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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

A Brief History of

Invensys Building Systems

Direct Digital Control

(DDC) Systems

Invensys™ Building Systems Training Center


ibsa-training.invensys.com
1354 Clifford Ave
Loves Park, IL 61111
Fax: 815-637-3077
A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Copyright Notice

The confidential information contained in this document is provided solely for use
by Invensys employees, licensees, and system owners, and is not to be released
to, or reproduced for, anyone else. Neither is it to be used for reproduction of this
control system or any of its components.

Invensys Building Systems


Climate Controls – Americas
1354 Clifford Avenue (Zip 61111)
P.O. Box 2940
Loves Park, IL 61132-2940
United States of America

www.ibs.invensys.com

© Copyright 2003 Invensys. All rights reserved.


No part of this document may be photocopied or reproduced by any means, or
translated to another language without prior written consent of Invensys.

Invensys, I/A Series, and Wonderware are trademarks of Invensys plc and its subsidiaries and affiliates.
Adobe, Acrobat, FrameMaker, Illustrator, and Reader are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated.
AutoCAD is a trademark of Autodesk Corporation.
Echelon, LON, LONMARK, LONTALK, and LONWORKS are trademarks of Echelon Corporation.
FullShot is a trademark of Inbit Corporation.
Microsoft, and Visio are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
RoboHelp is a trademark of eHelp Corporation.
SnagIt! is a trademark of TechSmith Corporation.
All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

This document contains several examples of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) equipment and applications. Many of
the applications include temperatures, setpoints, throttling ranges, and other examples of conditions found in the HVAC world. When
reading this document, keep in mind that these are examples only. Equipment, climate, building codes, local practices and so on, vary
and have a major impact on methods, procedures, and sequences used to control buildings. This document gives examples of the
uses and applications of Invensys products, however, it is not intended as a guide for specific applications.
A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Table of Contents

Introduction .......................................................................................................................1

Controller Basics...............................................................................................................2

Controller I/O Points .........................................................................................................3

NETWORK 8000.................................................................................................................4

NETWORK 8000 Controllers ............................................................................................4


Programming Software for NETWORK 8000 Controllers..................................................6
Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs)......................................................................................8

DMS ..................................................................................................................................10

DMS Controllers..............................................................................................................10
Programming Software for DMS .....................................................................................11
Graphical User Interfaces ...............................................................................................11

The I/A Series System.....................................................................................................12

Features of I/A Series .....................................................................................................12


Components of the I/A Series System ............................................................................12

Review Questions ...........................................................................................................19

Answers to Review Questions .......................................................................................23


A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Introduction
In 1987, Barber-Colman® Company of Rockford, Illinois introduced a family of DDC
controls called NETWORK 8000®. At nearly the same time, Robertshaw Company of
Richmond, Virginia developed a DDC system called DMS™ (Digital Management System).
By 1990 both Barber Colman Company and Robertshaw Company had been purchased by
Siebe, PLC of the United Kingdom. Robertshaw and Barber Colman merged to form Siebe
Environmental Controls® (SEC). In the mid-1990’s, Siebe Environmental Controls
developed a new family of DDC controls called the I/A (Intelligent Automation) Series™.
These controllers are called I/A Series® MicroNet™ controllers, and they were among the
first controllers to use LON® (Local Operating Network) technology. This document
explains the features and functions of the controllers in these DDC families, along with
descriptions of the Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs) used by each system. Not every
controller in each family is discussed.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Controller Basics
The basic control system is made up of a sensor, a controller and a controlled device.

A sensor sends a signal to the controller. The signal can be analog or digital. A sensor sends an
analog signal (input) if it modulates or varies, such as a temperature sensor. If a sensor produces
an on or an off signal it is a digital input, such as an airflow switch.

The controller is a microprocessor that reads signals from attached sensors, processes the signal
data and sends an output signal to an attached controlled device. A software control program
that runs in the controller accomplishes this process.

