Sie sind auf Seite 1von 209

CREDIT ACCUMULATION AND TRANSFER SYSTEM

EAST AFRICA

ENGINEERING

INTRODUCTION

A. General guidelines

The following practical points were agreed upon when it comes to Credit Accumulation and
Transfer System (CATS) East Africa. These are MINIMA and nothing prevents a university to
go above this. The first ten points were agreed unanimously and the last two still need further
discussion.
1. Each university is free to decide on either the semester or term system of study.
2. The duration for each programme Engineering must be al least 4 years
3. The entry to a programme can be:
- Direct entry after Secondary school training
- Indirect entry through:
- Mature Age examination
- Diploma
- Bridging course
4. Students applying to join university with a Diploma can be accepted (see 3 above). The
credits transferable should be carried forward in the university programme. Each university shall
decide the credits to be granted.
5. Entry will be accepted if the candidate obtained the results in not more than three sittings.
6. The mode of delivery of courses shall be either through lectures, practicals/laboratories,
tutorials, seminars, problem based learning, distance/remote learning or e-learning.
7. Each programme shall have practical training as a compulsory part of the programme.
8. The credit system shall be set as follows:
- 1 Credit Unit (CU) for 15 Lecture Hours
- 1 CU for 30 Tutorial Hours
- 1 CU for 45 Practical Hours
- 1 CU for 60 Industrial/Vocational Training Hours
9. Credits are Transferable within 5years of obtainment
10. To obtain a degree from a given university, the candidate must have obtained at least
51% of the minimum graduation requirements of that university
11. The grading of course (subjects) for transfer shall be based on the raw mark obtained by
the candidate. The grading of the degree shall depend on the study system of the university i.e.
semester or term system
12. Qualifications of staff
a. A Librarian shall have a minimum of a Masters degree in Library and
Information Science.
b. Persons recruited as technical staff should possess appropriate qualifications in
technical fields for each programme offered by the university / institution.
c. Persons recruited as academic staff should possess minimum qualifications that
are higher than the level of programmes they teach in the same field. Thus:
i. Diploma programmes should be taught by at LEAST Bachelor degree
holders.
ii. Undergraduate programmes should be taught by at least Masters degree
holders at Lecturer grade level.
iii. Masters programmes should be taught by PhD holders with teaching and
research experience.

Minimum Standards Engineering -1-


iv. PhD programmes should be taught by PhD holders with extensive teaching
and research experience.
v. For Medicine, Engineering and Law a relevant Masters degree with
extensive teaching, professional and research experience supported by
publications in peer reviewed journals may be considered appropriate.
vi. Academic leadership. Each Department should be headed by a qualified
academic staff with appropriate experience in university teaching,
preferably a Professor or Associate Professor, holding a PhD in the
relevant field of study on a full-time employment.

Minimum Standards Engineering -2-


B. Introduction to the Engineering programmes
This harmonized programme in Engineering for Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania covers the areas of
Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. It takes into consideration the difference in
education systems in the three countries. Whereas Uganda and Tanzania use the 7-4-2-4 system,
Kenya uses the 8-4-5 system. Students under the 7-4-2-4 system attend 4 years of Engineering at
university, while those under the 8-4-5 system attend 5 years of Engineering at university.
Consequently, those who attend the 5-year programme need to cover basic requisite principles in
the subjects of Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics, Technical Drawing and Introduction to
Computers before they join the specific areas of Engineering in their second year of their 5-year
Engineering programme.
CREDIT TRANSFERS
Transfer between Tanzania and Uganda is easy because they use the same system of education.
Transfer from either Tanzania or Uganda to Kenya should be done in such a way that credits are
given for Physics, Chemistry and some Mathematics units since these are covered at Advanced
Secondary School level. They can straight away join the second year of the 5-year engineering
programme. Transfer from Kanya to either Tanzania or Uganda would require students to do
matriculation exams or bridging programmes as may be advised by IUCEA, CHE, TCU and
NCHE.
The following credit distribution into clusters has been proposed:

Course Clusters 4-year programme 5-year


programme
Basic Sciences 0 12
Mathematics 12 18
ICT 8 8
Core, Electives and support courses 108 108
Projects 6 6
Industrial/Vocational Training 9 9
Total 143 161

Minimum Standards Engineering -3-


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

INTRODUCTORY YEAR COURSES FOR THE 5-YEAR PROGRAMME


Course Name: GENERAL CHEMISTRY
Credit units: 3

Objectives
To provide an overview and insight into some concepts of inorganic and physical chemistry.

Outcomes:
At the end of the course, student should be able to:

1. State the fundamental properties of matter, numbers of protons, neutrons and


Electrons;
2. Describe the periodic arrangement of elements in the periodic table;
3. Describe the chemistry of elements along some periods and down some groups of the
periodic table;
4. Describe types of bonding, covalent, ionic, metallic, etc;
5. Describe shapes of some covalent and ionic compounds;
6. Describe ionic and chemical equilibriums;
7. Calculate the e.m.f of a sample cell and a concentration.

Prerequisites:
Ordinary level Chemistry

Course Content

Introduction: (15 hours)


Brief introduction of atomic structure and periodic table. Groups and periods of the periodic
table. The mole concept and balancing of ionic equations. Qualitative treatment of bonding in
terms of dot and cross formula. Bond types covalent, ionic, metallic, Vander Waals hydrogen
bonding, shapes of simple molecules (orbitals).

Equilibrium: (15 hours)


Introduction to, chemical and physical equilibrium, Le-Chateliers principle. Ionization of water,
acids, bases and salts, pH and buffer solutions. Solubility and solubility products.

Electrochemistry: (15 hours)


Introduction to electrochemical processes, half-cell reaction, equilibrium electrode potentials and
sign convention e.m.f of a cell. Practical will include acid-base and redox titration, measurement
of pH and solubility products.

Teaching Organization:
Lectures 2 hours per week
Tutorials 2 hours per week
Practicals/labs 3 hours per week

Assessment: To be determined by the university.

Minimum Standards Engineering -4-


Course Name: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
Credit units: 3

Objectives
To provide an overview and insight into some concepts in organic chemistry.

Outcomes
At the end of the course students should be able to:

1. Describe the uniqueness of carbon in the periodic table;


2. Define a functional group and a homologous series;
3. Describe the chemistry of a number of functional groups;
4. Describe petroleum as fuel;
5. Describe addition and condensation polymers.

Course Content (45 hours)


The uniqueness of carbon in the periodic table. Catenation, Bonding in Carbon compounds.
Brief introduction to functional groups chemistry and nomenclature. Chemical and physical
properties of alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes, halogen alcohol, carboxylic acids and benzene.
Petroleum, fuels, knocks, actane number and synthetic gasoline.

Polymers: addition and condensation polymers and copolymers. Practicals will involve
investigation of physical and chemical properties of organic compounds and their preparation.

Teaching Organization:
Lectures 2 hours per week
Tutorials 2 hours per week
Practicals/labs 3 hours per week

Assessment: To be determined by the university.

Course Name: PHYSICS I


Credit Units: 3

Course Objectives:
The purpose of this course is to impart knowledge of physical concepts in basic mechanics,
thermal physics and sound as a preparation for their application to engineering problems.

Outcomes
At the end of this course, the student should be able to:-
• Understand kinetics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies;
• State Newton’s laws of motion;
• Derive the various scientific formulae for gravitation, elasticity, momentum, circular
motion and energy;
• Demonstrate the application of the various scientific formulae for gravitation, elasticity,
momentum, circular motion and energy;
• Explain the expansion of matter;
• Explain the mechanisms of heat transfer in matter;
• Determine the coefficient of thermal conductivity;
• State Stefan”s law;
• Manipulate and apply the equation of wave motion to calculate velocity, frequency, and
wavelength;

Minimum Standards Engineering -5-


• Explain sound propagation in solids and fluids;
• Explain the relationship between velocity and elasticity;
• Describe ultrasonic waves and their applications.

Prerequisites: Ordinary Level Physics


Course Description:

Mechanics (15 hours)


Rectilinear motion. Newton’s laws of motion and their applications. Uniform circular motion.
Newton’s law of gravitation – Gravitational constant, acceleration due to gravity (g).
Determination of ‘g’.

Forces composition and resolution. Moments and couples. Equlibrium of particles and rigid
bodies under a system of co-planar forces. Friction and coefficient of friction. Projectiles.
Momentum and impulse, simple cases of conservation of momentum. Conservation of energy.
Kinetic energy of a rigid body. Power, rotation about a fixed axis, simple moment of inertia.
Simple harmonic motion: Oscillation of a simple pendulum, elastic string and springs. Motion in
a circle. Basic stresses and strains. Flow of liquids. Viscosity. Surface tension.

Thermal Physics (15 hours)


Expansion of solids, liquids and gases. Scales of temperature; gas and resistance thermaometers
perfect gas-absolute temperature. Specific heat capacities of gases at constant pressure and
volume. Kinetic theory of gases; derivation of the relation for pressure. Mechanism of heat
transfer: coefficient of thermal conductivity. Black body, Stefan’s law.

Sound
Equation of wave motion; Velocity of sound in solids and fluids; Waves on a string; Relation
between velocity and elasticity of the medium; Ultrasonics and their applications.

Teaching Organisation
Lectures 2 hours per week
Tutorials 2 hours per week
Practicals/Labs 3 hours per week

Assessment: To be determined by the university

Course Name: PHYSICS II


Credit Units: 3

Course Objectives:
The purpose of this course is to impart knowledge of physical concepts in electricity and
magnetism, optics and quantum physics as a preparation for their application to engineering
problems.

Outcomes
At the end of this course, the student should be able to:-
• Describe the concept of magnetism and cite examples of magnetic materials and their
uses;
• Distinguish between direct and alternating current;
• Apply Ohm’s Law;
• Distinguish between series and parallel circuits;
• Describe the characteristics of resistive (R), inductive (L), and capacitive (C )
components in a circuit;

Minimum Standards Engineering -6-


• Describe the characteristics of diodes and their application in rectification;
• Describe the working of a transistor and its applications;
• Describe the Working principle and application of the Cathode Ray Oscilloscope (CRO);
• Describe the principles of optics as applied to mirrors, lenses and propagation of light;
and
• Describe the basic concepts of quantum theory, X-ray generation, radioactivity, nuclear
physics and their application.

Prerequisites
Ordinary Level Physics

Course Content:

Electricity and magnetism (15 hours)


Magnetic materials and their uses; Direct and alternating current, Ohms Law and its applications.
Series and Parallel circuits. Behaviour of R, L and C (resistance, inductance and capacitance)
components; Measurement of R, L and C; Diodes: characteristics and rectification: Transistor:
characteristics and application. Working principle and application of the Cathode Ray
Oscilloscope (CRO).

Optics (15 hours)


Review of mirrors and lenses. Defects in lenses. Different kinds of microscopes and telescopes.
Particle and wave theories, phenomena of interference, diffraction and polarization. Their
applications.

Modern Physics and Quantum Theory (15 hours)


Bohr’s theory and Heisenberg’s quantum concept. Explanation of atomic spectra X-rays.
Radioactivity, Structure of the nucleus fission and fusion, nuclear reactor.

Teaching Organisation
Lectures 2 hours per week
Tutorials 2 hours per week
Practicals/Labs 3 hours per week

Assessment: To be determined by the university

Course Name: PURE MATHEMATICS I


Credit Units: 3

Objectives:
To provide students with knowledge in the basic principles of algebra that are relevant in
Engineering applications.

Course Content (45 hours)


Algebra, Algebraic structures, Series, Polynomial functions, Trigonometry, Vectors, Ratio
theorem, scalar and vector products, unit vectors, geometric interpretations, applications to
mechanics. Matrices, Solution of linear equations, Crammer’s rule, elementary row operations;
Gauss’ elimination method; lower-upper decomposition. Solutions of homogeneous equations.

Minimum Standards Engineering -7-


Teaching Organisation:
Lectures 2 hours per week
Tutorials 2 hours per week

Assessment:
Written Examination 70%
Continuous assessment tests 20%
Assignments 10%

Course Name: PURE MATHEMATICS II


Credit Units: 3

Objectives:
To provide students with knowledge in the basic principles of mathematical manipulation that are
relevant in Engineering applications.

Course Content (45 hours)


Complex numbers, Integration: integration of areas and volumes, polar coordinates and areas of
sectors. Evaluating the particular integral. Differentiation, Ordinary differential equations.
Linear first order differential equations, general linear differential equations with constant
coefficients. Alar-Cauchy differential equation. Series: arithmetic, geometric, logarithmic,
infinite; summation of infinite series, convergence of infinite series, tests for convergence,
Maclaurin and Taylor series. Leibnitz’s theorem for differentiation; convergence of power series.
Limiting values of functions. L’Hopital’s rule.

Teaching Organisation:
Lectures 2 hours per week
Tutorials 2 hours per week

Assessment:
Written Examination 70%
Continuous assessment tests 20%
Assignments 10%

Course Name: STATISTICS


Credit Units: 3

Objectives
To provide students with knowledge in the elementary principles of data handling, analysis and
presentation that are relevant in Engineering applications.

Course Content
Probability theories, Conditional probability, Baye’s theorem. Binominal, Poisson and Normal
distributions. Elementary treatment for large and small samples. Chi squares, F-and T-tests.
Correlation and linear regression. Method of least squares, curve fitting. Estimation. Testing of
significance. Confidence Intervals. Quality control. Stochastic Processes and Statistical
inference.

Teaching Organisation:
Lectures 2 hours per week
Tutorials 2 hours per week

Minimum Standards Engineering -8-


Assessment:
Written Examination 70%
Continuous assessment tests 20%
Assignments 10%

Course Name: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS


Credit Units: 3

Objectives:
1. To provide knowledge on various types and development of modern computers;
2. To give an understanding of the operating systems of computers;
3. Provide elementary knowledge on data management;
4. Understand electronic presentations using typical graphics software: creating and editing
presentations.

Course Content (45 hours)


History of computers; types of computers; computers and the society. Basic computer
organization; language hierarchy, system software components and language syntax diagrams;
hardware and software. Computer operating systems: introduction to operating systems such as
Unix, Linux, DOS and Windows; files and disk management; use of anti-virus protection. Word
processing: creating, editing, formatting, saving, retrieving, and printing documents using a
typical word-processor. Spreadsheet management: creating worksheets, entering data, arithmetic
and statistical manipulation, formatting, saving, retrieving and printing worksheets; creating and
printing graphs using a typical spreadsheet. Database management: creating databases; entering,
editing, sorting, indexing, and appending records; saving and retrieving databases; printing
reports. Electronic presentations using typical graphics software: creating and editing
presentations; adding sound to presentations; slide shows. Integration of word-processor,
spreadsheet, database and graphics software. Using the Internet.

Teaching Organisation:
Lectures 2 hours per week
Tutorials 2 hours per week
Practical/Labs 3 hours per week

Assessment:
Written Examination 70%
Practical 15%
Continuous assessment tests 10%
Assignments 5%

Course Name: TECHNICAL DRAWING


Credit Units: 3

Objectives:

1. Understand and know the various drawing equipment;


2. Know the use of various drawing instruments;
3. Understand the interpretation of technical drawing.

Course Content

Minimum Standards Engineering -9-


Introduction to technical drawing: Drawing equipment and use of instruments, lettering and line
work. Simple geometrical constructions. Conventional representations. Dimensioning.
Orthographic projections: first and third angle projection. Principal views of machine parts.
Sectional views. Free hand sketching.

Teaching Organisation:
Lectures 2 hours per week
Practical 3 hours per week

Assessment:
Written Examination 60%
Continuous assessment tests 20%
Assignments 20%

Minimum Standards Engineering -10-


CIVIL ENGINEERING PROGRAMME STRUCTURE
FIRST YEAR
Semester I
Course L P CH CU
Engineering Mathematics I 60 0 60 4
Engineering Drawing I 30 60 60 4
Introduction to Civil Engineering and Society 45 0 45 3
Information and Communication Technology I 45 30 60 4
Engineering Mechanics 45 0 45 3
Communication Skills and Humanities 45 0 45 3

Semester II L P CH CU
Engineering Mathematics II 60 0 60 4
Strength of Materials 45 30 60 4
Information and Communication Technology II 45 30 60 4
Electricity and Thermodynamics 60 0 60 4
Fluid Mechanics 45 0 45 3

Recess Semester L P CH CU
Workshop Practice 0 60 30 2

SECOND YEAR
Semester I L P CH CU
Engineering Mathematics III 60 0 60 4
Theory of Structures I 60 0 60 4
Engineering Geology 45 30 60 4
Engineering Surveying I 45 30 60 4
Construction Materials I 45 0 45 3
Hydraulics 45 30 60 4
Sociology for Engineering 45 0 45 3
Concrete Technology 45 30 60 4

Semester II L P CH CU
Engineering Mathematics IV 60 0 60 4
Theory of Structures II 60 0 60 4
Soil Mechanics 45 30 60 4
Construction Materials II 45 0 45 3
Engineering Surveying II 45 30 60 4
Engineering Drawing II 30 60 60 4
Information and Communication Technology III 45 30 60 4
Economic for Civil Engineering 45 0 45 3

Recess Semester L P CH CU
Industrial Training 0 60 30 2

THIRD YEAR
Semester I
Course L P CH CU

Minimum Standards Engineering -11-


Organisation Theory 45 0 45 3
Design of Structures I (Concrete) 60 0 60 4
Highway Engineering 45 30 60 4
Construction Technology I 45 0 45 3
Environmental Chemistry 45 30 60 4
Principles of Quantity Surveying 45 0 45 3

Semester II L P CH CU
Foundation Engineering 45 30 60 4
Group Design Project 9 72 45 3
Design of Structures II (Steel) 60 0 60 4
Water Resources Engineering 45 30 60 4
Public Health Engineering I 45 30 60 4
Construction Technology II 45 0 45 3

Recess Semester L P CH CU
Industrial Training 0 60 30 2

FOURTH YEAR
Semester I L P CH CU
Civil Engineering Management 45 0 45 3
Civil Infrastructure Maintenance 45 0 45 3
Traffic Management Engineering 60 0 60 4
Public Health Engineering II 45 30 60 4
Design of Structure III (Masonry and Timber) 45 0 45 3
Final Year Project 0 60 30 2

Semester II L P CH CU
Civil Engineering Law 45 0 45 3
Civil Engineering Economy 45 0 45 3
Environmental Quality Management 45 0 45 3
Entrepreneurship Skills 45 0 45 3
Final Year Project 0 120 60 4

Minimum Standards Engineering -12-


FIRST YEAR COURSES

Course Name: ENGINERING MATHEMATICS I


Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Rationale
Engineering Mathematics is fundamental to the study of Engineering. It provides the
necessary analytical skills for the study of more advanced subjects.
Objectives
• The purpose of this course is to provide an introductory treatment of mathematical
concepts fundamental to Engineering.
• It consolidates and advances the material covered in Pre-University Mathematics.
This course also provides the mathematical tools needed in other semesters’ course
units.
• To develop the analytical and critical thinking abilities fundamental to problem
solving in Engineering.
Course Content
1. Concept of a Function
• Definition, Properties, Range, Domain of the elementary (Algebraic and
Transcendental) Functions of a Real Variable
• Concept of a limit of a function of a real variable
• Continuity
• Indeterminate forms and L’Hopital’s Rule
2. Complex Variable Algebra
• Cartesian and Polar Algebra representations;
• Absolute Values; Products, Powers and Quotients; Extraction of Roots;
• De Moivre’s Theorem;
• Exponential and Hyperbolic Functions of the Complex Variable.
3. Differential Calculus
• The Derivative: Definitions, notation, properties and Theorems;
• Differentiation of elementary functions of a real variable.
• Applications: Optimization, Curve Sketching, Approximations
• Multivariable Differentiation: Partial Derivatives, Optimization and
approximations.
4. Integral Calculus
• The Integral: Definition and Properties
• Fundamental theorem of Calculus
• Techniques of Integration
• Definite Integral; its interpretation as area under a curve
• Applications of the Definite Integral: Length of a curve, area bound between
curves, volume of revolution, moments
• Improper Integrals and their evaluation using limits
• Integration of a Continuous Function; Inequalities; The Definite Integral as a
Function of its Upper Limit
• Differentiation of an Integral Containing a Parameter; Double Integrals and
their Applications

Minimum Standards Engineering -13-


5. Linear Transformations and Matrices
• Definitions and types of matrices
• Operations on Matrices: Sums, Products, Transposition of Matrices, Equality
of Matrices;
• Determinants: Definition and Properties; Minors and Cofactors; Evaluation
of Determinants by Cofactors; Rank of a Matrix; Inverse Matrices
• Solution of Systems of Linear Algebraic Equations; Consistent and
Inconsistent Equations; Systems of Homogeneous Equations; Cramer’s Rule;
The Gauss-Jordan Method, Gaussian Elimination.
6. Vector Algebra
• Definitions: Scalars, Vectors, Unit Vector, and Dimensionality
• Operations on Vectors: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Dot and Cross
Products
• Position and Distance vectors

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: ENGINERING DRAWING I


Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
In this course, students are introduced to the basics and standards of drawing techniques,
including sizing and folded drawing as a means of communication. The drawing technique is
emphasized in how to draw an object graphically, and projection point from surface and arch
lines, and projection drawing from different points of view. Besides that, the student is given the
requirements of technical drawing of Civil engineering objects such as construction of buildings,
water systems, roads, etc.

Course Objectives
The course is intended to achieve the following objectives:
• To inculcate in students the ability to produce, read and comprehend engineering
drawings, so that they are able to convey their creative ideas effectively.
• To make them familiarize with various building components used.
• To make them aware of modern techniques used in Engineering communications.
• The students will gain experience in transforming ideas into 2D drawings.

Detailed Course Content

Minimum Standards Engineering -14-


Introduction and Simple Geometrical Construction (12 hours)
• Points, lines, angles, planes and applications,
• Drawing equipment, drawing papers and sizing, title blocks
and applications, lettering and printing methods.
Tangency (12 hours)
• Internal and external tangents to circles,
• Curved tangents, inscribing and circumscribing arcs.
Simple Plane Figures (6 hours)
• Definitions, triangles, rectangles, trapezium, rhombus,
circle and regular polygons.
Transformation of Plane Figures (12 hours)
• Transformation, reduction and enlargement of figures.
Special Curves and Loci (12 hours)
• Ellipse, parabola and hyperbola,
• Epi and hypo cycloid, Link mechanisms.
Principles of Orthographic Projection (15 hours)
• Drawing paper planning,
• 1st and 3rd projection,
• Three-view drawing of regular objects,
• Dimensioning of orthographic drawings.
Principles of Sectioning (15 hours)
• Definition, where and how to section,
• Types of sections (full/half, local/resolved, part/removed
and offset/aligned sections),
• Dimensioning of isometric drawings.
Isometric and Oblique Drawings (6 hours)
• Principles,
• Objects with isometric and non-isometric lines,
• Projections – use and applications.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures and practical drawing sessions.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Drawing tables and Reading list

Course Name: INTRODUCTION TO CIVIL ENG AND SOCIETY


Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit: 3 CU

Course Description
This course gives a historical background, present status and future challenges of the Civil
engineering profession. It treats ethics and professional responsibility, written and oral
communication, concepts of analysis, design, computational approaches, experiments,
interpretation of results and decision making.

Minimum Standards Engineering -15-


Course Objectives
The course is intended to achieve the following:
• Introduces fresh students to the profession of Civil Engineering, basic teamwork skills,
and basic ethical and professional issues.
• To introduce students to interim report writing, presentations, and project management
skills.
• Enhance student’s ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering,
• Appreciate the value of designing and conducting experiments, function on multi-
disciplinary teams, and understand professional and ethical responsibility.

Detailed Course Content


University studies and Engineering (6 hours)
• Introduction, Criteria in selecting Civil Engineering fields,
• Value of Civil Engineering to society.
Civil Engineering profession (6 hours)
• Background to the profession, fields (structures, water and
sanitation, transport systems, management),
• Linkage to quantity surveying and construction management.
Development of Science and technology in Uganda (6 hours)
• Evolution of engineering practice in Uganda,
• Standard of engineering, history of construction, modern
construction and future trends, contracts.

Analytical methods (6 hours)


• Scientific methods
• Experimental methods.
Ethics and Integrity in Engineering (6 hours)
• Professionalism, ethics and integrity.
Professional bodies in Uganda (6 hours)
• Uganda Institution of Professional Engineers,
• Engineers Registration Board,
• Development of a professional Engineer.
Social aspects in Engineering (6 hourss)
• Gender issues, society,
• Health, safety and risk assessment.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Reading list

Minimum Standards Engineering -16-


Course Name: FUNDAMENTALS OF ICT
Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course draws upon evolution of Information Communication Technologies as a
precursor to applications of computers in day-to-day life. This is critical for any student
going into the field of engineering.

Course Objectives/Learning Outcomes


On completion of this course the student should be able to:
• Discuss the evolution of the computing and information communication technology
• Identify the types of computers
• Identify the hardware components of the computer
• Execute basic office automation tasks including word processing, working with
spreadsheets and preparing computer-aided presentations
• Browse the internet and use email

Detailed Course Content

Minimum Standards Engineering -17-


1. Introduction and Overview
• Definition of Information and Communication Technology
• History and Evolution of Computing and Information Communication
Technology
• The changing role of Information and Communication Technology in society
• Current domains of application of Information Communication Technology:
Mobile Communication, Broadcasting, Internet, Enterprise applications,
Office automation, Specialised Applications (Engineering, Entertainment,
Simulation etc.)
2. The Computer
• Definition of a computer, Types of computers, Elements of Computer
Information Systems (CIS)
• Introduction to components of the computer: the user, hardware and the
software
3. Personal Computer Hardware
• Motherboard, Child-boards, and Circuitry
• Central Processing Unit: Control Unit, Registers and the Arithmetic Logic
Unit
• Storage: Memory and Auxiliary Storage
• Buses: Types, USB and its advantages
• Chassis
• Peripherals: Input and Output devices
• Expansion cards
• Power Supply and the Un-interruptible Power Supply (UPS)
• Connectors
4. Firmware
• Definition
• Types of firmware: BIOS and others
5. Software
• Definition
• Evolution
• System software(operating systems, device drivers, utilities and file
management)
• Application software (definition and categorization)
• Software development tools
• Licensing (Proprietary, Shareware, freeware, General Public License (GPL))
6. Office Automation
• Definitions
• Benefits of office automation
• Overview of office automation tools (Personal Information Management,
Office Suites)
7. Word Processing
• Definition and Evolution
• Types of Word Processors
• Features of a word processor
• Word processing exercise
8. Spreadsheets
• Definition and Evolution

Minimum Standards Engineering -18-


• Limitations of spreadsheets
• Features of a spreadsheet
• Types of spreadsheet applications
• Spreadsheet exercises
9. Presentations
• Definition
• Preparation
• Features of presentation packages
• Presentation exercise
10. Email and Browsing the Internet
• Definition of the Internet
• Uses of the Internet
• Netiquette
• Internet Browsers
• Search engines and Web directories
• Email (Definition, Composing, Sending, Archiving, etc.)
• Email clients
• Information Literacy and lifelong learning (Definition and Implications of
Internet Resources)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%
Course Name: ENGINEERING MECHANICS
Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course introduces engineering students to the analysis of basic static and dynamic systems
encountered in engineering design practice.

Course Objectives
In this course students will:
• Develop a clear understanding of the basic principles that govern the statics and
dynamics of particles and rigid bodies;
• Develop an ability to use that understanding in solutions to engineering problems.

Detailed Course Content


Statics of bodies (9 hours)
• Particles, rigid bodies, free body diagrams,
• Structures, force systems,
• Shear and bending moments,

Minimum Standards Engineering -19-


• Body systems (beams and cables), friction, virtual work, moment of inertia.
Kinematics of particles (9 hours)
• Rectilinear motion,
• Plane/space curvilinear motion,
• Relative motion.
Kinetics of particles (12 hours)
• Newton’s second law,
• Work and energy,
• Impulse and momentum.
Kinematics of rigid bodies (7 hours)
• Rotation,
• Absolute and relative motion.
Kinetics of rigid bodies (8 hours)
• Force, mass and acceleration,
• Work and energy,
• Impulse and momentum.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Reading list

Course Name: COMMUNICATION SKILLS


Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
The applications of engineering occur in society, as thus effective communication to
varied audiences and clientele is a key virtue a civil engineer must possess.
Communication is a tool through which work gets done, ideas get sold and defended.
This course introduces to the students to principles of organization, development, and
writing of technical documents; and instills in them skills of listening, speaking and
interaction.
Objective/Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:
• Exhibit effective skills in reading, listening, speaking and interaction
• Prepare technical and academic documents
• Effectively deliver Public and Formal Oral Presentations using appropriate Visual
and Computer aids

Detailed Course Content


1. Interpersonal Skills

Minimum Standards Engineering -20-


• Reading both individual and public
• Listening Skills
• Speaking, Interaction, and Conversational Skills
• The Concept Team Work
• Inter-Office and Intra-Office Communication
• Conduct of Discussions and Dynamics of Meetings

2. Writing and Documentation Skills


• Note-taking
• Writing Minutes
• Writing Notice of Meeting and Agenda
• Preparing Formal Documents (Resume, Application Letters, Acceptance
Letters, Resignation Letters, Memos, Circulars, Responses, Letters of
Introduction etc)
• Development of Technical and Academic Documents(Theses, Proposals,
Dissertations, Laboratory Reports, Papers, Articles, Abstracts)

3. Oral Presentation Principles


• Visual and Computer-assisted presentation
• Analysis and Design of Web Presentation
• Choice and use of appropriate presentation tools
• Organising and presenting effective talk
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%
Course Name: ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS II
Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Rationale
Against the foundation of the Calculus and Algebra covered in EMT1101, this course
develops the fundamental aspects of Mathematical Analysis critical to Engineering. The
major themes include; Ordinary Differential Equations, Real Analysis, and Numerical
Analysis.
Objectives

Minimum Standards Engineering -21-


• To introduce students to the concept of Single Predictor-Response mathematical
modelling in areas such as electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory
mechanical systems
• To expose students to analytical solutions of classical ordinary differential
equations in mathematical physics.
• To expose students to the fundamentals of Real Analysis.
• To introduce students to the foundations of Scientific Computing and Numerical
Analysis.
Course Content
1. Ordinary Differential Equations
• Definition of Differential Equations
• Definition and Classification of Ordinary Differential Equations
• Formulation of Ordinary Differential Equations - electrical circuit problems
and vibratory and oscillatory mechanical systems
• Solution Techniques for First Order ODE’s
- Method of Separation of Variables
- Methods for Exact Equations
- Equation Reducible to Exact Form (The Integrating Factor)
- Applications to electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory
mechanical systems
• Solution Techniques for Higher Order ODE’s
- The General nth Order ODE
- Existence and Uniqueness of Solution of Linear Equations
- Second Order Homogeneous ODE’s with Constant Coefficients (auxiliary
equation and method of variation of parameters)
- Second Order Non-Homogeneous ODE’s with Constant Coefficients (The
Complimentary and Particular Solution, Method of Undetermined
Coefficients)
- Special Cases (Equations Reducible to 1st Order or 2nd Order with
Constant Coefficients)
- Applications to electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory
mechanical systems
• Solutions of Systems of Linear First Order ODE’s
2. Real Analysis

Minimum Standards Engineering -22-


• Sequences - Definitions and Examples. Convergence of Sequences,
Sequences of Real and Complex Numbers. Some Limit Theorems of
Sequences.
• Series – Definition, Series as a Summation of Terms of a Sequence,
Necessary Condition for Convergence, Sufficient Conditions for
Convergence (Cauchy’s nth Root Test, D’Alembert Ratio Test, Comparison
Test), Convergence of Series with Negative Terms, and Absolute Converge
• Power Series – Definitions, Maclaurin’s and Taylor’s Series and
Approximations, Arithmetic Operations on Power Series (Sum, Products,
Shifting of Summation Indices, and Differentiation), Convergence (Radius,
Interval and Tests)
• Differentiability, Rolle’s Theorem, The Mean Value Theorem, Cauchy’s
Mean Value Theorem, Proof of L’Hospital’s
• Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
• Riemann Integral-Definition and Characteristics
• Fourier Series – Motivation, Definition, Existence, Fourier Series of General
Functions (of period 2 or arbitrary), Fourier Series of Odd and Even
Functions, Half-Range Fourier Series Expansions, Determination of Fourier
Series without Integration. Dirichlet’s Theorem (Limit theorems).
Application of Fourier Series to Electric Circuits.
3. Scientific Computing and Numerical Analysis using MATLAB and Spreadsheets
• Definition and Rationale for Scientific Computing
• Error Analysis
• Numerical Solutions of Polynomial Algebraic Equations, Interpolation
Formulae
• Numerical Differentiation and Integration, Trapezoidal and Simpson’s Rules
of Integration
• Numerical Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations: Euler method,
Modified Euler method and Runge-Kutta
4. Vector Analysis
• Scalar and Vector Fields
• Classification of vector fields
• Scalar and Vector Functions
• Directional Derivatives of Scalar Functions and Derivatives of Vector
Functions
• Gradient, Divergence, Curl and Laplacian of Vector Functions
• Physical Interpretation of the Divergence and the Curl of a Vector Field
• Green’s theorem, Line Integrals Independent of Path, Exact Differential
Forms
• Differential length, Area and Volume; Line, surface and Volume integrals
• Coordinate systems and Transformation: Cartesian; Cylindrical; Spherical
coordinate
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Minimum Standards Engineering -23-


Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: STRENGTH OF MATERIALS


Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course deals with basic mechanics of materials and is fundamental to understanding
mechanical behaviour and capacity of engineering materials.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Evaluate behaviour of materials subjected to normal, shear, twisting and bearing loads,
• Derive the stress transformation formulas and thus determine the principle stresses on
any loaded element, and
• Appreciate the theory behind failure of ductile and brittle engineering materials.

