced banana
¼ c chopped walnuts and cinnamon
1 fried egg and ½ avocado
¼ c blueberries and 1 T chia seeds

Huevos Rancheros
EAT THIS: After a long run.
WHY: Post-long run is a great time to get in
some nutrients. The eggs and black beans
provide high-quality protein, and the spinach
and avocado add nutrients for recovery. Most
runners crave savory flavors after a long run,
especially when it’s warm out.

Ingredients (Serves 2)
4 corn tortillas
Banana Bread 4 eggs
EAT THIS: For a quick bite before heading out 1 avocado
LEFT: ISTOCKPHOTO; RIGHT: STEPHANIE HOWE VIOLETT

the door. ½ c black beans


WHY: It’s better to have something to eat 1 c spinach
before running than going on an empty 2 T olive oil
stomach. Not only does it get your blood Pico de gallo
glucose up so you feel better, it also results
in higher-quality training. When you are Directions
maximizing your sleep time, grab a piece of Heat a cast-iron skillet to medium high.
banana bread before heading out the door. Add olive oil to coat the pan. Fry tortillas
Top it with almond butter for a little more for 1 to 2 minutes on each side, and transfer
nutritional value. to serving plates. Crack the eggs in the
skillet and cook for a couple of minutes on
Ingredients each side. Carefully transfer the eggs to
¾ c almond meal the tortillas. Top each tortilla with spinach,
¼ c flour black beans, avocado and pico de gallo.
¼ c brown sugar (or maple syrup) Serve immediately. TR

74 J U LY 2 0 18T R A IL RU NNE R M A G .CO M


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Running Camp Aug 17–19, 2018
with David and Megan Roche Snowmass, Colorado
Come run with Trail Runner magazine and respected coaches
David and Megan Roche in the spectacular Elk Mountains. In For more information
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Bishop, California
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TRAIL

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Your Running Readiness isn’t a static


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Is Your Training
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Unproductive? Are you motivated to run today or is


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HOW TO ASSESS YOUR RUNNING or resent it?
READINESS BEFORE PILING ON THE MILES Everything you notice during this
body scan is information you can use
to regulate your run’s pace, intensity,
By Elinor Fish duration and purpose that day.
For example, in the second article
After registering for his first trail ultramarathon, a 100K in Northern California, of this series, you learned how the
Ron Nowland, a consistent runner with several marathons under his belt, began degree to which you enjoy a run directly
tacking more miles onto his Saturday long runs. His usual 10-mile Saturdays impacts its efficacy in building fitness
became 13, 15, 17 miles long. (meaning that the more you enjoy
After two months, however, rather than feeling fitter, Nowland struggled to working out, the better you build
get through his long runs and experienced achy knees for days afterwards. Soon, fitness). If your body scan reveals a
even his short recovery runs felt like a chore that left him snoozing on his desk by heavy body and unmotivated mind,
mid-afternoon. then these may be signs you’re under-
Even though Nowland’s training approach had been by the book, his body wasn’t recovering. Rather than doing the hard
able to handle the increasing load. What he needed was to step back to assess his hill repeats you’d planned, perhaps you
Running Readiness. should adapt today’s run to be playful
and unstructured instead.

Are You Ready for More?


Running Readiness is the degree to which your body is able to assimilate the stress Why Trust and
of training. A high degree of Running Readiness means you’re ready for more miles, Compassion Matter
harder races or tougher workouts. It means that your body is primed to make fitness Making training decisions based on
MATTIAS FREDRIKSSON

gains in response to those workouts, which is considered productive training. your Running Readiness requires you to
A low degree of Running Readiness, on the other hand, means your body’s trust your body to help you determine
already so overloaded with stress—from running and/or life in general—that what is working and what isn’t.
it lacks the energy to build strength or endurance. In this state, each run could It also requires a great deal of
potentially make you more fatigued and susceptible to injury or burnout, known as self-compassion, a key component to
unproductive training. any mindfulness practice. And self-

