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Student Teaching Evaluation of Performance (STEP)

Template

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Table of Contents

Student Teaching Evaluation of Performance (STEP) Template..............................1


Table of Contents.......................................................................................................2
STEP Standard 1 - Contextual Factors: Knowing Your School and Community.....3
STEP Standard 2 - Writing Standards-Based Objectives and the Learning Goal.....5
STEP Standard 3 - Assessment and Data Literacy....................................................6
STEP Standard 4 - Unit and Lesson Planning...........................................................7
STEP Standard 5 - Implementation of Instructional Unit.......................................10
STEP Standard 6 - Analysis of Student Learning....................................................11
STEP Standard 7 – Reflecting on Instruction to Improve Student Progress...........13

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STEP Standard 1 - Contextual Factors: Knowing Your School and
Community

Part I: Community, District, School, and Classroom Factors

You will be completing this portion of the STEP document using the following
link:
STEP Standard 1, Part I

After completing the e-doc portion, submit the PDF you receive into the Learning
Management System (LMS).

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STEP Standard 1 - Contextual Factors: Knowing Your School and
Community
Part II: Demographic, Environment, and Academic Factors

You will be completing this portion of the STEP document using the following
link:
STEP Standard 1, Part II

After completing the e-doc portion, submit the PDF you receive into the Learning
Management System (LMS).

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STEP Standard 2 - Writing Standards-Based Objectives and the
Learning Goal

Unit Topic: Math

Unit Title: Multiplication with Whole Numbers

National or State Academic Content Standards


CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NBT.A.1
Recognize that in a multi-digit whole number, a digit in one place represents ten times what it
represents in the place to its right. For example, recognize that 700 ÷ 70 = 10 by applying
concepts of place value and division. (Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2018)
CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.4.NBT.B.5
Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two
two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations.
Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.
(Common Core State Standards Initiative, 2018)

Learning Goal
Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of place value to illustrate and solve
multiplication problems using whole numbers.

Measurable Objectives
Students will master the following objectives to a minimum proficiency of 85%
• Multiply whole numbers in tens, hundreds and thousands place by a one-digit number
• Multiple whole, rounded numbers in the tens place by a two-digit number
• Demonstrate how to use models and arrays to represent multiplication

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STEP Standard 3 - Assessment and Data Literacy
Pre-Assessment - Copy and paste the pre-assessment you plan to use to assess the students’
knowledge of the topic prior to implementing the unit lessons. Include the scoring criteria used
to determine whether the student Exceeds, Meets, Approaches, or Falls Far Below the learning
goal and measurable objectives.

Post-Assessment Name_______________

1. 247 2. 46 3. 8,312 4. 90 5. 40
x 2 x 3 x 6 x 50 x 30

6. Draw an area array or rectangle model that represents the problem 4x3.

7. A jacket costs $32. If 2 jackets are purchased, what is the total cost?

__________________________________________________________________

8. Ben earns $88 each month mowing lawns. He will go camping in 4 months.
How much will he earn before his camping trip?

Assessment created by Elizabeth White September, 2018

Scoring Criteria for learning objectives:

Exceeds- 100% (all 8 correct)

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Meets- 88% (7/8)

Approaches- 63%-75% (5/8 or 6/8)

Falls Far Below- 50% or below (4 or less correct)

Pre-Assessment Data: Whole Class - Once you have assessed your students’ knowledge on the topic,
collect and analyze the pre-assessment data to determine if you will need to modify the standards,
learning goal, or measurable objectives that will be addressed during instruction.

Number of Students

Exceeds 0

Meets 1

Approaches 5

Falls Far Below 23


Pre-Assessment Analysis: Whole Class

Based on the data above, what changes, if any, will you make to your selection of national or state
academic content standards, the learning goal, or measurable objectives?

It is believed the goals for this unit are attainable and realistically align with the national and state
standards. The only changes, based on the pretest, may come in the organization of lesson delivery.
Teaching the objective in small groups instead of the whole class, based on the students that are
approaching proficiency may be explored.
Based on the data above, describe in 1-3 paragraphs the effect this data could have on the planning,
delivery, and assessment of your unit.