Detailed Course Content


Concept of Stress (8 hours)
• Forces and Stresses in normal, shear, twisting and bending modes,
• Oblique planes, ultimate and allowable stress, factor of safety.
Stress and Strain (6 hours)
• Axial loading and Hooke’s law,
• Poisson ration, Shear and Bulk modulus.
Torsion of Circular Shafts (6 hours)
• Stresses and deformations in a shaft in the elastic range, angle of twist,
• Statically indeterminate shafts,
• Design of transmission shafts.
Pure Bending (6 hours)
• Prismatic members,
• Stresses and deformations in symmetrical members in the elastic range,
• Composite materials,
• Eccentric Axial Loading in a Plane of symmetry,
• Unsymmetrical bending.
Transverse Loading on Beams (6 hours)
• Prismatic members,
• Distribution of the Normal Stresses,
• Shear on a horizontal plane,
• Shear in beams.
Transformations of Stress (8 hours)
• Plane stress, Principal stresses, Maximum shear stresses,
• Mohr’s circle,
• General state of stress,
• Application of Mohr’s circle to 3-D.

Minimum Standards Engineering -24-


Failure Theories (5 hours)
• Yield Criteria for ductile materials under plane stress;
• Tresca yield criterion and von Misses yield criterion,
• Fracture Criteria for brittle materials under plane stress;
• Coulomb’s criterion, Mohr’s criterion.
Practicals in the laboratory (15 hours)

Mode of Delivery
This course is delivered through lectures, tutorials, assignments and practicals.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: COMPUTER PROGRAMMING FUNDAMENTALS


Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
Competency in a programming language is prerequisite to the study of computer
engineering. Object-oriented programming, event-driven applications, and the use of
extensive APIs (application programming interfaces) are fundamental tools that computer
engineering students need early in their academic program.
Objectives/Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course the student should be able to:
• Describe how computer engineering uses or benefits from programming
fundamentals.
• Identify the appropriate paradigm for a given programming problem.
• Use a suitable programming language to implement, test, and debug algorithms for
solving simple problems.
• Describe the way a computer allocates and represents these data structures in
memory.
• Outline the philosophy of object-oriented design and the concepts of encapsulation,
subclassing, inheritance, and polymorphism.
Course Content
1. History and Overview (4 Hours)
• Indicate some reasons for studying programming fundamentals
• Influential people; important areas such as programming constructs,
algorithms, problem solving, data structures, programming paradigms,
recursion, object-oriented programming, event-driven programming, and
concurrent programming
• Contrast between an algorithm and a data structure
• Distinguish between a variable, type, expression, and assignment
• Highlight the role of algorithms in solving problems
• Describe some of the fundamental data structures such as array, record,
stack, and queue
• Explain how divide-and-conquer strategies lend themselves to recursion

Minimum Standards Engineering -25-


• Explore some additional resources associated with programming
fundamentals
• Explain the purpose and role of programming fundamentals in computer
engineering
2. Programming Languages
• Definition and History
• Characteristics (Pragmatics, Semantics and Syntax)
• Distinction between Text-based and Visual Programming
• Classification (Categorical, Chronological and Generational)
• Comparison of common programming languages (C, C++, C#, Java)
• Programming errors and warnings (syntax, logical, etc.)
3. Programming Paradigms
• Definition and rationale of a programming paradigm
• Types: Structured, Unstructured, Procedural, Object-oriented, Event-
Drive, Generic etc.
• Separation of behavior and implementation
4. ISO/ANSI C++ Programming Fundamentals
• Bjarne Stroustrup Design rules
• Console applications basics (Source file, Basic I/O, Standard I/O
Consoles, Function main( ))
• Fundamental data types
• Expressions and operators
• Control constructs (Conditional and Iterative)
• Pointers and Named collections (Arrays, Enumerators, Bit-fields, Unions)
• User-defined data types (Structures and Classes)
• Functions (In-built and User-defined)
• Object –oriented programming (Abstraction, Encapsulation, Inheritance,
Composition, Polymorphism, Friend and Virtual Functions)
• File I/O
5. Algorithms and Problem-Solving
• Problem-solving strategies
• The role of algorithms in the problem-solving process
• Implementation strategies for algorithms
• Debugging strategies
• The concept and properties of algorithms
• Structured decomposition
6. The Integrated Development Environment (IDE)
• Definition
• Toolchains
• Advantages of IDEs
• Comparison of IDEs
• Using a typical IDE (Visual Studio)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%

Minimum Standards Engineering -26-


Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: ELECTRICITY AND THERMODYNAMICS


Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course introduces students to the basic principles of electricity and thermodynamics relevant
to buildings and other Civil Engineering infrastructure.

Course Objectives
The main objective of this course is to develop in the engineering student the ability to:
• Value the contribution of electrical and thermodynamic engineering principles to Civil
Engineering profession.
• Appreciate flow of current,
• Apply the laws of thermodynamics in solving heat related problems in systems.

Detailed Course Content


Electromagnetic Principles (6 hours)
• Charge and matter,
• Electric field, potential, dielectrics,
• Electromotive force,
• Magnetic fields.
Circuit elements (6 hours)
• Resistors, inductors and capacitors.
Current flow theories (6 hours)
• Direct Current, Alternating Current,
• Current, resistance, inductance and capacitance,
• Ohm’s law.
Circuit Laws and theorems (6 hours)
• Kirchoff’s laws,
• Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems.
Thermodynamic principles (6 hours)
• Energy, temperature and heat transfer.
Thermodynamic systems (6 hours)
• Laws of thermodynamics,
• Entropy, enthalpy, and internal energy
• Change of state.
Applications to Civil Engineering (9 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -27-


Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is Lectures and practicals.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: FLUID MECHANICS


Course Level: Level 1
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course introduces general fluid flow principles to Civil Engineering students. It demonstrates
the principles through examples where the fluid is water. Civil Engineering projects such as
hydropower development, water supply, drainage and flood defences require knowledge of fluid
mechanics.

Course Objectives
• The course introduces fluid mechanics and establishes its relevance in Civil engineering.
• Develop the fundamental principles underlying the subject.
• Demonstrate how these are used for the design of simple hydraulic components.

Detailed Course Content


Introduction (9 hours)
• Fluid definition, units, flow,
• Equilibrium conditions,
• Viscosity and Newtonian fluids.
Fluid Statics (9 hours)
• Hydrostatic pressure,
• Manometry and pressure measurement,
• Hydrostatic forces on submerged bodies.
Fluid Dynamics (12 hours)
• Continuity equation,
• Bernoulli equation and applications,
• Momentum equation and application.
Flow in Pipes (12 hours)
• Viscosity, Reynolds numbers,
• Boundary layer, Laminar, transition and Turbulent motion
• Hagen – Poise Uille theory,
• Friction factors, Head loss coefficients,
• Valves, Bends, Pipe networks and Quasi steady flow problems.
Dimensional analysis and Similitude (3 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -28-


Mode of Delivery
The course is delivered through lectures, tutorial and assignments

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Minimum Standards Engineering -29-


SECOND YEAR COURSES

Course Name: ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS III


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
Drawing from the concepts covered in Engineering Mathematics I and II, this course is
designed to consolidate and advance analytical techniques for solution of ordinary
differential equations; and introduces concepts fundamental to the study of other courses
in Computer Engineering. The major themes covered include integral transforms, series
solutions to ordinary differential equations and special functions.
Objectives
• Introduce the student to Integral Transforms and their application to the solution of
Ordinary Differential Equations
• Introduce the Power Series solution technique to Ordinary Differential Equations
• Expose the student to some special functions fundamental to engineering
specifically Gamma, Beta, Bessel and Legendre An important emphasis of the
course is to develop problem solving skills and proof skills by working on specific
problems in which it is natural to look at special or simpler cases in order to try to
discover patterns. An integral part of the process of mathematical thinking is to
wander into blind alleys, sometimes being frustrated, before ultimately obtaining a
solution or proof. In this process mathematical scientists often work together with
colleagues, and this group work and sharing of ideas often adds great value to a
mathematical investigation.
• A major goal of the course is to give a balanced introductory treatment of the area
of PDE so that a student appreciates the power of PDE modeling; and is aware of
major techniques for their solution. The focus of the course is on analytical
techniques for the classical linear PDE of physics and engineering (heat, wave and
Laplace equations), and their frequent occurrence in applications.
Course Content
1. Fourier Integrals and Transformations
• Motivation for the Fourier Integral
• Definition of Fourier Integral as a limit to the Fourier Series with period
tending to infinity
• Conditions for existence of a Fourier Integral representation (Dirichlet’s
conditions, Existence of the absolute integral for the entire real axis)
• Complex exponential Fourier Integral representation, Standard Fourier
Integral representation, Fourier Cosine and Sine Integral representations
• Definition of the Fourier Transform and its Inverse
• Frequency spectrum of periodic and continuous functions
• Distinction between the Fourier Transform and Integral
• Properties of the Fourier Transform Transform: Linearity, First Shift
Theorem, Second Shift Theorem, t- duality, Time differentiation,
Frequency Differentiation, Convolution, Correlation
• Fourier Transform of special functions: Delta function (Sifting property),
Heaviside Step function,
• Applications: Parseval’s theorem, RCL circuits, Frequency shifting in

Minimum Standards Engineering -30-


Communication theory (carrier signals and Antenna design)
• Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations with constant coefficients
2. Laplace Transformations
• Motivation for the Laplace transform
• Definition of the Laplace transform
• Comparison of the Laplace and Fourier Transforms
• Conditions for existence of the Laplace transform (Dirichlet’s conditions,
Piecewise continuity of thee function)
• Properties of Laplace Transforms: Linearity, First Shift Theorem, Second Shift
Theorem, Time differentiation, s-domain Differentiation, s-domain Integration
• Laplace Transforms of special functions: Delta function and Heaviside function
• Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations by Laplace Transform Techniques
• Solutions of Simultaneous Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with constant
coefficients
• Applications in RLC Circuit Analysis
3. Power Series Solutions to Ordinary Differential Equations
• Motivation of the Power Series solution method
• Concept of the Power Series method (Ordinary points, Singular points)
• Series solutions about Ordinary points
• Series solutions about Regular Singular points (Method of Frobenius)
4. Gamma and Beta Functions
• Integral Definition of Gamma and Beta Functions
• Properties of Gamma and Beta Functions
• Generalisation of the factorial by Means of the Gamma function
• Relations Between Gamma and Beta Functions
• Definition of Gamma Function for Negative Values of Argument
5. Bessel Functions
• Bessel’s Equation and its Solutions.
• Familiarisation with Characteristics and Graphs of Bessel Functions
• Properties of Bessel Functions of the First Kind: Differentiation, Recurrence
relationships, Generating functions
• Ordinary Differential Equations solvable using the notion of Bessel’s
equations
• Integral Representations of Bessel Functions
• Integrals Involving Bessel Functions
• Laplace Transforms of Bessel functions
6. Legendre Functions
• Legendre’s Equation and its Solutions
• Legendre’s Polynomials; the Generating Function for Legendre’s
Polynomials; Orthogonality of Legendre’s Polynomials
• Rodriguez’s formula
• Orthogonality Relations for the Associated Legendre Functions,
• Familiarisation with Characteristics and Graphs of Legendre’s Polynomials
and Associated Legendre Functions
• Integrals involving Legendre Polynomials
7. Definition of a Partial Differential Equation
8. Derivation of Some Typical PDEs of Mathematical Physics

Minimum Standards Engineering -31-


• The One-Dimensional Wave Equation (Vibrating String)
• The One-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
• The Telegraph or Transmission Line Equation
• The Two-Dimensional Wave Equation (Vibrating Membrane)
• The Two-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
• The Three-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
9. Classification of Partial Differential Equations
• Homogeneous and Non Homogeneous PDE’s
• Linear and Non-Linear PDE’s
• N-Order PDE’s
• Parabolic, Elliptic and Hyperbolic PDE’s
10. Classification of Boundary Conditions to PDE’s
• Homogeneous and Non Homogeneous BC’s
• Linear and Non-Linear BC’s
• Dirichlet BC’s
• Neumann BC’s
• Robin BC’s
• Cauchy BC’s
11. Overview of Methods of Solving Boundary Value Problems
12. Solutions of Boundary Value Problems Using the Method of Separation of
Variables
• 2nd Order Linear and Homogeneous BVP’s with Period BC’s
• Use of Fourier Series in the Solution of 2nd Order Linear and
Homogeneous Dirichlet and Neumann BVP’s
• Solution of Non-Homogeneous BVP’s
• Direct Originality with Mixed BVP’s
• The Cauchy BVP’s
• Sturm-Liouville Problems
13. Use of Laplace Transforms in Solving PDEs
14. FDM Solutions of Boundary Value Problems involving PDEs
• Parabolic BVP’s
• Elliptic BVP’s
• Hyperbolic BVP’s
• Use of MATLAB in the Solution of PDE’s
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%
Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: THEORY OF STRUCTURES I


Course Level: Level 2

Minimum Standards Engineering -32-


Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description:
This course introduces the student to methods of static analysis of linear statically determinate
elastic structures as well as an introduction to the solution of statically indeterminate structures.
(This is a later change to accommodate in-depth treatment of the usage of matrix methods in the
analysis of structures in the subsequent course.
Course Objectives

At the end of the course, the student should be able to:

• Apply basic mathematics, science and engineering principles to solve structural


engineering problems.
• Identify, formulate and solve statically determinate and simple statically indeterminate
problems using several basic methods.
• Use other complex tools to solve more complicated structures in the subsequent higher
level courses in structures.

Detailed Course Content

Definitions and Geometry (12 hours)


• External equilibrium and internal forces in members,
• Stability and determinacy,
• Principal of Virtual work,
• Principal of superposition.
Stresses and strains (12 hours)
• Direct and shear stresses, Principal stresses,
• Maximum shear stresses,
• Mohr’s circle, Direct and shear strains,
• Isotropy and Elasticity,
• States of stress and strain for axial, bending, shear, torsion, flexural and combined effects.
Statically determinate members (12 hours)
• Beams, trusses and frame analysis,
• Moment, shear force and axial diagrams,
• Internal forces at cut sections.
Statically Indeterminate members (12 hours)
• Method of consistent deformations of indeterminate beams and frames.
Deflection analysis (12 hours)
• Displacements in beams and frames due to loads and temperature change,
• Differential equation of flexure,
• Macaulays’ methods,
• Influence lines.

Minimum Standards Engineering -33-


Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: ENGINEERING GEOLOGY


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course deals with basic geological materials and earth processes and how they influence
mechanical behaviour and capacity of engineering materials, processes and structures. The
linkage to Rock Mechanics and Hydrogeology are emphasized. It is divided into physical and
historical Geology.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Assess the influence of geological factors on the conception, location, planning,
feasibility, design, construction, cost, safety and management of Civil engineering works
• Choose appropriate geological materials that can be used for specific Civil Engineering
projects.
• Evaluate the effects of geological processes on Civil Engineering activities and structures
• Carry out geotechnical site investigations for Civil engineering projects
• Utilize knowledge about the earth structure, surface processes, sedimentology,
geormorphology, sedimentation and stratigraphy.
• Establish linkage to rock mechanics and hydrogeology

Detailed Course Content


The Earth and Historical perspective (3 hours)
• Physical and Historical geology,
• Principle of Uniformitarianism,
• Earth structure, mineralogy, dynamic geology,
• Surface processes.
Structural Geology (5 hours)
• Petrology and sedimentology,
• Geomorphology, sedimentation and stratigraphy,
• Folds and faults,
• Joints and unconformities.
Elements of Rock Mechanics (6 hours)
• Weathering and denudation,
• Assessment and effects on rock masses,
• Rock mass quality, assessment and improvement.
Geological processes and structures (8 hours)
• Rock formation and classification,
• Rock mineralogy and hardness,
• Excavation and mining of rocks,

Minimum Standards Engineering -34-


• Hydrogeology/Geo-hydrology – aquifers, wells, springs, boreholes and seepage,
• Soils, slope stability, rock mass improvement.
Tunneling (5 hours)
• Excavations, tunnels, disposal of excavated material
• Shape and type of channels
• Geological considerations
• Consolidated and unconsolidated rocks
Geotechnical investigation of Sites (6 hours)
• General techniques
• Desk study
• Reconnaissance
• Boring, drilling, profiling, borehole records, interpretation and reporting
Earthquakes (6 hours)
• Definition and types
• Causes, waves, location of epicenter,
• Intensity and magnitude
• Seismic zones
Use of Geological Maps (6 hours)
• Introduction and scales of geological maps
• Drifts and outcrops
• Sub-surface geology
• Geomorphologic and geotechnical maps
• Age relationships, outliers and inliers.
Practicals and Fieldwork (15 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials, fieldwork and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
• Lab space, rock specimens, laboratory and field kits for lab and in-situ measurements and
field trips
• Reading list

Course Name: ENGINEERING SURVEYING I


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course develops fundamental skills in the theoretical and practical aspects of plane surveying
through the use and care of modern instruments and the associated computations. Topics include
the classification of errors incurred in observed field data and necessary correction applications,
the use and care of surveying equipment, traversing, differential leveling, stadia and mapping,
and electronic data transfer. Computer applications are used where appropriate.

Course Objectives

Minimum Standards Engineering -35-


At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Obtain a full understanding of the nature of surveying data, including errors and the need
for error control.
• Learn about surveying project fundamentals, particularly referencing systems, horizontal
and vertical control, and topographic mapping.
• Gain an understanding of the nature of calculations made with surveying data, methods of
data recording, display, and storage.

Detailed Course Content


The course is divided into the following modules
Introduction (6 hours)
• Objectives and major forms of Surveying,
• Guideline in surveying,
• Units of measurement,
• Plans, maps, accuracy and precision.
Cadastral and Ordinance surveying (9 hours)
• Coordinate systems,
• Theodolites – adjustments, horizontal and vertical measurements,
• Levelling – Terminologies and equipment,
• Traversing – Bearing, north directions, linear and angular.
Errors (4 hours)
• Types of error and corrections to distance measurements;
Chain/Linear surveying (9 hours)
• Equipment - Chains, Tapes (types and uses) and ranging rods,
• Horizontal methods,
• Topography and booking methods,
• Setting out and obstructions.
• Plotting equipment and surveys.
Theory of EDM (6 hours)
• Electromagnetic waves,
• Principle of distance measurement,
• Types of EDM and applications.
Use of Total Station (3 hours)
• Instrumental combinations for xyz measurements.
Recording (8 hours)
• Map and scaled drawing techniques,
• Public survey books and records.
Field exercises (15 hours)
• Use of Equipments,
• Ranging,
• Reconnaissance,
• Measurements, Computations, Adjustments and Plotting.

Minimum Standards Engineering -36-


Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials, fieldwork and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Laboratory Requirements
• Total station, GPS, Tapes, chains, ranging rods, levels, field notebooks.
• Reading list

Course Name: CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description:
This course deals with properties, applications and analysis of important materials used in
construction. It offers coverage on how materials are made or obtained, their physical and
mechanical properties, how they are used in construction, how they are tested in the lab, quality
control and their strength characteristics; information that is essential for material selection and
elementary design. The materials covered include aggregates, lime, cement, concrete, blocks and
bricks.

Course Objectives:

At the end of the course the student should be able to:


• Appreciate the properties and behaviour of materials in the construction industry.
• Apply materials within the general context of analysis and design of structures.
• Choose materials that ensure that the final product will adequately fulfil the purpose for
which it is intended.
• Promote awareness of the importance of material behaviour in both design and
construction and how this affects engineering decisions.
• Create awareness of diverse usage of materials in Civil Engineering structures (roads,
bridges, buildings, water supply systems etc)

Detailed Course Content


Introduction to Civil Engineering Materials (5 hours)
• Basic requirements of materials,
• Standards and specifications.
Aggregates (8 hours)
• Origin and classification,
• Properties and characteristics,
• Storage and testing.
Cement (8 hours)
• Types and properties,
• Composition and functions of constituent components,
• Manufacture (Ordinary and special cements),
• Setting and Hardening.
Lime (8 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -37-


• Properties,
• Sources and uses,
• Classification and manufacture.
Concrete (8 hours)
• Constituents and their batching,
• Manufacture and workability,
• Quality control,
• Pre-cast concrete.
Bricks and Blocks (8 hours)
• Types and uses,
• Quality control in production,
• Properties – Strength, weight and absorption.

Mode of Delivery
The course is mainly delivered through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Equipped Laboratory and Reading Materials

Course Name: HYDRAULICS


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course on provides the fundamentals needed to understand the application of hydraulics to
the environment and to Civil engineering works. The course covers aspects of open and closed
flow in machines and other structures of practical relevance to engineering.

Course Objectives
The course is intended to provide the student with:
• an understanding of hydraulics as applied to the environment and to Civil engineering
works.
• an understanding of the factors affecting fluid flows in pipes and open channels.
• tools for measurement of flow in pipes and open channels.
• an understanding of the use of hydraulic machines in Civil Engineering projects.

Detailed Course Content

Introduction (2 hours)
• Historical development,
• Application of hydraulics.
Open channel flow (15 hours)
• Pipe flow and open channel flow and fundamental equations of flow,
• Velocity distribution in open channels ,

Minimum Standards Engineering -38-


• Computation of uniform, gradually varied and rapidly varied flows,
• Critical, sub-critical and super-critical flow: the Froude Number,
• Specific energy,
• Structures and critical depth.
Pipe flow (12 hours)
• Pressure loss (friction, laminar and turbulent flow),
• Choice of friction factor (Laminar flow, Blasius equation, Nikuradse, Colebrook-White
equation),
• Local head losses (Sudden enlargement, Sudden contraction, Other local losses),
• Pipeline analysis (Pressure, velocity, potential and total head in a pipeline, pipelines in
series, parallel and branched).
Hydraulic structures (8 hours)
• Flow regulation structures,
• Flow measuring structure,
• Discharge structures.
Hydraulic machines (8 hours)
• Pumps,
• Turbines.
Laboratory practice (15 hours)
• Design of hydraulic experiments,
• Physical models,
• Flow measurement in the Laboratory.
Mode of Delivery
The course is mainly delivered through lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Laboratory Space and Reading list

Course Name: SOCIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERING


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course deals with how technologies have altered the fabric of society. It crosses disciplines
and academic traditions with an open mind, curiosity, and willingness to engage in fun. The
course arouses analytical thinking about everyday technologies affecting our life. It therefore
examines how engineers, scientists, humanists, social scientists, and artists work together in their
respective professions.

Course Objectives
The course is intended to:
• Explore the social and cultural impact of engineering innovations.
• Discuss how technology shapes culture and how culture shapes technology.
• Teach how human behavior affects design decisions within engineering.
• Demonstrate that values are embedded within technology.

Minimum Standards Engineering -39-


• Show international focus on specific technologies.

Detailed Course Content


Social structures (2 hours)
• Individual – Society – Civilisation,
• Historical perspective – Relation between Individual and Society,
• Theories – Personal needs and Societal needs as related to development of Technology.
Evolution of Society (15 hours)
• Ancient Society,
• Development of Science and Technology based on Societal needs,
• Examples from Ancient Civilisations.
Industrial Development (12 hours)
• Technological changes and their influence on social, economic and political systems,
• Industrial Revolution,
• Fall out – Recession and Impact on Society.
Knowledge and Information revolution (8 hours)
• Basic influence on rural and urban development strategies,
• Feature of society to individual relationship.
Civil Engineering from ancient Civilizations to modern times (8 hours)
• Impact of development in the area of Civil engineering on individual and society,
• Importance of considering societal needs,
• Interaction with society at different stages of planning and implementation,
• Other issues – Gender, HIV/AIDS, Status, Corruption, Child labour and Malaria,
• Professional ethics.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, individual reading and assignments

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: CONCRETE TECHNOLOGY


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
In this course, students are trained to acquire knowledge and skills of planning, selecting
constituent concrete materials, mixing concrete, placing it, curing it and ensuring good field
performance.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Understand the physical, mechanical and mathematical principles of concrete,
• Measure concrete properties in accordance with accepted standards, and

Minimum Standards Engineering -40-


• Design the different types of structures for concrete.

Detailed Course Content


Basics of Concrete Technology (5 hours)
• Properties of Concrete.
• Types of Concrete.
Materials for Concrete (8 hours)
• Aggregates (Types of Aggregates, Choice of Aggregates, Production of Aggregates,
Grading of Aggregates)
• Cements (Types of Cements, Manufacture of Cement; Admixtures)
• Water (Water/Cement Ratio and Workability)
Concrete Mix Designs (4 hours)
• Batching of Aggregates,
• Cement and Water.
• Mixing and Transporting Concrete.
Preparation and Joints (4 hours)
• Placement of Concrete
• Compaction of Concrete
• Curing of Concrete
• Surface Finishing of Concrete.
Formwork (2 hours)
Reinforcement (2 hours)
Concrete Mixing Plant (2 hours)
Protecting Concrete (4 hours)
• Concrete in Hot Weather,
• Concrete in Cold Weather.
• Concrete in Wet Conditions.
• Shrinkage. Cracking. Creep. Repairs.
Concrete for Road Construction (2 hours)
Concrete Structures: (4 hours)
• Piles, Fluid Retaining Structures,
• Dams and Tunnels.
• Pre-cast Concrete Products.
Floors and Floor Surfaces (2 hours)
Durability of Concrete (2 hours)
Quality Control, Inspection and Testing (2 hours)
Detailing (2 hours)
Laboratory (15 hours)
• Concrete Mix.
• Concrete Curing.
• Fresh Concrete Tests.
• Testing of Dry Samples.
• Writing Concrete Specifications.
• Reinforcement Configurations and Placement.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments.

Minimum Standards Engineering -41-


Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Laboratory space and Reference material

Course Name: ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS IV


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course discusses basic theory of probability and statistics and its applications in engineering.
Materials given include basic understanding of statistics, mathematics, population and sample,
data presentation, methods of calculating mean, standard deviation, mean estimation, outliers
tests, simulation and probability theory, models of distributions, statistical tests of distributions,
mean and standard deviation, linear regression, coefficient of correlation, and computer
application for statistical analysis. This course is intended to develop the ability in design
research, in data analysis, and in decision analysis using valid mathematical approach.

Course Objectives
The main objective of this course is to:
• Develop in the engineering student the ability to plan, collect and analyze data leading to
valid and reliable findings applicable to natural phenomena.
Course Content
1. Discrete Mathematics
• Functions, Relations, and Sets
• Basic Logic
• Applications of logic to computer engineering Proof Techniques
• Basics of Counting
• Graphs and Trees
• Recursion
2. Probability Basic
• Introduction: Basic concepts Random experiments & events
• Elementary Theorems
• Probabilistic Modelling
• Independence
• Transformations
• Moments
• Reliability and failure rates
• Transforms of PDF
• Tail inequalities
• A vector Random variable
• Joint CDF & Joint PDF Conditional Probabilities & Densities
• Expectation, Covariance & correlation coefficient
• Joint distributions.
3. Estimation Theory
• Definitions: Estimators, Point-Estimators, Interval Estimators

Minimum Standards Engineering -42-


• Properties of Point Estimators
• Types of Estimation: Estimation of a Distribution’s Unknown Parameter;
Estimating the value of an inaccessible variable in terms of an accessible
variable
• Maximum Likelihood Estimator
• Bayesian Estimator
• Mean Square Linear Estimator: Univariate Linear Regression; Orthogonality;
Basic extension to Multivariate Linear Regression
4. Random Processes
• Definition of a random process, qualitative discussion of examples of random
processes: Poisson process
• Markov process, Brownian motion process
• Digital modulation using phase-shift keying
• Stationary and Ergodic processes
• Power spectral density (PSD): Properties of PSD, PSD applied to base band
signals; PSD of white noise process
• Gaussian random processes and their application in communication theory.
5. Statistics
• Overview of Statistics (Descriptive and Inferential)
• Role of Statistics in Engineering
• Misuse and Abuse of Statistics
• Design of Survey Experiments
• Descriptive Statistics
• Simple Linear Regression and Correlation Analysis
• Tests of Hypothesis
• Use of a Statistical Data Analysis Software Package
6. Complex Variable Analysis
• Functions of a Complex Variable
• Mapping and Conformal Mapping
• Line Integrals
• Cauchy-Goursat Theorem
• Taylor and Laurent Series
• Residue Theory
• Complex Analysis Applied to Potential Theory
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%
Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: SOIL MECHANICS

Minimum Standards Engineering -43-


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
In this course, students are trained to acquire knowledge and skills in assessment of soils for
suitability as engineering materials. It covers aspects on analysis of soil response to loading, flow
of water in soils and its effects, soil supporting capacity and stability, soil explorations in the field
and other theories relevant to soil behaviour.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Understand the physical properties of soils and its classification,
• Assess soil supporting capability for applied loads,
• Analyse stresses and strains imparted by applied loads,
• Assess soil compressibility in relation to structures,
• Conduct investigations of soils in the laboratory and in the field,

Detailed Course Content


Introduction to soil mechanics (3 hours)
• Nature of soils,
• Phase relationships,
• Physical properties (Plasticity, Grading size distribution, classification).
Soil compaction (7 hours)
• Theory of compaction, standard and modified compaction,
• Field control of compaction.
Groundwater flow (6 hours)
• Permeability and capillarity,
• Darcy and Bernoulli laws,
• Seepage through soils,
• Flow nets,
• Pore water pressure and Piping.
Mechanical properties of soils (7 hours)
• Principle of effective stress,
• Shear strength of soil,
• Stresses and displacements,
• Direct shear box test, Triaxial test, Shear vane test.
Bearing capacity of soils (6 hours)
• Introduction,
• Ultimate and allowable bearing capacity,
• Ground improvement.
Stability analysis of soils (4 hours)
• Introduction,
• Rankine’s theory and Coulombs theory,
• Retaining walls,
• Types of slopes, Methods of slope analysis, Fellenius and Bishop Methods, Slope
stability charts.
Compressibility of soils (6 hours)
• Terzaghi’s theory,

Minimum Standards Engineering -44-


• Consolidation curves,
• Pre-consolidation,
• Oedometer test,
• Settlement computation.
Soil exploration (3 hours)
• Methods of investigation,
• Sampling,
• Borehole logs,
• Geophysical methods.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is Lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Well Equipped Laboratory space and Reference material.

Course Name: THEORY OF STRUCTURES II


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description:
This course develops further the structural principles introduced in Semester I. It deals with
analysis of statically indeterminate elastic structures using slope-deflection methods and moment
distribution. More emphasis is placed on the matrix methods of analyzing structures

Course Objectives:
At the end of the course students should acquire the following skills:
• Selection of an appropriate analysis method for beams, frames and trusses
• Recognition and Analysis of frames with/without sway using several methods
• Recognition and the usage of computing and IT skills (in particular spreadsheets) in the
analysis of structures

Detailed Course Description:


Analysis of deformation (10 hours)
• Virtual work and Energy methods.
Slope deflection and Moment distribution (15 hours)
• Derivation of basic displacement equations,
• Application to statically indeterminate beams,
• Application to statically indeterminate frames with and without sway,
• Settlement (joint translations),
• Matrix formulations.
Stiffness and flexibility methods (15 hours)
• Trusses beams and frames,

Minimum Standards Engineering -45-


• Force-displacement relationships,
• Flexibility coefficients and matrices,
• Temperature changes,
• Pre-strains and support displacements,
• Stiffness matrices.
Influence Lines (10 hours)
• Statically indeterminate beams and frames with load combinations.
Computer applications (10 hours)
• Analysis using spread sheets.

Mode of Delivery
The course is mainly delivered through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements:
Reading Materials

Course Name: CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS II


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description:
This course is deals mainly with assessment of origin/production and characterisation of
additional materials like timber, glass, metals, polymeric materials, bituminous materials and
coatings.

Course Objectives:

The course has the following objectives:


• Appreciate the properties and behaviour of materials in the construction industry.
• Apply materials within the general context of analysis and design of structures.
• Choose materials that ensure that the final product will adequately fulfil the purpose for
which it is intended.
• Promote awareness of the importance of material behaviour in both design and
construction and how this affects engineering decisions.
• Create awareness of diverse usage of materials in Civil Engineering structures.

Detailed Course Content


Timber (6 hours)
• Classification (softwood and hardwood),
• Manufacture and seasoning,
• Defects and utilization,
• Preservation and treatment,
• Fire resistance.

Minimum Standards Engineering -46-


Glass (6 hours)
• Glass manufacture (drawing, floating, rolling and roughcasting),
• Types of glass (sheet, plate, float, reflective, wired etc.),
• Basic properties of glass (hardness, bending strength, etc),
• Definition of glazing and types of glazing,
• Other glass products for building (glass blocks, solid glass bricks).
Metals (6 hours)
• Crystal types of metals and categories of metals,
• Standards and specifications of Steel,
• Basic properties of steel (elasticity, ductility, fatigue, creep, etc.),
• Protective coatings for steel,
• Use of steel structures,
• Other metals (aluminium, lead, tin and copper).
Polymeric Materials (6 hours)
• General classification,
• Properties of polymeric materials (density, mechanical, thermal etc.),
• Uses of polymers in Civil Engineering.
Bituminous materials (6 hours)
• Definition and types of bituminous materials,
• Standards and specifications,
• Functional requirements of bitumens,
• Types of bitumens (tar & pitch bitumens and asphalt bitumens),
• Properties of bitumen,
• Viscosity tests of bitumen (Penetration, Softening point and Ductility),
• Uses of bituminous.
Coatings (15 hours)
• Importance of coatings,
• Types of coatings,
• Components of paints ,
• Definition, types, composition, properties paints (oil-based, alkyd, etc),
• Paint standards,
• Application of paint,
• Definition, types, composition, properties of Varnishes,
• Definition, types, composition, properties of Enamels,
• Definition, types, composition, properties of Shellac,
• Definition, types, composition, properties of Lacquers,
• Definition, types, composition, properties of Stains,
• Definition, types, composition, properties of Fillers,
• Definition, types, composition, properties of Sealers.

