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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:

International Symposium on Geophysical Issues


Bandung, July 2-4, 2018
Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Preface
This issue of IOP Conference Series : Earth and Enviroment Science contain selected papers
presented at the Padjadjaran Earthday Dialogue : Intenational Symposium on Geophysical
Issues, PEDISGI. The meeting was held from July 2 to 4, 2018. at the Trans Luxury Hotel in
Bandung, Indonesia. The PEDISGI is a symposium to accommodate communication between
reserchers, in particular geophysicts and related scientist, and to enable sharing of knowledge
and research findings concerning local and geophysical issues. The symposium was attended by
126 participant and 64 contributors from Indonesian universities and the neighbouring
countries in four categories, viz. Theoretical and Computational Geophysics, Enviromental
Geophysics, Geophysical Exploration, and Geophysical Intrumentation and Methods.
The Symposium was accompanied by a dialog, discussing a chosen topic regarding
environmental and geological problems of relevance for the Indonesian archipelago and the
surrounding regions. For the Indonesian archipelago surrounding regions. For this second event
topic was “River: Welfare or Disaster”, presented by invited speaker and local expert. This
activity was aimed at extending out knowledge on this particular subjects, which may have
global impact. This topic was augmented by theoretical background lectures on the earth’s
surface formation, presented by the invited speakers of the symposium.
The meeting would not have been successful without the assistance of the local organizing
committee. We want to specially thank Kartika Hajar Kirana, Dini Fitriani, Budi Santoso, Yudi
Rosandi, Irwan A. Dharmawan, Bambang Wijatmoko, Mia U. Hasanah, Eddy Supriyana, Asep
Harja, and Anggie Susilawati. We also thank the National Geographic Indonesia, PT. Mitra Inti
Marga, Marina, and Wardah for its support via the Business to Business Collaboration Program.

July 2018,
Dr. Eleonora Agustine, MT.
Chairperson of PEDISGI 2018

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Table of Contents

Floor Plant ..............................................................................................................1


Abstract ..................................................................................................................4
Rundown ..............................................................................................................11
Oral Presentation .................................................................................................13

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Floor Plant
2nd Floor

Cisadane Cihaniwung

Cikawedukan

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

3rd Floor

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

The origin of earth's water

Herbert M. Urbassek1
1
Physics Department, University, 67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany

Abstract. Today large oceans cover Earth’s surface, and also in rivers, lakes and glaciers
large amounts of water are present. But in the stage of planet formation, 4.6 billion years
ago, the planets were formed from a cloud of dust particles, which agglomerated to larger
planetesimals and finally planets. At this stage, the Earth and other planets were hot and
covered with magma, and no water could be present on Earth’s surface. Our twin planets,
Venus and Mars, and also Moon and Mercury, contain today no or little water. So how
did water come to Earth?
Planetologists discuss nowadays three scenarios of the origin of Earth’s water: water may
have condensed from the gas mixture surrounding the nascent planets, the so-called
protosolar nebula; or it may have been brought to Earth by comets, cosmic ice balls; or it
may have been contained in asteroids, hidden in their rocky structure.
These scenarios can today be discussed using measurements of the ratio of heavy to light
hydrogen (D/H). While the D/H ratio of Earth’s oceans has been known for long with
high accuracy, recent space measurements of the D/H value of comets, asteroids and
estimates of the protosolar nebula allow to shed new light on the origin of Earth’s water.

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Identifying lithogenic and anthropogenic components in riverine


and lacustrine sediments: Case studies from Citarum River and
Lake Limboto

Satria Bijaksana1
1
Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa
10, Bandung 40132, Indonesia

Abstract. Identification of lithogenic and anthropogenic components in river and lake


sediments is very important, especially in identifying sources pollutant. In general,
lithogenic and anthropogenic components culd be easily distinguishable through
geochemical and magnetic analyses. However, in the tropics this is not always easily,
particularly in volcanic areas where the source rocks are initially very magnetic or contain
high concentrarion of metals. Two case studies will be presented. The first one is the
strategic Citarum River in West Java that is heavily polluted by industial, agricultural and
residential wastes. Unlike that in the rivers in non-volcanic area in temperate climate,
magnetic susceptibility of suspended sediments tends to decrease downstream after
passing polluted area. Moreover, Zn content tends to increase downstream but there is no
clear pattern fo Fe and Ti content. The second case is about the seriously degraded lake
Lake Limboto in Gorontalo. Analyses on surface sediments taken in 17 points in the lake
shows that there is similarity in magnetic susceptibility in between those in residential
and non-residential areas. Parameter SIRM/χLF (saturation isothermal remanent
magnetization divided by mass specific magnetic susceptibility at low frequency),
however, clearly differ in residential area compared to that in non-residential area.
Moreover, sediments in residential area are has higher content of Mn, La, Pr, and Gd
while that in non-residential area has higher content of Fe, Sc, Nd, and Ce. These studies
show that identification of lithogenic and anthropogenic components, especially in the
topics or in the volcanic area is challenging and should be carried out with great care.

