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CONTEMPORARY

TEACHING AND
LEARNING

Assignment 1:
Report
HELEN ASOKAN
18042085

1
Table of Contents
Executive Summary………………………………………….. 3

Objective and Context………………………………….. 3


Goals …………………………………………………….. 4
List of recommendations ……………………………….4

Background Information ……………………………………5

Comparative Table ………………………………………….6

Recommendations ……………………………………………8

Reconstructed Unit Outline…………………………………10

Scope and Sequence …………………………………….10


Concept Map……………………………………………..11
Assessment Task and Marking Criteria ……………..12
Redesigned Unit Outline……………………………….13

References …………………………………………………….17

Appendices ……………………………………………………18

2
Executive Summary
Objective and Context
This report has been designed for the Science faculty at The Ponds High School, located in Western Sydney.
The Ponds High School has established itself as a model institute that develops the students’ scientific
knowledge, understanding, values and skills attributed to the broad areas of Science. The Ponds High School
is recognised as a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) leader in Western Sydney.
The school strives to be culturally inclusive in the approach to learning, seeing as 50% of the student body is
recognized with a language background other than English (LBOTE), and only 1% as Indigenous students.
Together with this, the socio-economic status of the school is evident to be in the middle to high area, with
only 11% of the parents in the bottom quarter. There is a fairly eve split between the learners, with boys at
52% and girls at 48%.

The unit of work provided below was taught in year 10 low ability class at The Ponds High School. The
class primarily consisted of students from LBOTE, students with disabilities and socio economic factors
impacting their performance within the class as successful learners.

Reference: The statistics above, along with the tables and charts were retrieved from: https://www.myschool.edu.au/school/51473/profile/2017

3
Goals

 Improve the sequence of learning through layout of science syllabus dotpoints so that the learning
has a clear progression for successful achievement

 Address any literacy and numeracy concerns and or suggestions in the unit of work to meet syllabus
requirements

 Expand the incorporation of ICT (Information, communication and Technology) further in the
classroom to support the learning needs of all students.

 Specify any suggestions for differentiation for students to ensure that all students can learn to the
best of their ability.

 Provide various pedagogical approaches to transitional lessons (i.e. theory and practical) to ensure a
variety of lessons to keep students motivated and engaged

Recommendations

Science is a subject area that can be taught in interesting and creative ways. The following list of
recommendations will focus on raising the level of teaching and learning in a mixed ability classroom, with
students from a LBOTE, Students who identify as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and a mixed
socioeconomic status. The teaching and learning environment in this classroom should be positive, inclusive
and comprehensive so that all needs and additional needs of students are catered for.

 Implement and develop various differentiation methods in the classroom to ensure all students have
equal opportunities to achieve to the best of their ability, for example, visual representation with
teacher lecture.

 Improve the sequencing of the lessons so that there is a clear progression with a coherent structure to
the learning (i.e. implement Understanding by Design framework).

 Integrate literacy, numeracy and ICT to target the syllabus requirements regularly throughout the
lessons.

4
Background Information

The set unit of work explores the concepts of evolution, inheritance and the use of biotechnologies for the
emerging world of DNA research. One of the main goals of this particular unit of work is to investigate
evidence for evolution and then proceeding onto understanding their own genetic makeup through hereditary
characteristics. The unit is designed for students to gain an understanding about the structure of DNA and its
role within a cell. This will further help them understand why certain genetic characteristics may be passed
on and some may not. Further on in the program, the students survey and investigate he use of rising
biotechnologies and their use and potential impact on the contemporary society. While teaching this unit, I
found that the students were not used to to the scientific metalanguage present within this topic. Although
they were provided with a definition sheet at the beginning, the use of such terms in the classroom setting
was not implemented. Conversely, the activities presented within this program is serve to challenge the
students to develop their higher order thinking skills. Presented below is a table that shows the areas of
strengths and concerns presented in the unit of work.

5
Comparative Table

Area of Strengths of the area of Concerns of the area of Suggested Changes to counteract Research support for the changes
consideration consideration consideration concerns suggested.
Definitions page provided Although definitions are provided, Spelling tests, dictagloss, consistent use Reed, Whalon, Lynn, Miller and Smith
for students they are not explicitly implemented of words in the classroom, according to (2017).
Literacy throughout the lessons activity
Literacy activities should be clearly
outlined in the coversheet of the unit
of work.
Comprehension activities No evidence of inclusion of journal Students at this stage should start to be
are present throughout the articles exposed journal articles/ news articles
unit- to make summary and try to extrapolate information on
notes, answer questions the topic covered
and discuss points
suggested
(Evidence for Evolution)
Constructing appropriate Evidence of only a couple of Students will benefit greatly with Leu, Kinzer, Coiro, Castek and Henry
graphs to present data numeracy activities; more graphing practice on graphing skills (2017)
Numeracy (cervical cancer) skills lessons
Analysing data and Numeracy activities should be clearly The teacher should easily identify any
explaining trends from outlined in the coversheet of the unit requirements for literacy and numeracy
graphs constructed or of work. activities
presented (the
chromosomal number on a
variety of organisms)
Information, A variety of videos Minimal student- directed research Incorporate more research tasks so that Alt (2018)
Communication (evidence for evolution) tasks relevant to topics covered- this students are immersed and develop
and Technology does not coincide with Understanding those skills needed for their assessment Kauts and Gupta (2013)
(ICT) by Design framework. task.