Mode of Delivery
The course is mainly delivered through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements

Minimum Standards Engineering -47-


Equipped Laboratory and Reading Materials

Course Name: ENGINEERING SURVEYING II


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course is about 1/3 engineering science consisting of error theory, principles of error
correction, geographic information systems, area computations, coordinate geometry and
principles of modern surveying technology. The remaining portions of the course emphasize
surveying practice and measurement.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Gain a better appreciation of data quality and how instruments and field techniques
contribute to error.
• Learn rules for handling systematic errors, random errors and blunders.
• Learn elementary statistical methods to aid in error control and to appreciate the concepts
of accuracy and precision.
• Understand how to meet client expectations in terms of data quality.
• Appreciate how one set of surveying data relates to another.
• Learn the importance of referencing their projects properly.
• Learn to work with others, respect the contributions of others, resolve difficulties, and
understand responsibility.
• Learn surveying techniques that will remain current for long periods of time.
• Understand the range of surveying instrumentation and the appropriate uses of each class
of instrument.
• Learn how surveying data is clearly and ethically reported.

Detailed Course Content


Tacheometry (9 hours)
• Principles of Tacheometry,
• Horizontal and inclined line of sight with vertical staff,
• Errors in vertical staff Stadia Tacheometry,
• Field booking.
Trigonometric Heighting (9 hours)
• Curvature and refraction,
• Eye and object height determination and correction.
Earthworks (9 hours)
• Calculation of plan areas – methods,
• Calculation of cross sectional areas,
• Calculation of volumes of cut and fill from cross section areas,
• Calculation of volumes of cut and fills from heights and contours,
• Haulage calculations and Mass Haul Diagrams.
Curve ranging (9 hours)
• Horizontal curves – Simple compound, reverse, radius and degree curves, through
chainage, points of tangent and intersection, setting out,

Minimum Standards Engineering -48-


• Vertical Curves – Gradients, types of curves, equations of curves, sight distances and
setting out,
• Transition Curves – radial force and design speed, super elevation, minimum curvature,
types of transition curves, setting out composite curves.
Deformation Monitoring (9 hours)
• Earth deformation,
• Types of deformation,
• Frequency of deformation monitoring,
• Reporting.
Field Exercises (15 hours)
• Use of Equipments,
• Measurements,
• Computations,
• Adjustments and Plotting,
• Setting Out.

Mode of Delivery
The course is mainly delivered through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
• Total station, GPS, Tapes, chains, ranging rods, levels, field notebooks.
• Reading materials

Course Name: ENGINEERING DRAWING II


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course is covers the basics and standards for drawing techniques, including sizing and folded
drawing. The drawing technique is emphasized in how to draw an object graphically, and
projection point from surface and arch lines, and projection drawing from different point of view.
Besides that, the student is given the requirements of technical drawing of Civil engineering
objects such as construction of buildings, water systems, roads, etc. In the end, the student is
capable of drawing the Civil objects and to interpret them.

Course Objectives
The course helps the students to:
• Comprehend the science of Engineering drawing, so that they are able to convey their
creative ideas effectively.
• Familiarize with various building components used.
• Be aware of modern techniques used in Engineering communications.
• Link from conventional 2D drawings to computer based commercial software.
• Gain experience in transforming ideas into 2D drawings.

Minimum Standards Engineering -49-


Detailed Course Content
Drawing Fundamentals (15 hours)
• Text Creation,
• Standard Symbols and Formats,
• Drawing and Sketching Techniques,
• Scaled Drawings,
• Drawing Layout,
• Charts and Diagrams,
• Pictorial Representation.
Production of Drawings (15 hours)
• Multi-view Orthographic Presentations,
• Sectional Views and Dimensioning.
Reading and Interpretation of Drawings (15 hours)
• Complete Building Drawings,
• Architectural and Structural Engineering drawings,
• Building Services,
• Highway Drawings,
• Detailing: Architectural, Steelwork Reinforced Concrete.
Practical Exercises (15 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures and practical drawing sessions.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements:
Well equipped drawing room and Reading list

Course Name: ICT III


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description: This course provides an introduction to concepts in computer aided drafting
(CAD) using AutoCAD software, through which students develop an understanding of the
features and considerations associated with the computer as a drafting /design tool. Students are
subsequently introduced to the concepts of Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS),
using Microsoft Access. The course further introduces students to programming in Visual Basic
for Applications (VBA) as applied to three applications (AutoCAD, Microsoft Excel and Access).
Finally, students are introduced to the set up and management of Local Area Networks (LANs).

Course Objectives:
This course provides students with an introduction to:
• Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) and Excel Programming;
• Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) design and programming;
• Visual Basic for Applications (VBA);
• Management of Local Area Networks (LAN).

Minimum Standards Engineering -50-


Detailed Course Content
Computer Aided Design (CAD) (7 hours)
• Introduction to 2D and 3D modelling,
• AutoCAD Customisation ,
• AutoLISP and VBA Programming.
Excel Programming (7 hours)
• Excell Programming using VBA.
Further Programming (9 hours)
• Access Database Design – Tables, Queries,
• Access Database Design – Forms, Reports,
• Access Database Programming – Macros, Modules and VBA,
• Development of custom integrated applications.
Networks and Data Networks (7 hours)
• Managing and administering LANS.
Practical sessions (15 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures and laboratory sessions.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirement
Computers loaded with CAD and appropriate Windows Applications.

Course Name: ECONOMICS FOR CIVIL ENGINEERING


Course Level: Level 2
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course is an introduction to the basic economic principles that are of importance to the
practice of Civil engineering.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Apply simple economic principles to analyse value to projects in Civil Engineering.

Detailed Course Content

Minimum Standards Engineering -51-


The social framework (9 Marks)
Population, prices, markets, and the allocation of economic resources (9 Marks)
Demand and supply concepts (9 Marks)
The structure, organization and ownership of the means of production (9 Marks)
National Income (9 Marks)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is lectures and laboratory sessions.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Minimum Standards Engineering -52-


THIRD YEAR COURSES

Course Name: ORGANISATION THEORY


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
Organisation theory is a fundamental subject within modern managerial education. The purpose
of the course is to present the fundamental concepts of the organisation theory. Introduction to
various approaches to an organisation must teach the students to complete macro- and micro-
analysis of organisations in the context of their development and interaction with the
environment. The main purpose of the course is to create modern outlook that could be a basis for
practical work in any management position.

Course Objectives
On completing the unit the student should be able to:
• Describe the essential features of organizations.
• Understand the factors shaping these features.
• Appreciate the evolution of different organizational designs/types.
• Understand how managers may build and change organizations.
• Understand how different organizational forms impact on the individual within
organizations.

Detailed Course Content


Evolution of management theory (10 hours)
• Classical/Scientific Approach,
• Human Relations Approach,
• Systems Approach,
• Contingency Approach.
Leadership (7 hours)
• Leadership traits – Personality/physical appearance,
• Leadership styles,
• Situational leadership,
• Team development.
Motivation (8 hours)
• Basic aspects of human motivation,
• Content theories,
• Process theories.
Group theory (10 hours)
• Purposes of groups,
• Group effectiveness,
• Determinants,
• Environment.
Rules and power in organisations (10 hours)
• Nature of power. Authority and influence,
• Bargaining power,
• Sources of power,
• Power and participation/decentralization.

Minimum Standards Engineering -53-


Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Reading materials

Course Name: DESIGN OF STRUCTURES I (Concrete)


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
The course deals with design principles of concrete structural components that are used in Civil
Engineering infrastructure under different possible modes of loading.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Appreciate the importance of concrete as a structural material
• Appreciate the shortcomings of concrete and how to overcome them
• Design various structural concrete elements loaded in tension, compression, bending and
torsion)
• Design connections of concrete with other materials like steel, masonry and timber.

Detailed Course Content


Materials and design theories (8 hours)
• Limit state design,
• Ultimate and serviceability limit state designs,
• Design standards,
• Properties of structural concrete – Advantages and disadvantages,
• Types of loading – Dead, live and wind loads and Factors of safety,
• Concepts of axial, biaxial, bending, eccentric and torsion loading.
Analysis and design of reinforced concrete elements (16 hours)
• Axially loaded reinforced concrete short columns,
• Axially loaded reinforced concrete slender columns,
• Eccentrically loaded columns,
• Shear, bending and torsion,
• Reinforced concrete beams – ultimate and serviceability limit state, simply, supported
and continuous, singly and doubly reinforced beams,
• Reinforced concrete Slabs – Classification, one way and two way, shear, deformation and
cracking control, Anchorage,
• Reinforced concrete Staircase – Transverse and longitudinal spanning, shear, deformation
and cracking control, Anchorage,
• Shear bond and torsion (links, bent up bars, hooks, bends, laps, joints, etc).
Pre-stressed concrete (12 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -54-


• Pre-stressed concrete – simple beams,
• Pre-stressed concrete – continuous beams,
• Pre tensioned and Post tensioned concrete units
• Design of prestressed beams.
Detailing (12 hours)
• Bar bending schedules,
• Practical design and detailing,
• Use of AUTOCAD.
Evaluation of concrete (12 hours)
• Defects in concrete,
• Field evaluation of concrete defects,
• Repair of defects.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Reading materials

Course Name: HIGHWAY ENGINEERING


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
In this course, students are trained to acquire knowledge and skills in the planning, designing,
supervision and maintenance of roads. It generally covers the areas of road construction materials
like soil/gravel, binders, aggregates, stabilisers, filters, etc., stabilization practice, mix design and
structural design aspects for flexible and rigid pavements, drainage and maintenance using
machine and labour based methods.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Conduct and analyse data from test methods used to assess materials used in road
construction,
• Independently use various standard approaches in planning and designing of paved and
unpaved roads,
• Understand the causes of deterioration and hence poor performance of roads,
• Understand the methods used to assess road condition,
• Undertake design, evaluate and evaluate maintenance of surface and subsurface drainage,
• Develop road maintenance and rehabilitation plans, and
• Oversee implementation of maintenance and rehabilitation plans of roads.

Detailed Course Content


Introduction to Highway Engineering (6 hours)
• History of road development,

Minimum Standards Engineering -55-


• Road development plans,
• Types and classes of roads.
Road location, earthworks and compaction of soils (6 hours)
• Route selection and location surveys,
• Centreline location and carriageway staking,
• Soil surveys and site investigations,
• Earthwork equipment, cuts/fills and haulage.
Highway pavement materials (9 hours)
• Soils engineering for roads (AASHTO classification, compaction and tests),
• Soil stabilization (Lime, cement and bitumen stabilisers),
• Binders – Bitumen, cutbacks, emulsions (production and properties),
• Recycled materials,
• Additives – Lime, cement, polymers, amines, etc.,
• Mix design concepts.
Design of Highway Pavements – Flexible and Rigid (9 hours)
• Types of pavements – Flexible, rigid, composite, earth roads and low cost,
• Alignment – Cross-section elements, design speeds, sight distances, horizontal and
vertical alignment, gradients, climbing lanes, Intersection design and widening of circular
curves,
• Structural design of flexible and rigid highway pavements,
• Environmental Impact Assessment of Highway Projects.
Pavement drainage (6 hours)
• Basic principles and concepts,
• Estimation of runoff from catchments – hydrological principles,
• Design of hydraulic drainage facilities,
• Design of subsurface drainage systems.
Construction and maintenance of paved and gravel roads (9 hours)
• Equipment in road construction and maintenance,
• Pavement condition survey methods,
• Distresses on road surfaces,
• Evaluation of structural condition of pavements,
• Machine and labour based methods for road maintenance.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Equipped Laboratory and Reference material

Course Name: CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY I


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description:

Minimum Standards Engineering -56-


This course deals with the process of constructing a residence or commercial building involving
mainly planning, environment and other aspects. It discusses the fundamentals of structures and
building design, typical construction materials, procedures and methods, construction
management and various aspects considered during the construction process.

Course Objectives:

The course has the following objectives:


• To comprehensively discuss the process of domestic construction from foundation to
finish.
• To emphasise the various forms, concepts and processes involved in building
construction.
• To develop the students' knowledge and skills in appraising and designing site layouts,
and developing adequate organisational schedules of works.
• To enable the student grasp the importance and means of quality control of materials and
workmanship for any building project.
• To promote the awareness of various types of sub-structural and super-structural building
systems, and their selection criteria.

Detailed Course Content

Forms, Concepts and Processes of construction (9 hours)


• Forms of construction – General,
• Traditional and Modified traditional building,
• Timber-framed building,
• House foundations,
• Elements of a house structure and process of construction – Integration,
• Ground works; definition, composition and difficulties,
• The substructure,
• The drainage system,
• The superstructure,
• Site Equipment.
Domestic Construction (3 hours)
• Function of internal walls,
• Types of internal partition (brick, block, slab, stud etc.),
• Non-load bearing panel partitions,
• Timber stud partitioning.
Site Design (6 hours)
• Site layout – General,
• Site investigation report,
• Factors considered in planning a site layout (Activities, efficiency, etc.),
• Case study of site layout and organisation of work,
• Organisation of Works.
Quality Control (9 hours)
• Need for inspection,
• Waste minimisation,
• Testing and storing of concrete materials (cement, aggregates, water),
• Transportation, placing, curing and testing of concrete,
• Reinforcement control,

Minimum Standards Engineering -57-


• Inspection and storage of bricks, blocks, timber, joinery, boards, plastering materials,
metal work, sanitary ware, plumbing materials and iron mongery,
• Quality control of workmanship.
Commercial and Industrial Construction (6 hours)
• Factors affecting the choice of superstructure,
• Structural forms (load-bearing walls, framed systems),
• Portal frames and framed multi-storey structures,
• Provision of natural light,
Civil Engineering Works - I (6 hours)
• Substructure I - Soil investigation, soil characteristics, On-site tests – Visual examination,
Other on-site tests, Laboratory tests, tests of engineering properties, Underpinning
General factors for choosing a foundation, Types of continuous and isolated support,
foundations in restricted condition,
• Substructure II - Principles of pile foundations, Types of piles (displacement, concrete,
steel, replacement piles etc.). Under-reamed bored piles, Testing piles, Functions of high
retaining walls, Forces in retained material. Failure of retaining walls, Types of retaining
walls, Reinforced concrete walls, other methods of retaining soils.
Civil Engineering Works - II (6 hours)
• Super-structure I - Scaffolding – Normal scaffolding, Complex scaffolding – Need for
complex scaffolding and types of complex scaffolding,
• Super-structure II – Brickwork, blockwork and stonework, roofing and Carpentry and
joinery.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Equipped Laboratory and Reference material

Course Name: ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
Environmental chemistry involves studying the fate and effects of chemicals species in the
environment. It defines the intended use of analytical data, preparing sampling plans for intended
use, selecting appropriate analytical methods, advising on collection of field samples, interpreting
laboratory analytical results, and assuring validity and legal defensibility of analytical results. It
also involves evaluation of organic and inorganic chemical reactions as well as physical processes
such as volatilization, cosolvency effects, and soil adsorption. The broad area of environmental
chemistry encompasses a number of related fields, including: analytical chemistry, chemical
engineering, organic chemistry, data quality assurance, radiation chemistry, and inorganic
chemistry and their applications in water and wastewater treatment.

Course Objectives
The objectives of this course are to:

Minimum Standards Engineering -58-


• Develop sensitivity for the environmental impact of large quantities of industrially produced
chemicals,
• Develop an understanding of the chemical/physical processes in the natural environment,
• Use simple mathematical models for quantitative prediction of chemical behaviour in the
natural environment, and
• Demonstrate that chemistry is the backbone of water and wastewater treatment and
environmental quality management.

Detailed Course Content


Fundamentals of Chemistry (6 hours)
• Water,
• Wastewater and Water Pollution Control,
• Industrial and Hazardous Wastes.
Concepts from General Chemistry (11 hours)
• Structure and Properties of Matter,
• Traditional Classification of Matter,
• Dalton's Atomic Theory and Consequences,
• Symbols, Formulas and Nomenclature,
• Chemical Reactions in General and Chemical Calculations,
• The Gas Laws,
• Solutions & Equilibrium.
Physical Chemistry (11 hours)
• Thermodynamics, Osmosis, Reverse Osmosis, Dialysis,
• Principles of Solvent Extraction,
• Chemical Reaction Rates and Equilibrium,
• Catalysis and Adsorption.
Colloidal chemistry (11 hours)
• Description of Colloidal Systems,
• Methods of Formation and Appearance of Colloids,
• General Properties,
• Colloidal Dispersions in Liquid.
Water and waste water analysis (6 hours)
• Chemical and Physical Analysis,
• Parameters in Water and Wastewater Analysis.
Practical session (15 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Laboratory Requirements

In addition to a reading list, the course requires apparatus like a Weigh Balance, Pipettes, burettes
and flasks, Spectrophotometer and Turbidimeter.

Course Name: PRINCIPLES OF QUANTITY SURVEYING

Minimum Standards Engineering -59-


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course deals with determination of quantities of Civil Engineering works and subsequently
valuing them to determine project costs.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Know how to take measurements on Civil works,
• Know how to obtain prices at the current market,
• Know how to prepare bills of quantities,

Detailed Course Content


Introduction (3 hours)
• History of Quantity Surveying,
• Functions of a Quantity Surveyor in the Construction Industry.
Communication (6 hours)
• Communicating Information within the Construction Industry,
• Forms of Communication Medium in Tendering and Construction Processes.
Measurement (30 hours)
• Evolution of Codes of Measurement used in the Construction Industry,
• Analysis of Work Content into Units and Groups Suitable for Tendering,
• Construction Management and Post Contract Administration,
• Interpretation of the Measurement Codes to Identify Measurable Items and Need for
Accurate Descriptions,
• Taking off - Setting Out and Order of Dimensions, Side Notes, Waste Calculations and
Use of Schedules,
• Measurement of Building Works Based on the Current Standard Method of Measurement
of Building Works,
• Site Preparation and Substructure Works,
• Walls in Brickwork, Block work and Stonework, Fair faced Work, Concrete and Steel
Structural Frames,
• Pitched and Flat Roofs, Roof Structures in Timber and Steelwork, Roof Coverings -
Tiles, Steel Sheets,
• Coatings, Windows and Doors in Steel and Timber, Ironmongery, Glazing and
Adjustments for Openings. Common Simple Finishing to Walls, Floors and Ceilings,
• Painting and Decorating,
• Measurement of Mechanical and Electrical Services.
Bill Preparation Process (6 hours)
Specification Writing,
Schedules, Preambles and Preliminaries, Day works, Prime Costs, Provisional Sums and
Contingencies,
Compiling Tender Documents.

Minimum Standards Engineering -60-


Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: FOUNDATION ENGINEERING


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
In this course, students acquire knowledge and skills in planning and designing of economical
and stable foundation of soils. It involves ground investigations (lab and field tests), providing
solutions to difficult soils, prediction of structural behaviour loading the soil and construction
aspects.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Understand the physical, mechanical and mathematical principles of soils,
• Measure soil properties in accordance with accepted standards,
• Design different types of foundations,

Detailed Course Content


The course has been arranged in six modules as follows:

Introduction (6 hours)
• Review of Bearing capacity,
• Terms and definitions,
• Prantl, Terzaghi, Meyerhof and Brinch-Hansen analysis,
• Consolidation/settlement.
Types of Foundations (10 hours)
• Classification of foundations – Strip, Raft, Pad and Pile foundations.
Design of Shallow Foundations (10 hours)
• Essentials on design,
• Axially and Eccentrically loaded foundations.
Design of Pile foundations (10 hours)
• Pile driving,
• Bearing capacity of piles (skin friction and end-bearing),
• Pile groups.
Earth retaining structures (9 hours)
• Types of structures,
• Lateral active and passive earth pressures,
• Surcharge on backfill,
• Stability of walls, (Gravity walls, cantilever walls, walls with counter forts),
• Backfill drainages.

Minimum Standards Engineering -61-


Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Equipped laboratory and Reading list

Course Name: GROUP PROJECT


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
Students undertake a research project largely of their own design and direction in the field of
engineering under a general course coordinator. The coordinator assigns appropriate supervisors
who guide the students in a group at agreed intervals. Students submit a report summarizing their
findings. They also deliver an oral presentation describing their research findings.

Course Objectives
This course is intended to train the students to:
• Pursue independent practical research project in engineering studies, developing some of
the student’s own academic interests,
• Review and appraise existing literature,
• Develop research, analysis, writing and editing and organization skills through an
extended exploration of a single topic, and
• Enhance understanding of the demands, and inevitable compromises, of academic work,
including project definition and management.

Detailed Course Content


• Producing a research proposal on a specific design problem and securing the agreement
of the project supervisors,
• Meeting with their supervisors regularly to discuss progress,
• Maintaining a research notebook, recording notes on material read, draft chapters,
questionnaire responses, or other relevant material
• Presenting a work-in-progress talk with their supervisors,
• Submitting a project report by the specified deadline.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is initial lectures and fieldwork on a specific project.

Course Assessment
• Group presentation (20%),
• Project report (60%),
• Project proposal at the start (10%),
• Progress reports (5%),

Minimum Standards Engineering -62-


• Research notebook (5%).

Resource Requirements - Project specific

Course Name: DESIGN OF STRUCTURES II (Steel)


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
The course deals with design principles of steel members and connections that are used in Civil
infrastructure under different possible modes of loading.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Appreciate the importance of steel as a structural material
• Appreciate the shortcomings of steel and how to overcome them
• Design various structural steel elements (tensile, compressive, bending members)
• Design steel member connections, both bolted and welded
• Read at ease BS 5950 Part 1 and the CONSTRADO Structural Designer's Manual

Detailed Course Content


Introduction (2 hours)
• History of steel development,
• Advantages and disadvantages of steel structures,
• Composition, classification and properties of steel,
• Steel sections (Hot rolled, compound, Built-up and Cold-rolled sections).
Design Principles (2 hours)
• Types of steel structures,
• Design principles,
• Load types – Dead, Live (imposed), wind and other loads,
• Design theories – Elastic, plastic and Limit state design.
Tension Members (6 hours)
• Design equation,
• Determination of net and effective areas - Net and Effective Areas, Staggered and
non-staggered holes, Rows of holes staggered, Holes staggered on two legs of an angle,
Single angle connected through one leg, Angles connected along their length, Angles
connected to each side of a gusset.
Compression Members (6 hours)
• Introduction – Effective length and Limiting slenderness.
• Design theories – Buckling and section classifications, and imperfections.
• Design steps – Perry-Robertson formula
Bending Members (14 hours)
• Introduction – Names of beams, standard sections and beam section classification,
• Design - Buckling and Section Classifications, Determination of moment Capacity,
Lateral-Torsional Buckling, Biaxial Bending, Determination of Shear Capacity,
Determination of Deflection Capacity, Buckling and Bearing of Web.

Minimum Standards Engineering -63-


Connections (15 hours)
• Bolts – Black bolts, HSFB bolts and Oversize holes,
• Riveting,
• Design Theories,
• Welding – Welding processes, Advantages/advantages, weld defects, Types of welded
joints, types of welds, inspection and testing, welded joint design.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: WATER RESOURCES ENGINEERING


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course is designed to review the fundamentals and practices of water resources engineering.
Students explore water resources engineering processes in the theoretical and applied area in the
fields of closed conduit (pipe) flow, open channel flow, surface water hydrology, water quality
analyses, and groundwater flow. The water resources engineering curriculum is designed to
prepare interested students for future careers in water supply, wastewater, floodplain, storm
water, and groundwater management.

Course Objectives
This course will enable students to:
• Understand the design of water resources systems utilizing the basic principles of the
hydrologic cycle and the watershed.
• Master the computation of flow in closed conduits including pipelines, pumps, and water
supply systems.
• Perform open channel flow design including water surface profiles, floodplain delineation,
storm water and sanitary sewer design.
• Understand the value of probability and statistical analysis in deriving precipitation and
stream flow data.
• Compute rainfall/runoff relationships for design of storm water management systems.
• Estimate pollutant loads for watershed and water quality analysis
• Learn the equations of groundwater flow for applications in water well development and
infiltration basin design.

Detailed Course Content


Aspects of water resources (6 hours)
• Water sources – Rainwater harvesting, surface and groundwater sources, rural water
supply, precipitation.
• Global and regional water quantities, hydrologic cycle, water budget analysis.
• Precipitation – Storm types and their formation, point vs. aerial precipitation values,
spacial and temporal averaging techniques and analysis of precipitation, snow hydrology.

Minimum Standards Engineering -64-


Hydrologic concepts (2 hours)
• Evapo-transpiration, infiltration, interception and depression storage
• Measurements and calculations.
Stream flow Characteristics (2 hours)
• Hydrograph components, measurement of stream flow, run-off analysis, forecasting.
Probability Concepts in Water Resources (6 hours)
• Review of probability concepts,
• return periods,
• common probabilistic models,
• Risk and design levels.
Hydrologic Time Series Analysis (6 hours)
• Stochastic time series,
• simple Markov models,
• Generation of records.
Flood Routing and Mitigation (3 hours)
• Hydrologic routing,
• Hydraulic routing and watershed analysis for the purposes of routing.
Reservoirs and irrigation systems (3 hours)
• Storage-yield analysis,
• Reliability, operation.
Groundwater occurrence (3 hours)
• Groundwater resources, distribution and measurement,
• Aquifer properties, groundwater hydraulics, transmissivity and storage,
• Yield, well hydraulics, pumping and slug tests.
Design of Hydraulic Structures (11 hours)
• Dams – Embankments, concrete and earth dams
• Outlets – Spillways, Gates and Valves
• River structures – Culverts, Bridges, Dips, and Diversions.
Water resources management in Uganda (3 hours)
• Storm water quality,
• Estimation of flows,
• Best management practice

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Hydraulic flow tube and Reading list

Course Name: PUBLIC HEALTH ENGINEERING I


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Minimum Standards Engineering -65-


Course Description
The course introduces sanitary engineering, in which the relationship between diseases, disease
vectors and transmission routes are studied as well as engineering barriers to counter disease
transmission. The course covers: solid and hazardous waste management and its functional
elements, i.e., generation, storage, collection, transportation, treatment including recycling and
final disposal; water and wastewater quality characteristics – the physical, chemical and
bacteriological quality parameters and their relevance in ensuring public health; and, onsite and
sewered sanitation. Onsite sanitation covers the design and management of different types of non-
water borne sanitation systems (traditional pit latrines and improved latrines, ROEC, compost
latrines), water borne sanitation systems (aquaprivy, vaults, cesspools, septic tanks and pour flush
toilets) and dry urine diverting ecological sanitation (ecosan) systems. Sewered sanitation covers
the planning, design, operation and maintenance of waste stabilisation ponds (WSPs) for
wastewater treatment and conventional wastewater treatment plants. Lastly, the course introduces
self-purification in surface water bodies.

Course Objectives
After the course, students should:
• Be aware of the importance of environmental sanitation and interventions to prevent
spread of infectious diseases,
• Be in position to design interventions in solid and hazardous waste management,
• understand water and wastewater quality characteristics and their importance in ensuring
good public health,
• Be aware of the various factors affecting the choice of a sanitation optionS and be able to
plan and design sanitation technology options in any given situation (rural, urban, semi/peri-
urban areas, low-lying areas; rocky and collapsing formations; the poor, middle income and
the rich).
• Be able to enumerate the factors affecting choice of a wastewater treatment system,
understand the design and operating principles of sewerage and therefore be able to follow
the procedure of planning and designing sewerage systems,
• Be in position to understand how natural self-purification processes impact on water
quality and the environmental factors that can be manipulated to improve the situation.

Detailed Course Content


Introduction to Sanitary Engineering (3 hours)
Definitions, vectors and diseases, rodents
Environmental transmission routes and measures to counter disease
Solid waste Management (6 hours)
• Solid waste generation and quantities, solid waste sorting, biodegradable and non-
degradable waste
• Functional elements of solid waste management – generation, storage, collection,
transportation, treatment and disposal
• Composting and Hazardous waste management
Aspects of Water and waste water quality (6 hours)
• Physical and chemical water and wastewater characteristics
• Bacteriological water and wastewater characteristics
• Laboratory work
Onsite Sanitation (15 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -66-


• Introduction – Objectives and definition of sanitation, historical developments in
sanitation, sanitation coverage in Uganda, definition of sewage, sewage strength, factors
affecting selection of a sanitation system.
• Types of on-site sanitation systems – Various types of non-water borne (traditional pit
latrines and improved latrines, ROEC, compost latrines) and water borne sanitation
systems (aquaprivy, vaults, cesspools, septic tanks and pour flush toilets)
• Ecological sanitation systems (Dry urine diverting ecosan systems)
Sewered (Offsite) Sanitation (15 hours)
• Introduction – Some definitions, Contaminants of concern in wastewater treatment,
Classifications and comparison of wastewater treatment methods,
• Waste stabilization ponds (WSPs) – Types and advantages of waste stabilization ponds,
process of wastewater treatment in waste stabilization ponds, principles of pond design –
Anaerobic, facultative and maturation ponds; pond lay out, pond construction, operation
and maintenance of WSPs,
• Conventional wastewater treatment – Preliminary treatment, primary sedimentation,
Trickling filters, Activated Sludge Systems (ASS), Operation and maintenance of
sewerage systems
• Self-purification in surface water bodies.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Well equipped laboratory and Reference materials.

Course Name: CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY II


Course Level: Level 3
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description:
This course deals with the process of constructing a residence or commercial building covering
mainly the physical construction and finishing works.

Course Objectives:
The course has the following objectives:
• To comprehensively discuss the process of domestic construction from foundation to
finish.
• To emphasise the various forms, concepts and processes involved in building
construction.
• To develop the students' knowledge and skills in appraising and designing site layouts,
and developing adequate organisational schedules of works.
• To enable the student grasp the importance and means of quality control of materials and
workmanship for any building project.
• To promote the awareness of various types of sub-structural and super-structural building
systems, and their selection criteria.

Minimum Standards Engineering -67-


Detailed Course Content
Building Construction (15 hours)
• Site Visits
• The Building Environment - Elements of the Environment;
• Functions and Relationship of Elements; Location of Elements and Environment.
• The Construction Site.
• Drawings and Documentation, Site Layout, Sequence of Work.
• Site Clearance - Setting Out Simple Buildings, Excavation Work on Construction Sites.
• Introduction to Foundations, the Superstructure and Finishes.
• Temporary Works
Brickwork, Block work and Stonework (15 hours)
• Bricks, Blocks and Building Stone.
• Brick/Block/Stone Tools, Their Care and Maintenance.
• Mortars for Masonry Work. Concrete. Laying Bricks, Blocks and Stones.
• Concrete: Preparation and Placement.
• Laying Damp Proof Courses.
• Brickwork/Block work/Stonework at Openings.
• Bending and Fixing Reinforcement.
• Builder's Plants and Their Maintenance
Carpentry & Joinery (15 hours)
• Carpentry and Joinery Tools and Equipment.
• Care, Safety and Maintenance of Tools.
• Wood Working Machines, Operation and Safety.
• Timbers for Carpentry and Joinery Work. Preparation of Timber Joints. Carcases Work to
Floors and Roofs. Joints to Hollow Floors. Preparation of Rafters, Cutting Bevels and
Birds Mouth, Fixing to Plates and Ridge. Fixing Windows and Door Frames.
• Preparation of Formwork for Concrete. Mouldings, Chamfers and Rebates.
• Fixing of Archives, Skirting, Picture Rails, Dado Rails, Cover Mouldings.
• Hanging Doors and Windows.
• Preparation of Woodwork for Polishing and Painting.
• Construction of Stairs.
• Fabrication of Timber Trusses and Beams.
• Bolted Joints and Timber Connected.
• Temporary Supports. Setting up a Production Unit for Joinery Work.
• Layout of a Simple Carpentry Workshop

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials, practicals and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Minimum Standards Engineering -68-


FOURTH YEAR COURSES

Course Name: CIVIL ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
The course comprises of:
• Project Management; including an overview of organisation theory, component
characteristics of projects, coordination theory, organisational structures and introduction
to procurement methods.
• Project Modelling; including CPM and PERT methods, linear problems of transportation
models and simplex technique types.
• Site Management and Practice including supervision techniques, productivity, build-
ability, and case studies on pre-site and site management.

Course Objectives
On completing the unit the student should be able to:
• Describe the essential features of organizations.
• Understand the factors shaping these features.
• Appreciate the evolution of different organizational designs/types.
• Understand how managers may build and change organizations.
• Understand how different organizational forms impact on the individual within
organizations.

Detailed Course Content


Introduction to Management (4 hours)
• Principles and functions of management
• Structures and relationships in organisations
Organizational theory overview (6 hours)
• Evolution of management theory
• Leadership theory
• Motivation theory
• Group theory
• Plant and equipment organisation
Project management (13 hours)
• Introduction to theory of Project Management
• Component characteristics of projects
• Coordination devices
• Organisational structures
• Introduction to procurement methods
Project Planning and scheduling (13 hours)
• Project Network Techniques - Project planning and modelling, AoA Networks, AoN
Networks, Analysing AoA and AoN networks, Resource analysis, Preparing Ghant
Charts
• Linear Programming – Linear problems, the transportation model (North-west corner
solution method, Initial feasible solution, Degeneracy, Shadow costs, Vogel’s

Minimum Standards Engineering -69-


approximation method, Special issues in the transportation problem), The Simplex
technique.
Site management theory and practice (9 hours)
• Supervisory techniques - The project environment, Project start-up techniques,
Communication in the project hierarchy and outstanding information list (OIL).
• Build-ability theory and case study
• Productivity theory and examples
• Construction site planning and assessment techniques
• Site safety, health and welfare, employment legislation and incentive schemes.

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Reference material

Course Name: FINAL YEAR PROJECT (Semesters I and II)


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 6 CU

Course Description
It this course, fourth-year students perform a research project largely of their own design and
direction in the field of engineering under guidance of academic supervisors. Students submit a
proposal at the beginning and a bound research report at the end summarizing their findings.
They also deliver an oral presentation to a panel of examiners describing their research findings –
one mini presentation at the end of semester I and a final presentation at the end of semester II.

Course Objectives
At the end of this course, the student should be able to:
• Do independent practical original research in Civil Engineering,
• Review and appraise existing literature,
• Develop research, analysis, writing and editing and organization skills through an
extended exploration of a single topic, and
• Disseminate research findings through presentation and publication.