A controlled device receives a control signal from the controller. The signal can be analog or
digital. If the controlled device uses the signal to allow more or less flow of the controlling
medium, such as hot water or air, it is receiving an analog signal from the controller. If the
controlled device is a piece of equipment such as a pump or fan, it requires a digital signal from
the controller.

Sensors Controlled Devices


Input points Output points

Analog or Digital Analog or Digital

Water Flow Valve

Temperature Supply
Air Flow Fan
(Static Pressure) Outside Air
Low Limit
Controller Dampers
(Freeze stat)
Chilled Water
Supply Pump
Smoke

Humidity Humidifier

Electric Heat

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Controller I/O Points


Before discussing specific controller and controller families, we need to explain the idea of I/O
(Input/Output) points. An I/O point is a connection from the controller to a HVAC (Heating,
Ventilating, and Air Conditioning) device in a building. I/O points are first defined as Inputs or
Outputs, in relation to the controller. An input is a signal coming into the controller from a
physical device, while an output is a signal produced by the controller going out to a physical
device. Next, points are defined as analog or digital. An analog signal is a varying signal, such
as a varying voltage, varying current or varying resistance that may represent temperature.
Digital signals are two-state or ON/OFF type of signals. Digital signals may also be called
binary, Boolean, discrete, contact or two-position. All of these words are used to describe
ON/OFF signals.

There are essentially four types of I/O points – analog inputs (AIs), digital inputs (DIs), analog
outputs (AOs) and digital outputs (DOs). A common example of a physical device connected to
a controller as an AI is a temperature sensor. The sensor may vary its electrical resistance based
on the surrounding (ambient) temperature. A flow switch, sometimes called a “sail” switch, that
closes when airflow pushes against a sail, is an example of a DI. Switches are digital because
they are open or closed (two-position) and the sensor is an input because the signal comes into
the controller. Two common examples of AO type points would be a proportional valve or
damper. A voltage or current signal is sent from the controller to move the valve or damper to a
specific position. The point is analog because the position of the valve or damper could vary
anywhere from full-closed to full-open. A fan or pump that is turned ON or OFF by the
controller would be a DO.

Be careful when thinking about I/O point types. While turning a pump or fan ON or OFF is
done by a DO point, variable speed pumps and fans are controlled by AO points. While
proportional valves and dampers are controlled by AO points, two-position valves or dampers,
which are fully-open or fully-closed only, are controlled by DO points. DDC controllers are
typically described by the number of I/O points that they have available.

Another type of I/O point is called a Universal Point. Universal Points can be configured in
software to be an AI, an AO, a DI or DO. Universal Points make a controller very flexible
because they can provide a variety of configurations for different applications. However,
Universal Points are costly because each point must have the hardware for four different types.
Some controllers have Universal Inputs, which must be used for hardware inputs, but can be
either Analog Inputs or Digital Inputs.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

NETWORK 8000

NETWORK 8000 Controllers


The heart of the NETWORK 8000 system is a controller called a GCM™ (Global Control
Module.) A GCM is an example of an “area controller”, which will be discussed soon. Up to
31 LCMs (Local Control Modules) can be connected to a single GCM. The connection is a
twisted, shielded pair of wires called the LCM Bus. Each LCM has 16 universal points. Also
connected to a GCM is another twisted-shielded bus called the ASD (Application Specific
Device) Bus. Up to 128 local ASD controllers can be connected to a single GCM on the ASD
bus. Application Specific Devices, which are a group of controllers in the NETWORK 8000
family, include the MICROZONE II®, MICROFLO II™, PEM™ (Packaged Equipment
Module) and the LIM™ (Lighting Interface Module). The MICROZONE II is a general-purpose
controller with 20 I/O points – 8 Universal Inputs, 4 Analog Outputs and 8 Digital Outputs. The
PEM is a smaller controller with 12 I/O points: 4 Analog Inputs, 2 Digital Inputs, 2 Analog
Outputs and 4 Digital Outputs. The Microflo2 is a specialized controller used only to control
VAV (Variable Air Volume) boxes. The LIM is a controller that interfaces with a General
Electric lighting panel.