Online Simulations and


games (Peppered moths)
Plenty of discussions The research Task provided only Provide a more Inquiry based learning Abdi (2014)
Critical and surrounding the topic of covered one particular topic on the approach to students- this could give
Creative evolution ethical considerations on arising new students a chance to practice before
Thinking technology their depth studies in stage 6.

6
Film study- Gattaca Bayram, Oskay, Erdem, Ozgur and Sen
(detecting any bias in the (2013)
media)
Plenty of first hand Small group discussions are not Provide students opportunity to work in Slavin (2014)
Personal and investigations evident Small group discussions
Social
Capabilities No evidence of presentations or Communication is one of the working
delivering information to the class with scientifically skill that should be
covered at this stage as well
There is ample evidence There is little evidence of individual/ The skills developed will be highly Roth (2006)
of theory and practical collaborative research activities relevant for the assessment task at hand
Understanding lessons corresponding leading up to the student research
by Design with the syllabus project.
dotpoints- aiding in their
yearly examination

7
Recommendations

The unit of work provided for the faculty has significant information regarding the topic and how it

should be sequenced. The program was well structured and shows little evidence of implementing the

Understanding by Design (UbD) framework. The scope and sequence shows precise information, in relation

to the outcomes taught and where the assessment tasks would take place throughout the weeks. There was

no concept map provided, therefore drawing up a concept map was undertaken to make sure that the key

ideas of the unit will be covered. The program did not need as much reworking; however, a few suggestions

and direction for literacy, numeracy and ICT was also added to the reconstructed content that was taught.

Further recommendations to fully incorporate UbD was also provided so that the teachers and students find

it beneficial to their teaching and learning. This will enable the students to learn skills that were relevant to

the assessment tasks (Trapani, 2016).

The contemporary high school that is the Ponds, strives to approach teaching science education with

student centred approaches. Incorporating collaborative work and even ICT has proven to contribute to the

engagement and academic successes of a student (Alt, 2017). The The student research project, the first

assessment task, must be praised because it was very much student centred and encompasses the inquiry

based learning approach. Even though the assessment task was set up as a research task, there was little

evidence of learning activities in which students were able to develop the skill for research. One of the

suggestions addressed was to prepare some lessons as a research lesson, where students undertake some

research for a relevant question in the topic. Consequently, such direction also proves to implement the UbD

framework within the unit of work. It is vital that such activities are planned to provide student enough

scope to produce outstanding work for their assessment task (Roth, 2006). Integrating teaching pedagogies

such as the “flipped classroom” method also exposes students to various techniques of differentiation

through ICT as well (Kauts & Gupta, 2013). Corresponding with UbD, such applications in the classroom

will strive to provide lessons that are engaging, self-directed and compliant with educational standards to

promote life-long learning (Roth, 2006).

8
Providing various activities with student choice, not only promote inquiry based learning, but also

their personal, social capabilities and critical, creative thinking skills. Students must be enabled to think for

themselves rather than be spoon fed information that they may eventually just forget. Suggestions such as

working collaboratively can eventually lead to forming positive relationships, working efficiently and

effectively (Slavin, 2014). The topic of ‘evolution’ provides an opportunity for students to display curiosity,

explore interesting analogies and solve problems. Suggestions for discussions and debates about

controversial topic surrounding the concept of evolution can aid students to enhance their critical and higher

order thinking skills (Bayram, Oskay, Erdem, Ozgur & Sen, 2013). Group/ collaborative work in such

situations can also help to expose students to different perceptions and views on the topic of evolution,

furthermore developing a deep and meaningful understanding to learning.

Students will learn that scientific information can be presented in many forms, such as, flowcharts,

mind maps, tables, graphs, and specific text types. These are ultimately used to link ideas and explanations

to formulate questions, hypothesis and draw conclusions form evidence based influences (Reed, Whalon,

Lynn, Miller & Smith, 2017). Literacy and Numeracy consideration is abundant within the original unit of

work. Although various activities have been planned, they must also be overseen throughout the weeks the

topic goes for. Consistent acknowledgement of vocabulary and use of graphing skills should be monitored

well. Suggestions have been provided in the unit of work to ensure teachers can monitor and evaluate

students work (Leu, Kinzer, Coiro, Castek and Henry, 2017). Although the use of ICT is encouraged,

teachers must recognize that students can become illiterate as they rely on technology so much. Spelling

tests, comprehension activities, that are relevant and appropriate to their level must be incorporated so that

students are provided opportunities to enhance their skills for effective communication (Leu, Kinzer, Coiro,

Castek and Henry, 2017).