Detailed Course Content


• Producing a research proposal clearing defining the problem, objectives and
methodology, and securing the agreement of selected academic supervisors,
• Exploring an area that has hitherto not been investigated (new method, community
welfare, poverty eradication, environmental preservation, new structure demonstrating a
unique understanding of the subject matter, material technology, etc.)
• Maintaining a research notebook, recording notes on material read, draft chapters,
questionnaire responses, or other relevant material
• Presenting a work-in-progress talk with their supervisors,
• Submitting a project report by the specified deadline.

Minimum Standards Engineering -70-


Mode of Delivery
Weekly meetings between student and academic supervisors to discuss student progress, point out
missing gaps, and ensure that the student remains in track.

Course Assessment
• Oral mini presentation at the end of semester I (10% of the final course mark),
• Oral final presentation at the end of semester II (20% of the final course mark)
• Project report following university guidelines (60% of the final course mark),
• Project proposal (10% of the final mark),

Resource Requirements
Funding for a design and reference materials.

Course Name: CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE MAINTENANCE


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course considers the status and operation of public infrastructure facilities generally, with
particular attention to the responsibilities and roles of public works engineers. It explores the
relationships between the engineering, administrative (managerial and economic) and political
aspects of public works management. It focuses on critical infrastructural issues like diagnosis,
analysis and repair of Civil infrastructure.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Understand the techniques for monitoring the quality of construction of infrastructure,
• Know the characteristics and how to use some tools to evaluate the condition or state of
infrastructure,
• Know how to reduce problems of construction and maintenance on infrastructure,
• Analyse and evaluate measures for rehabilitation of infrastructure like roads, building,
bridges, drainage systems, and others,

Detailed Course Content


• Diagnosis, assessment and repair of Civil Engineering Infrastructure (13 hours)
• Terminology, deterioration, process and diagnostic procedures (8 hours)
• Assessment procedures (8 hours)
• Some repair procedures (8 hours)
• Life cycle planning and maintenance management (8 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Minimum Standards Engineering -71-


Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: TRAFFIC MANAGEMENT ENGINEERING


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
The traffic and transportation engineering course trains students to plan and conduct traffic
management designs of different elements of streets, highways and abutting lands and the traffic
operations thereon. The major control parameters in their planning and design include safety,
convenience (comfort) and economic operation of freight and passengers.

Course Objectives
On completing the unit the student should be able to:
• Assess and understand traffic characteristics on roads and other facilities.
• Conduct traffic studies and analyses.
• Plan traffic operation controls and regulations.
• Design traffic handling facilities.
• Undertake administration and management of traffic.

Detailed Course Content


Introductory concepts (7 hours)
• Scope of traffic engineering
• Transportation administration
• Road network
• Road classification in Uganda
Traffic characteristics (7 hours)
• Vehicular characteristics
• Road user characteristics
• Road characteristics
Traffic studies and analysis (7 hours)
• Traffic volume study
• Traffic speed study
• Origin and destination studies
• Traffic capacity studies
• Parking studies
• Road accident studies
Transportation planning (7 hours)
• Present year inventories
• Trip generation
• Trip distribution
• Modal split
• Network assignment
Level of service analysis (8 hours)
• Selection of Level of service

Minimum Standards Engineering -72-


• Multilane and suburban highways
• Two lane highways
• Service volume
Elements of traffic analysis (8 hours)
• Traffic flow, speed and density
• Basic traffic stream models
• Models of traffic flow
• Queuing theory and traffic flow analysis
• Traffic analysis at highway bottlenecks
Signalised Intersections (10 hours)
• Pros and cons of signalisation
• Traffic control signal needs studies
• D/D/1 queuing with arrivals below capacity
• D/D/1 queuing with arrivals exceeding capacity
• Probabilistic arrivals
• Optimal traffic signal timing
• Traffic signal timing in practice
• Other traffic control devises
Highway lighting (6 hours)
• Terminology
• Basic lighting concepts
• Design of highway lighting

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: PUBLIC HEALTH ENGINEERING II


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course introduces concepts of planning and design of water and wastewater treatment
systems, design concepts and calculations of water transmission and distribution systems. It also
covers wastewater conveyance systems and creates awareness of environmental aspects of water
supply and wastewater management projects.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course, the students should be able to:

• Plan, select and design combinations of appropriate unit treatment processes in a given
situation (for both water and wastewater)

Minimum Standards Engineering -73-


• design wastewater conveyance, water transmission/distribution systems and pumping
systems
• Understand environmental aspects of water supply and wastewater systems and know
how to carry out environmental impact assessment for related projects.

Detailed Course Content


Planning of Water Supply and Wastewater Management Systems (6 hours)
• Introduction/Definitions, community planning, functional and definitive planning,
constraints of project planning, planning and design considerations
• Basis of volume-design period, Design population, Design demand, Peaking factors
• Sustainability of water and wastewater management system
Design of Water Treatment Plants (10 hours)
• Objectives of treatment of drinking water, characteristics of different water sources,
Intake works-Ground and surface water sources
• Aeration and Gas Transfer
• Coagulation and Flocculation
• Sedimentation- Discrete, hindered and flocculent settling
• Filtration- Mechanical filtration, slow sand filtration, rapid sand filtration
• Disinfection- Physical and chemical methods of drinking water disinfection
Water Transport and Distribution (10 hours)
• Introduction, pipe materials and fittings, network configurations/layouts (Branched vs
Grid systems)
• Network design- Layout of networks, hydraulic formulae for network calculations,
distribution systems i.e., gravity flow vs pumped systems
• Branched vs grid grid systems, equivalence method, Hardy-cross method
• Reservoirs and pumping stations
Wastewater Collection and Transportation (4 hours)
• Sewer layout and appurtenances, types of collection systems, design of sewer systems
(Separate vs Combined)
Design of Wastewater Treatment Plants (10 hours)
• Review of treatment plant layout, Design of suspended growth/activated sludge systems,
O & M of activated sludge systems
• Design of attached growth/trickling filter systems, sludge treatment and disposa
Environmental Impact Assessments (4 hours)
• Definitions, why EIAs?, Projects likely to be exempted from EIAs vs those where EIAs
are a must, The EIA process (screening, EI study, Decision making), some case studies

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials, assignments and field excursions.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Equipment:
Jar test apparatus, Paline test equipment, Water quality metres (pH, DO, Temperature, Electrical
conductivity), DR 4000U HACH Spectrophotometer
Chemicals and consumables:

Minimum Standards Engineering -74-


Aluminium sulphate, DPD no. 1 tablets, 50mm dia Filter papers (0.45µm pore size), 50mm
membrane filter pads

Reading list

Course Name: DESIGN OF STRUCTURES (Masonry and Timber)


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course is intended to cover the basic design of structural elements constructed of masonry
and timber. The extensive use of masonry and timber in building construction renders the course
on design of masonry and timber structures an important part in training of a well rounded and
practical degree in Civil engineering. Naturally, the course is divided into two parts, namely
masonry and timber.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
• Design and detail masonry building structures
• Design timber buildings.

Detailed Course Content


The modules are listed as below, with the recommended time for each module indicated in
parentheses:

MASONRY
Structural Masonry (4 hours)
• Materials
• Structural Forms
• Material Propel1ies
• Limit State Design
Axially Loaded Walls (6 hours)
• Design Criteria
• Single–Leaf Masonry Walls
• Stiffened Single–Leaf Masonry Walls
• Cavity Walls, including Jointed Wall and Grouted Cavity Walls
• Walls subjected to Concentrated Walls
• Masonry Column
Laterally Loaded Walls (7 hours)
• Design Criteria
• Single–Leaf Wall
• Stiffened Single–Leaf Wall
• Cavity Wall
• Single–Leaf Wall with Pre-Compression
• Free Standing Boundary Wall
• Walls Containing Openings
Reinforced and Prestressed Masonry (5 hours)
• Reinforced Masonry

Minimum Standards Engineering -75-


• Reinforced Masonry Beam
• Reinforced Masonry Wall
• Prestressed Masonry

TIMBER
Wood Buildings (4 hours)
• Design Loads: Gravity Loads (Dead Loads and Live Loads)
• Deflection Criteria
• Lateral Loads (Wind Loads, Earthquake and Load Combinations
Properties of Wood & Grading of Timber (4 hours)
• Classification of trees
• Cellular makeup
• Effects of Moisture and shrinkage
• Growth characteristics and defects
• Strength modifiers for natural defects
• Grading of Timber
Structural Glue-Laminated Timber (4 hours)
• Sizes of Glulam members
• Fabrication
• Design Parameter
Elements Design (5 hours)
• Bending Elements (beams, girders and built-up beam sections)
• Axial Loaded Elements (Tension; Tension + Bending)
• Axial Loaded Elements (Compression; Compression + Bending
Nailed and Bolted Connections (6 hours)
• Types of Nails
• Factors affecting strength
• Laterally Loaded Connections
• Withdrawal Type Connections
• Spacing Requirements
• Bolted Connection

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials, assignments and field excursions.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: CIVIL ENGINEERING LAW


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description

Minimum Standards Engineering -76-


This course covers aspects of construction law and its applicability in Civil Engineering projects.
It includes aspects of professional conduct and ethics, contract procurement and conditions of
contract.

Course Objectives
At the completion of this course students should be able to:
• Appreciate the role of engineers, local authorities, insurance companies and other
stakeholders in enforcement of the law in construction.
• Know the role of engineers in transforming society
• Understand the laws of procurement and contracts

Detailed Course Content


Civil Engineering and the law (12 hours)
• Professional Ethics
• Legal responsibility for engineers
• Responsibility of local authorities
• Insurance
• The Law of Torts
• Codes of Ethics
Labour laws (12 hours)
• Workman’s compensation
• Risk and moral responsibility
• Gender issues
Elements of the law of contracts (12 hours)
• Construction contracts and specifications
• Contract procurement – FIDIC/ICE Conditions of Contract
Civil liability, Claims, Disputes and their resolutions (9 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Course Name: CIVIL ENGINEERING ECONOMY


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description:
This course covers decision making techniques in engineering through economic analysis. Basics
of economics; concept of interest and time value of money, investment alternatives evaluation
technique, tax and depreciation method, engineering work cost estimation, influence of inflation,
public works and industrial projects economic study, break even point analysis and return period,
risk and uncertainty in economic study.

Minimum Standards Engineering -77-


Course Objectives:
The objective of this course is that students:
• Can understand the basic principles and decision making techniques in investment based
on economic evaluation.
• Are able to carry out a simple economic analysis on an engineering project or other
investment alternatives.

Detailed Course Content


The course has been arranged in six modules as follows, with the recommended contact hours for
each module indicated in parentheses:

Principles of economic analysis and comparison (6 hours)


Annual cost method (6 hours)
Cost Recovery method (6 hours)
Annual rate of return method (9 hours)
Cash flow procedures and others (9 hours)
Resource levelling (9 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Reference materials

Course Name: ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY MANAGEMENT


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course deals with ecosystems-life support systems in the environment, water quality
management, air pollution and control, noise pollution, land use & control of soil pollution,
wetlands use and management, environmental legislation and policies, environmental impact
analysis and monitoring of development projects.

Course Objectives
At the end of the course the student should be able to:

• Understand the major causes of environmental pollution and its impacts locally and
globally.
• Appreciate the range of pollution abatement strategies.
• Understand the legislation designed to protect the environment, economic aspects of
pollution and its control and the role of environmental education in pollution control.

Detailed Course Content

Introduction and definitions (5 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -78-


Ecosystems-life support systems in the environment (5 hours)
Water quality and waste management (5 hours)
Air pollution and control (5 hours)
Noise pollution and control (5 hours)
Land use & control of soil pollution (5 hours)
Wetlands use and management (5 hours)
Environmental legislation, policies and institutional framework (5 hours)
Environmental impact analysis and monitoring of development projects (5 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is through lectures and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements
Reference materials

Course Name: ENTREPRENEURSHIP SKILLS


Course Level: Level 4
Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course includes aspects that trains a student on skill of entrepreneurship that are of value in
the field during application of the knowledge and skills attained during training.

Course Objectives
On completing the unit the student should be able to:
• Exercise skills towards job creation and self development
• Conduct business profitably

Detailed Course Content


Introduction to Entrepreneurship (4 hours)
• Definitions and concepts
• Objectives and historical perspectives
Employment Creation (8 hours)
• Self employment
• Policies
• Viable programmes for Development
Entrepreneurship Process (13 hours)
• Business enterprises and their characteristics
• Identification of Business Opportunities
• Market surveys
• Business plans
Managing Business Enterprises (13 hours)
• Enforcing business plans,
• Strategic Management,

Minimum Standards Engineering -79-


• Communication in Business,
• Managing competition,
• Finance management – Taxation and cost control,
• Human resource management.
Cost accounting systems (7 hours)
• Cost analysis
• Accounting

Mode of Delivery
The mode of delivery is lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment
Assignments (20%), Tests (20%) and Final Exam (60%)

Resource Requirements – Reading list

Minimum Standards Engineering -80-


ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

NO COURSE NAME L P C CU
. H
YEAR ONE (SEMESTER I)
1. Engineering Mathematics I 60 0 60 4
2. Circuit Theory 45 30 60 4
3. Fundamentals of ICTs 45 30 60 4
4. Physical Electronics 60 0 60 4
5. Communication Skills 45 30 45 3
6. Sociology and Engineering 45 0 45 3
YEAR ONE (SEMESTER II)
1. Engineering Mathematics II 60 0 60 4
2. Introduction to Digital Electronics 45 30 60 4
3. Electromagnetics I 60 0 60 4
4. Statics and Dynamics 45 0 45 3
5. Computer Programming 45 30 60 4
YEAR ONE (RECESS SEMESTER )
WORKSHOP PRACTICE (INTERNSHIP) 0 180 45 3
YEAR TWO (SEMESTER I)
1. Engineering Mathematics III 60 0 60 4
2. Electronic Circuits 45 30 60 4
3. Electrical Machines I 45 30 60 4
4. Electromagnetics II 60 0 60 4
5. Electrical Materials I 60 0 60 4
YEAR TWO (SEMESTER II)
1. Engineering Mathematics IV 60 0 60 4
2. Power Systems Theory 60 0 60 4
3. Electrical Materials II 60 0 60 4
4. Network Theory I 60 0 60 4
5. Basic Thermodynamics 45 0 45 3
YEAR TWO (RECESS SEMESTER)
1. INDUSTRIAL ATTACHMENT (INTERNSHIP) 0 180 45 3
YEAR THREE (SEMESTER I)
Core
1. Electromagnetic Fields 60 0 60 4
Electives
2. Applied Analogue Electronics 45 30 60 4
3. Control Engineering I 60 0 60 4
4. Applied Digital Electronics 45 30 60 4
5. Electrical Machines II 45 30 60 4
6. Electrical Installation Practice 45 30 60 4
7. Advanced Computer Programming 45 30 60 4
YEAR THREE (SEMESTER II)
Core Courses
1. Instrumentation and Measurement 45 30 60 4
2. Maintenance Engineering 45 0 45 3
3. Engineering Economics 45 0 45 3

Minimum Standards Engineering -81-


Elective Courses
4. Power Electronics 45 30 60 4
5. Energy Conversion 45 30 60 4
6. Energy Utilization 45 30 60 4
7. Communication Theory 60 0 60 4
8. Business Management 60 0 60 4
9. Legal Aspects of Engineering 45 0 45 3
YEAR THREE (RECESS SEMESTER )
INDUSTRIAL ATTACHMENT (INTERNSHIP) 0 180 45 3
YEAR FOUR (SEMESTER I)
Core Courses
1. Electrical Engineering Project1 45 0 45 3
2. Engineering Ethics 45 0 45 3
Elective Courses
3. Communication Engineering 45 0 45 3
4. Propagation and Antennas 60 0 60 4
5. Telecommunications Systems 60 0 60 4
6. Microprocessors 60 0 60 4
7. Power Systems Engineering I 60 0 60 4
8 Network Theory II 60 0 60 4
9 Power Systems Protection and Co-ordination 60 0 60 4
YEAR FOUR (SEMESTER II)
Core Courses
1. Electrical Engineering Project 0 180 45 3
Elective Courses
2. Telecommunication Management 45 0 45 3
3. Radio Frequency Engineering 60 0 60 3
4. Control Engineering II 60 0 60 4
5. Integrated Circuit design and fabrication 60 0 60 4
6. Power Systems Engineering II 60 0 60 4
7. High Voltage Engineering 60 0 60 4
8. Electrical Installation Design 45 30 60 4
9. Computer Communication Networks 60 0 60 4
10. Power Economics and Management 45 0 45 3

Minimum Standards Engineering -82-


Description of the Courses

Course Name: ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS I


Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 4CU

Rationale
Engineering Mathematics is fundamental to the study of Engineering. It provides the
necessary analytical skills for the study of more advanced subjects.
Objectives
• The purpose of this course is to provide an introductory treatment of mathematical
concepts fundamental to Engineering.
• It consolidates and advances the material covered in Pre-University Mathematics.
This course also provides the mathematical tools needed in other semesters’ course
units.
• To develop the analytical and critical thinking abilities fundamental to problem
solving in Engineering.
Course Content
3. Concept of a Function
• Definition, Properties, Range, Domain of the elementary (Algebraic and
Transcendental) Functions of a Real Variable
• Concept of a limit of a function of a real variable
• Continuity
• Indeterminate forms and L’Hopital’s Rule
4. Complex Variable Algebra
• Cartesian and Polar Algebra representations;
• Absolute Values; Products, Powers and Quotients; Extraction of Roots;
• De Moivre’s Theorem;
• Exponential and Hyperbolic Functions of the Complex Variable.
7. Differential Calculus
• The Derivative: Definitions, notation, properties and Theorems;
• Differentiation of elementary functions of a real variable.
• Applications: Optimization, Curve Sketching, Approximations
• Multivariable Differentiation: Partial Derivatives, Optimization and
approximations.
8. Integral Calculus
• The Integral: Definition and Properties
• Fundamental theorem of Calculus
• Techniques of Integration
• Definite Integral; its interpretation as area under a curve
• Applications of the Definite Integral: Length of a curve, area bound between
curves, volume of revolution, moments
• Improper Integrals and their evaluation using limits
• Integration of a Continuous Function; Inequalities; The Definite Integral as a
Function of its Upper Limit
• Differentiation of an Integral Containing a Parameter; Double Integrals and
their Applications

Minimum Standards Engineering -83-


9. Linear Transformations and Matrices
• Definitions and types of matrices
• Operations on Matrices: Sums, Products, Transposition of Matrices, Equality
of Matrices;
• Determinants: Definition and Properties; Minors and Cofactors; Evaluation
of Determinants by Cofactors; Rank of a Matrix; Inverse Matrices
• Solution of Systems of Linear Algebraic Equations; Consistent and
Inconsistent Equations; Systems of Homogeneous Equations; Cramer’s Rule;
The Gauss-Jordan Method, Gaussian Elimination.
10. Vector Algebra
• Definitions: Scalars, Vectors, Unit Vector, and Dimensionality
• Operations on Vectors: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Dot and Cross
Products
• Position and Distance vectors

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Circuit Theory


Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course introduces concepts, laws and their applications for DC and AC circuits. It
presents basic units theory that enables students to understand and analyze circuits.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Have a good understanding of the basics of circuit theory and acquire engineering
analytic techniques and skills.
• Apply circuit theorems to simplify and find solutions to electrical circuits.
• Interpret, develop and design electrical engineering circuits

Detailed Course Description

• DC circuit analysis (12 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -84-


Review of circuit concepts of resistance, capacitance and inductance, ohm’s law,
concept of input output resistance of networks, single-port and two-port network,
electric power, electric energy/work, energy sources, sources transformations,
power transfer and maximum power transfer, Kirchoff’s circuit laws (KVL and
KCL), current and voltage divider theorems, mesh and Nodal analysis, DC power
supplies and their industrial applications. Superposition Thevenin’s and Norton’s
theorems.

• AC Circuits (15 hours)


Time-varying and alternating quantities, period, fundamental frequency, concept
of harmonics; mean/average, rms, sinusoidal signals, phase difference; complex
numbers; representation of time-varying/sinusoidal quantities, phasors,
rectangular and polar representation; concept of reactance impedance,
conductance, admittance, susceptance; phasor diagrams, resistive, purely
inductive and purely capacitive impedances; simple circuit solution using phasor
diagrams; power in AC circuits, power factor and power factor correction
complex power, real and apparent power and the power triangle. Application of
circuit laws and theorems.

• Elementary transient signals (6


hours)
Simple functions; step, ramp, impulse, transient analysis of circuits with one
energy storage element, impulse response, step response, time constant concept of
damping, undamped circuits.

• Three Phase Circuits (8


hours)
Concept of three-phase supply, phase diagram for the-phase circuits, balanced
three-phase supply, star and delta circuits, analysis of simple balanced 3-phase
circuits, power in three-phase circuits power measurement in three phase circuits.

• Frequency Response Curves (4


hours)
Resonance, series and parallel resonance, the concept of Q-factor, tuned circuits
frequency selective networks.

• Practical (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and laboratories

Assessment
Assignments, laboratory reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -85-


Course Name: Fundamentals of ICTs
Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 4CU

Course Description
This course draws upon evolution of Information Communication Technologies as a
precursor to applications of computers in day-to-day life. This is critical for any student
going into the field of engineering.

Course Objectives/Learning Outcomes


On completion of this course the student should be able to:
• Discuss the evolution of the computing and information communication technology
• Identify the types of computers
• Identify the hardware components of the computer
• Execute basic office automation tasks including word processing, working with
spreadsheets and preparing computer-aided presentations
• Browse the internet and use email

Detailed Course Content

Minimum Standards Engineering -86-


11. Introduction and Overview
• Definition of Information and Communication Technology
• History and Evolution of Computing and Information Communication
Technology
• The changing role of Information and Communication Technology in society
• Current domains of application of Information Communication Technology:
Mobile Communication, Broadcasting, Internet, Enterprise applications,
Office automation, Specialised Applications (Engineering, Entertainment,
Simulation etc.)
12. The Computer
• Definition of a computer, Types of computers, Elements of Computer
Information Systems (CIS)
• Introduction to components of the computer: the user, hardware and the
software
13. Personal Computer Hardware
• Motherboard, Child-boards, and Circuitry
• Central Processing Unit: Control Unit, Registers and the Arithmetic Logic
Unit
• Storage: Memory and Auxiliary Storage
• Buses: Types, USB and its advantages
• Chassis
• Peripherals: Input and Output devices
• Expansion cards
• Power Supply and the Un-interruptible Power Supply (UPS)
• Connectors
14. Firmware
• Definition
• Types of firmware: BIOS and others
15. Software
• Definition
• Evolution
• System software(operating systems, device drivers, utilities and file
management)
• Application software (definition and categorization)
• Software development tools
• Licensing (Proprietary, Shareware, freeware, General Public License (GPL))
16. Office Automation
• Definitions
• Benefits of office automation
• Overview of office automation tools (Personal Information Management,
Office Suites)
17. Word Processing
• Definition and Evolution
• Types of Word Processors
• Features of a word processor
• Word processing exercise
18. Spreadsheets
• Definition and Evolution

Minimum Standards Engineering -87-


• Limitations of spreadsheets
• Features of a spreadsheet
• Types of spreadsheet applications
• Spreadsheet exercises
19. Presentations
• Definition
• Preparation
• Features of presentation packages
• Presentation exercise
20. Email and Browsing the Internet
• Definition of the Internet
• Uses of the Internet
• Netiquette
• Internet Browsers
• Search engines and Web directories
• Email (Definition, Composing, Sending, Archiving, etc.)
• Email clients
• Information Literacy and lifelong learning (Definition and Implications of
Internet Resources)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Physical Electronics


Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course addresses the physics of basic physical concepts of electronic devices.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the behaviour of electrons in electrical and magnetic fields in
materials.
• Understand the design and operation of diodes and bipolar junction transistors.

Detailed Course Description


• Charged particle dynamics (15 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -88-


Electron in an electric field, magnetic field and current in external circuit.
Electrostatic deflection in CRO. Magnetic deflection and focusing. Magnetron.
Electron-optic magnetic lens. Electrostatic lens and electron microscope.

• Conductors, semi-conductors and insulators (15 hours)


Electron theory metals, classical theory of conduction. Electronic collisions.
Dependence of conductivity on temperature. Production of free charge carriers. Band
and band models. Carrier drift and mobility. Mobility variation with temperature. A
derivation of Ohm’s law. Drift current equations. Carrier diffusion. Flux equation.
Fick’s law. Einstein relation. Total current density. Carrier recombination and
diffusion length. Intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors. Doping methods, donors
acceptors, majority and minority carriers.

• Semi-conductor junction diode (15 hours)


Contacts between; two metals, metal and semiconductor. Junction diode manufacture.
Current-voltage characteristics of diode. P-n junction diode in thermal equilibrium.
Forward and reverse bias. The ideal diode equation. Relative magnitude of hole and
electron current. Junction breakdown, tunneling.

• The Bipolar Junction Transistor (BJT) (15 hours)


The transistor action; carrier density profile. Potential and energy distribution. Band
diagram under equilibrium, forward and reverse bias. Current distribution under these
conditions. Emitter injection efficiency, transport factor, current and collector leakage
current, in terms of the device physical conditions. Distribution of excess charges.
Charge in the base and base width modulation BJT D-C characteristics.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.
Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, and tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Communication Skills


Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 3CU

Course Description
The applications of engineering occur in society, as thus effective communication to
varied audiences and clientele is a key virtue a civil engineer must possess.
Communication is a tool through which work gets done, ideas get sold and defended.

Minimum Standards Engineering -89-


This course introduces to the students to principles of organization, development, and
writing of technical documents; and instills in them skills of listening, speaking and
interaction.
Objective/Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:
• Exhibit effective skills in reading, listening, speaking and interaction
• Prepare technical and academic documents
• Effectively deliver Public and Formal Oral Presentations using appropriate Visual
and Computer aids

Detailed Course Content


1. Interpersonal Skills
• Reading both individual and public
• Listening Skills
• Speaking, Interaction, and Conversational Skills
• The Concept Team Work
• Inter-Office and Intra-Office Communication
• Conduct of Discussions and Dynamics of Meetings

2. Writing and Documentation Skills


• Note-taking
• Writing Minutes
• Writing Notice of Meeting and Agenda
• Preparing Formal Documents (Resume, Application Letters, Acceptance
Letters, Resignation Letters, Memos, Circulars, Responses, Letters of
Introduction etc)
• Development of Technical and Academic Documents(Theses, Proposals,
Dissertations, Laboratory Reports, Papers, Articles, Abstracts)

3. Oral Presentation Principles


• Visual and Computer-assisted presentation
• Analysis and Design of Web Presentation
• Choice and use of appropriate presentation tools
• Organising and presenting effective talk
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%
Course Name: Sociology and Engineering
Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 3CU

Minimum Standards Engineering -90-


Brief Course Description
The course is meant to provide students with knowledge on social aspects of society.
Since engineers solve problems faced by the society, it is important for them to
understand the characteristics and behaviour of the community.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand cultural, conflict and control, dynamics of social change and the
impact of the technology on the environment
• Understand rural and urban sociology in developing countries

Detailed Course Description

Social structures (15 hours)


• Individual, family and community; family kinship and neighbourhood structure,
status and class
• Manifest and latent of institutions and groups; social norms, conflict and control
• Dynamics of social change with reference to East Africa/Uganda
• Reflections of these issues in dwelling, community and development
• Introduction to urban sociology in developing countries

Industrialization and society (15


hours)
• Industrialization and its impact on society
• Assessment of impacts of appropriate technology, intermediate technology and
high technology on the development of society
• Effects of industrialization and the environment
• Impact land tenure system on industrial development.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments and tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course
Course Name:
Name: ENGINEERING Engineering
MATHEMATICS Mathematics
II II
Course
Course Level:
Level: Level 1 1
Course Credit: 4CU
Credit Unit : 4 CU

Rationale

Minimum Standards Engineering -91-


Against the foundation of the Calculus and Algebra covered in EMT1101, this course
develops the fundamental aspects of Mathematical Analysis critical to Engineering. The
major themes include; Ordinary Differential Equations, Real Analysis, and Numerical
Analysis.
Objectives
• To introduce students to the concept of Single Predictor-Response mathematical
modelling in areas such as electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory
mechanical systems
• To expose students to analytical solutions of classical ordinary differential
equations in mathematical physics.
• To expose students to the fundamentals of Real Analysis.
• To introduce students to the foundations of Scientific Computing and Numerical
Analysis.
Course Content
1. Ordinary Differential Equations
• Definition of Differential Equations
• Definition and Classification of Ordinary Differential Equations
• Formulation of Ordinary Differential Equations - electrical circuit problems
and vibratory and oscillatory mechanical systems
• Solution Techniques for First Order ODE’s
- Method of Separation of Variables
- Methods for Exact Equations
- Equation Reducible to Exact Form (The Integrating Factor)
- Applications to electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory
mechanical systems
• Solution Techniques for Higher Order ODE’s
- The General nth Order ODE
- Existence and Uniqueness of Solution of Linear Equations
- Second Order Homogeneous ODE’s with Constant Coefficients (auxiliary
equation and method of variation of parameters)
- Second Order Non-Homogeneous ODE’s with Constant Coefficients (The
Complimentary and Particular Solution, Method of Undetermined
Coefficients)
- Special Cases (Equations Reducible to 1st Order or 2nd Order with
Constant Coefficients)
- Applications to electrical circuit problems and vibratory and oscillatory
mechanical systems
• Solutions of Systems of Linear First Order ODE’s
2. Real Analysis

Minimum Standards Engineering -92-


• Sequences - Definitions and Examples. Convergence of Sequences,
Sequences of Real and Complex Numbers. Some Limit Theorems of
Sequences.
• Series – Definition, Series as a Summation of Terms of a Sequence,
Necessary Condition for Convergence, Sufficient Conditions for
Convergence (Cauchy’s nth Root Test, D’Alembert Ratio Test, Comparison
Test), Convergence of Series with Negative Terms, and Absolute Converge
• Power Series – Definitions, Maclaurin’s and Taylor’s Series and
Approximations, Arithmetic Operations on Power Series (Sum, Products,
Shifting of Summation Indices, and Differentiation), Convergence (Radius,
Interval and Tests)
• Differentiability, Rolle’s Theorem, The Mean Value Theorem, Cauchy’s
Mean Value Theorem, Proof of L’Hospital’s
• Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus
• Riemann Integral-Definition and Characteristics
• Fourier Series – Motivation, Definition, Existence, Fourier Series of General
Functions (of period 2 or arbitrary), Fourier Series of Odd and Even
Functions, Half-Range Fourier Series Expansions, Determination of Fourier
Series without Integration. Dirichlet’s Theorem (Limit theorems).
Application of Fourier Series to Electric Circuits.
3. Scientific Computing and Numerical Analysis using MATLAB and Spreadsheets
• Definition and Rationale for Scientific Computing
• Error Analysis
• Numerical Solutions of Polynomial Algebraic Equations, Interpolation
Formulae
• Numerical Differentiation and Integration, Trapezoidal and Simpson’s Rules
of Integration
• Numerical Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations: Euler method,
Modified Euler method and Runge-Kutta
4. Vector Analysis
• Scalar and Vector Fields
• Classification of vector fields
• Scalar and Vector Functions
• Directional Derivatives of Scalar Functions and Derivatives of Vector
Functions
• Gradient, Divergence, Curl and Laplacian of Vector Functions
• Physical Interpretation of the Divergence and the Curl of a Vector Field
• Green’s theorem, Line Integrals Independent of Path, Exact Differential
Forms
• Differential length, Area and Volume; Line, surface and Volume integrals
• Coordinate systems and Transformation: Cartesian; Cylindrical; Spherical
coordinate
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Minimum Standards Engineering -93-


Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Introduction to Digital Electronics


Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course is intended to provide the basics and necessary theoretical background on
digital electronics.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand Digital Electronics Techniques and their advantages over analogue
techniques.
• Analyse and synthesize logic circuits
• To build and test logic circuits

Detailed Course Description


Introduction (3 hours)
Analogue and Digital quantities and techniques, distinction between analogue and digital
techniques. Advantages in data acquisition, processing, storage, access and transmission.
Application examples: instrumentation, communication, control systems and compute.

Number Systems and Codes (2 hours)


Decimal, binary, octal, hexadecimal, etc

Logic Gates and Boolean algebra (12 hours)


AND, OR NOT, and NAND operations and truth tables, hierarchy of operations. Logic
circuit analysis and synthesis using AND, OR, NOT, NOR and NAND operations and
path truth tables. Single and multivariate Boolean theorems; commutative, associative,
and distributive laws; De Morgan’s theorem. Logic circuits starting from description of
physical systems; sum of products and product of sums approaches. University of NAND
and NOR gates. Exclusive OR, exclusive NOR and BUFFER gates.

Physical Realisation of logic gates and logic families (12


hours)
Representing logic levels using voltages. Diodes as switches. Diodes resistor logic. BJT
as switches. Switching characteristics and definitions of collector saturation current,
delay time, rise time, turn on time, storage time, full time and turn-off time. Resistor-
transistor, diode-transistor, and transistor-transistor logic; emitter-coupled logic. The field
effect transistor as a switch. Switching characteristics; channel profile; pinch-off;
MOSFET switch in enhancement and depletion modes. pMOS and nMOS logic gates;
complementary MOS (CMOS). Merit consideration: cast per gate; propagation delay;
threshold voltage; noise margin; fan-in and fan-out; power dissipation. Comparison of
TTL, ECL and CMOS.

Minimum Standards Engineering -94-


Combinational Logic Circuits (4
hours)
Design procedure. Half and full adder circuits; number encode/decodes even and odd
parity encoders/decoders.

Flip flops and sequential digital circuits (8 hours)


A stable and mono-stable circuit’s definitions and examples. Clocking-circuits. Edge
triggering. SR, D0-type and J-K flip-flops. Ripple counters and shift registers.