The ASD Bus can have up to 7 MicroNet 2000™ Integrators, and connected to each integrator
can be up to 31 MicroNet 2000 controllers. MicroNet 2000 controllers come in two models: MN
FLO, which is used to control VAV boxes and MN HPFC, which is used to control heat pumps
or fan coil units. Although it is confusing, these MicroNet 2000 devices are in no way related to
the I/A Series MicroNet controllers that use LON technology, which are discussed later.

Up to 31 GCMs can be connected together in a single NETWORK 8000 network. Area


controllers like the GCM do not have any physical I/O points. Instead, area controllers are used
to provide global control for multiple local controllers. An example of a global control function
is a single schedule located in a GCM used to send ON and OFF commands to several local
controllers. The advantage to the end-user is that they need only enter their building schedule
once (in the GCM) rather than use multiple identical schedules in each local controller. A
second purpose of an area controller is to provide communication between local devices. None
of the NETWORK 8000 local controllers can communicate with any other local controllers.
(This is called “peer-to-peer” communication.) Therefore, the GCM is necessary to allow LCMs
communicate with other LCMs, or to allow an LCM to communicate with a MICROZONE II.
For example, if a MICROZONE II needs to send a value such as Outside Air Temperature to an
LCM, the value must first be sent from the MICROZONE II to the GCM, and then from the
GCM to another local controller, such as an LCM.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

There are three different types of communications between the GCMs in a NETWORK 8000
network – BC LAN™, Echelon® and Ethernet. BC LAN (Barber Colman Local Area Network)
is the oldest and slowest network communications. Ethernet is the newest and fastest. The
Echelon and Ethernet connections between GCMs are made with NIMs (Network Interface
Modules) that mount on the side of a GCM. Considering that a NETWORK 8000 network can
have up to 31 GCMs, and each GCM can have 31 LCMs and 128 ASD controllers connected to
it, the network can be very large, with thousands of controllers connected to tens-of-thousands of
I/O points

NETWORK 8000 ARCHITECTURE

Ethernet or Echelon

GC M GC M

MZ II NIM
NIM

PEM

Integrator
LCM
MicroNet 2000
VAV

Heat pump/
Fan coil

LCM Bus
MF II

ASD Bus

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Programming Software for NETWORK 8000 Controllers


The most basic software used to program the NETWORK 8000 GCM and LCM is called
Terminal Mode. It is a DOS terminal emulation program. Although other software has been
developed and used for programming GCMs and LCMs, Terminal Mode is still widely used
today.

Illustration of Terminal Mode

PSI™ (Personal System Interface) was the first software tool for programming devices found on
the ASD Bus, including the MICROZONE II, PEM, MICROFLO II, and the LIM.

Illustration of PSI

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Another programming tool for NETWORK 8000 controllers was developed in the late1990’s
and is called Tree Tech™. Tree Tech, a Windows-based software package, was developed for
use with the InVue graphical user interface software. Tree Tech can be used as an alternative to
Terminal Mode and PSI.

Illustration of Tree Tech

Stonet Systems, a wholly owned subsidiary of Base Controls, one of Invensys’ IFOs
(Independent Field Office) has developed the Eclypse™ software, also known as ProBlock™, in
the late 1990’s. ProBlock is a windows-based programming tool designed to update the look of
Terminal Mode, as well as to add more functions to increase the efficiency of creating and
maintaining a controller database. ProBlock can be used in place of Terminal Mode and PSI.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Graphical User Interfaces (GUIs)


Several graphical user interfaces have been developed during the evolution of the NETWORK
8000 product. The purpose of graphical interfaces is to connect to controllers and show data
from the controllers in a graphical display. Graphical user interface programs allow the user to
interact with and view dynamic readings of the operation of the control system in their building.
Following is a list of NETWORK 8000 graphical interfaces in chronological order.

HOST-8000™

The HOST-8000 is a powerful GUI that runs on the QNX® operating system and DOS® 3.1.
HOST-8000 uses icons to navigate the system. Due to the non-availability of QNX operating
system, HOST-8000 is no longer available.