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

A new pilot geochemical map of Brunei Darussalam:


environmental implications and opportunities for mineral
exploration

Basilios Tsikouras, Khairunnisa N. Karim, Cynthia. S.C. Shie, Nurul-Izzyani


Zulkefle, Chee-Hui Teo, Rahmat Tarif, Nur’Aqidah Norazme and Elena
Ifandi
University of Brunei Darussalam

Abstract. A new geochemical atlas of Brunei-Muara District in Brunei Darussalam


resulted from a geochemical survey and high-density topsoil sampling (1 sample per
km2). The samples were acquired from a depth of 30-60 cm and the concentrations of 64
elements were determined in the fine fraction (<63 μm), after 4-acid digestion by ICP-
OES and ICP-MS, as well as total determination of resistive elements by INAA. The data
were collected into spreadsheets, statistically treated and graphically presented in a series
of geochemical maps, which were constructed with the aid of GIS software. Detection
and investigation of geochemical anomalies enabled us to elucidate natural and
anthropogenic environmental impacts in the region, as well to spot areas, which have a
potential for further mineral exploration and hence they require future prospecting. Data
and interpretations, based on these maps, are used to better understand the distribution,
mobility and significance of chemical elements in the near-surface environment of Brunei
Darussalam, which is dominated by detrital, sedimentary material of sand and clay sizes.
Additional parameters such as pH and soil colour were determined in order to facilitate
the interpretations for element mobility and distribution. These constitute the first series
of large scale and high density sampling, geochemical maps for the region of SE Asia and
ASEAN prepared and analysed in a uniform and thoroughly documented manner and
over a relatively short time period.

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

The last frontier, deep sea landscape and rivers. Circulation of


the cold Arctic Ocean water along the Reykjanes ridge.

Armann Höskuldsson1
1
Nordic VolcanologicalCenter, Institute of Earth Science, University of Iceland

Abstract. In this talk we shall discuss observations made during two oceanographic
missions focusing on the evolution of the Mid-Atlantic ridge south of Iceland, namely the
Reykjanes ridge. First mission in 2007 was focusing on its relation to Iceland and its
evolution during the past 20 Ma. The second mission was in 2013 and focused on the
termination of the Reykjanes ridge and its relation to transform faults.

The Reykjanes ridge (RR) extents for about 900 km south of Iceland and is the longest
straight segment of the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Our investigation shows that RR has gone
through several reorganisations periods since the abandoning of the Ægir ridge. Prior it
had been suggested that the plate boundary had moved twice in the Iceland region, which
is the Westfjord rift (WR) and the Snæfellsnes rift (SR). However, our investigation
suggest that there are two more abandoned rift system in Iceland, the Husavíkurkleif rift,
active between WR and SR, and the Hvalfjordur rift, active between SR and the current
rift system in Iceland.
West of the currently active RR plate boundary large and deep river channels are
observed at the depth of some 700 to 1500 m. Origin of these channels are in Iceland
suggesting that glacial muddy melt water is capable of flowing along the ocean bottom
due to higher density.
Our last mission in 2013 was more focused on the southern extremity of the RR and its
connections with the Bight transform fault (BTF). Some of our data from this mission
show how the RR extension to the south has decoupled the transform faults. However the
scar of the faults can still be observed along the main plate boundary. In relation to the
transform faults we observe several oceanic core complexes, indication rotation of the
crust and small magma activity. Further as the RR comes closer to the BTF the ridge form
of the boundary changes to rift valley bounded by up to 1000 m high fault scarps.
Volcanism in the rift valley is segmented and bounded by the pre-existing transform
faults.
At last bathymetry reveal that oceanic currents are strong at the floor level, strong enough
to build up dunes that are up to 10 to 20 m high. It shows that the RR forms a major
boundary for Arctic Ocean water and channels it to south along the western boundary of
the plate boundary. Strong deep currents might be one of the main reasons why it has
proven to be difficult to locate black smokers in the area by chemical sniffing.