Analogue to digital and digital to analogue conversion (4 hours)


Sampling and quantization. Simple A-D and D-A circuits

Practicals (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, laboratory work and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Electromagnetics I


Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course provides engineering concepts on electrostatics and magnetostatics. It begins
with review of the mathematical background required to understand the subject.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the theoretical background about static electromagnetic fields in free
space.
• Derive and apply equations related to static electromagnetic fields in free space

Detailed Course Description

Vectors and vector algebra (2 hours)


Scalar and vector quantities. Unit vector. Vector addition, subtraction and multiplication;
position and distance vectors.

Minimum Standards Engineering -95-


Coordinate systems and transformation (24 hours)
Cartesian coordinates. Coordinates systems and Transformation Cylindrical Coordinates.
Coordinate systems and Transformations: Spherical coordinates, vector calculus:
Differential length, Area and Volume. Vector Calculus: Line, surface and volume
integrals. Vector calculus: Gradient, Divergence, Curl and Laplacian.

Electrostatics (20 hours)


Classification of vector fields. Electrostatic Fields: Coulomb Law and Field Intensity.
Electric Field due to continuous charge distribution. Electric flux density, Gauss Law,
Maxwell Equation. Electric potential; relationship between E and V-Maxwell Equation.
Electrostatic Fields Coulomb.

Magnetostatics (14
hours)
Biot-Savart’s Law; Ampere Circuit Law; Maxwell Equation. Application of Ampere’s
Law; Magnetic Flux Density-Maxwell Equation. Maxwell Equation for Static EM Fields;
Magnetic Scalar and Vector Potential, Magnetic Forces; Material and Devices; Forces
due to Magnetic Fields; Magnetic torque and movement; magnetization in materials.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course name: Statics and Dynamics


Course Level: 1
Course Units: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


Statics and Dynamics course is designed purposely to help Electrical Engineering
students to understand mechanical forces and energy in physical structures (structures
used in electrical and telecommunication installations).

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand types of mechanical forces in physical engineering structures
• Apply the concepts of statics and dynamics in the design of engineering
structures.

Brief Course Description

Minimum Standards Engineering -96-


Statics (20 hours)
Fundamental concepts and principles of mechanics. Important vector quantities.
Fundamental units. Moments and couples. Resultants of forces and couples. Laws of
equilibrium. Free body diagrams; structures, cables, frames and machines.

Dynamics (25 hours)


Fundamentals of dynamics. Dynamics of particles and rigid body including kinematics
and kinetics. Applications of Newton’s second Law of motion. Analysis of motion in two
dimensional and three dimensional spaces. Simple harmonic motion. Methods of energy
momentum Applications of Dynamics to the engineering concepts. Strength of material,
Fluid Mechanics, Pulleys, Chains. Concepts of Flywheel, Bearing, Mechanical Power
Transmission.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Computer Programming


Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course provides knowledge on structured and object-oriented programming to the
students.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Analyse a problem by decomposing it into distinct inputs, outputs and processes.
• Use stepwise refinement to design an algorithm from the problem analysis.
• Translate a correct algorithm design from pseudo-codes into a C/C++-program-
coding
• Use programming environment (e.g. test editor, compilers etc) for development of
C/C++-programs.

Detailed Course Description

Introduction to the C-Programming Language (8 hours)


• Keywords; portability; Syntax style;

Minimum Standards Engineering -97-


• Modular Structure; C data type; Programmer control;
• Declarations; Program components; expressions
• Statements, statement blocks; function blocks;
• Pre-processor derivatives; global variables;
• Function protypes; main function; function declarations; function calls and
output; library function

Structured Programming Techniques (12


hours)
• Data structures; arrays, strings, linear lists, and non-linear lists;
• Flow control structures; printers and files

Programming Cycle (4 hours)


• Coding, testing, debugging and maintenance
• Input/output functions, print(), scan(), and related I/O functions

Numerical Methods Applications (6 hours)


• Solution of non-linear equations, f(x) = 0
• Newton-Raphson and Secant methods
• Gaussian elimination and pivoting

Laboratory Work (60 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials assignments and computer
laboratory work.

Assessment
Assignments, tests, laboratory work and final examination. Their relative contributions to
final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Workshop Practice


Course Level: 1
Course Credit: 3CU

Brief Course Description


At the end of first year students should be subjected to vocational training in which they
attain practical skills in a workshop environment. Depending on the level of facilitation

Minimum Standards Engineering -98-


of the university this can be arranged either at the university or organized with the
industries.

Course Objectives
• To help students acquire practical skills in a workshop environment

Detailed Course Description


This practical course should cover at least eight modules. Some of the modules are
summarized as follows:

Safety Precautions (60 hours)


• Use and care of tools and measuring instruments
• Electric shock and its treatment, use of insulation meter, multi-meters wire-guage,
phase tester and other electrician’s tools
• Cables: sizes, current rating, jointing and termination
• Solders and soldering
• Main features of domestic installations and appliances, e.g. D.B. system,
fluorescent lamps, fans etc.
• Necessity and methods of earthing, faults and remedies, in wiring circuits.
• Winding practice of machine coils

Elementary Machine Shop (30 hours)


• Detailed study of centre lathe and accessories
• Plain and taper turning, simple screw cutting
• Cutting tools and their grinding
• Introduction of shaper, slotter, planner, pillar and radial drilling machines.

Fitting Shop (30 hours)


• Use and care of fitter’s tools. Marking out of jobs
• Practice in metal filing, sawing, drilling, Die sinking, tapping and reaming
• Introduction and use of power jack saw and arbor press

Smithy Shop (30 hours)


• The use and care of forging tools and blacksmith tools
• Open hearth forge, practice in upsetting, drawing out spreading, bending, cutting
and punching, hardening and tempering of small cutting tools.
• Brazing, electric and gas welding.

Electronics and Computer Shop (60 hours)


• Windows XP, Office automation and use of internet
• Software and hardware maintenace

Building Construction (30


hours)
• Brick work, concrete work, trusses and plumbing
• Building finishing processes; painting, varnishing and decorating.

Mode of Delivery

Minimum Standards Engineering -99-


The course will be taught through lectures and practical work in workshops/laboratories
and on sites.

Assessment
Supervision, inspection and technical report. Their relative contributions to final grade
are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Supervisor’s and inspector’s assessment 70%
Final Report 30%
Total 100%

Course Name: Engineering Mathematics III


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU

Course Description
Drawing from the concepts covered in Engineering Mathematics I and II, this course is
designed to consolidate and advance analytical techniques for solution of ordinary
differential equations; and introduces concepts fundamental to the study of other courses
in Computer Engineering. The major themes covered include integral transforms, series
solutions to ordinary differential equations and special functions.
Objectives
• Introduce the student to Integral Transforms and their application to the solution of
Ordinary Differential Equations
• Introduce the Power Series solution technique to Ordinary Differential Equations
• Expose the student to some special functions fundamental to engineering
specifically Gamma, Beta, Bessel and Legendre An important emphasis of the
course is to develop problem solving skills and proof skills by working on specific
problems in which it is natural to look at special or simpler cases in order to try to
discover patterns. An integral part of the process of mathematical thinking is to
wander into blind alleys, sometimes being frustrated, before ultimately obtaining a
solution or proof. In this process mathematical scientists often work together with
colleagues, and this group work and sharing of ideas often adds great value to a
mathematical investigation.
• A major goal of the course is to give a balanced introductory treatment of the area
of PDE so that a student appreciates the power of PDE modeling; and is aware of
major techniques for their solution. The focus of the course is on analytical
techniques for the classical linear PDE of physics and engineering (heat, wave and
Laplace equations), and their frequent occurrence in applications.
Course Content
3. Fourier Integrals and Transformations
• Motivation for the Fourier Integral
• Definition of Fourier Integral as a limit to the Fourier Series with period
tending to infinity
• Conditions for existence of a Fourier Integral representation (Dirichlet’s

Minimum Standards Engineering -100-


conditions, Existence of the absolute integral for the entire real axis)
• Complex exponential Fourier Integral representation, Standard Fourier
Integral representation, Fourier Cosine and Sine Integral representations
• Definition of the Fourier Transform and its Inverse
• Frequency spectrum of periodic and continuous functions
• Distinction between the Fourier Transform and Integral
• Properties of the Fourier Transform Transform: Linearity, First Shift
Theorem, Second Shift Theorem, t- duality, Time differentiation,
Frequency Differentiation, Convolution, Correlation
• Fourier Transform of special functions: Delta function (Sifting property),
Heaviside Step function,
• Applications: Parseval’s theorem, RCL circuits, Frequency shifting in
Communication theory (carrier signals and Antenna design)
• Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations with constant coefficients
4. Laplace Transformations
• Motivation for the Laplace transform
• Definition of the Laplace transform
• Comparison of the Laplace and Fourier Transforms
• Conditions for existence of the Laplace transform (Dirichlet’s conditions,
Piecewise continuity of thee function)
• Properties of Laplace Transforms: Linearity, First Shift Theorem, Second Shift
Theorem, Time differentiation, s-domain Differentiation, s-domain Integration
• Laplace Transforms of special functions: Delta function and Heaviside function
• Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations by Laplace Transform Techniques
• Solutions of Simultaneous Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with constant
coefficients
• Applications in RLC Circuit Analysis
3. Power Series Solutions to Ordinary Differential Equations
• Motivation of the Power Series solution method
• Concept of the Power Series method (Ordinary points, Singular points)
• Series solutions about Ordinary points
• Series solutions about Regular Singular points (Method of Frobenius)
4. Gamma and Beta Functions
• Integral Definition of Gamma and Beta Functions
• Properties of Gamma and Beta Functions
• Generalisation of the factorial by Means of the Gamma function
• Relations Between Gamma and Beta Functions
• Definition of Gamma Function for Negative Values of Argument
15. Bessel Functions
• Bessel’s Equation and its Solutions.
• Familiarisation with Characteristics and Graphs of Bessel Functions
• Properties of Bessel Functions of the First Kind: Differentiation, Recurrence
relationships, Generating functions
• Ordinary Differential Equations solvable using the notion of Bessel’s
equations
• Integral Representations of Bessel Functions
• Integrals Involving Bessel Functions

Minimum Standards Engineering -101-


• Laplace Transforms of Bessel functions
16. Legendre Functions
• Legendre’s Equation and its Solutions
• Legendre’s Polynomials; the Generating Function for Legendre’s
Polynomials; Orthogonality of Legendre’s Polynomials
• Rodriguez’s formula
• Orthogonality Relations for the Associated Legendre Functions,
• Familiarisation with Characteristics and Graphs of Legendre’s Polynomials
and Associated Legendre Functions
• Integrals involving Legendre Polynomials
17. Definition of a Partial Differential Equation
18. Derivation of Some Typical PDEs of Mathematical Physics
• The One-Dimensional Wave Equation (Vibrating String)
• The One-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
• The Telegraph or Transmission Line Equation
• The Two-Dimensional Wave Equation (Vibrating Membrane)
• The Two-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
• The Three-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
19. Classification of Partial Differential Equations
• Homogeneous and Non Homogeneous PDE’s
• Linear and Non-Linear PDE’s
• N-Order PDE’s
• Parabolic, Elliptic and Hyperbolic PDE’s
20. Classification of Boundary Conditions to PDE’s
• Homogeneous and Non Homogeneous BC’s
• Linear and Non-Linear BC’s
• Dirichlet BC’s
• Neumann BC’s
• Robin BC’s
• Cauchy BC’s
21. Overview of Methods of Solving Boundary Value Problems
22. Solutions of Boundary Value Problems Using the Method of Separation of
Variables
• 2nd Order Linear and Homogeneous BVP’s with Period BC’s
• Use of Fourier Series in the Solution of 2nd Order Linear and
Homogeneous Dirichlet and Neumann BVP’s
• Solution of Non-Homogeneous BVP’s
• Direct Originality with Mixed BVP’s
• The Cauchy BVP’s
• Sturm-Liouville Problems
23. Use of Laplace Transforms in Solving PDEs
24. FDM Solutions of Boundary Value Problems involving PDEs
• Parabolic BVP’s
• Elliptic BVP’s
• Hyperbolic BVP’s
• Use of MATLAB in the Solution of PDE’s
Mode of Delivery

Minimum Standards Engineering -102-


The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Electronic Circuits


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course gives basic knowledge on the design and operation of electronic circuits.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the principles of operation of electronic components and circuits
• Design electronic circuits

Detailed Course Description

Thermionic Devices (4 hours)


• Principles of Operation and Characteristics of Vaccum diodes, triode, tetrode and
pentode
• Biasing techniques and load lines; small signal parameters and equivalent circuits
• CRO, Photoelectric tubes
• Mercury are rectifier
Diodes (8 hours)
• Zener and avalanche types
• LEDs and tuned diodes
• Single and poly phase rectifier circuits
• Ripple factor, smoothing
• Voltage regulation and power supply design and use of regulators
• Voltage doubling and multiplying
• Clipping, clamping, slicer circuits
Field Effect Transistors (9 hours)
• JFETs and MOSFETs; construction, principles of operation, static and dynamic
characteristics, biasing and load lines
• FET amplifier circuits: CS, CD and CG
• Small signal parameters
• Equivalent circuits
• Amplifier analysis and design
• FET as a variable resistor
• MOSFETs in digital circuits

Minimum Standards Engineering -103-


BJTs (6 hours)
• Static and dynamic characteristics
• Biasing and load lines
• Small signal parameters
• Equivalent circuits
• Amplifier analysis and design
• Comparison of FETs and BJTs
Frequency Response of Amplifier (6 hours)
• Inter-electrode capacitance and the Miller effect
• High frequency hybrid-pi model of BJT
• FET high frequency equivalent circuits
• Analysis of amplifier performance at low frequency, mid-frequency estimation of
3bd frequencies
• Band width and gain band width product
Feedback and Operational Amplifiers (12
hours)
• Negative and positive feedback concepts
• Effect of negative feedback on gain, distortion and bandwidth, impedances,
stability
• Derivation and application of feedback signals; effect of feedback on input and
output impedances
• Qualitative discussion of amplifier stability
• Approximation ananlysis of signals and multistage feedback amplifiers
• Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifier characteristics
• Practical IC OPAMPs and their characteristics
• Feedback amplifiers based on OPAMPs
• Mathematical operations of addition/subtraction, multiplication by a constant,
integration, and differentiation
• OPAMP as a comparator
• Non-linear applications of OPAMPs
Practicals (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and laboratory work.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Electrical Machines I


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU
Minimum Standards Engineering -104-
Brief Course Description
The course equips students with theories and concepts related to static and dynamic
electrical machines.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• To present a comprehensive treatment of transformers and electrical machines.
• To understand, develop and apply physical concepts and principles of circuit
model equivalents of both transformers and motors.

Detailed Course Description


Magnetic Circuits (3 hours)
• Equivalent circuit
• MMF, magnetic flux, reluctance, magnetic path, hysteresis, eddy-currents

Transformers (8
hours)
• Construction and practical considerations
• No-Load and Load operations
• Excitation phenomenon, equivalent circuits
• Per unit system
• Losses, testing and determination of parameters
• Efficiency and voltage regulations.

Windings (6 hours)
• DC windings: Pitches; Lap, wave and Multiplex
• AC windings: Long pitch, short pitch and fractional slot winding (double/single
layer winding)
• Flux distribution and MMF development
• EMF development and winding factors
• Winding technologies

DC Machines (10
hours)
• Circuits models
• Magnetization characteristics, EMF and torque
• Commutation, armature reaction and compensating windings
• Methods of excitation and types of DC Machines

Induction Machines (7 hours)


• Construction and principles of operation
• Power across air gap
• Torque and power output
• Tests to determine circuit model parameters

Minimum Standards Engineering -105-


Synchronous Machines (7 hours)
• Construction and principles of operation
• Equivalent circuit
• Excitation and types of machines
• Determination of Armature reaction, Ampere turns and Leakage reactance
• Portlier method

Special Machines (4 hours)


• Construction and principles of operation of
 A single phase induction machine
 Series repulsion
 Shaded pole
 Universal and step-motors

Practicals (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and laboratory work.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Electromagnetics II


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course builds on Electromagnetics I to provide concepts on electric and magnetic
fields in material space.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the theoretical background of static electromagnetic fields in material
space.
• Derive and apply equations related to static electromagnetic fields in material
space

Detailed Course Description

Electric Field in Material Space (20 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -106-


• Properties of materials
• Conventional and conduction current
• Polarization in dielectric
• Displacement current
• Dielectric constant and strength
• Continuity equation and relaxation time
• Lorenz force field and Clausius Mosoti equation

Electrostatic Boundary Value Problem (20 hours)


• Boundary conditions
• Poisson’s and Laplace Equations
• Uniquences theorem
• Procedure for solving Poisson’s and Laplace equations
• Method of images
• Electric specific energy
Magnetic Field in Material Space (20 hours)
• Magnetization, magnetic moments and permeability
• Ferromagnetism, paramagnetism and diamagnetism
• Magnetic Boundary Conditions
• Magnetic Forces, Material and Devices
• Inductor and Inductance
• Method of images
• Magnetic specific energy

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Electrical Materials I


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course exposes students to the basic understanding of atomic theory and spectrum of
electrical engineering materials that include dielectrics, semiconductors and their
applications.

Minimum Standards Engineering -107-


Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the basic principles of atomic theory and wave mechanics.
• Understand the characteristics of dielectrics and semi-conductors materials and
their applications.

Detailed Course Description


Atomic theory and introduction to wave mechanics (2 hours)
• Rutherford and Bohr atoms
• Emission spectra
• Breakdown of classical theory
Dual Nature of Particles and Waves (4
hours)
• Electron diffraction
• Photoelectric effect
• Blackbody radiation
• De Broglie’s postulate

The Hydrogen Atom (4 hours)


• Multi-electron atoms: Pauli’s exclusion principle, electronic structure of elements
and the periodic table

Thermal behaviour of Materials (8 hours)


• Equipartition of energy (specific heats of gases as an example)
• Statistical mechanics and energy distribution: Maxwell-Boltzman’s distribution,
Fermi-Dirac distribution and Fermi energy.

Free electron and zone theories (16 hours)


• Free electron theory: successes and failures
• Band theory: Kronig-Penney model, allowed and forbidden zones, Brillouin
zones.
• Constant energy surfaces and occupancy of states: equienergy contours, Fermi
surfaces, overlapping and non-overlapping, density of states.
• Application of zones theory: classification of materials (conductors, semi-
conductors and insulators)
• Fermi energy in a metal: factors limiting acceleration of electrons, Mathiesen’s
rule. Hall effect and Hall devices
• Conduction of heat
• Concept of phonons: conduction of phonons and electrons, thermal conductivity,
Widemann-Franz-Lorenz law.

Dielectric Materials and Processes (14 hours)


• Chemistry and physics of insulating materials
• Brief review of electrostatic relationships: Coulomb’s law, dielectric
displacement, dielectric constant, polarization density, electric susceptibility
• Temperature dependence of permittivity: dipolar polarization, Langevin function,
complex dielectric constant, loss tangent.

Minimum Standards Engineering -108-


• Electrical processes in dielectrics: Piezoelectric effect, ferro-electricity, ionic
conductivity, electrostriction and Curie-Wiess law.
• Electric breakdown in dielectric: thermal, electrolytic, dipole, collision and gas
discharge breakdown.

Semiconductor materials and processes (12 hours)


• Intrinsic semiconductors: band model, effective mass, density state, hole and
electron conduction.
• Extrinsic semiconductors: doping, donor and acceptor states, Fermi level and its
variation with temperature and dopants.
• Carrier concentration and mobility: Hall effect, measurement of carrier
concentration and mobility, temperature dependence of mobility, diffusion
constant, Einstein’s relations.
• Majority carrier lifetime, generation and recombination, recombination centres,
diffusion length.
• Contacts: surface states, depletion and inversion, rectifying contacts, Ohmic
contacts, rectifier equation and point contact.
• P-N junction and its applications: built-in potential, operation under forward and
reverse bias, expression for hole, electron and total currents, junction capacitance,
junction rectifier zener diode, photocells, quantum mechanical tunneling and the
tunnel diode, LEDs solar cells, breakdown in p-n junctions.
• Integrated circuits: types of ICs, advantages of integration, fabrication techniques.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Engineering Mathematics IV


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU

Course Description
This course discusses basic theory of probability and statistics and its applications in Civil
engineering. Materials given include basic understanding of statistics, mathematics, population
and sample, data presentation, methods of calculating mean, standard deviation, mean estimation,
outliers tests, simulation and probability theory, models of distributions, statistical tests of
distributions, mean and standard deviation, linear regression, coefficient of correlation, and

Minimum Standards Engineering -109-


computer application for statistical analysis. This course is intended to develop the ability in
design research, in data analysis, and in decision analysis using valid statistical approach.

Course Objectives
The main objective of this course is to:
• Develop in the engineering student the ability to plan, collect and analyze data leading to
valid and reliable findings applicable to natural phenomena.
Course Content
3. Discrete Mathematics
• Functions, Relations, and Sets
• Basic Logic
• Applications of logic to computer engineering Proof Techniques
• Basics of Counting
• Graphs and Trees
• Recursion
4. Probability Basic
• Introduction: Basic concepts Random experiments & events
• Elementary Theorems
• Probabilistic Modelling
• Independence
• Transformations
• Moments
• Reliability and failure rates
• Transforms of PDF
• Tail inequalities
• A vector Random variable
• Joint CDF & Joint PDF Conditional Probabilities & Densities
• Expectation, Covariance & correlation coefficient
• Joint distributions.
3. Estimation Theory
• Definitions: Estimators, Point-Estimators, Interval Estimators
• Properties of Point Estimators
• Types of Estimation: Estimation of a Distribution’s Unknown Parameter;
Estimating the value of an inaccessible variable in terms of an accessible
variable
• Maximum Likelihood Estimator
• Bayesian Estimator
• Mean Square Linear Estimator: Univariate Linear Regression; Orthogonality;
Basic extension to Multivariate Linear Regression
4. Random Processes
• Definition of a random process, qualitative discussion of examples of random
processes: Poisson process
• Markov process, Brownian motion process
• Digital modulation using phase-shift keying
• Stationary and Ergodic processes

Minimum Standards Engineering -110-


• Power spectral density (PSD): Properties of PSD, PSD applied to base band
signals; PSD of white noise process
• Gaussian random processes and their application in communication theory.
5. Statistics
• Overview of Statistics (Descriptive and Inferential)
• Role of Statistics in Engineering
• Misuse and Abuse of Statistics
• Design of Survey Experiments
• Descriptive Statistics
• Simple Linear Regression and Correlation Analysis
• Tests of Hypothesis
• Use of a Statistical Data Analysis Software Package
6. Complex Variable Analysis
• Functions of a Complex Variable
• Mapping and Conformal Mapping
• Line Integrals
• Cauchy-Goursat Theorem
• Taylor and Laurent Series
• Residue Theory
• Complex Analysis Applied to Potential Theory
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Power Systems Theory


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course introduces the students to power systems engineering and covers basic
principles about transmission lines (overhead and underground), transformers and
generators in power systems.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the components and characteristics of a power system
• Calculate parameters of transmission lines and mechanical forces in overhead
lines

Detailed Course Description

Minimum Standards Engineering -111-


Basic Concepts (2
hours)
• One line diagram
• Per unit system

Series Impedance of Transmission Lines (6 hours)


• Conductors types
• Resistance, skin effect
• Line inductance based and flux considerations. Inductance of single phase and
three phase lines. Inductance of composite conductor line.
• Inductance of Bundled conductors

Capacitance of Transmission Lines (4 hours)


• Capacitance of single phase and 3-phase lines
• Effect of earth on capacitance
• Capacitance of bundled conductors, parallel circuit lines, Ferranti effect.

Representation of Transmission Lines (6


hours)
• Short, medium and long transmission lines
• Solution of equations
• Travelling waves, surge impedance loading
• Equivalent circuit
• Power flow through the lines
• Voltage regulation and line surges
Mechanical Design of Overhead Lines (7
hours)
• Line supports
• Sag and tension calculation
• Total length of conductor supports at different levels
• Mechanical degree of safety
• Effect of wind pressure and ice loading, conductor vibration and use of dampers

Insulators (4 hours)
• Insulator material types of insulators
• Voltage distribution over insulator string
• String efficiency, methods of improving the string efficiency
• Testing of insulators

Corona (2 hours)
• Corona effect, corona loss, radio interference due to corona

Underground Cables (9 hours)


• Types of cables
• Calculation of inductance and capacitance
• Insulation resistance and insulation breakdown of cables
• Thermal characteristics of cables
• Calculation of current rating of the cables

Minimum Standards Engineering -112-


• Fault locating techniques cable jointing techniques

Transformers in Power Systems (8 hours)


• Equivalent circuits to 2 and 3 winding 3 phase transformers
• Transformer connections and groups
• Parallel operation of transformers
• Losses and cooling
• Harmonics in transformers

Synchronous Generators and Power Systems (8


hours)
• Cylindrical and salient pole machine parameters
• Power delivered to infinite bus
• Excitation
• Governor
• Capability curves, V-curves
• Synchronism
• Parallel operation of synchronous machines

Economics of Power Plants (4 hours)


• Kelvins’ law of transmission, choice of transmission, distribution voltages
• Effect of load factor, power factor and diversity factor on generating cost.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Electrical Materials II


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course is a continuation of Electrical Materials I, it covers basically semiconductor
technology, optical devices and superconductivity.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:

Minimum Standards Engineering -113-


• Understand and appreciate the principles of operation and design of
semiconductor and optical devices
• Understand the technology of producing semiconductor and optical devices
• Understand the principles of superconductivity and its engineering applications

Detailed Course Description

Bipolar Junction Transistors (4 hours)


• BJT fabrication
• Heterojunction BJT

Unipolar Devices (9 hours)


• Metal-semiconductor contacts
• Surface charge in metal oxide semiconductor capacitors
• Fabrication of FETs e.g. MOSFET, MESFET
• Heterojunction FETs
• MOS diode

Transistor structures (7 hours)


• Permeable base transistors
• Planar doped burrier devices
• Super lattice devices
• Resonant tunneling devices

Photonic Devices (8 hours)


• Optical absorption
• Crystalline and amorphous structure
• Solar cells
• Electroluminescence and LEDs: materials, reliability, temperature dependence,
spectral purity, response
• Photo detectors

Integrated Circuit Design and Technology (12 hours)


• Planner technology
• Pattern generation and photomask
• Photolithography
• Epitaxy oxidation
• Diffusion and iron implantation
• Metallization and interconnections
• Encapsulation
• IC components and basic building blocks
• Design philosophy

Lasers (6 hours)
• Spontaneous and stimulated emission
• Semiconductors lasers
• Optical absorption, loss and gain

Minimum Standards Engineering -114-


Optical Fibres (6
hours)
• Fabrication and principles of operation
• Properties and losses

Superconductivity (8 hours)
• Occurrence and theory
• Critical fields and Meissner effect
• Penetration depth and quantum tunneling
• Engineering applications

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Network Theory I


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course helps the student to understand the principles and methods used to simplify
electric networks.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Know various types and components of networks
• Apply network concepts to build, simplify and analyse electric and electronic
systems.

Detailed Course Description

Network elements, R,L,M,C (4 hours)


• Thevenin’s Norton’s, Superposition and Reciprocity theorems
• Star delta transformation for D.C. and A.C. circuits
• Single-phase and three phase circuit analysis

Minimum Standards Engineering -115-


Network functions (8 hours)
• Review of Laplace transforms
• Simple first and second order circuits
• Natural responses and frequencies
• Pole and zero frequency response
• Bode plots

Matrix methods and network analysis (8


hours)
• Network topology, planar and hinged graphs
• KVL and KCL, mesh and loop formulations
• Cut-sets, coupled circuits

Fourier Transforms and Integrals (4 hours)


• Convolution integral
• Solution of circuits with periodic but not-sinusoidal inputs.

Two port networks (12 hours)


• Types of two-port networks, y-, z-, h- and ABCD parameters.
• Image impedance, insertion loss, attenuation and phase constants.

Network Stability (12 hours)


• Reliability, stable and unstable network function, realizing network
functions/polynomials, positive real network functions
• Synthesis of LC, RC, RL and RLC networks
• Generalized ladder networks

Electric filters
(12 hours)
• Classification of filters, passive and active filters
• Filter transfer functions
• Butterworth and Chebyschev filters
• Attenuation and phase function, propagation constant, normalized filter.
• Magnitude and frequency normalization
• Frequency time functions
• Denormalised filter.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%

Minimum Standards Engineering -116-


Total 100%

Course Name: Basic Thermodynamics


Course Level: 2
Course Credit: 3CU

Brief Course Description


The course introduces students to principles of thermodynamics as required in electrical
engineering. These principles will be applied in other courses such as energy conversion.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• State and understand the laws of thermodynamics
• Apply the knowledge in the analysis of thermo systems applicable to electrical
engineering

Detailed Course Description

Basic concepts and definitions (9 hours)


• Processes and cycles
• Concept of thermodynamic property
• Definition of state

First Law of Thermodynamics (18 hours)


• Work & Heat at energies in transition
• Interchange-ability of energy states, working fluids and steady/unsteady, flow
energy equations
• Perfect and real gases

Second Law of Thermodynamics (18 hours)


• Reversible and Irreversible processes
• Entropy and Carnot Efficiency
• Concept of Available Energy

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -117-


Course Name: Electromagnetic Fields
Course Level: 3
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course covers types and propagation of electromagnetic waves and their importance
in electrical and telecommunications engineering.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Derive relevant equations applied in wave guides and propagation of EM waves
• Use electromagnetic laws and principles to solve problems in propagation of EM
waves.

Detailed Course Description

Unbounded Wave Propagation (10 hours)


• Definition of wave motion
• Wave equation; Helmholtz equation
• Wave propagation in uniform plane
• Intrinsic impedance
• Conductors, quasi-conductors and dielectrics
• Wave in conduction media
• Attenuation, skin depth and surface impedance
• Poynting’s vector, reflection of waves
• Standing waves and VSWR, energy in standing waves; polarization

Guided waves and wave guiding system (10 hours)


• Transmission lines and wave guides, and their types
• Transmission line equation using distributed circuit analysis
• Transmission line equation, primary and secondary constants (R, L, C, a, b, Z0)
and values for a, b and Z0 of low loss and lossless conductors.
• Micro strip transmission lines: characteristics and empirical expressions

Standing waves on transmission lines (10


hours)
• Expressions for S and R
• Different terminations; Matching, matching devices, quantitative treatment of
quarter wave transformer
• Single stub, double stub tuners and triple stub tuners
• Development and treatment of Smith Chart.

Minimum Standards Engineering -118-


The Infinite Plane Waveguide (10
hours)
• Maxwell’s equation, solutions separated into TE, TM and TEM modes
• Field Pattern
• Cut-off frequency; space wavelength, space velocity and group velocity
• Attenuation and perturbation; impedance convention

Hollow Rectangular Wave Guide (8 hours)


• Complete field expression for TM and TEM modes
• Use Maxwell’s equation and wave guides
• Expression for a, b and f
• Dominant mode and its parameters
• Circular waveguide
• Field solution for TE and TEM modes

Wave propagation in Plasmas (7


hours)
• Plasma oscillations and frequency
• Maxwell’s equations
• Concept of plasma cut-off frequency and consequences

Optical Fibres
(5 hours)
• Electromagnetic modes in fibres
• Discussion of physical optics
• Types and parameters of fibres

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Applied Analogue Electronics


Course Level: 3
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description

Minimum Standards Engineering -119-


The course treats analogue electronics focusing on applications of analogue electronics in
amplifiers, power regulation, oscillation and control.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the operation of the various analogues electronic circuits
• Derive relevant equations and apply them to solve engineering problems, design
and analyse analogue electronic circuits
• Build and test analogue electronic circuits

Detailed Course Description


Power Amplifiers (9 hours)
• Class A, B, C and IC Power Amplifiers

Bipolar and FET Differential Amplifiers (10 hours)


• DC and AC analysis
• Single and Double ended operation
• Differential gain
• Common mode gain and rejection ration

Operational Amplifier (10


hours)
• Characteristics and parameters
• Linear and non-linear operation
• Inverting and non-inverting
• OPAMP applications circuits
• LCs, 555 timers

Regulated Power Supplies (6 hours)


• Open loop and closed loop voltage regulation
• Voltage and current limiting
• Switched mode regulators

Oscillators (6 hours)
• Sinusoidal and non-sinusoidal oscillators
• RC, RL and Crystal oscillators
• Relaxation oscillator
• Schmitt Trigger

Electronic Control Circuits (4 hours)


• Silicon controlled rectifier
• Full wave devices
• DC and AC control circuits
• Feedback in control circuitry
Practical (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Minimum Standards Engineering -120-


Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Control Engineering I


Course Level: 3
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course requires a good mathematical background especially in complex, matrix and
Laplace algebra. It is an introductory course of control engineering that covers block
diagram systems representation, stability and compensation techniques.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand operation and characteristics of control systems
• Analyse and design control systems using appropriate mathematical tools

Detailed Course Description

General s-plane topics (12 hours)


• Mathematical models and block diagrams
• Transient response characteristics
• Second order systems
• Steady state characteristics
• Classification of system, errors criteria, analysis by root-locus,
• Bode and Nyquist plots, constants M-contours, constant-contours
• Nicholas chart

Stability and Design Procedure (12 hours)


• Stability criteria
• Types of stability
• Characteristics frequency response testing
• System identification, statistical considerations
• Time-domain and frequency domain identification, design, correlation between
root locus and frequency response

Compensation techniques (12 hours)


• Cascade frequency compensation: lag and lead compensator bridge-T
compensators

Minimum Standards Engineering -121-


• Cascade root-locus compensation lag, lead, lag-lead bridge-T compensators,
comparison of techniques
• Feedback compensation: time response consideration, transformation of control
elements, use of root-locus and polar plots

State-space methods (12 hours)


• Linear algebra: matrix methods
• Linear vectors; spaces, dimension, minor products, Euclidean space
• Orthonormalisation, change of bases
• Eigen-values, eigenvectors, polynomial matrices transfer function matrices
• System stability by Lyapunov’s state-space representation, boundendness of
solution
• Asymptotic stability domain of attraction, linearization, limit cycles
• Poincare-Pendixson theorem, Lienards criteria, point-transformation method

Discrete Data System (12 hours)


• Sampling process, Shannon sampling theorem, impulse sampling
• The z-transform, inverse transform theorems
• Pulse transfer function
• Limitations, modified z-transform
• Inverse system representation: block diagrams, signal flow graphs
• Time and frequency response
• Time response, frequency response, bilinear transform, relative stability, root-
locus

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Applied Digital Electronics


Course Level: 3
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description

Minimum Standards Engineering -122-


The course treats digital electronics focusing on applications of digital electronics in logic
circuits and digital storage.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand operations and applications of digital electronic circuits
• Analyse and sysnthesise digital electronic circuits
• To build and test digital electronic circuits

Detailed Course Description

Synthesis of logic circuits (4 hours)


• Mapping and tabular minimization

FET Switching Characterisation (2 hours)


• CMOS gates

Logic Families
(8 hours)
• TTL, ECL, CMOS
• Fall-in, fall-out
• Speed; power and noise performance
• Interconnection

Applications (14 hours)


• Clock and sweep generations
• Monostable and Astable
• Schmitt Trigger
• Multiplers and de-multiplexers
• Codes, decoders and code

Digital storage and Memory Circuits (14


hours)
• Read only Memory
• Static and dynamic Random Access Memory
• PROM; EPROM
• Memory organization
• Memory chips
• Compact disks
• Error correction during transmission and processing of digital data

Introduction to Programmable Logic Controllers (3


hours)

Practical (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery

Minimum Standards Engineering -123-


The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Electrical Machines II


Course Level: 3
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course addresses practical electrical machines which include transformers, DC and
AC generators and motors.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Analyse the characteristics of the electrical machines and their behaviour in and
electrical systems.
• Understand the applications of various electrical machines in an electrical system
• Operate and test these machines

Detailed Course Description


Transformers (12 hours)
• Transformer Foundamentals, Importance of transformers and types
and construction
• Ideal transformer
• Theory and operation of real Single-phase transformers and
Phasor diagrams
• Leakage reactance. Losses. Equivalent circuit parameters
• No load and short circuit test per Unit systems
• Voltage regulation and efficiency
• Autotransformers
• Tapping, parallel operation and load division
• Inrush current and exciting current
• Three-phase transformer and the per unit system
• Three phase connections and harmonic Suppression
• Vector groups, three phase transformation using two transformers.