76 JULY 20 18
RACE FINDER GEAR FINDER
PERFORM

compassion really comes in handy


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RunWildRetreats.com). 970-704-1442 X 120
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DISCLAIMER: Trail Runner magazine assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of any Trophy 08/11 Marlette 50K and 10 Miler 10M, 50K; Incline 09/07 Oakridge Triple Summit Challenge 36M;
Series race information. Race dates, locations and lengths are subject to change without Village, NV; bryan@bigblueadventure.com; www. Eugene, OR; devin.vanscoy@gmail.com; www.
notice. Check with each race in advance to verify race time, date, length and availability. oakridgetriplesummitchallenge.com
tahoetrailrunning.com/trail-runs/marlette-50k
08/12 SAR Wild Run 5K, 10K, 13.1M; Shaver Lake, CA; 09/15 Bull of the Woods Trail Race 10M, 14M, 26.2M;
PACIFIC/DESERT USA 08/04 Taos Ski Valley Up & Over Trail Run 10K; Taos sarwildrun@yahoo.com; www.sarwildrun.com Taos, NM; bullofthewoodsrun@hotmail.com;
Ski Valley, NM; tsvchamber@gmail.com; www. www.bullofthewoodsrun.com
07/14 Brian Waterbury Memorial Rock To Pier Run 08/18 XTERRA Lake Tahoe Trail Run 5K, 10K; Incline
taosskivalley.com/trailrun 09/16 Emerald Bay Trail Run 10K; Tahoma, CA; bryan@
6M, 13.1M; Morro Bay, CA; ksweeny@morrobayca. Village, NV; angel@bigblueadventure.com; bigblueadventure.com; www.tahoetrailrunning.
gov; www.leaguelineup.com/rock2pier 08/04 Sierra Crest Trail Run 30K, 50K, 15K; Truckee, www.bigblueadventure.com com/trail-runs/emerald-bay-trail-run
07/14 Grey Rock Trail Run 12K, 25K, 50K; Yakima, CA; m.seifert@assoc.auburnskiclub.org; 08/25 San Bruno Mountain Run 5K, 10K, 13.1M; San
WA; richardbetancourt1806@gmail.com; www. www.auburnskiclub.com/summer-fun-runs/ Bruno, CA; info@urbancoyoteracing.com; www. ROCKIES
facebook.com/GreyRockTrailRuns urbancoyoteracing.com/san-bruno-mountain-run. 07/07 Silverheels Endurance Run 100M; Fairplay, CO;
sierra-crest-50k
07/28 Oakland Redwoods Run 5K, 10K, 13.1M; Oakland, html Sherpajohn@gmail.com; www.humanpotentialrunning.
CA; info@urbancoyoteracing.com; www. 08/11 Haulin’ Aspen Trail Runs 6.5M, 13.1M, 26.2M; 09/01 SLO Ultra at Wild Cherry Canyon 5M, 13.1M, 26.2M, com
urbancoyoteracing.com/oakland-redwoods. Bend, OR; info@layitoutevents.com; www. 50M; Avila Beach, CA; customerservice@raceslo. 07/28 Classic 10K Race 10K; Colorado Springs, CO; director@
html haulinaspen.com com; www.sloultra.com csgrandprix.com; www.csgrandprix.com