SIGNAL®

SIGNAL is an extremely user-friendly Windows based interface that can run in a Windows®
3.1, Windows 95, or Windows XP operating system. SIGNAL uses icons to navigate the
system.

Illustration of Signal

ULTIVIST™

UltiVist uses a tree structure, and is a powerful and flexible GUI. Because it is based on the
OS/2® operating system, UltiVist is no longer available.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

INVUE™

The InVue graphical user interface is an application based on the Wonderware InTouch™
software. InVue was developed as part of the overall I/A Series® MicroNet system to
accompany the I/A controllers. InVue runs on a Windows NT or Windows 2000 operating
system. InVue has been superceded by the I/A Series platform.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

DMS

DMS Controllers
The area controller for the DMS system is a DMS 3500™. The local controllers in a DMS
system are called MicroSmart™ Controllers. There are different MicroSmart Controllers with
different arrangements of I/O points. The MicroSmart Controllers connect to the DMS 3500 via
two RS-485 buses, called MicroSmart Trunks. Up to 31 MicroSmart controllers can be
connected together on a single MicroSmart Trunk. The DMS 3500 area controllers are
connected via NIMs, (Network Interface Modules), using Ethernet or Echelon, very much like
GCMs in NETWORK 8000. Older versions of DMS area controllers include DMS 350A™ and
DMS 35™. The DMS 350A requires another device called the Distributed Control Module
(DCM) to communicate with the MicroSmart Controllers.

DMS ARCHITECTURE

DMS-3500 NIM Ethernet or Echelon

DMS-3500 NIM

RS-485 Controller Trunk RS-485 Controller Trunk


Trunk A Trunk B

MicroSmart MicroSmart MicroSmart MicroSmart MicroSmart


Controller Controller Controller Controller Controller

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Programming Software for DMS


The DMS system can be accessed, viewed, and programmed using the DOS based OPRIF
(Operator’s Interface) software. OPRIF is run on a computer that is usually connected to the RS-
232 port of the area controller. DMS controllers can also be programmed by using Tree Tech.

Illustration of OPRIF

Graphical User Interfaces


DMS system control data can be viewed graphically with SIGNAL, UltiVist and InVue, which
were discussed in the NETWORK 8000 section.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

The I/A Series System


The I/A Series System is an HVAC control system incorporating an Internet accessible GUI,
network controllers, field bus controllers and temperature sensors compatible with many
different protocols. The system also provides a built-in network management tool for managing
devices on a LonWorks network. The two main components of the I/A Series System are the
Universal Network Controllers (based on Niagara Framework Technology) and the MicroNet
LonWorks-based controller family.

Features of I/A Series


The I/A Series software is a graphical user interface with two main advantages over all other
GUIs previously mentioned. First, the I/A Series software has the ability to be accessed through
a standard Internet browser. Therefore, the end user can view building parameters and even
make changes from anywhere in the world by using an Internet browser, with no other software
required. Second, the I/A Series software is designed to integrate data from many types of
control systems, including NETWORK 8000, DMS, LON, BACnet, and Modbus.

Components of the I/A Series System

UNIVERSAL NETWORK CONTROLLER

The UNCs (Universal Network Controller) are area or network controllers. They have ports to
connect busses for integration, but no I/O points. The UNC 600 has greater capacity and more
functionality than a UNC 510. A UNC 600 is a small industrial personal computer. The UNC
600 has a hard disk drive to store its databases, including the graphics. A UNC 500 or UCN 510
does not have a hard drive. The database in a UNC 500 or 510 is stored on a memory chip called
“flash” memory. UNCs connect together with Ethernet connections. Each UNC has its own IP
(Internet Protocol) address.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

I/A SERIES ENTERPRISE SERVER

The I/A Enterprise Server is a network server for connected UNCs. The I/A Enterprise Server
software runs on a PC with the Windows 2000 or NT operating system. I/A Enterprise Server
functions include processing alarms and logs, plus making graphics available to Internet
browsers.