(9 hours)

Three Phase Induction Motor and generator

Minimum Standards Engineering -124-


• Production of rotating field and torque
• Reversal of rotation, construction
• Synchronous speed
• Slip and its effect on rotor frequency and voltage
• Equivalent circuit
• Power and torque, losses, efficiency and power factor
• Torque-speed characteristics
• Starting and speed control
• Induction generator.
(6 hours)
Single-Phase Induction Motors

• Types and performance analysis


• Heating and cooling of motors.
(9 hours)
Synchronous Generator

• Construction, excitation system, equivalent circuit and phasor diagram


• Power and torque
• Measurement of parameters
• Generator operating alone
• Capability chart, synchronization parallel operation with infinite bus
and power sharing
• Parallel operation of same size generator generating, loss of field excitation
(9 hours)
• Cooling systems and shut down procedure.

Synchronous Motors

• Principle of operation, starting, shaft load, power angle and developed torque
• Counter voltage (CEMF) and armature reaction voltage, equivalent circuit
And phasor diagram
• Power Equation
• Effects of changes in shaft load and field excitation
• V-curves. Losses and efficiency
• Power factor improvement
• Speed control

Practicals (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final grade
are as shown below:

Minimum Standards Engineering -125-


Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Electrical Installation Practice


Course Level : 3
Course Credit : 4 CU

Brief Course Description


In this course the students will acquire knowledge and skills about domestic, institutional
and industrial electrical installations.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• know electrical installation standards and practices
• inspect and test electrical installations

Detailed Course Description

Electrical Drawing
(4 hours)
• Symbols
• Types of diagrams
• Power Systems
• Electrical Equipment

Wiring Regulation
(4 hours)
• IEEE Regulations: scope; objectives
• Requirements for safety and protection
• Standards: national and international standards
(6
hours)
Selection and erection of equipment
• Locations
• Tools and equipment
• Performance criteria
• Ratings
• Protection and safety
(12
hours)
Special installations
• Domestic
• Industrial
• Institutional

Minimum Standards Engineering -126-


(4
hours)
Inspection; testing; certification

Practicals (30
hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and practicals.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final grade
are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Computer Programming Fundamentals


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 4 CU

Course Description
Competency in a programming language is prerequisite to the study of computer
engineering. Object-oriented programming, event-driven applications, and the use of
extensive APIs (application programming interfaces) are fundamental tools that computer
engineering students need early in their academic program.
Objectives/Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course the student should be able to:
• Describe how computer engineering uses or benefits from programming
fundamentals.
• Identify the appropriate paradigm for a given programming problem.
• Use a suitable programming language to implement, test, and debug algorithms for
solving simple problems.
• Describe the way a computer allocates and represents these data structures in
memory.
• Outline the philosophy of object-oriented design and the concepts of encapsulation,
subclassing, inheritance, and polymorphism.
Course Content
1. History and Overview
• Indicate some reasons for studying programming fundamentals
• Influential people; important areas such as programming constructs,
algorithms, problem solving, data structures, programming paradigms,
recursion, object-oriented programming, event-driven programming, and
concurrent programming
• Contrast between an algorithm and a data structure
• Distinguish between a variable, type, expression, and assignment

Minimum Standards Engineering -127-


• Highlight the role of algorithms in solving problems
• Describe some of the fundamental data structures such as array, record,
stack, and queue
• Explain how divide-and-conquer strategies lend themselves to recursion
• Explore some additional resources associated with programming
fundamentals
• Explain the purpose and role of programming fundamentals in computer
engineering
2. Programming Languages
• Definition and History
• Characteristics (Pragmatics, Semantics and Syntax)
• Distinction between Text-based and Visual Programming
• Classification (Categorical, Chronological and Generational)
• Comparison of common programming languages (C, C++, C#, Java)
• Programming errors and warnings (syntax, logical, etc.)
3. Programming Paradigms
• Definition and rationale of a programming paradigm
• Types: Structured, Unstructured, Procedural, Object-oriented, Event-
Drive, Generic etc.
• Separation of behavior and implementation
4. ISO/ANSI C++ Programming Fundamentals
• Bjarne Stroustrup Design rules
• Console applications basics (Source file, Basic I/O, Standard I/O
Consoles, Function main( ))
• Fundamental data types
• Expressions and operators
• Control constructs (Conditional and Iterative)
• Pointers and Named collections (Arrays, Enumerators, Bit-fields, Unions)
• User-defined data types (Structures and Classes)
• Functions (In-built and User-defined)
• Object –oriented programming (Abstraction, Encapsulation, Inheritance,
Composition, Polymorphism, Friend and Virtual Functions)
• File I/O
5. Algorithms and Problem-Solving
• Problem-solving strategies
• The role of algorithms in the problem-solving process
• Implementation strategies for algorithms
• Debugging strategies
• The concept and properties of algorithms
• Structured decomposition
6. The Integrated Development Environment (IDE)
• Definition
• Toolchains
• Advantages of IDEs
• Comparison of IDEs
• Using a typical IDE (Visual Studio)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment

Minimum Standards Engineering -128-


Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Instrumentation and Measurement


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


The course enables students to acquire knowledge and skills on electrical instrumentation
and measurements.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the construction, operation and characteristic of electrical instruments
• Use electrical instruments to measure various quantities

Detailed Course Description


Measurement and Errors (10 hours)
• Definition, Accuracy, precision, sensitivity, resolution, Decibel. Bandwidth,
Significant figures
• Types of errors
• Constructional features
• Types of Ammeters, meter, etc.

Electromechanical Instruments (10 hours)


• Moving coil and moving iron meters
• Temperature compensation
• Extension of Instrument ranges by shunts and multipliers
• Ohms per volt and loading effect for voltmeter
• Calibration of D.C. Instruments
• Watthour meter and power factor meters
• Instrument transformers
• Frequency meters, KVAR meters and phase sequence measurement
• Recording Instruments

Bridges and Potentiometers (10 hours)


• Wheatstone bridge and Kelvin bridge
• A.C. bridges and their applications
• A.C and D.C. potentiometers.

Electronic Instruments (12 hours)


• Amplified D.C. meter
• Average, peak, and true r.m.s responding A.C. voltmeters

Minimum Standards Engineering -129-


• Electronic multi-meters
• Considerations in choosing an analogue voltmeter
• Q meter Dual trace and storage oscilloscopes
• Introduction to digital instruments. Phase angle measurement.

Measurement of Non Electrical Quantities (4 hours)


• Classification of transducers
• Measurement of temperature, pressure, displacement, vibration, Speed and
acceleration.

Signal Analysis: (8 hours)


• Wave analysis.
• Harmonic distortion analysis.
• Spectrum analysis.

Practicals (12 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, laboratory work and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests, laboratory work and final examination. Their relative contributions to
the final grade are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Maintenance Engineering


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


The course introduces basic concepts of maintenance engineering as applied to electrical
equipment and systems

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand maintenance principles and plan maintenance schedules
• Carry out inspection, servicing and troubleshooting of electrical equipment and
systems

Detailed Course Description


Introduction (6 hours)
• Overview of damage mechanism and their burden
• Evaluation of equipment reduction loss

Minimum Standards Engineering -130-


• Failure modes
• Effects and critical analysis of failures
• Failure prevention

Maintenance planning (6 hours)


• Planned preventive maintenance
• Planned corrective maintenance
• Condition based maintenance
• Condition monitoring techniques

Maintainability and reliability assessment (8


hours)
• Organising for maintenance records
• Equipment record
• Inspection record
• Inspection check list
• Inspection schedule
• Maintenance cost record

Machine tools maintenance (8 hours)


• General recommendations
• Troubleshooting
• Lubrication schedule
• Lubrication points

Electric Motor and generator Maintenance (10 hours)


• General recommendations
• Insulation maintenance
• Bearing maintenance
• Commutation and brush maintenance

Maintenance and repair of electronic equipment (7 hours)


• technique and procedures

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final
Grade are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -131-


Course Name : Engineering Economics
Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


Engineering Economics course introduces students to economics principles and methods,
and accounting principles which will enable them to understand the socio-economic
environment.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• understand economic and accounting principles
• carry out a cost analysis and estimation of project costs.

Detailed Course Description


Introduction of Economics
(15 hours)

• History of economic thought and definition of economics


• Macro and Micro economic
• Economics laws and applications
• Assumptions and methods of economics
• Cost benefit analysis, prices, wages, rent, interest and profit
• Economic planning and development.

The social framework (8


hours)
• Population, allocation of economic resources, demand and supply concepts
• The structure, organization and ownership the means of production
• National income, GDP, GNP

Accounting
• Its components and determinants
• Methods of estimating costs
• Single price methods – annual rate of return
• Unit methods
• Superficial area methods
• Elemental methods
• Approximate methods

Introduction to cost planning and cost control techniques


(7 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final grade

Minimum Standards Engineering -132-


are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Power Electronics


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


The course covers power electronic devices and their applications in power converters.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the operations and characteristics of power electronics devices
• Understand operation and design of power electronic circuits
• Build and test power electronic circuits

Detailed Course Description


Principles of Power Electronics (6 hours)
• Converters and Applications
• Control Aspects of power electronics circuit Components and their Effects,.

Power Electronic Devices


• Power diode, BJT, MOSFET IGBT’ and SCR’s, GTO, & TRIAC and DIAC
• Their construction, characteristics, operations, losses, ratings, control and
protection of thyristors.

AC to DC converters/rectifiers (12 hours)


• Half wave and full wave rectifiers with resistive and inductive loads
• Un-controlled, semi controlled and full controlled rectification
• 3 Phase rectifiers: un-controlled, semi controlled and full controlled
• 6-pulse, 12-pulse and 24 pulse rectification
• PWM converters.

DC to AC converters/inverters (9 hours)
• Single phase DC to AC converters
• 3 Phase inverter
• 6-pulse, 12 pulse inverters
• PWM inverters.

Switched Mode Power Supplies (6 hours)


• DC to DC conversion

Minimum Standards Engineering -133-


• Buck, Boost and Buck-Boost converters
• Isolated converters, Forward converters
• Fly back converters

Practicals (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures tutorials, assignments and laboratory work.

Assessment
Assignments, tests, laboratory work and final examination. Their relative contributions
to the final grade are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Energy Conversion


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


This course helps the students to understand different energy sources and conversion
technologies for generating electric power and heat.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the energy conversion principles
• Distinguish between various energy sources and conversion technologies

Detailed Course Description


Energy Resources and conversion (27 hours)
• Renewable energy resources
• Solar (photovoltaic and thermal)
• Hydro
• Biomass (traditional, bio-fuels)
• Wind
• Geothermal
• Conventional energy resources (coal, Natural Gas, petroleum nuclear)
• Combined heat and power (CHP)
• Heat transfer and energy efficiency

Processes and conversion technologies (18 hours)


• Thermo, photoelectric, electro-thermal conversions
• Electrochemical (chemical batteries and fuel cells)

Minimum Standards Engineering -134-


• Electromagnetic conversion
• Gassification
• Pico Hydro turbines

Practical (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, practical work and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests, practicals and final examination. Their relative contributions to
the final grade are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and practical work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Energy Utilisation


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


The course equips students with knowledge of energy utilization technologies and
applications.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand energy utilization concepts and technologies
• Carry out calculations in energy utilization and plan illumination schemes

Detailed Course Description


Heating (10 hours)
• Electric heating: Resistance, Induction
• Dielectric heating
• Electric furnaces
• Microwaves heating.

Electric Welding (3 hours)


• Resistance welding and its types.

Illumination (17 hours)


• Fundamentals of illumination Engineering
• Laws, units, terms used
• Requirements for good lighting

Minimum Standards Engineering -135-


• Illumination schemes for various situations (street lighting, Commercial/
Industrial lighting, Stadium/ flood/ Stage / Spot lighting etc.)
• Types of lamps, their working and relative merit.

Practical (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, practical work and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests, practicals and final examination. Their relative contributions to the
final Grade are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and practical work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Communication Theory


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


He course introduces the student to the theory of communication systems

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand principles of signal transmission, filtering and modulation
• Distinguish between different types of noise and transmission systems
• Analyse characteristics of signals and effect of noise in communication systems

Detailed Course Description

Introduction (6 hours)
• Fundamental terms and definitions
• Information, message, signal, analogue and digital signals
• Elements of communication systems
• Modulating and coding need for modulation
• Coding methods and benefits.

Signals and spectra (12 hours)


• Method of signal representation
• Time and frequency domain
• Mathematical representation of signals, Fourier series and Fourier Transforms
• Power in a signal, Parse Val’s power theorem
• Raleigh energy theorem

Minimum Standards Engineering -136-


• Fourier Transform and convolution of signals
• Specific signal types as impulse step and signum function.

Signal Transmission and filtering (12


hours)
• Linear time invariant systems
• Impulse response and superposition integral
• Transfer function and block diagram analysis
• Distortion and equalizers
• Transmission loss and repeater
• Ideal and real filters, quadrature filters and Hilbert transform
• Correlation and spectral density
• Probability and Random variables: Probability functions, probability models and
distributions, statistical averages.

Random Signals and Noise (15 hours)


• Random process, ensemble and time average, stationary and argotic
Process, noise equivalent BW
• Analogue base band transmission
• Linear Modulation: Band pass systems and signals, AM, DSB, SSB, VSB
• Modulated signals, modulators, balanced modulator, & switching modulator
• SSB generation (method), demodulators, synchronous, detection, Heterodyne
detection, envelope detection.

Pulse Modulation (9 hours)


• Sampling Theory, ideal sampling and reconstruction, aliasing,
PAM, PWM, PPM.
Exponential CW Modulation (6 hours)
• Frequency and phase modulation
• Bandwidth criteria, generation methods, receivers, de-emphasis filtering.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final grade
are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Business Management


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 4 CU

Minimum Standards Engineering -137-


Brief Course Description
This course introduces students to principles of managing engineering businesses and
projects/contracts. It covers organizational structures and characteristics, management
functions and marketing principles.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand organizational operations, management function and marketing
principles
• Manage an organization, business and project/contract.

Detailed Course Description

Organizations (6
hours)
• Definitions and reasons for their existence
• Classifications
• Objectives, structure and ownership
• Evolution of management theory

Management functions (12


hours)
• Planning, organizing, human resource management
• Leadership motivation
• Monitoring and control
• The rolls and responsibilities of managers
• The challenges managers face today
• Management of organizational change
• Conflict resolution and creativity

Marketing (12 hours)


• Environmental forces affecting the marketing process
• Tools used by modern marketers
• Four P,s of marketing (product, place, price and promotion)

Development of an Enterprise (10


hours)
• Identification and selection of a viable project
• Preliminary and detailed studies
• Preparation and evaluation of business plans
• Resource mobilization and start-up

Production planning and control (10 hours)


• Product design
• Plant location and layout
• Forecasting, planning routing, loading, scheduling and dispatching

Minimum Standards Engineering -138-


• Follow-up actions, capacity planning and production smoothing
• Materials requirement and manufacturing resources planning
• Inventory planning and control
• Productivity and service quality
• Quality assurance and statistical quality control methods

Production management (10 hours)


• Pricing, competitor and customer analysis
• Product strategy and marketing nix decisions
• Customer service and financial analysis for product management
• Service and industrial marketing including standard industrial
Classification system
• Derived demand, industrial buying behaviours and market segmentation
• Business ethics: ethics of markets and prices, environmental, customer
employee issues

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final
grade are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Legal Aspects of Engineering


Course Level : 3
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


This course equips students with basics of legal issues affecting the engineering
contracts. It covers law of contract and tendering.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the law of contract and tendering process
• Manage the tendering process and contract

Detailed Course Description

Law of contract (36 hours)


• Contract management
• Subcontracting and subcontracting agreement

Minimum Standards Engineering -139-


• The role of client/customer, the contractor, subcontractor, Suppliers and
consultants
• Engineer’s professional responsibilities and fees
• Liability and indemnity

Tendering
• Types of contract and basis of tender
• Contractual agreement
• Contract management

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions To the final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Engineering Ethics


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description

This introduces students to the basics of ethical foundations going through several
schools of thought

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students will have all the theoretical knowledge required to
make value based decisions.

Detailed Course Description

Contemporary philosophy (15 hours)


• Beginnings: logic and mathematics
• Philosophical analysis: Moore and Russel
• Alternatives: Realism and logical positivism
• Postmodernism: critical theory
• Feminism: theory and ethics

Engineering Ethics (30 hours)


• General Ethical theory

Minimum Standards Engineering -140-


• Minimum requirements for practice of engineering
• Responsibility of engineering institutions
• Safety and reliability
• Professional responsibility to client and employers
• Whistle blowing, codes of ethics, career choice and legal obligations
• Concrete engineering case studies
• Software reliability
• Bribery and conflict of interest dilemma
• Protection of intellectual property
• Privacy of communication e.g. electronic mail
• Ethics of testifying as an expert witness
• The preferential treatment of women in engineering
• Morality of prolusion in less developed countries

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions
to the final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Communication Engineering


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


This course builds on the concepts learned in Communication theory to introduce the
principles of information theory, coding and modulation techniques in communication
systems.

Course Objectives
By the end of this course students should be able to:
• Understand the concepts of information theory in communication systems
• Appreciate the methods used in coding and data compression
• Understand the different digital modulation techniques.

Detailed Course Description

Information theory (13 hours)


• Entropy and channel capacity

Minimum Standards Engineering -141-


• Shannon”s Formula
• Prediction and information coding
• Noise free and noisy channels
• Signal estimation and detection
• Probability of detection and decision theory

Source coding (10


hours)
• Data reduction and compression techniques
• Audio and video signal source coding techniques

Error Correction (10 hours)


• Automatic repeat request techniques
• Forward error correction: block codes, convolution codes and
trellis-coding

Digital modulation techniques (12


hours)
• M-ary pulse amplitude shift keying
• Quadrature amplitude modulation
• Minimum shift keying

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final grade
are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Propagation and Antennas


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


The course provides the necessary knowledge required to understand wave propagation
and operation principles as well as the design and installation of Antennas.

Course Objectives

Minimum Standards Engineering -142-


By the end of this course, students should be able to understand the concepts of
electromagnetic wave propagation and appreciate the various types of Antennas and their
characteristics
Have basic

Detailed Course Description

The Earth’s Atmosphere (6 hours)


Composition
Fluctuations
Effect of the atmosphere on propagation of waves

The Ionosphere (12 hours)


• Orbit and Sky wave
• Effect on ground wave propagation
• Line of site propagation and fading

Radiation (15 hours)


• Retarded potentials and Lorentz gauge conditions
• Near and far fields
• Dipoles such as half wave, Hertzian
• Radiation resistance and patterns

Antennas (27 hours)


• Properties of antennas
• Types of antennas (such as medium wave, short wave, rhombic, YAGI)
• Measurement of antenna characteristics
• Computer aided design and testing

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final grade
are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Telecommunications Systems I


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description

Minimum Standards Engineering -143-


This course introduces the concepts for high level data and voice communications as well
as communication media.

Course Objectives
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
• Understand the theory of data and voice communications as well as the different
transmission techniques.

• Understand types of losses and error control in the transmission and reception of
Telecommunication signals.
• Understand communication channels, signal encoding and decoding.

Detailed Course Description

Communication standards (10 hours)


• Introduction to communication standards
• The International Communications Union (ITU)
• Committees of ITU e.g. CCITT, CCIR, PATU, ATU, COMSAT, PANAFTEL
• Regional and country regulation bodies e.g. UCC

Data communication (30


hours)
• Integrated voice and data communication systems
• Data transmission and reception
• Communication modes
• Transmission techniques: serial and parallel
• Transmission rates, codes and impairments
• Data, digital transmission channel and source encoding
• Error control
• Transmission facilities

Optical Fiber Communication (20 hours)


• Base band and band pass systems
• Broad band communication: SONET, SDH, ATM

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final
grade are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -144-


Course Name : Microprocessors
Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


This course covers the architecture, operation and programming of microprocessors.

Course Objectives
By the end of this course, students should be able to:
• Understand the architecture and features of microprocessors
• Gain experience in Assembly language programming for microcontrollers.
• Implement the design process for the development of microprocessor-based
applications.

Detailed Course Description


Introduction to Microprocessor (20 hours)
• Basic concepts, Control unit, Internal registers, ALU
• The microprocessor state, An 8-bit microprocessor (8085A or Z-80 or 6800)
• Timing and sequencing, Power-on and manual RESET
• Memory and I/O synchronization: the wait state, Hardware single Stepping,
Memory speed requirements
• Logic levels, Loading and Buffering
• The instruction set: Data transfer Logic operations and branching,
Programmed I/O interrupts and DMA operations, digital data and display
• Analogue data input & output, Microprocessor system design
• Program Assembly and testing, Software development
• Assembly source programs, Manual Assembly of programs,
Assembler directives, Pseudo instructions, Two pass
Assemblers, Macros, Software testing.

Microcontrollers (10 hours)


• Single-chip microprocessor, an introduction to microcontrollers
• 8051 internal RAM and registers, the 8051 interrupts systems,
the 8051 instruction set
• Other microcontrollers on the 8051 family.

Developing Microprocessor-Based Products (15


hours)
• An introduction to the design process
• Preparing the specification
• Developing a design, implementing and testing the design
• Regulatory compliance testing
• Design tool for microprocessor development

Practical (30 hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -145-


Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, practical work and
assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to the final
grade are as shown below:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Power Systems Engineering I


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


This introduces students to power systems components and analysis

Course Objectives
• To be able to investigate and work on large power system networks

Detailed Course Description

The Admittance Model and Network Calculations (15 hours)


• Branch and Node admittances
• Mutually coupled Branches in Y-bus
• Equivalent Admittance Network
• Modification of Y-bus; Impedance matrix and Y-bus
• Method of successive elimination
• Node Elimination (Kron Reduction)
• Triangular Factorization
• The Impedance Model and Network Calculations: The bus, admittance and
impedance Matrices
• Thevenin’s Theorem and Z-bus
• Modification of an existing Z-bus
• Direct determination of Z-bus
• Calculation of Z-bus elements from Y bus
• Power Invariant Transformations
• Mutually coupled branches in Z-bus

Symmetrical Faults (12 hours)


• Transients in RL circuits
• Internal voltages of loaded machines
• Under fault conditions

Minimum Standards Engineering -146-


• Fault calculations using Z bus
• Equivalent circuits
• Selection of circuit breakers

Unsymmetrical Faults (15 hours)


• Unsymmetrical faults on power systems
• Single line to ground faults
• Line to line fault
• Double line to ground faults
• Demonstration problems; open conductor faults

Symmetrical Components and Sequence Networks (9 hours)


• Synthesis of unsymmetrical phasors
• Symmetrical components of unsymmetrical phasors
• Symmetrical Y and D circuits
• Power in terms of symmetrical components
• Sequence networks: Y and D impedances, symmetrical unsymmetrical
services impedances
• Positive, negative and zero sequence networks;

Steady state and Transient Stability (9 hours)


• The swing equation, application of swing curve & solution of
Problems using digital computers
• Stability of loads, effects of mechanical and electrical time lag and delays
• Electromechanical behaviour of machine/lines/bus bar systems
• Equal area criterion in machine dynamics.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions to the final grade as shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Network Theory II


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


The course provides information on issues related to power systems control mechanisms
and coordination of power systems.

Minimum Standards Engineering -147-


Course Objectives
• To help students understand the concept of protection and coordination in power
systems

Detailed Course Description

AC Transmission and distribution (9 hours)


• Justification and disadvantages
• General description of system connections
• Radial and ring systems
• Interconnections
• Brief review of main items of equipment
• Per unit representation

Transmission Lines (15


hours)
• Overhead line cable parameters
• Equivalent circuit for short line, medium line with T or TT
Representation
• Long line with distribution constants (ABCD constants)
• Voltage regulation and power charts
• Load flow calculation
• Methods applicable to small networks
• Hand calculations
• Symmetrical faults
• Synchronous machine reactance
• Calculations of faults on small networks using network
Reduction and similar techniques
Load Flow Calculations: (12 hours)
• Methods applicable to small networks, hand calculations.
• Systems economics, tariff structure;
• Symmetrical fault studies; synchronous machine reactances.
• Calculation of faults on small networks using network reduction and similar
techniques.
Mechanical construction of overhead lines: (9
hours)
• Poles, towers, insulation, sag, and tension.
• Effect of wing dust and pollution.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions
to the final grade are as shown as follows:

Minimum Standards Engineering -148-


Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Final Project


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 6 CU

Brief Course Description


The project is devoted to an independent investigation, design and implementation where
applicable, and production of final year report. The report should reflect the capability of
the student to apply theory and practical knowledge in Electrical Engineering. The
project is done through in the final year under the supervision of the member of academic
staff or any other expert as appointed by the University / Faculty. The student should
present his report both orally and in written format. This is a core course that must be
completed by all students.

Course Name : Radio Frequency Engineering


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


This course introduces the principles and RF & Microwave engineering and their
application in radar and broadcast radio communication systems.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course the student should
• Understand the operation of components and devices used in RF systems
• Have a thorough understand of the principles of design and operation of devices
for generation and processing of RF signals at different power levels.
• Have a good understanding of the applications of RF and microwave systems in
communication, control and instrumentation.

Detailed Course Description


Transmission lines and Wave guides (8
hours)
• Evaluation of Attenuation constants (perturbation analysis)
• Coaxial lines and wave guides
• Matching: physical realization of reactive elements, sliding and
triple screws, E-H tuners, quarter wave transformers
• Energy coupling: loop and aperture

Minimum Standards Engineering -149-


Passive devices (8
hours)
• Attenuators, couplers, terminators, phase shifters, slotted lines, hybrid junctions,
tuners, switches, bends, twist, flanges and hybrid rings
• Surface acoustic waves and SAW devices
• Ferric devices and Faradays notation
• Isolators and circulators
• Microwave resonators
• Frequency meters
• Scattering parameters

Generation and Processing Devices (10 hours)


• Tube devices: Klystron, Magnitron, Travelling wave tubes and
backward wave oscillators
• Solid state devices: BJT, tunnel diodes, FETs, Gunn diodes,
• Microwave integrated circuits and monolithic microwave integrated circuits.
• Parametric amplifiers; Masers; Lasers.
Measurements: (4 hours)
• Frequency, wavelength, VSWR, reflection coefficient, attenuation and
impedance;
• scattering parameters.
• Power measurements
Radio frequency power applications: (6
hours)
• Industrial, scientific and medical applications;
• Applicators: Parallel plate, resonant and traveling wave. Biological effects ofnon-
ionising radiation; Leakage standards and leakage control.
Radar systems: (4 hours)
• Radar equation and applications. Antenna types and scanning systems.
• Radar performance;
• Types of radar: Pulsed, MTI, CW,FM and mapping (synthetic aperture)
Broadcast radio Communications: (5 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
Contributions to the final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Power Systems Engineering II

Minimum Standards Engineering -150-


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


This introduces students to power systems components and analysis

Course Objectives
• To be able to investigate and work on large power system networks

Detailed Course Description

Three Phase Transformers (15 hours)


• Types
• Connections: star, delta, zig-zag, Vee
• Balanced and unbalanced loading
• Earthing effects

Harmonics (9 hours)
• Voltage and current harmonics
• Resonance

Load Flow Studies (27 hours)


• Review of network equations and solution
• Network model equations and their formulation
• Load flow problem
• Gauss-Siedel iterative method and algorithm for load flow solution
• Netwon-Raphson method
• NR-Algorithm for load flow solution
• De coupled load flow methods
• Comparison of load flow methods
• Control of voltage profile, power flow, frequency
• Computer Application.

DC Transmission systems (9
hours)
• Justifications and disadvantages of high voltage DC (HVDC)
• Operation features
• Review of current technologies

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions
to the final grade are as shown as follows:

Minimum Standards Engineering -151-


Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Computer Communication Networks


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


The course introduces communication systems

Course Objectives
• To be able to understand the principles of design, deployments and operation of
modern computer and communication networks

Detailed Course Description

Telecommunication networks: (6 hours)


• hardware and software,
• reference models,
• transmission media, wireless transmission
The telephone system: (4
hours)
• POTS, Nnarrow- and broad-band ISDN, ATM, cellular radio communications
satellites.
The data link layer: (9 hours)
• Design issues, error detection and correction, sliding window protocols.
• The medium access sub-layer: MAC protocols, IEEE 802.3 for LANs and MANs,
fast Ethernet, satellite networks.

The network layer: (9 hours)


• Routing
• internetworking,
• the network layer in the Internet.
The transport layer: (8 hours)
• the transport service,
• TCP and UDP,
• congestion control.

The application layer: (9


hours)
• network security,

Minimum Standards Engineering -152-


• domain name system,
• electronic mail,
• the worldwide web,
• multimedia.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions to the final grade are as shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Power System Protection


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description


The course provides information on issues related to power systems control mechanisms
and coordination of power systems.

Course Objectives
• To help students understand the concept of protection and coordination
in power systems

Detailed Course Description


Causes of Over Voltages. Propagation of surges. Insulation coordination. Determination
of system voltages produced by traveling wave surges. (6
hours)

Protection against lightning. Surge arrestors and directors. Interference with


Communication circuits. Types, performance and selection of Fuses.
(9 hours)

Purpose, type, selection and location of Reactors. Static, electromagnetic and


electromechanical relays. Microprocessor controlled relays. Short Circuit calculations.
Initiation of arc. Recovery voltage and re-striking voltage. Classification of circuit
breakers. Protection Schemes. (9 hours)

Introduction to power system control and its importance:


Modes of Power system operation. Major tasks of operation. SCADA (Supervisory
control and Data Acquisition): System-Remote terminal unit, Control Centres,

Minimum Standards Engineering -153-


Communication Sub System, remote terminal unit, Control centres, Communication
aspects. (12 hours)

Economic Dispatch: Characteristics of power generation units. Economic dispatch


problems with and without consideration of losses. Incremental fuel cost, penalty factor,
economic power interchange, Static and dynamic analysis of a one-area system.
Evaluation of effect of speed change on drop characteristics.
(9 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions to the final grade are as shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : Telecommunication Management


Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 4 CU

Brief Course Description


The course helps the students to acquire skills in handling and management of
telecommunication system.

Course Objectives
• To train in the running of telecommunication systems

Detailed Course Description


Theories of Telecommunications Management (6 hours)
A Concept of Management, Different approaches to the Management, Components of
Telecommunications Management. Telecommunications Management Skills. Functions
of Telecommunications Management. Roles for Telecommunications Management.
Model of Telecommunications Management.

Telecommunications Financial Management (9 hours)


Basic financial Aspects of Telecommunications Management. Tangible assets, Intangible
assets, Liabilities, Depreciation and Amortization. Methods of financial reporting.
Financial Planning and Projections. Computerized Telecommunication Management.
Traffic, Sale, Accounting, Programming.

Personnel management and Employee relations (9 hours)


Functions of Personnel Administration in Telecommunications. Organizational hierarchy.
Core departments in Telecommunications. Job description in Telecommunications.

Minimum Standards Engineering -154-


Staffing: Recruitment, training and evaluation policies. Telecommunications
Management and labour relations. Guides and Unions, Union Organization and
Operation Management and Collective Bargaining.

Industry and market Structure of Telecommunication (12 hours)


Elements of Market Structure. Elements of Market Conduct. Elements of Market
Performance. Acquisition Strategies. Media Valuation. Market Analysis.