9
Reconstructed Unit Outline - Scope and Sequence
THE PONDS HIGH SCHOOL Year 10 Science 2018 | Stage 5 | 2018
Term 1 - Approx. 10 weeks
Week1 Week2 Week3 Week4 Week5 Week6 Week7 Week8 Week9 Week10

Mystery Solutions On the Move


SC5-16CW, SC5-17CW SC5-10PW, SC5-11PW

Term 2 – Approx. 10 weeks


Week1 Week2 Week3 Week4 Week5 Week6 Week7 Week8 Week9 Week 10
(Only 3 days)
On the Move Life goes On
SC5-14LW, SC5-15LW

Formative Assessment- Student Research Project

Term 3 - Approx. 10 weeks


Week1 Week2 Week3 Week4 Week5 Week6 Week7 Week8 Week9 Week 10
(Only 4 days)

Life Goes on Making Waves


SC5-10PW, SC5-11PW

Term 4 - Approx. 10 weeks


Week1 Week2 Week3 Week4 Week5 Week6 Week7 Week8 Week9 Week10
Making Waves Star Wars
SC5-12ES, SC5-13ES

Summative Assessment- Year 10 YEARLY EXAM

10
Concept map

11
Assessment Task and Marking Criteria

12
Redesigned Unit of Work
10.3 Life Goes On Suggested Unit Length: 7 weeks
Unit Context:
This unit starts to explore the concepts of evolution and inheritance. Students will explore evidence for evolutionary theory and move onto an understanding of their own
genetic makeup, through the exploration of inherited characteristics. Students will gain an understanding of the structure of DNA and its role within the cell, as well as an
understanding of why certain characteristics may be passed on, whilst others may not. This unit addresses not only the advancements in biological sciences, but also the rise
of biotechnology and its potential impact on modern society.

Targeted outcomes in the lesson sequence: Unit Created: May 2015 Unit Last Evaluated: May 2018
☑ SC5-1VA: Appreciates the importance of science in their lives and the role of
scientific inquiry in increasing understanding of the world around them Skill Focus Area(s): Working Scientifically – Conducting Investigations
☑ SC5-5WS: Produces a plan to investigate identified questions, hypotheses or
problems, individually and collaboratively Scientific metalanguage used within this unit:
☑ SC5-6WS: Undertakes first-hand investigations to collect valid and reliable Students are to complete Spelling & Definitions sheet using the following terms:
data and information, individually and collaboratively
☑ SC5-7WS: Processes, analyses and evaluates data from first-hand meiosis, genotype, phenotype, heterozygous, allele, chromosome, homozygous, recessive, gene, dominant.
investigations and secondary sources to develop evidence-based arguments
and conclusions Numeracy Focus Area(s): Literacy Focus Area(s):
☑ SC5-14LW: Analyses interactions between components and process within
biological systems and explains how biological understanding has advanced  Graphing skills  Comprehension activities
through scientific discoveries, technological developments and the needs of  Interpreting graphs  Spelling tests
society  Drawing data from graphs  Dictagloss
☑ SC5-13ES: Explains how scientific knowledge about global patterns of  Writing skills – short answer/ extended
geological activity and interactions involving global systems can be used to
response
inform decisions related to contemporary issues
 Marking sample answers
☑ SC5-15LW: Explains how biological understanding has advanced through
scientific discoveries, technological developments and the needs of society
☑ LW-AC. describe examples of advances in science and/or emerging science
and technologies, in areas that involve biological science such as dentistry,
environmental science, biomedical engineering, physiology, pharmaceuticals
or nanotechnology

Assessment:
ICT Focus Area(s):
ASSESSMENT TASK: Student Research Project
FORMAL ASSESSMENT TASK: Section 1 – Yearly Examination ● Research using secondary sources • Computer Interactive
● Microsoft Office – creating Word and Publisher documents

Quality Teaching: QT strategies are embedded throughout the program and are found in the ‘Integrated Learning Experiences and Instruction’.