Illustration courtesy of Climatic Control


WORKPLACE PRO

WorkPlace Pro (WPP) is a graphical engineering tool. It is used to create the database that
includes control logic and graphics for UNC controllers and the I/A Enterprise Server.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

MICRONET CONTROLLERS

The I/A Series MicroNet controllers are field bus controllers that are based on the LonWorks
technology. LonWorks is the name of the collective technology developed by the Echelon
Corporation. It refers to a networking communications system using LonWorks hardware and
software components that allows the direct sharing of data between devices. Echelon designed
LonWorks as a modular, “open architecture” system, providing a method for manufacturers to
build devices that can operate on an interoperable control network.

The I/A Series MicroNet controllers may be used as standalone devices or networked together to
form a LonWorks communications network. Third party (non MicroNet) devices may also exist
on the network, allowing interoperability among various manufacturers’ products. All devices
on the LonWorks network contain a special chip called a neuron chip, making them capable of
sharing information in a peer-to-peer fashion. A complete line of digital S-link™ temperature
sensors, many with a LCD display, are available to be used with the I/A Series MicroNet
controllers.

The I/A Series MicroNet controllers each have a defined I/O point configuration. Refer to the
table below:

Type of I/O Point MN 50 MN 100 MN 150 MN 200 MNV1 MNV2 MNV3 MN 800

Digital Inputs (DI) 1 1 2 1 1 1

Universal Inputs (UI) 1 2 3 3 1 1 1 8

Digital Outputs (DO) 3 4 2 6 3 3 8

Analog Outputs (AO) 2 2 1 1 4

Triac Outputs 2

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

The MN 50, MN 100, MN 150, MN 200 and MN VAV controllers are LonMark compliant. This
means they contain a fixed LonMark HVAC profile that facilitates the communication between
controllers. A profile contains a certain list of Standard Network Variable Types (SNVTs).
Using network management software, SNVTs are “bound” between controllers to allow data
sharing. Network variables in I/A Series MicroNet Controllers fall into three general classes:
• NCIs (Network Configuration Inputs)
nciSetPnts

• NVIs (Network Variable Inputs)


nviOccCmd

• NVOs (Network Variable Outputs)

nvoSpaceTemp

All I/A Series MicroNet controllers, except the MN 800 Controller, have a specific LonMark
HVAC functional profile (Fan Coil, Roof Top, VAV), determined by its model. A LonMark
profile describes the general application purpose and the network image of a device. A profile is
made from a standardized set of SNVTs available to other LON devices. A controller profile is
set at the factory and held in read-only memory (ROM), and therefore a profile cannot be erased
or changed. There is no external difference among controller models containing the same
profile. For example, all of the MN 200 model controllers look the same. However, MN 200
controller models can differ by LonMark profile.

The MN 800 Controller is a LonWorks controller with eight universal inputs, four analog
outputs, eight digital outputs, which is the exact same I/O configuration as a NETWORK 8000
MICROZONE II. The MN 800 provides the same basic network variable functionality as with
the LonMark compliant MicroNet controllers; however, it does not contain a LonMark profile.
A programmer can choose which SNVTs he or she wishes to use with each MicroNet 800.

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A B R I E F O V E R V I E W A N D H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

The LON Network Controller (LNC) is part of the first generation of I/A controllers that provided
an interface between a NETWORK 8000 or DMS system and LonWorks network devices.
Devices on the LonWorks network include the I/A Series MicroNet controllers and third-party
devices. The LNC is very similar to the NETWORK 8000 GCM area controller. The main
difference is the LNC has a connection for a LonWorks network (instead of the LCM bus) and
an ASD (Application Specific Device) bus. Like the GCM, the LNC is programmed using
Terminal Mode, Tree Tech or ProBlock. An LNC does not contain a LonMark profile. The
integration of LonWorks to the I/A Series can now be done with the Universal Network
Controllers.

Example of the use of an LNC

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WorkPlace Tech Tool (WP Tech) is the PC-based graphical software programming tool used to
program and download a control application to an I/A Series MicroNet controller. WP Tech
Version 3.2 is designed for use with Windows® 2000 and Visio® 2000.