This data helps understand the potential for growth within the class. Many of the students have been
exposed to multiplication, and there was only one who knew how to multiply the value rather than the
digit. All other students multiplied the ones place, then just brought down the tens and hundreds
place. They also added the numbers in the story problems instead of multiplying them. As results were
considered, it was realized, teaching the whole group may be difficult since there are quite a few
students who not only fall far below proficiency, as expected, but that still do not grasp general single
digit multiplication. The lesson delivery in degrees or groups will be explored in response to this pre-
assessment and according to how well the students performed, and their performance in a prior lesson.

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Collaborative learning is also a strategy to engage students and encourage academic progress.

Post-Assessment – Copy and paste the post-assessment you plan to use to assess the students’ knowledge
of the topic after implementing the unit lessons. The post-assessment can be the same as the pre-
assessment, a modified version, or something comparable that measures the same concepts. Include the
scoring criteria used to determine whether the student Exceeds, Meets, Approaches, or Falls Far Below the
learning goal and measurable objectives.
Post-Assessment Name_______________

2. 326 2. 52 3. 2,719 4. 80 5. 50
x 3 x 2 x 5 x 20 x 30

6. Draw an area array or rectangle model that represents the problem 3x5.

7. A hat costs $23. If 3 hats are purchased, what is the total cost?

__________________________________________________________________

8. Ben earns $54 each month mowing lawns. He will go camping in 3 months.
How much will he earn before his camping trip?

__________________________________________________________________

Assessment created by Elizabeth White, September 2018

Scoring Criteria for learning objectives:

Exceeds- 100% (all 8 correct)

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Meets- 88% (7/8)

Approaches- 63%-75% (5/8 or 6/8)

Falls Far Below- 50% or below (4 or less correct)

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STEP Standard 4 - Unit and Lesson Planning

Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5


Title of Multiplication Multiplication Multiplication Multiplication Review Multiplication
Lesson Introduction Summative
or Assessment
Activity
Standar CCSS.MATH.CO CCSS.MATH.C CCSS.MATH.C CCSS.MATH.CO CCSS.MATH.C
ds and NTENT.4.NBT.A.1 ONTENT.4.NBT.A.1 ONTENT.4.NBT.A.1 NTENT.4.NBT.A.1 ONTENT.4.NBT.A.1
Recognize that in a multi- Recognize that in a multi- Recognize that in a multi- Recognize that in a multi- Recognize that in a multi-
Objecti digit whole number, a digit digit whole number, a digit whole number, a digit whole number, a digit digit whole number, a
ves in one place represents ten digit in one place digit in one place in one place represents ten digit in one place
times what it represents in represents ten times what represents ten times what times what it represents in represents ten times what
the place to its right. For it represents in the place it represents in the place the place to its right. For it represents in the place
example, recognize that to its right. For example, to its right. For example, example, recognize that to its right. For example,
700 ÷ 70 = 10 by applying recognize that 700 ÷ 70 = recognize that 700 ÷ 70 = 700 ÷ 70 = 10 by applying recognize that 700 ÷ 70 =
concepts of place value 10 by applying concepts 10 by applying concepts concepts of place value 10 by applying concepts
and division. (Common of place value and of place value and and division. (Common of place value and
Core State Standards division. (Common Core division. (Common Core Core State Standards division. (Common Core
Initiative, 2018) State Standards Initiative, State Standards Initiative, Initiative, 2018) State Standards Initiative,
CCSS.MATH.CO 2018) 2018) CCSS.MATH.CO 2018)
NTENT.4.NBT.B.5 CCSS.MATH.C CCSS.MATH.C NTENT.4.NBT.B.5 CCSS.MATH.C
Multiply a whole number ONTENT.4.NBT.B.5 ONTENT.4.NBT.B.5 Multiply a whole number ONTENT.4.NBT.B.5
of up to four digits by a Multiply a whole number Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a Multiply a whole number
one-digit whole number, of up to four digits by a of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, of up to four digits by a
and multiply two two-digit one-digit whole number, one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit one-digit whole number,
numbers, using strategies and multiply two two- and multiply two two- numbers, using strategies and multiply two two-
based on place value and digit numbers, using digit numbers, using based on place value and digit numbers, using
the properties of strategies based on place strategies based on place the properties of strategies based on place
operations. Illustrate and value and the properties value and the properties operations. Illustrate and value and the properties
explain the calculation by of operations. Illustrate of operations. Illustrate explain the calculation by of operations. Illustrate
using equations, and explain the and explain the using equations, and explain the
rectangular arrays, and/or calculation by using calculation by using rectangular arrays, and/or calculation by using
area models.(Common equations, rectangular equations, rectangular area models.(Common equations, rectangular
Core State Standards arrays, and/or area arrays, and/or area Core State Standards arrays, and/or area
Initiative, 2018) models.(Common Core models.(Common Core Initiative, 2018) models.(Common Core

© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Page 10 of 22


State Standards Initiative, State Standards Initiative, State Standards Initiative,
2018) 2018) 2018)

Acade Multiplication Multiplication Multiplication Multiplication Multiplication


mic Product Product Product Product Product
Langua Factor Factor Factor Factor Factor
ge and
Vocabul
ary

Summa Distribute pre- Show Flocabulary Go outside with Show Factors Show Flocabulary
ry of assessment, have from yesterday to measuring tape and Flocabulary:
Instruct students take then turn increase whiteboards/markers https://www.flocabular Show students how
ion and in. (Practice math understanding and (one per student). y.com/unit/factors/ to do double digit
Activiti facts until everyone is hook the students times single digit
es for done) into the topic. Before beginning, Play, “Math Facts Face multiplication, then
the Introduction activity: ask students to define Off” with whiteboards. three digits times one
Lesson “Math Facts Face Off” Write problem on academic vocabulary. implement larger digit, then four digits
game. (I show board that was taught numbers (20x40) times one digit.
flashcard, students in in previous lesson. Measure dry patch (50x300) Write problems on
front respond) Larger Ask students to (that kids always board for students to
problem is inserted consider the answer complain about) Have students define try (draw names)
(20x40) and students and what steps were (about 20x60 feet) academic vocabulary
are stumped. After a necessary to get the Distribute
minute of students answer. Draw Ask students to work Discuss previous day’s whiteboards/markers
trying, have them sit names to share. in groups to come up activity from outside, and have students try
down and look closely with a story problem asking what students on their own boards
at the problem. Ask, Ask students to they could present to learned. as their peers do it on
“What do you notice define academic the principal asking the large classroom
and what do you vocabulary to replace the sod on Ask what other kinds board.
wonder?” (Some the field. ways this lesson could
students will notice Practice factoring a (use only one board be applied. Create Have students partner
how the answer couple problems for the problem) brainstorm map on up and create similar
reminds them of Discuss area models board. problems for each

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something they previously used (2x6) Pass the board to a other.
already know: 2x4=8) then discuss a larger different group Ask students to get
area model (20x60) (careful not to chrome books and Discuss real life
Introduce factoring- and show how to smudge) and have gather with their applications.
(Define, have students factor. them review it and groups to create a (Buying four folders
write in math try and solve it (on a story problem for every student in
notebook and chorally Distribute worksheet clean board) applying their the class… buying 4
repeat) (2-2) work on first understanding of large folders for every
one together. Ask Using a second clean digit multiplication student in the
Show students to consider board, create an area and area models. school… Babysitting
https://www.flocabular what steps they need model representing 45 hours a month for
y.com/unit/factors/ to take. Continue the problem. When finished, work 6 months… then
with problems as individually on earning $5 per hour=
Show students how to necessary, allowing Did the story assignment 2-3 how much money in
factor the equation to students to go ahead problem make sense? the six months)
find a product once they understand. Before block is
(2x10)x(4x10) and (RTI activities when Have groups share finished, show Have students create
(2x4)x(10x10) finished) their story problems students how to a story problem (one
and solutions. multiply multi digit or two step) in
Pass out whiteboards, multiplication groups. Rotate story
have students work on problems on a grid. problems and solve.
some together, then Ask students to come Take turns sharing on
create some for each try. Once they are the document
other. hooked, let them know camera.
we will be continuing
Distribute worksheet tomorrow. Pass out practice
from workbook (Math sheet/exit ticket.
Expressions Unit 2 Once students finish
activity 1) and score, they can
take post assessment,
Work on first couple
turn in, and work on
together on document
camera, asking students RTI activities.
to demonstrate. Allow

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students to work on rest
of worksheet
independently, while
those who still need help
continue working
together.