13
BOS Outcome

K&U WS Registration
Evidence of Learning Integrated learning experiences
At the end of At the end of Sign and date At the end of this unit, students Resources
and assessment
W

m
N
u
e
e

this unit, this unit, BOS outcomes should be able to:


students should students should as they are
be able to: be able to: completed

1. EVIDENCE FOR EVOLUTION


Living World
SC5-LW4a (a) Outline the theory of evolution BRAINSTORM: Discuss what students already know about PS10 pp 100-104
describe evolution eg. how life on Earth has changed from the time of iS10 pp 43-4
scientific the dinosaurs to the present day and reasons for the iS10 pp64-68
evidence that difference. Outline the theory of evolution.
present-day
organisms have (b) Discuss the historical treatment of RESEARCH / LITERACY TASK: Using secondary sources,
evolved from NS10 pp58-60
evolutionary theory complete table outlining the contributions of different
organisms in scientists to evolutionary theory
the past
Living World (c) Discuss evidence supporting the ICT ACTIVITY: Introductory video – Evidence for evolution https://youtu.be/lIEoO
SC5-LW4b theory of evolution including
5KdPvg
relate the fossil ● age of the Earth ACTIVITY: Read and comprehend written information on PS10ABpp25-27
record to the
the Geological Time Scale.
age of the
Earth and the ● biogeography
time over which CRITICAL THINKING: Examine map of world showing NS10 p 70
life has been distribution of animals and/or fossils and infer reasons for
evolving their distribution- Relevance to contemporary society.
● existence of fossils
DISCUSSION: Define fossils and outline the process of NSp63-4
LW Additional fossilization. Students demonstrate understanding of SQ10 p139
Content: fossilization by placing jumbled pictures of the process of
fossilization into the correct order.
assess the role INVESTIGATION: Students follow a procedure to
of the model fossilization with plaster molds. (Collaborative
development of work)
fast computers PS10ABpp32-3
in the analysis

14
of DNA ACTIVITY: Students complete worksheet to demonstrate
sequence ● comparison of fossils with
how index fossils can be used to determine the age of rock
present day life forms PS10 p83-4
layers.
Worksheet “Evolution
ACTIVITY: Using the horse as an example, students of the Horse”
explain that fossils may be compared to present day life PS10AB pp 22-3
forms.
● comparative anatomy
INVESTIGATION: Students view a series of fossils or
pictures of fossils and identify any modern day organism that PS10 p 91
shares similarities with the fossil. Collaborative PS10AB pp36-8
NS p 68-9
INVESTIGATION: Students collect information from
iS10 pp56-7
specimens or secondary sources to complete a table
comparing vertebrate forelimbs.
● transitional forms
DISCUSSION: Discuss how the presence of tailbone and
appendix in humans and other vestigial structure are NS10 p65
evidence for evolution Worksheet
“Transitional Forms”
ACTIVITY: Students infer features of transitional forms PS10AB pp31-2
● embryology common to individual species. Input; seed fern,
archaeopteryx, lobe finned fish.
LITERACY TASK: Students read text on “Dinobirds” and NS10 p 71
complete comprehension questions. - extension (extended iS10 p56
response question)
Additional Content:
Discuss how biotechnology has been used INVESTIGATION: Students analyze pictorial evidence of
to provided evidence for evolution vertebrate embryos to infer evolutionary links PS10 p 103
(Collaborative work) NS10 pp66-7
iS10 pp57-59
Living World
2. DARWIN’S THEORY OF
SC5-LW4c ICT ACTIVITY: Students play Peppered Moth simulation
EVOLUTION AND NATURAL
explain, using SELECTION game and complete the questions on the website.-
examples, how answer an extended response question iS10 pp 64-68
(a) Explain how changes in a population http://www.biologycor
natural
can arise due to natural selection ner.com/worksheets/p
selection INVESTIGATION: Perform a first-hand investigation to
relates to model natural selection epperedmoth.html
changes in a SQ10 p 126
population, eg. NUMERACY TASK/CRITICAL THINKING: Analyse given
in the data to critically evaluate a hypothesis from conducted
development of PS10AB pp39-40
investigation
15
resistance of
bacteria to ACTIVITY: Student answer questions and complete
antibiotics and table showing changes in populations by natural selection NS10 pp 48, 55
insects to and selective pressures
pesticides.
DISCUSSION: Students apply information about natural
(b) Relate natural selection to the theory
selection in the peppered moth to other populations of
of evolution, using examples
organisms eg. bacteria and antibiotics or insects and SQ10 p 124-5
pesticides .

LITERACY TASK/CRITICAL THINKING: Review text


about antibiotic resistance and infer reasons for
resistance- extended response PS10AB pp41-2

INVESTIGATION: Students perform a first-hand


investigation to model evolution by natural selection
iS10 p 69

16
References

Abdi, A. (2014). The effect of Inquiry based learning method on students’ academic achievement in science
course. Universal Journal of Educational Research, 2(1), 37-41. Doi: 10.13189/ujer.2014.020104

Alt, D. (2018). Science teachers’ conceptions of teaching and learning, ICT efficacy, ICT professional
development and ICT practices enacted in their classrooms. Teacher and Teacher Education, 73,
141-150. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2018.03.020.