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Industrialization and degradation of water ecosystem


services in Citarum River: a preliminary study

Sunardi Sudianto1*
1
Graduate Program of Environemntal Studies, and Department of Biology
Faculty of Mathematic and Natural Science – Universitas Padjadjaran
*
Email: sunardi@unpad.ac.id

Abstract. Industrialization has been known as the backbone of, and the driver for the
economic growth of countries. In particular for the developing countries, industrialization
is becoming the primary element to strive the economic delays. In local context,
industries have proven their contribution in lifting the gross domestic product (GDP).
Unfortunately, the governments are not aware of their impacts on many sectors of our
live, such as on the environment and socio-economy. This paper aims to discuss the
effects of industrialization on ecosystem services provided by water resource in Citarum
River, and its impacts on economy. To summarize, industrial pollution has, in fact,
degraded the water ecosystem services, creating further socio-economic and
environmental problems; and the economic lost can be greater than the profit generated
by the industries

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Magnetic analysis in different objects as proxy parameters


of environmental assessment

Dini Fitriani 1, *, Eleonora Agustine 1 and Kartika Hajar Kirana1

1
Department of Geophysics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Universitas
Padjadjaran, Jalan Raya Bandung-Sumedang Km 21, Sumedang 45363

*email: dini@geophys.unpad.ac.id

Abstract. The extensively used of rock magnetism to assess environmental problems is


based on the assumption that environmental conditions can be reflected by the presence
and abundance of magnetic minerals. We have conducted number of studies related to
magnetic analysis in different environmental objects as proxy parameters. Study on soil
samples from Bojongsoang paddy field showing that the use of agrochemical materials
and the presence of industrial waste transported into paddy field may affect the
magnetism and morphology of magnetic minerals in soil. We also identified the
morphology of magnetic grain of soil from landslide area using scanning electron
microscopy (SEM). SEM analysis infers that the magnetic grains are hedral in shape with
rough texture. In other study, we have analyzed that the breakdown of diamagnetic
organic materials in composting process could produce ferrimagnetic minerals.

Keywords: magnetic mineral, magnetic susceptibility, morphology

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Environmetic Techniques as a tool for the cost effective solution


in identifying possible contaminants of river water pollution: A
case study in Kuantan River Malaysia

Hafizan Juahir
Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin

Abstract. This study focuses on the investigation of the spatial pattern of river pollution
and the possible contaminants using the the environmetric techniques. Kuantan River was
selected as a study area due to its surrounding rapid urbanization. Twelve sampling points
along the river were chosen for representing all the possible water quality status during
the sampling period. Eleven physico chemical water quality parameters were taken into
consideration for the further analysis. The most five common environmetric techniques
were employed in this study, namely, Hierarchical Agglomerative Cluster Analysis
(HACA), Partial Least Square-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA), Principal Component
Analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). Based on the average of WQI
value, the Kuantan Rivers reveals deteroriation of water quality within a ten-year period
(2005 to 2015), from clean (Class II) to slightly polluted (Class III). Spatial classification
of water quality parameters by HACA, forming three groups of patterned, namely, Clean,
Slightly Polluted and Polluted. Moreover, predefined cluster by HACA as the qualitative
dependent parameter, DA was successfully determined with 100% correct classification.
Of eleven, only six water quality parameters are the most significant (p<0.05), due to
spatial patterns of the Kuantan River. The parameters are pH, Turbidity, Ammoniacal
Nitrogen, Nitrate, Salinity, and Electrical Conductivity. Then, PCA was employed in the
identification of the possible contaminants of pollution loading into the river systems.
Based on the strong factor loading value >7.0, the possible sources of pollution within the
Kuantan River are Domestic & Industrial discharges and surface runoff. Artificial neural
networks combined with the principal component score estimated that 85% of the
Kuantan River water pollution contributed by the domestic and industrial discharges,
while the remaining 15% contributed by surface runoff. Based on the study findings, the
environmetric techniques are the most applicable tools for time and cost saving for
quantitative evidence, precise decision and to proceed with prompt action in river
pollution control.

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Rundown Activity
Day 1, Monday 2nd July 2018
Time Activity
08.00 - 08.30 Registration and Coffee Break
08.30 - 08.45 Chairperson Speech
08.45 - 08.55 Rector's Speech
08.55 - 09.00 Ceremony & Photo Session
Keynote Speaker 1
09.00 - 09.30 Dr. Ir. Siti Nurbaya, M.Sc.
Minister of Environment and Forestry, Indonesia
09.30 – 09.45 Student Performance (Kasundaan UNPAD)
09.45 - 10.15 Coffee Break & Poster Session
Keynote Speaker 2
10.15 - 11.00 Dr. Marcos A. E. Chaparro
CIFICEN, Argentina
Invited Speaker 3
11.00 - 11.45 Letjen TNI Doni Monardo
Secretary General of National Resilience Council
Invited Speaker 4
11.45 - 12.30 Prof. Herbert M. Urbassek
TU Kaiserslautern, Germany
12.30 - 13.30 Lunch Break
Invited Speaker 5
13.30 - 14.15 Prof. Satria Bijaksana
Institut Teknologi Bandung, Indonesia
Invited Speaker 6
14.15 - 15.00 Dr. Basilios Tsikuoras
University Brunei Darussalam, Brunei Darussalam
15.00 - 15.30 Coffee Break & Poster Session
15.30 - 17.30 Oral Presentation