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A B R I E F H I S T O R Y O F I B S D D C S Y S T E M S

Internet

Remote Browser WorkPlace Pro


User Interface (Field Office)

BACnet Devices

Enterprise
B AC net S yste ms
Server

Ethernet

UNC-500/510 UNC-600 UNC-600

WorkPlace Local Browser


Pro Interface
MS Trunk

ASD Bus
ASD Bus

RS-232
MN 50
MN 50

MZ2 MPC MZ2


MN 200
MN 200
LON

DMS 3500
LON

MPC
MF2 MF2
MN VAV

MN 800
PEM

Third Party
Device
A BRIEF HISTORY OF INVENSYS DDC SYSTEMS

Review Questions
1. Define the following abbreviations:
IBS ___________________________________________________________________
DDC __________________________________________________________________
DMS __________________________________________________________________
MS ____________________________________________________________________
GUI ___________________________________________________________________
GCM __________________________________________________________________
LCM __________________________________________________________________
PEM __________________________________________________________________
ASD __________________________________________________________________
AI ____________________________________________________________________
DI ____________________________________________________________________
AO ____________________________________________________________________
DO ____________________________________________________________________
UNC __________________________________________________________________

2. a.) What company initially developed the NETWORK 8000 DDC family?
________________________________________________________________________
b.) What company initially developed the DMS family of controllers?
________________________________________________________________________
c.) What company developed the LonWorks technology?
________________________________________________________________________

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF INVENSYS DDC SYSTEMS

3. Give a hardware example of each of these point types:


a.) AI ______________________________________________________________
b.) DI ______________________________________________________________
c.) AO ______________________________________________________________
d.) DO _____________________________________________________________

4. a.) Explain what a Universal Point is?


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
b.) Explain the difference between Universal Points and Universal Inputs.
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

5. a.) Explain the function of an “Area Controller.”


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
b.) Name the NETWORK 8000 area controller. ________________________________
c.) Name a DMS area controller. ____________________________________________
d.) Name the I/A Series Niagara Framework area controllers.
________________________________________________________________________

6. Describe the I/O point configuration for each of these controllers:


a.) GCM _______________________________________________________________
b.) LCM _______________________________________________________________
c.) MICROZONE II ______________________________________________________
d.) PEM _______________________________________________________________
e.) DMS 3500 ___________________________________________________________
f.) MNL 200 ________________________________________________________
g.) MNL 800 ________________________________________________________
h.) UNC 600 ____________________________________________________________

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7. a.) What two busses are connected to a GCM? ______________ ______________.


b.) What bus is connected to a DMS 3500? ______________

8. Tell which operating system each graphical user interface uses, and then specify the
controller families that the GUI can talk to.
GUI or Controller
Programming Tool O/S Families
a. PSI _______________ ____________________
b. OPRIF _______________ ____________________
c. HOST _______________ ____________________
d. SIGNAL _______________ ____________________
e. UltiVist _______________ ____________________
f. InVue _______________ ____________________
g. WorkPlace Tech _______________ ____________________
h. I/A Series Niagara _______________ ____________________

9. What are the three main classes of LonWorks SNVTs?


_______________________ _______________________ _______________________

10. What are the two unique advantages of the I/A Series Niagara Framework user
interface? _______________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF INVENSYS DDC SYSTEMS

Invensys DDC Abbreviations

NETWORK 8000
GCM Global Control Module (an area controller)
LCM Local Control Module (16 universal points)
MF II MicroFlo II (VAV controller)
ASD Application Specific Device (a family of controllers)
MZ II MicroZone II (8 UIs, 4 AOs, 4 DOs)
PEM Packaged Equipment Module (12 points)
LIM Lighting Interface Module (GE Lighting Panel)

DMS Digital Management System


MS MicroSmart (local controller family)

I/A Intelligent Automation


LON Local Operating Network - Interoperable
MN MicroNet – Invensys Family of LON controllers
SNVT Standard Network Variable Type (values transmitted on the LON)
UNC Universal Network Controller