Bayram, Z., Oskay, O. O., Erdem, E., Ozgur, S. D. & Sen, S. (2013). Effect of inquiry based learning
method on student’s motivation. Social and Behavioral Sciences, 106, 988-996. Doi: doi:
10.1016/j.sbspro.2013.12.112

Kauts, A. & Gupta, S. (2013). Efficacy of ICT as a transactional Pedagogical Strategy in Teaching of
science at secondary stage. Educational Quest, 4(1), 49-56.

Leu, D. J., Kinzer, C. K., Coiro, J., Castek, J. & Henry, L. A. (2017). New Literacies: A Dual-Level Theory
of the Changing Nature of Literacy, Instruction, and Assessment. Journal of Education, 197(2).

Reed, D. K., Whalon, K., Lynn, N. & Smith, K. (2017). A comparison of general and content-specific
Literacy strategies for Learning science content. Exceptionality, 25(2), 77-96. Doi:
10.1080/09362835.2016.1196441

Slavin, R. E. (2014). Cooperative Learning and Academic Achievement: Why does group work work?
Anales de Psicologia, 30(3), 785-79. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.6018/analesps.30.3.201201

Trapani, B. (2016). Efficacy of Understanding by Design implementation plan: Evaluated through teacher
perceptions and practices (PhD thesis). Retreived from:
https://search.proquest.com/docview/1774050044/?pq-origsite=primo

17
Appendix – *I was not provided with a scope and sequence or a concept map.
Original Unit
10.3 Life Goes On Suggested Unit Length: 7 weeks
Unit Context:
This unit starts to explore the concepts of evolution and inheritance. Students will explore evidence for evolutionary theory and move onto an understanding of their own genetic makeup,
through the exploration of inherited characteristics. Students will gain an understanding of the structure of DNA and its role within the cell, as well as an understanding of why certain
characteristics may be passed on, whilst others may not. This unit addresses not only the advancements in biological sciences, but also the rise of biotechnology and its potential impact on
modern society.

Targeted outcomes in the lesson sequence: Unit Created: May 2015 Unit Last Evaluated: May 2018
☑ SC5-1VA: Appreciates the importance of science in their lives and the role of
scientific inquiry in increasing understanding of the world around them Skill Focus Area(s): Working Scientifically – Conducting Investigations
☑ SC5-5WS: Produces a plan to investigate identified questions, hypotheses or
problems, individually and collaboratively Scientific metalanguage used within this unit:
☑ SC5-6WS: Undertakes first-hand investigations to collect valid and reliable
data and information, individually and collaboratively
meiosis, genotype, phenotype, heterozygous, allele, chromosome, homozygous, recessive, gene, dominant.
☑ SC5-7WS: Processes, analyses and evaluates data from first-hand
investigations and secondary sources to develop evidence-based arguments Numeracy Focus Area(s): Literacy Focus Area(s):
and conclusions
☑ SC5-14LW: Analyses interactions between components and process within
biological systems and explains how biological understanding has advanced
through scientific discoveries, technological developments and the needs of
society
☑ SC5-13ES: Explains how scientific knowledge about global patterns of
geological activity and interactions involving global systems can be used to
inform decisions related to contemporary issues
☑ SC5-15LW: Explains how biological understanding has advanced through
scientific discoveries, technological developments and the needs of society
☑ LW-AC. describe examples of advances in science and/or emerging science
and technologies, in areas that involve biological science such as dentistry,
environmental science, biomedical engineering, physiology, pharmaceuticals
or nanotechnology

Assessment:
ICT Focus Area(s):
FORMAL ASSESSMENT TASK: Section 1 – Yearly Examination
● Research using secondary sources • Computer Interactives
● Microsoft Office – creating Word and Publisher documents

Quality Teaching: QT strategies are embedded throughout the program and are found in the ‘Integrated Learning Experiences and Instruction’.

18
BOS Outcome

K&U WS Registration
Evidence of Learning Integrated learning experiences
At the end of At the end of Sign and date At the end of this unit, students Resources
and assessment
W

m
N
u
e
e

this unit, this unit, BOS outcomes should be able to:


students should students should as they are
be able to: be able to: completed

3. EVIDENCE FOR EVOLUTION


Living World
SC5-LW4a (d) Outline the theory of evolution BRAINSTORM: Discuss what students already know about PS10 pp 100-104
describe evolution eg. how life on Earth has changed from the time of iS10 pp 43-4
scientific the dinosaurs to the present day and reasons for the iS10 pp64-68
evidence that difference. Outline the theory of evolution.
present-day
organisms have (e) Discuss the historical treatment of
evolved from evolutionary theory ICT ACTIVITY: Introductory video – Evidence for evolution
organisms in
the past
ACTIVITY: Read and comprehend written information on https://youtu.be/lIEoO
Living World (f) Discuss evidence supporting the
the Geological Time Scale. 5KdPvg
SC5-LW4b theory of evolution including
relate the fossil PS10ABpp25-27
● age of the Earth
record to the DISCUSSION: Define fossils and outline the process of
age of the fossilisation. Students demonstrate understanding of
Earth and the NS10 p 70
● biogeography fossilisation by placing jumbled pictures of the process of
time over which fossilisation into the correct order.
life has been
INVESTIGATION: Students follow a procedure to
evolving
model fossilisation with plaster moulds. NSp63-4
● existence of fossils
ACTIVITY: Students complete worksheet to demonstrate SQ10 p139
LW Additional how index fossils can be used to determine the age of rock
Content: layers.