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Photo credit: Ben Mawhinney


2014 TROPHY SERIES
RACE CALENDAR
UPDATED REGULARLY AT W W W.TRAILRUNNERMAG.COM
07/28 Grand Mesa 30K, 55K, 50M, 100M; Grand Mesa, 08/04 The Legend 5M, 10M, 13.1M; Laingsburg, MI; 09/09 Rock Cut HOBO Trail Race 50K 50K; Rockford, 09/15 Bays Mountain Trail Race 15M; Kingsport,
CO; BESTSLOPEEVENTS@GMAIL.COM; www. info@rfevents.com; www.runlegend.com IL; hoboruns@rockfordroadrunners.org; www. TN; markskelton@markskelton.com; www.
grandmesa100.com 08/04 Tahqua Trail Run 10K, 25K; Paradise, MI; rockfordroadrunners.org/hobo-runs.html RunTriCities.org
07/28 Living Journeys Half Marathon 13.1M; Crested info@greatlakesendurance.com; www. 09/15 Barkley Fall Classic 50K; Wartburg, TN; durb417@
Butte, CO; info@livingjourneys.org; www. greatlakesendurance.com NORTHEAST gmail.com; www.durbinracemanagement.com
livingjourneys.org/half-marathon 08/11 Flying Pug Trail Run 5K, 10K, 20K; Mount Perry, 08/04 Dahlgren Heritage Rail Trail Run 50K,
08/04 HURL Elkhorn Endurance Runs 15M, 52K, 50M; OH; trucker@ruckerendurancepark.com; www. 13.1M; King George, VA; vic@farc.org; www. CANADA
Helena, MT; hurlelkhorn@gmail.com; www. ruckerendurancepark.com racetimingunlimited.org/R/DHRT/Info.aspx
hurlelkhorn.com 07/01 Slay the Dragon 12K, 25K, 50K; Silver Star Mountain,
08/17 Lean Horse Ultra 20M, 30M, 50M, 100M, 100R; 08/04 Beast of Burden Ultramarathon 50M, 100M; BC; jmartin@skisilverstar.com; www.skisilverstar.
08/04 Sheep Mountain Endurance Run 50M, 55K; Custer, SD; track@rushmore.com; www. Lockport, NY; Beastofburdenultra@gmail.com; com/events/slay-dragon-trail-running-race
Fairplay, CO; info@HumanPotentialRunning. Leanhorse100.com www.beastofburden100.com
com; www.humanpotentialrunning.com 07/07 Sinister 7 Ultra 100M; Crowsnest Pass, AB; info@
08/25 Conserve School Trail Run 5K, 13.1M; Land 08/11 Eastern States 100 100M; Waterville, PA; sinister7.com; www.sinister7.com
08/11 Aspen Backcountry Marathon 13.1M, 26.2M; O’Lakes, WI; info@greatlakesendurance.com; ultrard100@gmail.com; www.easternstates100.
Aspen, CO; AspenSpecialEvents@cityofaspen. com 07/28 Idaho Peak Ultra Trail Marathon & 10k 10K,
www.greatlakesendurance.com
com; www.aspenbackcountrymarathon.com 45K; Nakusp, BC; info@kootenaysufferfest.
08/25 Under Down Trail Races 5K, 10K, 13.1M, 50K, 08/18 River Valley Run Trail Festival 1M, 5K, 10K, 15K; com; www.kootenaysufferfest.com
08/12 Steamboat Stinger 13.1M, 26.2M; Steamboat Springs, Manchester, MD; run@rivervalleyranch.com;
50M; Hayward, WI; info@gritevents.com; www.
CO; SteamboatStinger@HoneyStinger.com; www. www.runrvr.com 08/05 Canadian Death Race 125K; Grande Cache, AB; info@
honeystinger.com/steamboatstinger.html theunderdown.com/trailrun
sinistersports.ca; www.canadiandeathrace.com
09/07 Rock Cut HOBO Coyote Howl 10K 10K; Rockford, 08/26 Northeast Delta Dental Race To The Top Of
Vermont 4.3M; Stowe, VT; info@rtttovt.com; 08/18 Iron Legs Mountain Races 60K, 50M, 100K; Calgary,
HEARTLAND IL; hoboruns@rockfordroadrunners.org; www.
rockfordroadrunners.org/hobo-runs.html www.rtttovt.com AB; ironlegs@telus.net; www.ironlegs.ca
07/07 Waugoshance Trail Run 13.1M, 26.2M, 26.2R; 09/15 Rock ‘N The Knob: PA’s Highest Trail Race 10K, 08/25 Black Spur Ultra 54K, 108K; Kimberley, BC; brian@
Cross Village, MI; info@greatlakesendurance. 09/07 Run Woodstock - 3 Day Trail/Music Fest 5K, 13.1M,
26.2M, 50K, 50M, 100K, 100M; Pinckney, MI; info@ 20M; Claysburg, PA; bmazur@alleghenytrailrunners. blackspurultra.com; www.blackspurultra.com
com; www.greatlakesendurance.com
rfevents.com; www.runwoodstock.com com; www.alleghenytrailrunners.com 09/07 Lost Soul Ultra 50K, 100K, 100M; Lethbridge, AB;
07/14 Dances With Dirt Devil’s Lake 10K, 13.1M, 26.2M, lostsoulultra@gmail.com; www.lostsoulultra.com
09/08 Hawk Hundred 26.2M, 50M, 100M; Lawrence, 09/16 Rick O’Donnell Memorial Challenge 5.22M, 8H;
50K, 50M; Baraboo, WI; info@rfevents.com;
KS; hawkhundredrd@gmail.com; www. Boonsboro, MD; info@rickstrailrun.com; www. 09/08 Haliburton Forest 50K, 50M, 100M; Haliburton,
www.dwddevilslake.com
hawkhundred.com rickstrailrun.com ON; tlegge@haliburtonforest.com; www.
07/21 Grand Island Trail Run 13.1M, 26.2M, 50K;
09/08 Wabash Trace Nature Trail Marathon 13.1M, 26.2R, 09/30 Eagleton Trail Challenge 25K, 50K, 10K; Lock Haven, haliburtonforest.org
Munising, MI; info@greatlakesendurance.com;
www.greatlakesendurance.com 26.2M; Shenandoah, IA; chamber@shenandoahiowa. PA; info@runemctc.org; www.runemctc.org 09/15 Beaver Flat 50 50M; Saskatchewan, ; pskyrunning@
07/21 Luna-Tics Trail Series/Junkyard Dog 50K 5K, 13.1M, net; www.shenandoahiowa.net gmail.com; www.pskyrunning.com
09/09 Rock Cut HOBO Trail Race 25K 25K; Rockford,
SOUTH 09/29 Mighty Quail Trail 100k 100K; Penticton, BC;
26.2M, 50K; Kewaskum, WI; rocky@traildogrunning.
com; www.traildogrunning.com/2014_races/ IL; hoboruns@rockfordroadrunners.org; www. 07/17 Wolf Run 7M; Kingsport, TN; markskelton@ mightyquail100@mail.com; www.mightyquail100.
race_information_luna-tic_race_series rockfordroadrunners.org/hobo-runs.html markskelton.com; www.RunTriCities.org blogspot.ca
parting shot

Photo By Matthias Fredriksson


Malene Blikken Haukøy, one of Norway’s top trail runners, runs across an old stone bridge near
Lygnstøylvatnet, in Norangsdalen, one of Norway’s narrowest valleys. Norangsdalen is ringed by
mountains, and in some places the houses were built into the ground as protection against landslides.
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