User Interfaces
PSI Personal System Interface - DOS based (NW 8000 – ASD)
HOST QNX based (NW 8000)
OPRIF Operator’s Interface – DOS based (DMS)
SIGNAL Windows 95 or XP based (NW 8000 or DMS)
UltiVist OS/2 based (NETWORK 8000 or DMS)
InVue Windows NT based (NW 8000, DMS, LON)
I/A Series Niagara Windows NT or Windows 2000 based – generates web pages
(NW8000, DMS, LON, BACnet)

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF INVENSYS DDC SYSTEMS

Answers to Review Questions


1. Define the following abbreviations:
IBS Invensys Building Systems
DDC Direct Digital Control
DMS Digital Management System
MS MicroSmart
GUI Graphical User Interface
GCM Global Control Module
LCM Local Control Module
PEM Packaged Equipment Module
ASD Application Specific Device
AI Analog Input
DI Digital Input
AO Analog Output
DO Digital Output
UNC Universal Network Controller

2. a.) What company initially developed the NETWORK 8000 DDC family?
Barber-Colman Company
b.) What company initially developed the DMS family of controllers?
Robertshaw Company
c.) What company developed the LonWorks technology?
Echelon Corporation

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF INVENSYS DDC SYSTEMS

3. Give a hardware example of each of these point types:


a.) AI Temperature Sensor, Humidity Sensor, Velocity Pressure Sensor
b.) DI Flow Switch, Low Limit Sensor, Smoke Sensor, Static Pressure Sensor
c.) AO Hot Water Supply Valve, Outside Air Dampers, Variable Frequency Drive
d.) DO Supply Fan, Lights, Chilled Water Pump

4. a.) Explain what a Universal Point is?


An input point that can be either analog or digital

b.) Explain the difference between Universal Points and Universal Inputs.
Universal Points refers to either input or output points and can be set up in any
combination of AI’s, DI’s, AO’s, or DO’s. Universal Inputs refers to input points and
can be set up in any combination of AI’s or DI’s.

5. a.) Explain the function of an “Area Controller.”


Provides global control of multiple local controllers.
Provides for communication between local controllers.

b.) Name the NETWORK 8000 area controller. GCM


c.) Name a DMS area controller. DMS3500
d.) Name the I/A Series Niagara Framework area controllers. UNC 500/510 and
UNC 600

6. Describe the I/O point configuration for each of these controllers:


a.) GCM None
b.) LCM 16 Universal Points
c.) Microzone2 8 UI’s, 8 DO’s, 4 AO’s
d.) PEM 4 UI’s, 2 DI’s, 4 DO’s, 2 AO’s
e.) DMS 3500 None
f.) MNL 200 2 DI’s, 3 UI’s, 6 DO’s, 2 AO’s

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A BRIEF HISTORY OF INVENSYS DDC SYSTEMS

g.) MNL 800 8 UI’s, 4 AO’s, 8 DO’s


h.) UNC 600 None
7. a.) What two busses are connected to a GCM? LCM Bus and ASD Bus
b.) What bus is connected to a DMS 3500? MicroSmart Trunk

8. Tell which operating system each graphical user interface uses, and then specify the
controller families that the GUI can talk to.
GUI or Controller
Programming Tool O/S Families
a. PSI DOS NETWORK 8000 - ASD
b. OPRIF DOS DMS
c. HOST QNX NETWORK 8000
d. SIGNAL Windows 95, XP NETWORK 8000, DMS
e. UltiVist OS/2 NETWORK 8000, DMS
f. InVue Windows NT I/A MicroNet NETWORK 8000, DMS,
g. WorkPlace Tech Windows NT, 2000 I/A MicroNet
h. I/A Series Niagara Windows NT, 2000 I/A MicroNet, NETWORK 8000, DMS

9. What are the three main classes of LonWorks SNVTs?


Network Variable Inputs Network Variable Outputs Network Configuration Inputs

10. What are the two unique advantages of the I/A Series Niagara Framework user
interface? Can be accessed anytime, and anywhere from a standard Internet Browser.
Can integrate data with many different types of control systems.

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