assess the role ACTIVITY: Using the horse as an example, students


of the explain that fossils may be compared to present day life
development of forms. PS10ABpp32-3
fast computers
in the analysis

19
of DNA ● comparison of fossils with INVESTIGATION: Students collect information from PS10 p83-4
sequence present day life forms specimens or secondary sources to complete a table Worksheet “Evolution
comparing vertebrate forelimbs. of the Horse”
PS10AB pp 22-3
DISCUSSION: Discuss how the presence of tailbone and
appendix in humans and other vestigial structure are
evidence for evolution
● comparative anatomy PS10 p 91
ACTIVITY: Students infer features of transitional forms PS10AB pp36-8
common to individual species. Input; seed fern, NS p 68-9
archaeopteryx, lobe finned fish.
iS10 pp56-7

INVESTIGATION: Students analyse pictorial evidence of


● transitional forms vertebrate embryos to infer evolutionary links NS10 p65
Worksheet
“Transitional Forms”
PS10AB pp31-2

● embryology NS10 p 71
iS10 p56

Additional Content: PS10 p 103


Discuss how biotechnology has been used NS10 pp66-7
to provided evidence for evolution iS10 pp57-59

Living World
4. DARWIN’S THEORY OF
SC5-LW4c INVESTIGATION: Perform a first-hand investigation to
EVOLUTION AND NATURAL
explain, using SELECTION model natural selection
examples, how DISCUSSION: Students apply information about natural iS10 pp 64-68
(c) Explain how changes in a population http://www.biologycor
natural selection in the peppered moth to other populations of
can arise due to natural selection ner.com/worksheets/p
selection organisms eg. bacteria and antibiotics or insects and
relates to pesticides. epperedmoth.html
changes in a SQ10 p 126
population, eg. LITERACY TASK/CRITICAL THINKING: Review text
in the about antibiotic resistance and infer reasons for
development of PS10AB pp39-40
resistance
resistance of

20
bacteria to INVESTIGATION: Students perform a first-hand
antibiotics and investigation to model evolution by natural selection NS10 pp 48, 55
insects to
pesticides.

(d) Relate natural selection to the theory


of evolution, using examples SQ10 p 124-5

PS10AB pp41-2

iS10 p 69
Living World 5. REPRODUCTION
SC5-LW3a
relate the
(a) Recall that reproduction is a ● DISCUSSION: Recall the characteristics of living things
characteristic of living things to and the need for reproduction
organs involved ensure the continuation of a species.
in human
reproductive (b) Recall why all body cells must ACTIVITY and DISCUSSION: Model cell division (mitosis),
systems to reproduce and identify this process of demonstrating that the daughter cells produced are
their function cell division as mitosis. identical to the parent cell. Discuss why this is important
SC5-LW3b
identify that
(c) Contrast sexual and asexual DISCUSSION: Deduce definitions of asexual and sexual
during
reproduction. reproduction from a variety of stimulus material
reproduction,
the
(d) Recall major structures involved in
transmission of ACTIVITY: Students label diagrams of the male and female
human reproduction and relate this Female reproductive
heritable reproductive systems.
to their function. system interactive
characteristics
from one ACTIVITY: Students view stimulus material to complete
generation to a table outlining the names and functions of the main parts of
the next the male and female reproductive systems
involves DNA Male reproductive
and genes system interactive

21
ACTIVITY: Construct a model of human conception to male-label
deduce the sequence of events involved in human
(e) Sequence the events of human reproduction. Evaluate the effectiveness of the model and conception
SC5-WS8e reproduction. discuss advantages and limitations of using models in science.
DVD- Miracle of Love

PUBERTY
Living World 6. DNA STRUCTURE AND
SC5-LW3d REPLICATION

outline how the (a) Recall the structure of a cell and the
Watson-Crick ACTIVITY: Worksheet “take a closer look”
role of the nucleus.
model of DNA
explains: (b) Describe the nature of chromosomes NS10 p4 activity 1.1.2
LITERACY ACTIVITY: Students read a given text to obtain
● the exact and the relationship between PS10 P4, SQ10 P62,66
replication information about the differences between
chromosomes, genes and DNA.
chromosomes, genes and DNA.
of DNA
(c) Outline the historical development of This Day In History
the discovery of the structure of DNA ICT ACTIVITY: Research the historical discovery of DNA
and complete the associated worksheet video
Timeline of DNA
discovery
the discovery of the
structure of DNA