Telecommunications Management in Future (9 hours)


Globalization and Vertical Integration, Technological Convergence, Telecommunications
Management and Social Change, Successful Management for new Millennium.

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Integrated Circuits Design and Fabrication


Course Level: 3
Course Credit: 4CU

Brief Course Description


The course introduces the concepts and physical procedures involved in the design,
integration and manufacture of semiconductor devices and circuits.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Be conversant with the terminology and theory involved in the design and
fabrication of semiconductor devices.
• Know the processes for the design, large scale integration and manufacture of
semiconductor devices.

Detailed Course Description

Terminology and Design (25 hours)


• Wafers, masks and photolithography
• Diffusion, dopants and metal
• Integrated n-channel, silicon-gate MOSFET
• ACMOS transistor pair design
• Bipolar technologies: npn epitaxial silicon bipolar transistor

Minimum Standards Engineering -155-


• Schottky diodes, resistors
• Large Scale Integration (LSI): MOSFET gate-array USIC

Fabrication Processes (20


hours)
• Silicon diode growth by dry oxidation
• Ion implantation
• Forming the poly-silicon gates
• Insulation and contact windows
• Metal removal by reactive ion itching (RIE) and wire bonding
• Very large-scale integration: advantages of integration and problems associated
with integrated circuits

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Control Engineering II


Course Level: 4
Course Credit: 3CU

Brief Course Description


The course follows up on the principles learnt in Control Engineering I to discuss
advanced control systems.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Enhance their knowledge of the concepts of Control Engineering I
• Apply control techniques to advanced engineering situations

Detailed Course Description

Non-Linear Systems (16 hours)


• General non-linear system description
• State and output equation linearization
• Stability analysis, Lyapunov methods, stability regions
• Application of artificial neural networks to non-linear systems
• Sub-harmonic resonance

Minimum Standards Engineering -156-


Optimal Control and Filtering Theory (14
hours)
• Concept of optimality
• Kuhn-Tucker conditions
• Dynamic programming
• Discrete-time optimal control
• Quadratic linear regulator
• Matrix Riccati equation
• Stability properties Stochastic systems and their control
• Kalman filtering
• Noise and its control

Adaptive Control and System Identification (15


hours)
• Time series models
• Parameter estimation
• Prediction-error identification
• Method of least squares
• Autoregressive Moving-Average (ARMA) models, model determination
• Self tuning, special techniques

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: High Voltage Engineering


Course Level: 4
Course Credit: 3CU

Brief Course Description


The course provides students with knowledge on the fundamentals governing generation
and control in high voltage power systems.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand the generation and measurement of high voltages
• Understand electric fields and field stress control around high voltage systems

Minimum Standards Engineering -157-


• Understand the phenomena involved in non-destructive insulation and testing as
well as over voltages in power systems.

Detailed Course Description

Introduction (4 hours)
• Generation and transmission of electrical energy
• Voltage stresses testing voltages ac and dc voltages

Generation of High Voltages (8


hours)
• Dc and AC voltage generation electrostatic generators
• Testing transforms
• Impulse voltages, their generation and operation

Measurement of High Voltages (8 hours)


• Peak voltage measurement by sparke gaps
• Electrostatic voltmeters
• Ammeters in series with high impedance and high ohmic resistor voltage dividers
• Generating voltmeter, measurement of peak voltages, impulse voltage
measurement

Electrostatic Fields and Field Stress Control (6


hours)
• Electric field distribution and breakdown strength of insulating materials
• Fields in homogeneous isotropic materials
• Fields in multi dielectric isotropic materials experimental field analysis
techniques

Electric breakdown in gases, liquids and solids (10 hours)


• Review of gases classic gas laws
• Ionization and decay processes
• Cathode processes
• Secondary effects, sparking voltages
• Breakdown field strength
• Corona discharge
• Surge breakdown, breakdown in solid and liquid dielectrics

Non-destructive Insulation and Testing (9 hours)


• HV dielectric loss and capacitance measurement
• Partial discharge measurement
• Calibration of partial discharge dielectric
• Phenomenon of over voltages in power systems
• Wave propagation over lines and equipment
• Protection of lines equipment against system over voltages

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Minimum Standards Engineering -158-


Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Electrical Installation Design


Course Level: 3
Course Credit: 3CU

Brief Course Description


In this course the students will acquire knowledge about the design and implementation
of domestic and industrial electrical installations.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Design and implement electrical installation and know the installation standards.

Detailed Course Description

Electrical Drawing (14 hours)


• Symbols, types of diagrams
• Power systems
• Electrical equipment

Wiring Regulation (16 hours)


• IEEE Regulations: scope; objectives
• Requirements for safety
• Protection; selection and erection of equipment
• Special installations; locations; inspection; testing; certification
• National standards

Practical (30 hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution

Minimum Standards Engineering -159-


Course work (Assignments, tests and laboratory work) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name: Power Economics and Management


Course Level: 4
Course Credit: 3CU

Brief Course Description


The course provides students with knowledge on the financial aspects and management
of power systems.

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students should be able to:
• Understand load estimation, growth and forecast
• Understand financial analysis and cost analysis in power plants
• Understand energy tariffs and their design

Detailed Course Description


Load Analysis and Management (18 hours)
• Types of loads, estimation of load, load growth and load forecasting, load
duration curves
• Maximum demand, Diversity And Diversity Factor, Load, Demand And Demand
Factor
• Capacity and Utilization factors and their importance in load estimation and
analysis.
• Load management
Financial Management and Cost Analysis (16 hours)
• Cost of power plant
• Financial mathematics, depreciation and amortization, maintenance and operating
costs
• Economic selection of number of units in the power station
• Relative costs of various power plants. Financial management.

Tariffs (11 hours)


• Energy Tariff objectives
• General Tariff forms, different types of tariffs, their origin and justification
• Optimum tariff design
• WAPDA tariff system
• Private power policy

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment

Minimum Standards Engineering -160-


Assignments, tests and final examination. Their relative contributions to final grade are
shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -161-


MECHANICAL ENGINEERING PROGRAMME STRUCTURE

No. Level Course Name L P CH CU


1 1 Communication Skills for Engineers 30 30 45 3
2 1 Engineering Mathematics I 60 0 60 4
3 1 Engineering Drawing 30 60 60 4
4 1 Fundamentals of ICT 30 30 45 3
5 1 Engineering Mechanics I - Statics 60 0 60 4
6 1 Engineering Mathematics II 60 0 60 4
7 1 Thermodynamics 45 30 60 4
8 1 Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering 30 30 45 3
9 1 Engineering Mechanics II - Dynamics 45 30 60 4
10 1 Mechanics of Materials I 45 30 60 4

11 1 Workshop Technology & Practice 0 180 45 3

12 2 Engineering Mathematics III 60 0 60 4


13 2 Fluid Mechanics 45 30 60 4
14 2 Mechanics of Materials II 45 30 60 4
15 2 Computer Aided Drawing 30 60 60 4
16 2 Materials Science 45 30 60 4
17 2 Theory of Machines 45 30 60 4
18 2 Computing for Mechanical Engineers 30 30 45 3
19 2 Electrical Devices and Machines 45 30 60 4
20 2 Materials Science & Engineering II 45 30 60 4
21 2 Introduction to Fluid Power Systems and Turbomachinery 45 30 60 4

22 2 Industrial Training I 0 180 45 3

23 3 Industrial Organisation and Management 45 0 45 3


24 3 Production Engineering I 45 30 60 4
25 3 Design of Machine Elements 45 30 60 4
26 3 Dynamic Systems Engineering 45 30 60 4
27 3 Applied Thermodynamics 45 30 60 4
28 3 Maintenance Engineering 45 30 60 4
29 3 Product Design & Development 15 90 60 4
30 3 Control Engineering 30 60 60 4
31 3 Production Engineering II 45 30 60 4
32 3 Environmental Engineering 45 30 60 4

33 3 Industrial Training II 0 180 45 3

34 4 Entrepreneurship for Engineers 45 30 60 4


35 4 Engineering Project Management 45 0 45 3
36 4 Business Management 45 0 45 3
37 4 Production Planning & Control 60 0 60 4
38 4 Professional Practice / Engineer in Society 45 0 45 3
39 4 Final Year Project 30 120 90 6
TOTAL 147

Minimum Standards Engineering -162-


COURSE DESCRIPTION
Course Name : ENGINEERING DRAWING

Course Level : Level 1

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description

This course introduces students to technical drawing a means of professional engineering


communication. It will cover: sketching, line drawing, shape description, projections,
drawing standards, sections and dimensioning.

Course Learning Objectives/Outcomes


At the end of this course, students should be able to:
o Translate physical objects into paper and computer drawings and models
o Produce orthographic and three dimensional drawings of engineering
components
o Use freehand, technical instruments and computer techniques for engineering
drawing

Detailed Course Outline

Aims and Purposes of Engineering Drawing for (2 Hours)


communication

Instruments, tools, materials (4 Hours)

Elements of Drawing and interrelationships– (8 Hours)


points, lines, curves, surfaces, solids

Projections – orthographic, pictorial, auxiliary (10 Hours)

Dimensioning (4 Hours)

Drawings standards (2 Hours)

Application to engineering components (90 Hours)


through practicals in drawing studio/lab

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and practical drawing exercises.

Mode of Assessment
These shall be by practical exercises, assignments, tests and examination. Both the tests
and examination shall include hands-on work. The relative contribution to the final grade
will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests/ Assignments/ Practicals 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -163-


Course Name : ENGINEERING MECHANICS I

Course Level : Level 1

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description

This course introduces students to the principles of mechanics as applied to engineering


objects and systems. It covers only statics, a branch of mechanics that studies the effects
of forces and moments acting on rigid bodies that are either at rest or moving with a
constant velocity in a straight line. . it introduces force systems, simple structural
elements and principles of work and energy.

Course Learning Objectives/Outcomes

At the end of this course, the student should be able to:


o Draw free-body-diagrams of mechanical elements
o Solve for forces acting on structural elements and supports
o Utilize the principles of work and energy to solve for forces in simple structural
elements such as supports, ropes, struts and beams
o Identify the real-world problems associated with engineering mechanics

Detailed Course Outline

Introduction to mechanics and principles of mechanics. Statics and (6 Hours)


dynamics

Coordinate systems and vector quantities (4 Hours)

Force systems and equilibrium laws (12 Hours)

Application to simple structural elements: trusses, beams, cables and (20 Hours)
chains

Principles of friction. Friction on inclined planes and screws (10 Hours)

Principles of virtual work and minimum potential energy (8 Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and assignments.

Mode of Assessment

This shall be by assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution to the final
grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests/ Assignments 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -164-


Course Name : THERMODYNAMICS

Course Level : Level 1

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course introduces students to the principles and laws of thermodynamics. It covers
the basic concepts such as definitions, properties of state and laws as well as
thermodynamic processes.

Course Learning Objectives/Outcomes


At the end of this course, the student should be able to:
o Define the relevant quantities used in thermodynamics
o State and apply the First Law of thermodynamics
o Sketch the cycles of different ideal processes
o Solve problems related to changes in state related to thermodynamic processes
o Derive the equation of state for an ideal gas using kinetic theory

Detailed Course Outline

Basic definitions and Introduction: (6 Hours)


o Equation of state and ideal gases
o Specific heat capacities and perfect gases
o Zeroth law of thermodynamics

Working fluids: (8 Hours)


o Pure substances
o Phase change and phase diagrams
o Reading of steam tables

First law of thermodynamics: (10 Hours)


o As applied to closed systems
o As applied to open systems
o Applications to common systems

Second law of thermodynamics: (6 Hours)


o Second law of thermodynamics and entropy
o Heat engines

Cycles: (8 Hours)
o Carnot cycle
o Brayton cycle
o Otto and diesel cycles
o Rankine cycle

Introduction Combustion: (7 Hours)


o Fuels and combustion
o Theoretical and actual combustion processes
o Enthalpy of formation and enthalpy of combustion

Minimum Standards Engineering -165-


o First law analysis of reacting systems
o Adiabatic flame temperature

Practicals (45 Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and practical
thermodynamics laboratory sessions.

Mode of Assessment

This shall be by practicals, assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution
to the final grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests / Assignments/ Practicals 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name: ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING I

Course Level : Level 1

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of electrical engineering. It covers the
description and analysis of DC circuits and the related laws, single phase AC theory and circuit
analysis, elements of transient signals and 3PH theory.

Course Objectives

At the end of this course, the student should be able to:


o Define circuit laws and solve DC circuits
o Explain magnetic phenomena and the relevant laws
o Carry out AC circuit analysis
o Distinguish between steady state and transient signals
o Distinguish between single and three phase quantities
o Solve for the different quantities in 3PH circuitry

Detailed Course Outline

DC circuits. (4 Hours)
o Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s laws
o Superposition principle
o Analysis of DC circuits

Principles of magnetism (6 Hours)


o Concepts and definition of magnetic terms
o Magnetic induction
o Magnetic circuit analysis
o B-H Characteristics

Minimum Standards Engineering -166-


Elements of Single Phase AC theory
o Complex quantities (8 Hours)
o AC circuit analysis of simple networks.
o Resonance

Transient effects (6 Hours)


o L-R-C circuits
o Time constants

Three phase supply (7 Hours)


o Nature and characteristics
o Connections
o Power measurements

Electronics (14 Hours)


Practical sessions (30 Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and practical electrical
Engineering laboratory sessions.

Mode of Assessment

This shall be by practicals, assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution to the
final grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests Assignments/ Practicals 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name : ENGINEERING MECHANICS II

Course Level : Level 1

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description

This course builds on an earlier course, Engineering Mechanics I course. It covers the
dynamics part of mechanics. The course deals with motions of particles and rigid bodies under
external forces; it also deals with the influence of vibration on mechanical systems.

Course Learning Objectives/Outcomes

At the end of this course, the student should be able to:


o State and apply the laws of motions
o Use accurately the relevant units and dimensions
o Analyse the kinetics and kinematics of particles

Minimum Standards Engineering -167-


Detailed Course Outline

Introduction: Statics and dynamics (5 Hours)


Fundamentals of Dynamics
- Laws
- Units
- Dimension

Kinematics of a particle in plane motion


- Rectilinear motion (12 Hours)
- Curvilinear motion
- Equation of motion

Kinetics of a particle (12 Hours)


- Work and Energy
- Impulse and momentum
- Moments of inertia

Introduction to Kinetics of a rigid body in plane motion (8 Hours)


-
Introduction to dynamics in 3 – D (8 Hours)

Practical (45 Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Mode of Assessment

This shall be by assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution to the final
grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests / Assignments 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Resources
Literature
Laboratory

Course Name : MECHANICS OF MATERIALS I

Course Level : Level 1

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description

Minimum Standards Engineering -168-


This course introduces students to the study of the behaviour of structural and machine
members under the action of external loads. It covers the basic concepts of stress and
strain, tensile and torsion stresses and strains.

Course Learning Objectives/Outcomes

At the end of this course, the student should be able to:


o Explain the basic theory of stress and strain
o Solve for direct and shear stresses of machine components
o Analyse simple beam stresses
o Analyse shaft stresses
o Derive stress-strain constants from test diagrams

Detailed Course Outline

Principles of stress and strain (6 Hours)

Tensile testing and stress-strain relations (6 Hours)

Shear stress (3 Hours)

Torsion of circular shafts (4 Hours)

Bending stresses in beams (6 Hours)

Shear stress in beams (6 Hours)

Compound stress and strain (10 Hours)

Elastic constants (4 Hours)

Practical sessions (45 Hours)

Mode of Delivery

The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments and practical
material testing laboratory sessions.

Mode of Assessment

This shall be by practicals, assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution
to the final grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests / Assignments/ Practicals 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Resources
o Laboratory with material testing machines

Minimum Standards Engineering -169-


o Literature

Course Name : VOCATIONAL TRAINING

Course Level : Level 1

Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This is a practical hands-on course where the students are to carry out workshop tasks including
machining, fabrication, welding, electrical installation and other manual task. Workshop safety
and the use of various tools and instruments is also covered. The course may be done during the
course of the semester OR as a seperate modularized session during the recess after the first two
semesters of the degree programme.

Course Learning Objectives/Outcomes

At the end of this course, a student should be able to:


o Identify and correctly use different manual workshop tools
o Operate the basic machine tools (lathe, shaper, milling machine, drill, welder,
tool grinder, etc.)
o Explain and implement different types of house wiring
o Identify and correctly assembly different sub-assemblies of an automobile

Detailed Course Outline

Fitting shop practice: Tools, marking off, measurements and fitting


(30 Hours)

Machine shop practice: Turning, milling, grinding, drilling (12 hours)


(30 Hours)

Fabrication practice: Joining processes (screw fastening, riveting,


welding, adhesive bonding) and fabrication of item. (30 Hours)

Electrical installation: Regulations, consumer circuits and wiring (30 Hours)


accessories fixing

Garage Practice: Operation, constructions, disassembly and assembly (30 Hours)


of Automobile components

Introduction to building services (30 Hours)

Mode of Delivery

This will be conducted through short briefing sessions and instruction followed by three or four
sessions of hands-on practice

Mode of Assessment

Each students is assessed on each element on the basis of the following:

Assessment Contribution

Minimum Standards Engineering -170-


Practical Exercises (objects made, weld joints, 50 - 70%
identification of tools, etc.)
Writtent workshop report 30 - 50%
Total 100%

Each of the modules will carry equal weight.

Resources
o Instructors
o Workshop consumable materials
o Training workshop

Course Name : ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS III


Course Level : Level 2

Credit Units : 4 CU
Course Description
Drawing from the concepts covered in Engineering Mathematics I and II, this course is
designed to consolidate and advance analytical techniques for solution of ordinary
differential equations; and introduces concepts fundamental to the study of other courses
in Computer Engineering. The major themes covered include integral transforms, series
solutions to ordinary differential equations and special functions.
Course Objectives/Learning outcomes
The objectives of this course are to:
• Introduce the student to Integral Transforms and their application to the solution of
Ordinary Differential Equations
• Introduce the Power Series solution technique to Ordinary Differential Equations
• Expose the student to some special functions fundamental to engineering
specifically Gamma, Beta, Bessel and Legendre An important emphasis of the
course is to develop problem solving skills and proof skills by working on specific
problems in which it is natural to look at special or simpler cases in order to try to
discover patterns. An integral part of the process of mathematical thinking is to
wander into blind alleys, sometimes being frustrated, before ultimately obtaining a
solution or proof. In this process mathematical scientists often work together with
colleagues, and this group work and sharing of ideas often adds great value to a
mathematical investigation.
• A major goal of the course is to give a balanced introductory treatment of the area
of PDE so that a student appreciates the power of PDE modeling; and is aware of
major techniques for their solution. The focus of the course is on analytical
techniques for the classical linear PDE of physics and engineering (heat, wave and
Laplace equations), and their frequent occurrence in applications.
Course Content
5. Fourier Integrals and Transformations (8
Hours)
• Motivation for the Fourier Integral
• Definition of Fourier Integral as a limit to the Fourier Series with period
tending to infinity

Minimum Standards Engineering -171-


•Conditions for existence of a Fourier Integral representation (Dirichlet’s
conditions, Existence of the absolute integral for the entire real axis)
• Complex exponential Fourier Integral representation, Standard Fourier
Integral representation, Fourier Cosine and Sine Integral representations
• Definition of the Fourier Transform and its Inverse
• Frequency spectrum of periodic and continuous functions
• Distinction between the Fourier Transform and Integral
• Properties of the Fourier Transform Transform: Linearity, First Shift
Theorem, Second Shift Theorem, t- duality, Time differentiation, Frequency
Differentiation, Convolution, Correlation
• Fourier Transform of special functions: Delta function (Sifting property),
Heaviside Step function,
• Applications: Parseval’s theorem, RCL circuits, Frequency shifting in
Communication theory (carrier signals and Antenna design)
• Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations with constant coefficients
6. Laplace Transformations (8
Hours)
• Motivation for the Laplace transform
• Definition of the Laplace transform
• Comparison of the Laplace and Fourier Transforms
• Conditions for existence of the Laplace transform (Dirichlet’s conditions,
Piecewise continuity of thee function)
• Properties of Laplace Transforms: Linearity, First Shift Theorem, Second
Shift Theorem, Time differentiation, s-domain Differentiation, s-domain
Integration
• Laplace Transforms of special functions: Delta function and Heaviside
function
• Solutions of Ordinary Differential Equations by Laplace Transform
Techniques
• Solutions of Simultaneous Linear Ordinary Differential Equations with
constant coefficients
• Applications in RLC Circuit Analysis
3. Power Series Solutions to Ordinary Differential Equations (2
Hours)
• Motivation of the Power Series solution method
• Concept of the Power Series method (Ordinary points, Singular points)
• Series solutions about Ordinary points
• Series solutions about Regular Singular points (Method of Frobenius)
4. Gamma and Beta Functions (2
Hours)
• Integral Definition of Gamma and Beta Functions
• Properties of Gamma and Beta Functions
• Generalisation of the factorial by Means of the Gamma function
• Relations Between Gamma and Beta Functions
• Definition of Gamma Function for Negative Values of Argument
25. Bessel Functions (2
Hours)
• Bessel’s Equation and its Solutions.

Minimum Standards Engineering -172-


• Familiarisation with Characteristics and Graphs of Bessel Functions
• Properties of Bessel Functions of the First Kind: Differentiation, Recurrence
relationships, Generating functions
• Ordinary Differential Equations solvable using the notion of Bessel’s
equations
• Integral Representations of Bessel Functions
• Integrals Involving Bessel Functions
• Laplace Transforms of Bessel functions
26. Legendre Functions (2
Hours)
• Legendre’s Equation and its Solutions
• Legendre’s Polynomials; the Generating Function for Legendre’s
Polynomials; Orthogonality of Legendre’s Polynomials
• Rodriguez’s formula
• Orthogonality Relations for the Associated Legendre Functions,
• Familiarisation with Characteristics and Graphs of Legendre’s Polynomials
and Associated Legendre Functions
• Integrals involving Legendre Polynomials
27. Definition of a Partial Differential Equation (2
Hours)
28. Derivation of Some Typical PDEs of Mathematical Physics (3
Hours)
• The One-Dimensional Wave Equation (Vibrating String)
• The One-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
• The Telegraph or Transmission Line Equation
• The Two-Dimensional Wave Equation (Vibrating Membrane)
• The Two-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
• The Three-Dimensional Heat Conduction Equation
29. Classification of Partial Differential Equations (2
Hours)
• Homogeneous and Non Homogeneous PDE’s
• Linear and Non-Linear PDE’s
• N-Order PDE’s
• Parabolic, Elliptic and Hyperbolic PDE’s
30. Classification of Boundary Conditions to PDE’s (3
Hours)
• Homogeneous and Non Homogeneous BC’s
• Linear and Non-Linear BC’s
• Dirichlet BC’s
• Neumann BC’s
• Robin BC’s
• Cauchy BC’s
31. Overview of Methods of Solving Boundary Value Problems (2
Hours)
32. Solutions of Boundary Value Problems Using the Method of Separation of
Variables
(3
Hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -173-


• 2nd Order Linear and Homogeneous BVP’s with Period BC’s
• Use of Fourier Series in the Solution of 2nd Order Linear and
Homogeneous Dirichlet and Neumann BVP’s
• Solution of Non-Homogeneous BVP’s
• Direct Originality with Mixed BVP’s
• The Cauchy BVP’s
• Sturm-Liouville Problems
33. Use of Laplace Transforms in Solving PDEs (2
Hours)
34. FDM Solutions of Boundary Value Problems involving PDEs (4
Hours)
• Parabolic BVP’s
• Elliptic BVP’s
• Hyperbolic BVP’s
• Use of MATLAB in the Solution of PDE’s
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : FLUID MECHANICS I


Course Level : Level 2

Credit Units : 4 CU
Course Description
This course introduces students to the basic phenomena and principles of fluid flow both
in equilibrium and in motion. It covers properties of fluids, fluid statics, conservation of
mass, momentum and energy including the relevant equations and flow in different
media. It also introduces dimensional analysis.
Course Objectives/Learning outcomes
At the end of this course, the student should be able to:
• Identify the different properties of fluids
• Derive the pressures and forces existing in different static fluid systems
• Apply conservational equations of mass, momentum and energy to problems involving
fluids motion.
• Apply the basic principles for computing head losses and flows in simple pipes and
fittings
• Carry out dimensional analysis of different fluid flow regimes
Course content
1. Introduction to Fluids and Properties of Fluids (4
Hours)
2. Fluid statics (8 Hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -174-


• Pressure
• Forces
• Instrumentation
3. Fluid motion, mass, energy and Momentum conservation equations (12
Hours)
• Laminar flow
• Bernoulli equations
• Continuity equation
• Instrumentation (gates, notches, weirs, etc.)
4. Application of Basic Principles (12
Hours)
• Steady Flow in Pipes
• Losses in Pipes and Fittings
• Jets
• Unsteady flow in closed conduits
5 Laboratories (45
Hours)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and practical fluid mechanics
laboratory sessions.
Mode of Assessment
Course work (laboratory exercises, assignments and tests) and final examination and their
relative contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage Contribution
Course work 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name : MECHANICS OF MATERIALS II

Course Level : Level 2

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course builds on the earlier course Mechanics of Materials I offered at Level 1. It
covers deflection and stress of complex mechanical components including beams, struts,
thick cylinders, circular beams, rotating discs and shafts, and elastic stability of simple
frames.

Course Objectives/Learning outcomes


At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Determine deflection of beams
• Check for elastic stability of struts or slender supports
• Derive and determine stresses in thick cylinders, circular beams, rotating discs
and shafts
• Check for elastic stability of simple frames.
Course content
1. Deflection of beams (8 Hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -175-


• Simply supported
• Fixed
• Indeterminate
2. Elastic stability: struts (6
Hours)
• Boundary conditions
• Slenderness ratio
3. Thick cylinders (4
Hours)
4. Detailed discussion of stresses and displacements due to: (8 Hours)
• Bending
• Shear
5. Bending of circular plates. (6
Hours)
6. Rotating discs and shafts (6
Hours)
7. Elastic stability of simple frames (7
Hours)
8. Laboratories (45
Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, and practical laboratory sessions.
Mode of Assessment
This course shall be assessed through course work (practicals, assignments, tests) and final
examination. The relative contribution to the final grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Percentage Contribution


Course work 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name : COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN

Course Level : Level 2

Credit Units : 4 CU

Course Description
This course is mainly a computer applications course. It builds on the concepts learnt by
the student from the Engineering Drawing course offered at Level 1. It involves a lot of
hands-on by the students using a standard Computer Aided Design (CAD) and modeling
software package.

Course Objectives/Learning outcomes


At the end of this course the student should be able to:
• Demonstrate capacity to utilize various features of a CAD solid modeling
package.
• Generate various mechanical engineering parts/components and assemblies using
a computer.

Minimum Standards Engineering -176-


• Produce working drawings from existing models.

Course content
1. Introduction to the solid modelling environment (4
Hours)
2. Swept protrusion (8
Hours)
3. Lofted protrusion, patterns and thin wall command (8
Hours)
4. Helical protrusion (4
Hours)
5. Curve by Table and Swept protrusion (8
Hours)
6. Boolean feature commands (8
Hours)
7. Assembly (12
Hours)
8. Sheet metal (4
Hours)
9. Production drawings (4
Hours)
10. Hands-on student activity (45
Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be delivered through illustration of the basic concepts by the instructor in
the computer laboratory followed by students’ hands-on activity and tutorials. Computer
Aided Design laboratory using 3-D modeling software such as Solid Edge or Solid
Works is a requirement in this course.

Mode of Assessment
This shall be by course work (student projects, assignments, and tests) and final hands-on
examination. The relative contribution to the final grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Percentage Contribution


Course work 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name : MATERIALS SCIENCE I


Course Level : Level 2

Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course introduces the student to the science of engineering materials. It covers
atomic structure, solidification and crystal formation, solid solutions, alloys as well as the
science of polymers, ceramics and composites.

Minimum Standards Engineering -177-


Course Objectives/Learning Outcomes
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Distinguish between the different forces that hold atoms together.
• Explain solidification and crystal formation in engineering materials.
• Explain different solid solution types and how they are affected by alloying.
• Describe the different strengthening mechanisms of engineering materials.
• Describe the structure and formulation of different engineering materials.

Course content
1. Introduction (2 Hours)
• Classification of Materials.
• Requirements for modern engineering materials.
2. Atomic Structure and Interatomic Bonding (2 Hours)
• Atomic Structure.
• Atomic Bonding In solids.
3. Solidification and Structural Crystallinity of Materials (4
Hours)
• Crystal Structures
• Crystallographic directions and planes
• Crystalline and Non-Crystalline Materials, Interplanar Spacing.
4. Imperfections in Solids: (4 Hours)
• Point Defects.
• Line defects.
• Interfacial Defects.
• Volume Defects
5. Solid Solutions and Phase Diagrams: (8 Hours)
• Solid Solutions.
• Equilibrium Phase Diagrams of Unary.
• Binary, Peritectics.
• Eutectics, Eutectoids.
• Non-equilibrium Phase Diagrams.
• Coring, Application and Examples of Phase Diagrams.
6. Diffusion in Solids: (12 Hours)
• Mechanism of solidification.
• Steady state diffusion.
• Fick’s Laws.
• Dislocation Motion.
• Non-steady state diffusion.
• Factors influencing diffusion.
• Nucleation and growth.
7. Strengthening Mechanisms: (4 Hours)
• Grains and Grains Boundaries,
• Dislocations and phase deformations, strengthening by grain refinement.
• Solid solution hardening.
• Strain hardening.
• Strain Ageing.
• Cold work.

Minimum Standards Engineering -178-


• Recovery and Recrystallisation.
• Precipitation Hardening

8. Structures and characteristics of: (8 Hours)


• Polymers and Plastics
• Ceramics
• Composites
9. Laboratories (45 Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials.
Mode of Assessment
This shall be through course work (practicals, assignments, tests) and final examination.
The relative contribution to the final grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Percentage Contribution


Course work 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name : THEORY OF MACHINES

Course Level : Level 2

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course introduces students to the analysis of the kinematics and kinetics of machine
elements. It covers planar linkages, gears and cams as well as balancing of rotating
mechanical components.

Course Objectives/Learning outcomes


At the end of this course, a student will be able to:
• Identify basic and functional linkage systems in machines and describe their
function
• Analyze the kinematics of a linkage mathematically to determine position,
velocity and acceleration variation throughout its range of motion.
• Analyze and design of cams and gear trains.
• Analyze and design of flywheels.
• Determine the static and dynamic forces acting on a moving linkage.
• Determine the specification of balance masses for mechanisms.

Course content
1. Basic concepts in mechanisms and machines
(5 Hours)
• Mechanisms and Simple Machines
• Planar & Spatial mechanisms
• Kinematics and Kinetics of Mechanisms
• Links

Minimum Standards Engineering -179-


• Kinematic Chains
• Pairs – Higher pairs and lower pairs
• Degrees of Freedom of planar mechanisms
2. Mathematical Analysis of linkages and mechanisms: Crank-slide, four bar pin
jointed, quick-return, Hooke’s joint, indexing, etc.
(8 Hours)
• Position analysis
• Velocity analysis
• Acceleration analysis
3. Gears (8
Hours)
• Gear transmission
• Simple and compound gear trains
• Planetary gear trains

4. Cams (8
Hours)
• Definitions
• Cam mechanisms
• Classification of cam mechanisms
• Cam Nomenclature
• Analysis of follower motion
• Cam design

5. Determination of static and dynamic forces in mechanisms.


(8 Hours)

6. Flywheels
(4 Hours)
7. Balancing of rotating and reciprocating masses (4
Hours)
8. Laboratories (45
Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, practical sessions involving hands-
on project work and laboratories.
Mode of Assessment
This shall be by course work (practicals, assignments, student projects and tests) and final
examination. The relative contribution to the final grade will be as shown below:
Assessment Percentage Contribution
Course work 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name : COMPUTER PROGRAMMING

Course Level : Level 2

Minimum Standards Engineering -180-


Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
Competency in a programming language is prerequisite to the study of computer
engineering. Object-oriented programming, event-driven applications, and the use of
extensive APIs (application programming interfaces) are fundamental tools that computer
engineering students need early in their academic program.
Objectives/Learning Outcomes
On completion of this course the student should be able to:
• Describe how computer engineering uses or benefits from programming
fundamentals.
• Identify the appropriate paradigm for a given programming problem.
• Use a suitable programming language to implement, test, and debug algorithms for
solving simple problems.
• Describe the way a computer allocates and represents these data structures in
memory.
• Outline the philosophy of object-oriented design and the concepts of encapsulation,
sub classing, inheritance, and polymorphism.