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Gala Dinner
Time Agenda
19.00 - 19.10 Open Gate For Gala Dinner
19.10 - 19.20 Traditional Dancer Performance
19.20 - 19.45 Chairperson Speech
19.45 - 20.05 Dinner
20.05 - 21.00 Angklung and Rengkenek Performance

Day 2, Tuesday 3th July 2018


Time Agenda
08.00 - 08.30 Registration
Invited Speaker 7
08.30 - 09.15 Prof. Àrmann Höskuldsson
University of Iceland, Iceland
09.15 - 09.45 Coffee Break & Poster Session
Invited Speaker 8
09.45 - 10.30 Prof. Hafizan Juahir
Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, Malaysia
Invited Speaker 9
10.30 - 11.15 Prof. Ir. Rachmat Witoelar
President’s Special Envoy for Climate Change
11.15 - 12.30 PEDISGI Dialogue
12.30 - 13.30 Lunch Break and Poster Session
13.30-15.30 Oral Presentation
15.30 - 16.00 Coffee Break & Poster Session
16.00 - 17.30 Oral Presentation
17.30 - 18.00 Closing Ceremony

Day 3, Wednesday 4th July 2018


Time Agenda Place
06.30 - 07.00 Preparation for Fieldtrip Trans Luxury Hotel
07.00 - 11.35 Excursion to Tangkuban Parahu Tangkuban Parahu
11.35 - 12.35 Lunch Break Tangkuban Parahu
12.35 - 12.50 Back to Hotel Tangkuban Parahu

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

Oral Presentation
Day 1, Monday 2nd July 2018
Room
Time
Pangsiraman Cikahuripan Cisadane Cihaniwung Cikawedukan
15.30-15.45 15' Dr. Andri Dian ELC01 PIRS01
Dr. Dini Fitriani Dr. Sunardi
15.45-16.00 15 Nugraha ELC02 IRS01
16.00-16.15 15' GMS01 EPR02 SAE01 ELC03 IRS02
16.15-16.30 15' GMS02 EPR03 SAE02 ELC04 IRS03
16.30-16.45 15' GMS03 EPR04 SAE03 ELC05 IRS08
16.45-17.00 15' GMS04 EPR05 SAE04 ELC06 IRS04
17.00-17.15 15' GMS05 EPR06 SAE05 ELC07 IRS05
17.15-17.30 15' GMS06 EPR07 SAE06 ELC08 IRS06
17.30-17.45 15' GMS07 EPR08 SAE07 ELC09 PIRS04
17.45-18.00 15' GMS08 EPR09 SAE08 ELC010 IRS09

Day 2, Tuesday 3th July 2018


Room
Time
Pangsiraman Cikahuripan Cisadane Cihaniwung Cikawedukan
13.30-13.45 15' GMS10 EPR01 TMC01 VGH01 HME02
13.45-14.00 15' GMS09 PEPR01 TMC02 VGH02 HME03
14.00-14.15 15' PGMS03 PEPR02 TMC03 VGH04 HME04
14.15-14.30 15' PGMS10 PEPR03 TMC04 VGH05 HME05
14.30-14.45 15' PGMS16 PEPR06 TMC05 VGH06 HME06
14.45-15.00 15' PGMS17 PEPR11 TMC06 VGH07 HME07
15.00-15.15 15' PGMS19 PEPR12 TMC07 VGH08 SAE05
15.15-15.30 15' PGMS21 PEPR13 TMC08 VGH09 SAE08
15.30-15.45 15'
Coffee Break & Poster Session
15.45-16.00 15’
16.00 - 16.15 15' PGMS26 PEPR15 TMC23 VGH10 PSAE03
16.15 - 16.30 15' PGMS27 EPR10 PTMC01 PVGH03 PSAE23
16.30 - 16.45 15' PGMS28 PEPR17 PTMC02 PVGH19 PSAE24
16.45 - 17.00 15' PGMS32 PEPR18 PTMC23 PVGH18 PSAE25

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

NOTES

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

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Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues:
International Symposium on Geophysical Issues
Bandung, July 2-4, 2018

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