Drag and Drop DNA:


SC5-WS8e (d) Describe the structure of DNA ACTIVITY: Use a prebuilt model to explain the structure of http://www.zerobio.com
DNA
(e) Discuss the importance of exact
replication of DNA ACTIVITY: Construct a model of DNA to illustrate its
CSIRO cardboard DNA
structure
(f) Explain how DNA replication occurs model
Edible DNA model
HIS3 p145
LS4 p 35
INVESTIGATION: Follow a procedure to extract DNA DNA Extraction
from strawberries

22
SC5-LW3c 7. CHROMOSOMES

identify that (a) Discuss how chromosome numbers NUMERACY TASK/CRITICAL THINKING: Students SQ10 p54
genetic vary between organisms. construct a graph from tabulated information about the CS4 p171
information is chromosomal number of a variety of organisms, interpret
transferred as trends and infer relationships.
genes in the
DNA of (b) Identify that DNA is the inheritable Introductory Video
chromosomes ACTIVITY AND DISCUSSION: Students watch a short
material responsible for the presentation on “What is Heredity” and discuss how https://youtu.be/aDpL
transmission of inheritable human traits are passed on from parent to offspring . DBaEBjk
characteristics from one generation
to the next.

(c) Describe how differences in our DNA


ACTIVITY:Students observe variations between each
results in variation among species
other and list a variety of differing physical features eg
widows peak and survey the class to determine frequency cell-division-and-dna-
of each trait. Students collaboratively generate a table for duplication
data collection.

(d) Describe the chromosomal structure INVESTIGATION: Students perform a simple activity to
of human cells, including the role of X determine the probability of the sex of an individual using
and Y chromosomes coin toss method.

(e) Describe the role of meiosis in


producing specialized cells for
reproduction

SC5-LW3c 8. Genetics & Inheritance

identify that (a) Explain why children look something


genetic ACTIVITY: Give students a list of heritable and non-
like their parents. heritable traits. DEBATE which traits will be passed on to
information is
transferred as the next generation and which ones will not.
(b) Define genetics and inheritance Students try to brainstorm reasons for some traits being
genes in the
DNA of inherited and why others are not.
chromosomes Discuss the meaning of inheritance, traits and heritable
characteristics

(c) Identify genes as the basic unit of


inheritance

23
(d) Define the following terms: DISCUSSION: Background on Gregor Mendel and his Heredity Video:
genotypes, phenotype, homozygous, experiments using pea plants. http://learn.genetics.u
heterozygous, Dominant, Recessive tah.edu/content/inheri
tance/intro/
(e) Predict the outcomes on monohybrid Traits Video:
crosses involving dominant/recessive http://learn.genetics.u
inheritance tah.edu/content/inheri
tance/traits/
(f) Construct and interpret pedigrees List of observable
traits:
http://learn.genetics.u
tah.edu/content/inheri
tance/observable/

Interactive DNA
Genetics

http://www.zerobio.co
m/drag_gr11/mono.htm

Pearson Science 10
P 5,6,7

Science Quest 10
P 17, 18

National Science 10
P 17,18,19,23

NS10 Pg 21&22

Living World SC5-WS5abcd


9. Effects of the environment
SC5-LW4d
SC5-WS6a (a) Outline the effect of a change in INVESTIGATION: Students design and conduct an
outline the
environment on phenotype experiment to determine the effect of environment on
roles of genes
and (b) Identify environmental factors that phenotype
environmental may affect how a baby develops.
factors in the
24
survival of (c) Interpret diagrams showing how ● Extension: Discuss nature versus nurture and the
organisms in a twins form. impact of the environment on identical twins..
population

Living World 10. MUTATIONS


SC5-LW3d
(a) Explain how changes in genes PS10 p105
outline how the (mutation) can arise. iS10 p5
Watson-Crick pS10AB p 15
model of DNA (b) Analyse how technological advances
explains: have improved our understanding of
changes in variation among species and the
genes Theory of Natural Selection
(mutation)
Living World 9. BIOTECHNOLOGY
SC5-LW3e
WS9a a) Discuss biotechnology and its uses BRAINSTORM / THINK, PAIR, SHARE ACTIVITY:
describe, using
throughout history Brainstorm student ideas on biotechnology.
examples, how
developments
in technology ACTIVITY: Use card set to identify correct statements
have advanced about biotechnology.
biological
understanding, ACTIVITY: Students to produce a definition of
eg vaccines, biotechnology.
biotechnology,
stem-cell OPTIONAL ACTIVITY: Make bread or yoghurt as an
research and example of traditional biotechnology
WS6a CS5 p 380
in-vitro
http:GM
fertilisation
WS7.1b b) Identify genetic engineering as an DISCUSSION: CASE STUDY- Flavr Savr tomato/ GM bananas
example of biotechnology Bananas
WS7.2e http:MONSANTO
c) Identify several transgenic species LITERACY ACTIVITY: Matching terms with correct
and describe their formation definition activity http:TOMATO
WS7.2a
d) Discuss the benefits and problems http:LABMEAT
associated with genetic engineering ACTIVITY: Explore the ethical arguments commonly CS5 p 385
e) Describe how cloning occurs and associated with cloning technologies.
discuss the ethical issues it raises