Course Content
1. History and Overview (4
Hours)
• Indicate some reasons for studying programming fundamentals
• Influential people; important areas such as programming constructs,
algorithms, problem solving, data structures, programming paradigms,
recursion, object-oriented programming, event-driven programming, and
concurrent programming
• Contrast between an algorithm and a data structure
• Distinguish between a variable, type, expression, and assignment
• Highlight the role of algorithms in solving problems
• Describe some of the fundamental data structures such as array, record,
stack, and queue
• Explain how divide-and-conquer strategies lend themselves to recursion
• Explore some additional resources associated with programming
fundamentals
• Explain the purpose and role of programming fundamentals in computer
engineering
2. Programming Languages (4
Hours)
• Definition and History
• Characteristics (Pragmatics, Semantics and Syntax)
• Distinction between Text-based and Visual Programming
• Classification (Categorical, Chronological and Generational)
• Comparison of common programming languages (C, C++, C#, Java)
• Programming errors and warnings (syntax, logical, etc.)
3. Programming Paradigms (8
Hours)
• Definition and rationale of a programming paradigm

Minimum Standards Engineering -181-


• Types: Structured, Unstructured, Procedural, Object-oriented, Event-
Drive, Generic etc.
• Separation of behavior and implementation
4. ISO/ANSI C++ Programming Fundamentals (11
Hours)
• Bjarne Stroustrup Design rules
• Console applications basics (Source file, Basic I/O, Standard I/O
Consoles, Function main( ))
• Fundamental data types
• Expressions and operators
• Control constructs (Conditional and Iterative)
• Pointers and Named collections (Arrays, Enumerators, Bit-fields, Unions)
• User-defined data types (Structures and Classes)
• Functions (In-built and User-defined)
• Object –oriented programming (Abstraction, Encapsulation, Inheritance,
Composition, Polymorphism, Friend and Virtual Functions)
• File I/O
5. Algorithms and Problem-Solving (6
Hours)
• Problem-solving strategies
• The role of algorithms in the problem-solving process
• Implementation strategies for algorithms
• Debugging strategies
• The concept and properties of algorithms
• Structured decomposition
6. The Integrated Development Environment (IDE) (6
Hours)
• Definition
• Toolchains
• Advantages of IDEs
• Comparison of IDEs
• Using a typical IDE (Visual Studio)
7.Hands-on student activity (45
Hours)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -182-


Course Name : ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING II
Course Level : Level 2

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course builds on the concepts from the earlier course, Electrical Engineering I done
at Level 1. It covers the principles of instrumentation and measurements, design and
control of electro-mechanical machines and drives, fundamentals of energy conversion
with emphasis on transmission and distribution.
Course Objectives/Learning outcomes
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Describe the functioning of various electrical and electronic instruments
• Compute the performance characteristics of electrical machines
• Discuss the fundamentals of electrical energy transmission and distribution.
• Analyze and design electronic control devices and circuits.

Course content
1. Instrumentation and Measurements (4 Hours)
2. Electrical Machines: DC Machines – Generators and Motors (16 Hours)
• Construction features
• Classification
• Characteristics
3. Electrical Machines: AC Machines-Transformers, Generators , Motors (synchronous
and asynchronous) (16 Hours)
• Construction features
• Classification
• Characteristics
4. Electrical Control Circuits and Devices (6 Hours)
• Switching and protective gear
• Cables
• Electronic controls
5. Fundamentals of Energy Conversion, Transmission and Distribution (3 Hours)
6. Laboratories (45 Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, and practical sessions in the
laboratory.
Mode of Assessment
This shall be by course work (practicals, assignments, tests) and final examination. The
relative contribution to the final grade will be as shown below:
Assessment Percentage Contribution
Course work 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -183-


Course Name : FLUID MECHANICS II
Course Level : Level 2

Credit Units : 4 CU

Course Description
This course builds on the concepts from the earlier Fluid Mechanics I course. It extends
the study of fluid statics and dynamics to applications engineering such as in open
channels, fluid machinery.
Course Objectives/Learning outcomes
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Explain in details the flow of ideal fluids.
• Discuss the existence and characteristics of boundary layer and wakes with engineering
applications.
• Discuss the concepts of free surface flow and variable density flow with application of
the principles to engineering problems.
• Analyze and describe the characteristics and parameters of different types of fluid
machinery.
Course Content
1. Flow of ideal fluids (8 Hours)
• Stream functions.
• Velocity potential, circulation and vorticity.
• Flow nets.
2. Boundary layer and wakes (12 Hours)
• Introduction and basic definitions
• Laminar and turbulent boundary layer and friction drag.
• Effect of pressure gradient and boundary layer control.
• Effect of compressibility on drag.
• Distribution of velocity in turbulent flow and free turbulence
3. Free surface flow (12 Hours)
• Open channel flow
• Flow in closed conduits.
• Specific energy and alternative depths of flow.
• Hydraulic jump.
• Gradually varied flow and oscillatory waves
4. Variable density flow (7 Hours)
• Thermodynamic concepts.
• Elastic and shock waves.
• Supersonic flow around corners
• One dimensional flow with negligible friction.
• High speed flow past an aerofoil
• Flow with variable density in pipes of constant cross section.
• Analogy between flow with variable density and flow with a free surface.

5. Turbo machinery (6 Hours)


• Reciprocating pumps
• Roto-dynamic machines.

Minimum Standards Engineering -184-


• Roto-dynamic pumps.
• Hydrodynamic transmission
6. Laboratories (45 Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and practical sessions in the
laboratory

Mode of Assessment
This shall be by course work (practicals, assignments, tests) and final examination. The
relative contribution to the final grade will be as shown below:
Assessment Percentage Contribution
Course Work 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name : INDUSTRIAL TRAINING I


Course Level : Level 2

Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description
This course introduces students to various technological skills in industries and provides
on-the-job training and exposure.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Identify and describe the major activities of the sections where he/she was
attached.
• Describe the technical aspects of the training that was undertaken.
• Identify technical areas of improvement of the sections where he/she was attached
• Write a clear and understandable training report
Detailed Course Outline
The student is required to participate in the day-to-day activities at the organizations
premises as a regular worker.
This activity lasts at least eight (8) weeks starting immediately after the end of
examination of Semester II of the second year of study.
Mode of Delivery
The student will be attached to an organization. During this, training is provided by the
organization’s personnel. The activity is closely supervised by a senior member of the
organization as the industry supervisor. A member of the academic staff of the
department is assigned to visit the organization at least two times and monitor the
progress of the attachment. The student keeps a daily log of the activities which is
reviewed weekly by the industry supervior and academic supervisor during the visits.

Mode of Assessment

Minimum Standards Engineering -185-


This shall be by the performance of the student in the organization and a report written by
the student after the training. The report must be endorsed by the industry supervisor. The
relative contribution to the final grade will be as shown below:
Assessment Percentage Contribution
Performance at industry assessed by industry supervisor 30%-50%
Report marked by Academic Supervisor 50%-70%
Total 100%
Course Name : INDUSTRIAL ORGANISATION & MANAGEMENT
Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 3 CU
Course Description
This course presents the principles and practice of organization and management in industrial
environments. It covers organizational structure, management functions, managerial skills and
industrial relations.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Explain the basic concepts of organization and management
• Describe the different management functions
• Identify the different managerial skills required to perform the roles and responsibilities
of Managers
• Explain the role of unions and management in organizations
Course Content
1. Basic Concepts

• What is an organization? (4 Hours)


• What is Management?
• Evolution of Management Theory
2. Organization Structure (4 Hours)
• Types of organization
• Charts
• Functional relationships
3. Management Functions (8 Hours)
• Planning
• Organizing
• Leading
• Controlling
4. Management skills (10Hours)
• Influencing
• Negotiating
• Counseling
5. Human Resource management (9 Hours)
• Motivation/incentives
• Recruitment
• Training and development
• Grievance handling
6. Industrial Relations (6 Hours)
• Role of unions in industrial setups
• Union-management relations
• Union-management negotiations
• Industrial legislation
7. Management of Organizational Change (6 Hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -186-


• Basic Change process
• Overcoming Resistance to Change

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative contributions to
final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : MATERIALS SCIENCE II


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course builds on an earlier Materials Science course. It introduces the ways in which
different engineering materials are formulated and manipulated to attain certain properties and
how they behave in use.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Explain the composition of the various engineering materials
• Explain the behavior of materials in use
• Describe the nature of the common engineering materials
• Explain the process of heat treatment of metals and their alloys
• Outline the processes and applications of non-metallic materials
Course Content
1. Plain Carbon Steels (10 Hours)
• Iron and steel making process
• Iron – Fe3C Phase Diagram
• Typical carbon steels and properties
• Isothermal Transformation Diagrams
• Continuous Cooling Transformation
• Quench Hardening
• Tempering
• Annealing
• Weldability
• Case hardening and Surface Treatment
2. Alloy Steels (8 Hours)
• Classification of Alloy Steels
• Effect of Different Alloys on Properties
• Hardenability and selection
• Carbon Equivalent
• Resistance to Corrosion
3. Cast Irons (6 Hours)
• Grey Cast Iron
• White Cast Iron
• Ductile Iron
• Other types of cast iron
• Heat treatment

Minimum Standards Engineering -187-


• Welding of Cast Iron
4. Non-Ferrous Alloys (8 Hours)
• Copper and its alloys
• Aluminium and its alloys
• Magnesium and its alloys
5. Processing and application of polymers, plastics, ceramics and (6 Hours)
composites
6. Materials Failure Mechanisms (7 Hours)
• Corrosion of metals
• Fracture of metals
• Fatigue Failure
• Creep and High Temperature Performance of Materials.
7. Practicals (30 Hours)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, practicals and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : PRODUCTION ENGINEERING I


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course introduces the principle processes used to manufacture primary products. It covers
metal re-melting and recycling, casting, metal forging, extrusion, drawing and related processes.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Describe the process of metal re-melting and recycling
• Distinguish between and explain the different casting processes and techniques
• Distinguish between and explain the different techniques of metal forming
Course Content
1. Introduction to manufacturing and manufacturing trends in (4 Hours)
Uganda:
2. Re-melting and recycling of metals (4 Hours)
3. Continuous casting (4 Hours)
4. Casting (12 Hours)
• Sand Casting
• Die casting
5. Precision casting processes (7 Hours)
• centrifugal casting
• shell casting
• investment casting
6. Powder Metallurgy (4 Hours)
• Mechanical forming of metals (10 Hours)
• Forging
• Rolling
• Extrusion

Minimum Standards Engineering -188-


• drawing
7. Introduction to plastics processing (4 Hours)
8. Practicals (30 Hours)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, practicals and tests) and final examination and
their relative contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : DESIGN OF MACHINE ELEMENTS


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course introduces the fundamentals and practice of design of machine elements. It covers
factors that determine designs; and the design of screws, joints, springs and power transmission
elements
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Describe the design process
• Explain the different factors that influence designs
• Analyze various mechanical joints, springs and power transmission devices for
strength (static, fatigue and wear)
Course Content
1. Factors influencing the proportion of machine elements: - (8 Hours)
• Stresses
• Deformation
• Factor of safety
• Failure criteria
• Fatigue
• Wear
2. Design of Joints
• Welded (4 Hours)
• Bolted
• Riveted
• Soldered/brazed
• Bonded
3. Design shafts and couplings (7 Hours)
• Shaft
• Keys
• Splines
• Couplings
4. Design of Springs (4 Hours)
• Coiled
• Leaf
5. Design of belt drives (4 Hours)
• Flat
• V
• Toothed

Minimum Standards Engineering -189-


6. Design of chain drive (4 Hours)
• Chain
• Sprocket
7. Design of Gears (10 Hours)
• Gear classification
• Gear tooth action
• Involute Curve
• Terminology for spur gears
• Condition for correct meshing
• Sizing of gears
8. Design and selection of bearings (4 Hours)
• Ball and roller bearing
• Journal bearing
9. Design Project (30 Hours)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, design project and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : DYNAMIC SYSTEMS ENGINEERING


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course introduces systems thinking, analysis and design. It covers modeling of dynamic
systems, their analysis by analytical and numerical methods as well as their simulation by use of
digital computers.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Explain the role of modeling in dynamic systems analysis and design
(mechanical and electrical)
• Model various forms of engineering systems
• Use Laplace Transform techniques to analyze the behavior of dynamic systems.
• Use computer software such as MATLAB or Scilab for engineering systems
analysis and design.
Course Content
1. Introduction to Dynamic Systems: Definition of system (4 Hours)
• Modeling
• types of models
• modeling procedure
2. Input/output Modeling of Physical Systems (14 Hours)
• Mechanical Systems
• Electrical Systems
• Electro-mechanical Systems
• Fluid Systems
• Thermal Systems
• Mixed Systems

Minimum Standards Engineering -190-


3. State Space Modeling of systems (6 Hours)
4. Determination of System Behavior (12 Hours)
• Time domain
• Plotting
5. Applications (4 Hours)
• Mechanical vibrations
• Shock absorbers
6. Characterization of System Behavior (5 Hours)
• Time constant
• Rise time
• Natural frequencies
• Damping ratio
7. Practicals and hands-on use of software (30 Hours)
• Use of Scilab or Matlab in the analysis of dynamic systems

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, practicals and tests) and final examination and their
relative contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : HEAT TRANSFER


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course introduces the basic concepts of heat transfer. It covers conduction heat transfer,
convection heat transfer, radiation heat transfer and Heat Exchangers. In convection heat transfer,
both laminar and turbulent cases are handled
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Describe the basic concepts and laws of heat transfer
• Compute the amounts of heat transferred between different media in a heat
exchanger system
Course Content
1. Basic concepts and laws of heat transfer analysis (4 Hours)
• Conduction Heat Transfer
• Thermal Conductivity
• Convection Heat Transfer
• Radiation Heat Transfer
2. Steady-State Conduction – One Dimension (6 Hours)
• The Plane Wall
• Insulation and R values
• Radial Systems
• The Overall Heat-Transfer Coefficient
• Critical Thickness of Insulation
• Heat-Source Systems
• Cylinder with Heat Source
• Conduction-Convection Systems

Minimum Standards Engineering -191-


• Fins
• Thermal Contact Resistance
3. Principles of Convection (8 Hours)
• Viscous Flow and Inviscid Flow
• Laminar Boundary Layer on a Flat Plate
• Energy Equation of the Boundary Layer
• The Thermal Boundary Layer
• The Relation between Fluid Friction and Heat Transfer
• Turbulent-Boundary layer Heat Transfer
• Heat Transfer in Laminar Tube Flow
• Turbulent Flow in a Tube
4. Empirical and Practical Relations for Forced-Convection Heat (4 Hours)
Transfer
• Empirical Relations for Pipe and Tube Flow
• Flow across Cylinders and Spheres
• Flow across Tube Banks (6 Hours)
5. Natural Convection Heat Transfer
• Physical Considerations and the Governing Equations
• Laminar Free Convection on a Vertical Surface
• The Effects of Turbulence
• External Free Convection Flows
• Free Convection within Parallel Plate Channels
• Empirical Correlations (6 Hours)
• Combined Free and Forced Convection
6. Condensation and Boiling Heat Transfer
• Dimensionless Parameters in Boiling and Condensation
• Boiling Modes
• Pool Boiling
• Pool Boiling Correlations
• Forced-Convection Boiling
• Condensation: Physical Mechanism
• Laminar Film Condensation on a Vertical Plate
• Turbulent Film Condensation
• Film Condensation on Radial Systems
• Film Condensation in Horizontal Tubes (5 Hours)
• Dropwise Condensation
7. Heat Exchangers
• Heat Exchanger Types
• Use of Log Mean Temperature Difference
• The Effectiveness-NTU Method
• Methodology of a Heat Exchanger Calculation (6 Hours)
• Compact Heat Exchangers
8. Radiation Heat Transfer
• Fundamental Concepts
• Radiation Intensity
• Blackbody Radiation
• Surface Emission
• Surface Absorptivity, Reflection, and Transmission
• Kirchhoff’s Law
• The Gray Surface
• The Geometric View Factor

Minimum Standards Engineering -192-


• Radiation Exchange between Diffuse, Gray Surfaces in an
Enclosure (30 Hours)
9. Practicals

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, practicals and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : MAINTENANCE ENGINEERING


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course presents the principles of maintenance, maintenance cost analysis and the application
of computers in maintenance management.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Explain the purpose and principles of maintenance
• Describe the main organisational setups for maintenance
• Carry out maintenance cost analysis and effectiveness
• Explain the role of computers in maintenance management
Course Content
1. Introduction (8 Hours)
• Meaning and Value of Maintenance,
• Historical Evolution
• Types of maintenance
2. Maintenance Strategies and planning (14 Hours)
• Maintenance programmes
• Planning
• Scheduling
• Budgeting
• Human resource planning
• Outsourcing
3. Costing (9 Hours)
• Maintenance costs
• Cost analysis
• Replacement analysis and justification
4. Computerized Maintenance Management Systems (CMMS) (10 Hours)
5. Introduction to advances in maintenance (4 Hours)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative contributions to
final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution

Minimum Standards Engineering -193-


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : PRODUCT DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course introduces the concepts and techniques employed in the design and development of
products. It covers design basics, methods, approaches and tools. It involves students working in
groups to go through the process of designing a product.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able:
• Describe the basic concepts of design
• Explain the various approaches to selecting the characteristics of a design
• Demonstrate the ability to work as a group and work from societal need to a
product design
• Produce documentation pertaining to a product design
Course Content
1. Introduction (2 Hours)
• Definition of terms
• Basics, who designs, who develops, innovations.
2. Product development processes/design process (4 Hours)
• Concept generation and selection
• Design in the context of engineering
3. Design methods (4 Hours)

4. Concurrent engineering (2 Hours)

5. Product architecture (2 Hours)

6. Quality engineering (2 Hours)

7. Modeling and simulation (4 hours)

8. Integrated design for optimization (2 Hours)

9. Materials selection, material processing in design (4 hours)


• Design for manufacture
• Design for assembly
• Prototype production

10. Product development costing (2 Hours)

11. Group Design project (60 Hours)


Mode of Delivery

Minimum Standards Engineering -194-


The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, design project and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : CONTROL SYSTEMS ENGINEERING


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course follows on an earlier course, “Dynamic Systems Engineering”. It covers types of
control systems, their representation, analysis and behaviour as well as instrumentation.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Explain the role of instrumentation and control in systems (mechanical and
electrical)
• Describe techniques of use of different instruments
• Develop models of control systems
• Determine conditions under which control systems are stable or not
• Use time domain and frequency domain techniques to design feedback
compensators to achieve a specified performance criterion.
• Use software for control system analysis and design.
Course Content
1. Overview of control systems (6 Hours)
• Purpose of control
• Type of controls
• Modeling of control systems
2. Instrumentation (12 Hours)
• Purpose of instrumentation
• Transducers
• Signal conditioning
• Recording and display devices
3. Stability analysis (12 Hours)
• Meaning of stability
• Routh-Hurwitz criterion
• Root locus technique
4. Control system performance (9 Hours)
• Time domain
• Frequency response
• Bode plots
• Nyquist plots
5. Control System Design schemes (6 Hours)
• P, PI, PID and Lead-lag
6. Practical Exercises in MATLAB and LABS (30 Hours)

Mode of Delivery

Minimum Standards Engineering -195-


The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative contributions to
final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : PRODUCTION ENGINEERING II


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course follows on an earlier course, “Production Engineering I”. It covers the production
processes that are normally grouped as secondary processes and are undertaken in machine shops.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Explain the role of machine shops in the manufacturing process
• Develop workshop layouts to address different needs
• Explain the details of secondary processes
• Determine quantitative characteristics of different secondary processes
Course Objectives
Course Content
1. Introduction (6 Hours)
• Overview of Workshops:
• Types of workshops
• The machine shop
• Drawings in a workshop
• Introduction to safety
2. Plant Layout (6 Hours)
• Introduction to plant layout
• Types of layouts
• Factors affecting layout
• Sample layout giving the material flow and space allocation
3. Machine tools – structure and installation (8 Hours)
• Lathe
• Milling machine
• Shaper
• Drilling machine
4. Mechanics and economics of metal cutting (8 Hours)
• Cutting Speed
• Cutting forces
• Tool life
• Cutting economics
5. Machine tool metrology (4 Hours)
• Tools
• Techniques
• Surface roughness
6. Finishing processes (5 Hours)
• Grinding, honing and super finishing
• Shot blasting
• Electroplating

Minimum Standards Engineering -196-


• Enameling
• Painting
7. Introduction to chipless machining (4 Hours)
• EDM
• Plasma cutting
• Ultrasonic machining
8. Process Planning (4 Hours)
• Generative
• Group technology
9. Practicals (30 Hours)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, practicals and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : INDUSTRIAL TRAINING II


Course Level : Level 3
Credit Unit : 3 CU
Course Description
This is similar to the one undertaken at level I. It introduces students to various technological
skills in industries and provides on-the-job training and exposure.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Identify and describe the major activities of the sections where he/she was
attached
• Describe the technical aspects of the training that was undertaken
• Identify technical areas of improvement of the sections where he/she was
attached
• Write a clear and understandable training report
Course Content
The student is required to participate in the day-to-day activities at the organizations premises as
a regular worker.
This activity lasts at least eight (8) weeks starting immediately after the end of examination of
Semester II of the second year of study.

Mode of Delivery
The student will be attached to an organization. During this, training is provided by the
organizations personnel. The activity is closely supervised by a senior member of the
organization as the industry supervisor. A member of the academic staff of the department is
assigned to visit the organization at least two times and monitor the progress of the attachment.
The student keeps a daily log of the activities which is reviewed weekly by the industry supervior
and academic supervisor during the visits.
Mode of Assessment
This shall be by the performance of the student in the organization and a report written by the
student after the training. The report must be endorsed by the industry supervisor. The relative
contribution to the final grade will be as shown below:
Assessment Contribution
Performance at industry assessed by industry 30%

Minimum Standards Engineering -197-


supervisor
Assessment of the records in the log book 20%
Report marked by Academic Supervisor 50%
Total 100%

Course Name : APPIED THERMODYNAMICS


Course Level : Level 4
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course introduces the basic concepts of heat transfer, steam and gas power plants and the
relevant analysis of the various system components.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Describe the different components of gas and steam power plants
• Compute or specify the key characteristics of gas and steam power plants
• Solve problems related to internal combustion engines and positive displacement
machines
• Describe a refrigeration and air conditioning system
Course Content
1. Steam Plant
• Rankine Cycles (8 Hours)
• The Rankine Cycle with Superheat
• The enthalpy-entropy chart (h-s chart)
• The reheat cycle
• The regenerative cycle
• Plant Efficiency

Minimum Standards Engineering -198-


1.
Course Positive
Name :Displacement
FLUID machines
POWER SYSTEMS (4 Hours)
• Reciprocating Machines
• Reciprocating compressors including clearance
• Volumetric Efficiency
• Multi-stage compression
• The ideal intermediate pressure
(8 Hours)
• Two-stage machine with intercooler
• Rotary Machines
2. Gas Turbines
• The practical gas turbine
• Modifications to the basic cycle
• Centrifugal and axial flow compressors
3. Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine
• Four stroke cycle
• Two stroke cycle (4 Hours)
• Criteria of performance
• Engine output and efficiency
• Performance characteristics
• Air-fuel ratio and volumetric efficiency (8 Hours)
• Supercharging
• Engine emissions and legal requirements (8 Hours)
4. Refrigeration
• Vapor-compression refrigeration cycles
• Refrigerating Load
• The pressure-enthalpy diagram
• Multi-pressure systems
• Absorption refrigeration
• Properties of refrigerants
5. Psychrometry (4 Hours)
• Psychrometric mixtures
• Specific humidity, percentage saturation, relative humidity
• Specific heat, specific enthalpy, and specific volume of moist air
• Air-conditioning
(30 Hours)
6. Practicals
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, practicals and tests) and final examination and their
relative contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -199-


Course Level : Level 4
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course builds on an earlier Fluid Mechanics course. It extends the study of fluid statics and
dynamics to applications to fluid power systems.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Describe the basic components of a fluid power system
• Solve for the power and efficiencies and other characteristics of a fluid power
system
• Explain characteristics of hydraulic circuit elements
• Analyze a fluid power system circuit
• Analyze a fluid logic control system
Course Content
1. Basic Fluid Power Components (6 Hours)
• Definitions using Steady-State Characteristics
• Relief valve, Non-relief valve, Pilot-operated relief valve,
• Pipes
• Pressure Compensation of Flow Control Valve
• Pressure Compensated Pump
2. Transmission Systems (8 Hours)
• The prime mover
• The transmission system
• The Load
• Flow control Systems
• Transmission Circuits
3. Valve-Controlled Systems (8 Hours)
• Speed-control Valve
• Series Pressure Compensation
• Parallel Pressure Compensation
4. Accumulator Systems (6 Hours)
• Simple Analysis
• Size of Accumulator
• Analysis of Accumulator System Dynamics
• Thermodynamic Considerations
• Applications: power and control, integration with microprocessors, pneumatics
and applications of pneumatics
5. Fluid Logic Control System (8 Hours)
6. Servomechanisms (5 Hours)
7. Fluid Power System Maintenance (4 Hours)

Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments and tests) and final examination and their relative contributions to
final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -200-


Course Name : AIR CONDITIONING & REFRIGERATION
Course Level : Level 4
Credit Unit : 4 CU
Course Description
This course builds on Applied Thermodynamics Course. It gives a much more detailed study on
air conditioning and refrigeration and expands on what was introduced in the earlier course.
Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
• Perform heating and cooling load calculations
• Describe a refrigeration and air conditioning system
• Analyze a vapor compression and absorption system
Course Content
1. Psychrometric Design (4 Hours)
• Properties of Humid Air
• Psychrometric Processes
2. Heating and Cooling Loads (8 Hours)
• Thermal Comfort
• Air Quality
• Thermal Transmission
• Infiltration and Ventilation Loads
• Components of the Cooling Load
• Internal Loads
• Solar Loads through Transparent Surfaces
• Solar Loads through Opaque Surfaces
• Cold-room design
(8 Hours)
3. Air-Conditioning Systems
• Thermal Distribution Systems
• Classic Single-Zone Systems
• Multiple-Zone Systems
• Terminal-Reheat System
• Dual-Duct or Multizone System
• Variable-Air-Volume Systems
4. Fan and Duct Systems (4 Hours)
• Pressure drop in ducts and fittings
• Design of duct systems
• Centrifugal fans and their characteristics
• Fan laws
5. Refrigeration Plant (9 hours)
• The expansion valve
• Evaporators
• Compressors
• Condensers
• Refrigerants (4 Hours)
6. Vapor Compression System Analysis
• Balance points and System simulation
• Condenser Performance using both graphical and mathematical
analysis
• Evaporator Performance using graphical and mathematical
analysis
7. Absorption refrigeration (4 Hours)

Minimum Standards Engineering -201-


• The Absorption Cycle
• The LiBr-Water Cycle
• Temperature, pressure, heat quantities and flow rates for the
LiBr-Water cycle
• Coefficient of Performance
• Crystallization
• Capacity Control
(2 Hours)
• Aqua-Ammonia System
8. Noise Control
• Acoustic Design in buildings (2 Hours)
• Fan and air noise transmission in ducts
9. Maintenance and Commissioning
• Commissioning
• Duct air-leakage test
• Airflow regulation
• Gas detectors
• Ventilation rate measurement
• Maintenance schedule
10. Practicals (30 Hours)
Mode of Delivery
The course will be taught by using lectures and tutorials
Assessment
Course work (assignments, practicals and tests) and final examination and their relative
contributions to final grade are shown as follows:
Requirement Percentage contribution
Course work 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Course Level : Level 4

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description

This course introduces students to small-scale business start-up, development and


management. It covers choice of business, risk taking, capital mobilization and growth of
a business.

Course Objectives

At the end of this course, a student should be able to:


o Identify and the describe the major steps and requirements for starting a small-
scale business
o Develop a business plan
o Explain the role of finance and financial management in the health of a business
o Appreciate the levels and impact of risk and risk taking in a business
o Describe strategies for nurturing or growing a business

Detailed Course Outline

Minimum Standards Engineering -202-


Introduction: (9 hours)
o The role of small scale business
o How to start a small scale industry
o Regulatory requirements and agencies

Business planning: (12 hours)


o Choice of business,
o Market opportunities and strategy
o Risk and risk taking
o Input resource requirements
o Capital acquisition
o Cash flow projection

Finance and financial management: (12 hours)


o Record keeping
o Financial analysis
o Decision making
o Tax issues
Business development (12 hours)
o Marketing and promotion
o Productivity and quality improvement
o Human resource development

Business start-up project (30 Hours)

Mode of Delivery

The course will be taught by using lectures, group business project, assignments and
examination. Students will undertake a start-your-business project.

Mode of Assessment

This shall be by project, assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution to
the final grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests / Assignments 20%
Business project 20%
Final Examinations 60%
Total 100%

Course Name : PROJECT MANAGEMENT

Course Level : Level 4

Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description

This introduces aspects of management of engineering management including the project


cycle, project planning, network techniques, project monitoring and control, and project
organisation

Minimum Standards Engineering -203-


Course Objectives

At the end of this course, a student should be able to:


o Describe the basic aspects of projects
o Manipulate project networks
o Calculate project schedules
o Develop project requirements especially human and financial
o Explain the various project monitoring and control techniques

Detailed Course Outline

Introduction (6 hours)
o Definition of a project.
o Project life cycle
o Project selection and evaluation criteria

Project feasibility studies and planning (14 hours)


o Investment analysis
o NPV
o ROI
o IRR
o Payback period

Project Scheduling (12 hours)


o Gantt Chart
o Network models – CPM & PERT
o Manpower leveling. PERT cost
o Resource allocation

Project monitoring and control (4 hours)

Project management information system (5 hours)


o MS project

Project Evaluation (4 hours

Mode of Delivery

The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and examination.

Mode of Assessment

This shall be by assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution to the final
grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests/Assignments 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Minimum Standards Engineering -204-


Course Name : BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

Course Level : Level 4

Credit Unit : 3 CU

Course Description

This course builds on the Industrial Organization and Management course offered at
Level 2. It introduces aspects marketing and finance as practiced in business entities –
that is business strategy, marketing, finance and costing.

Course Objectives

At the end of this course, a student should be able to:


o Explain the different forms of ownership of business
o Explain the role of marketing in business
o Explain the different aspects which influence the success of a marketing process
o Explain the different ways in which successful marketing is undertaken
o Explain and compute the different measures of financial performance
o Demonstrate costing of products and services

Detailed Course Outline

Introduction to business: (8 hours)


o Meaning of business
o Forms of business ownership
o Business objectives and strategy
o Systems approach to management

Marketing Management: (16 hours)


o Introduction
o Product and product development
o Pricing
o Distribution
o Promotion

Financial Management: Basic Accounting: Introduction; (16 hours)


Recording, of Transactions: The general journal and other
journals, Cash book, The ledger; Preparation of final
account: Income Statement, the Balance Sheet, the
Sources and uses of funds statements. Interpretation of
accounts

Cost Accounting. (8 hours)

Engineering Economics and its applications to Investment (12 hours)


decision making.

Mode of Delivery

The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and examination.

Minimum Standards Engineering -205-


Mode of Assessment

This shall be by assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution to the final
grade will be as shown below:

Assessment Contribution
Tests / Assignments 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Total 100%

Course Name : PRODUCTION PLANNING AND CONTROL

Course Level : Level 4

Credit Unit : 4 CU

Course Description
This course introduces aspects of planning and controlling resources especially
machinery and materials in a production or service environment. It covers aspects of the
industry supply chain which includes production forecasting and planning, inventory
management, systems management and control.

Course Objectives
At the end of this course, a student should be able to:
o Apply different methods of forecasting
o Develop production plans
o Describe and apply inventory management models
o Develop schedules
o Explain contemporary approaches to systems management

Detailed Course Outline

Introduction to the production environment (3 hours)

Production forecasting techniques (8 hours)

Material Requirements Planning (20 hours)


o Aggregate planning
o Inventory systems and models

Production Scheduling (9 hours)

Contemporary Approaches to Systems management (6 hours)


o Japanese Manufacturing Systems (JIT)

Quality management (14 hours


o Quality assurance
o statistical quality control
o Total Quality Management

Mode of Delivery

Minimum Standards Engineering -206-


The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials, assignments and examination.

Mode of Assessment

This shall be by assignments, tests and examination. The relative contribution to the final
grade will be as shown below:
Assessment Contribution
Tests / Assignments 30 - 50%
Final Examinations 50 - 70%
Course Name : Engineering Ethics
Course Level : 4
Course Credit: 3 CU

Brief Course Description

This introduces students to the basics of ethical foundations going through several
schools of thought

Course Objectives
By the end of the course students will have all the theoretical knowledge required to
make value based decisions.

Detailed Course Description

Contemporary philosophy (15 hours)


• Beginnings: logic and mathematics
• Philosophical analysis: Moore and Russel
• Alternatives: Realism and logical positivism
• Postmodernism: critical theory
• Feminism: theory and ethics

Engineering Ethics (30 hours)


• General Ethical theory
• Minimum requirements for practice of engineering
• Responsibility of engineering institutions
• Safety and reliability
• Professional responsibility to client and employers
• Whistle blowing, codes of ethics, career choice and legal obligations
• Concrete engineering case studies
• Software reliability
• Bribery and conflict of interest dilemma
• Protection of intellectual property
• Privacy of communication e.g. electronic mail
• Ethics of testifying as an expert witness
• The preferential treatment of women in engineering
• Morality of prolusion in less developed countries

Mode of Delivery

Minimum Standards Engineering -207-


The course will be taught by using lectures, tutorials and assignments.

Assessment
Assignments reports, end of module tests and final examination. Their relative
contributions
to the final grade are shown as follows:

Requirement Percentage contribution


Course work (Assignments, tests) 30-50%
Final examination 50-70%
Total 100%

Course Name : FINAL YEAR PROJECT

Course Level : Level 4

Credit Unit : 6 CU

Course Description

This course requires that each student carries out a project devoted to an investigation of
a topic and produces a final report. This could be design of a product to fill an identified
need or a study to solve an identified problem.

Course Objectives

At the end of this course, a student should be able to:


o Isolate a need or a problem requiring a systematic design and/or study
o Conduct a guided investigation using knowledge from previously studied
subjects to arrive at a rational solution
o Demonstrate the worth of the proposed solution
o Write a report of the work done
o Make an oral presentation and/or demonstration of the work done

Detailed Course Outline

The course stretches over two semesters. A total of 30 hours of contact with a supervisor
is necessary. At least 120 hours of student time is required

Mode of Delivery

The project is conducted under the supervision of a member of the academic staff,
assisted by a co-supervisor. An original report and a copy shall be handed in by the
student before sitting for the final written examinations. The report should reflect the
capacity of the student to apply theoretical and practical knowledge in Mechanical
Engineering. Each candidate shall also present the report orally to a panel of Examiners
made up of all the members of academic staff of the department. One presentation takes
place at the end of the First Semester while the Second takes place at the end of the
Academic Year.

Mode of Assessment

Minimum Standards Engineering -208-


The grading is as follows:
• First Semester with a proposals and a presentation – 2 CU.
• The final report and presentation – 4 CU.

Minimum Standards Engineering -209-