25
ACTIVITY: Interpret and analyse data on the history of
cloning HIS3 p 140

LITERACY ACTIVITY: Correctly sequence the steps


involved in cloning SFHW4?
Living World 10. STEM-CELLS
SC5-LW3e
WS9 a) Explain what ‘Stem Cells’ are
describe, using DISCUSSION: Distinguish between multipotent and pluripotent CS5 p 24
examples, how stem cells
b) Recall some applications of stem cell
developments
therapy http:MAKINGLIFE
in technology
LITERACY ACTIVITY: Explore the application of stem cell
have advanced
WS7.2e c) Discuss the advantages and technology in the treatment of patients with spinal injuries
biological
disadvantages of ‘Stem Cell Therapy’
understanding,
eg vaccines, RESEARCH ACTIVITY: Latest advancements in Stem Cell
biotechnology, Research.
stem-cell
research and
ACTIVITY: Student make their own judgements on the benefits,
in-vitro
drawbacks and risks of stem cell therapy
fertilisation

Living World 11. IN-VITRO FERTILISATION


SC5-LW3e
WS9ade a) Explain what is meant by DISCUSSION: Why reproductive technologies are required CS5 p 70
describe, using
‘reproductive technology’ by some people and the various ways in which they are used.
examples, how
developments
b) Distinguish between Artificial
in technology
insemination and In-vitro fertilisation
have advanced ACTIVITY: Student make their own judgements on the
biological benefits, drawbacks and risks of IVF
WS7.2e c) Discuss and form own opinions on
understanding,
other current reproductive
eg vaccines,
technologies.
biotechnology,
stem-cell
research and
in-vitro
fertilisation
Living World 12. ETHICAL ARGUMENTS
SC5-LW3f
discuss some
26
advantages and WS7.2e a) Identify the importance of ethical DISCUSSION: Explore the concept of a ‘designer baby’ and CS5 p 74
disadvantages of considerations to scientific examine the difference between being scientifically possible
the use and developments
applications of
and socially acceptable
GATTACA
biotechnology,
b) Critically analyse a range of ethical CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING: Film Study- GATTACA
including social
and ethical issues surrounding biotechnology.
considerations
CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING: Detecting bias in media
c) Identify the role of the media in articles
WS7.2g influencing society’s view on scientific SE10 p 19
advances. Include the concept of bias SE10 p 21
in media articles. SE10 p 141

LW-AC. discuss, 13. NEEDS OF CONTEMPORARY


using examples, SOCIETY
how the values WS7.1b DISCUSSION: Recall the concept of vaccination and
and needs of a) Explain how scientific research is examine the discovery of the cervical cancer vaccine. LOS4 p 42
contemporary often driven by the needs of society
society can
influence the NUMERACY ACTIVITY: Select appropriate graph to
WS9b
focus of scientific present data on cervical cancer.
WS7.2a
research, eg the
occurrence of CRITICAL AND CREATIVE THINKING: Examine the latest
diseases development of condoms in response to disease control
affecting animals WS7.1c http:condoms
b) Identify the application of the across the world
and plants, an
epidemic or scientific method to a number of http:STIs
pandemic discoveries. LITERACY ACTIVITY: Examine various medical
disease in breakthroughs
humans or HIS3 p 8
lifestyle related LITERACY ACTIVITY: Aboriginal Health Problems SE9 p 112
non-infectious
http:
diseases in
ORGANBIOPRINTING
humans Library Lesson in
preparation for
Assessment Report
LW-AC. describe 14. EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES http://NANOTECHNOL
examples of OGY
advances in WS7.1b a) Explain some applications of LITERACY ACTIVITY: Review a number of newspaper
science and/or
nanotechnology article about nanotechnology http:NANOENGINEERI
emerging science
NG
and technologies,
in areas that WS7.2e

27
involve biological ACTIVITY: Student make their own judgements on the
science such as
benefits, drawbacks and risks of nanotechnology
dentistry, WS7.1b b) Identify cases where scientific
environmental ICT ACTIVITY: Students research emerging career
advances have led to new career
science, opportunities
opportunities
biomedical
engineering,
physiology,
pharmaceuticals
or
nanotechnology

Chemical World
SC5-CW4e
describe
examples to
show where
advances in
science and/or
emerging science
and technologies
significantly
affect people's
lives, including
generating new
career
opportunities in
areas of chemical
science such as
biochemistry and
industrial
chemistry
(ACSHE161,
ACSHE195)

28