Fast finishers can work


on personalized math
RTI activities already
established.
Differe Implement wait time Wait time Peer support Wait time Wait time
ntiation to allow for slow
for processors to respond Individual attention Intentional grouping Intentional grouping Intentional grouping
ELL’s, to questions. and instruction when
students needed. Close up attention and Close up attention
with Give up-close individual instruction. and individual
learning attention to students Fast finisher peer instruction
disabilit who struggle walking (teacher approved) Multiplication strategy
ies, and them individually can share their tips (book)
gifted through the process on understanding.
students their whiteboard.

Require Pre-assessment Computer Measuring tape Computer Computer


d (Flocabulary)
Materia Multiplication fact Document camera Whiteboards and Document Camera Whiteboards
ls, flash cards markers
Handou Worksheet 2-2 Worksheet 2-3 Document camera
ts, Text, Whiteboards/markers
Slides, Chromebooks Exit ticket and
and Computer (show grading sheet
Technol https://www.flocabulary.
com/unit/factors/ )
ogy Copies of summative

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Math worksheet from assessment
workbook
Instruct Introduction Repetition Class and small Direct instruction Whiteboard activity
ional connection activity group Collaboration
and Draw names brainstorming Draw names
Engage Whiteboards Application activity
ment I do, we do, you do Small group Real-life relations
Strategi Call on students to collaboration activity
es- participate during
Continua discussion and work- Application activity
lly watch together(draw names)
for Chrome books
students Technology (factors
and
defined with music
reaching
out to
and document camera
individua projector)
ls
needing
more
specific
engagem
ent.

Format Observe student Observation Observation Observation Observation


ive interaction
Assess Interaction Interaction Interaction Whiteboard response
ments Written responses on
whiteboards Assignment Questioning Questioning Exit ticket
completion
Direct questioning Google Classroom
story problem
Assignment submission
completion
Assignment

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completion
Summa Post-Assessment Name_______________
tive,
Post-
Assess
ment
1. 326 2. 52 3. 2,719 4. 80 5. 50
x 3 x 2 x 5 x 20 x 30

6. Draw an area array or rectangle model that represents the problem 30x50.

7. A hat costs $23. If 3 hats are purchased, what is the total cost?

__________________________________________________________________

8. Ben earns $54 each month mowing lawns. He will go camping in 3 months. How much will he earn
before his camping trip?

__________________________________________________________________

© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Page 15 of 22


Scoring Criteria for learning objectives:

Exceeds- 100% (all 8 correct)

Meets- 88% (7/8)

Approaches- 63%-75% (5/8 or 6/8)

Falls Far Below- 50% or below (4 or less correct)

© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Page 16 of 22


STEP Standard 5 - Implementation of Instructional Unit
Implement the unit you have designed. You have already implemented and analyzed the pre-
assessment. In this topic, you will implement all lesson activities, correlating formative
assessments and the summative post-assessment. Choose one of the lesson activities to video
record a 5-10 minute segment, review, and reflect on your teaching. Have your cooperating
teacher/mentor review the recording and provide feedback, if possible.

Video Recording Link: Submitted through OneDrive

Summary of Unit Implementation:


 This lesson begins with a pre-assessment containing examples of each of the core
standards covered in the unit. Once completed, a unit introduction activity is done in the
form of a game to hook students. It is a repetitive game they are familiar with, but at the
end, an unintroduced problem is displayed. Once the students are given the chance to
solve the problem, they are asked, “What do you notice and what do you wonder”. This
activity activates their curiosity and promotes higher levels of thinking. A video is
shown, samples are shown, then students work together practicing the new concept on
whiteboards at their desks. An assignment was done to assess understanding at that point.
Throughout the initial lesson, about 95% of students were on task and engaged.
Engagement was measured through interaction, observations, direct questioning and
assignment understanding. Some differentiation was necessary for students with learning
disabilities, ELL’s, and gifted students.
 The following lesson was built on the first, repeating the video element, and defining
academic vocabulary. This lesson focused on deepening the understanding of factoring
and using place value method. After a short instructional segment, students worked in
small groups to complete an assignment. Some students worked independently, by
choice, and others, who needed continued support, worked with the teacher.
 The third lesson in this unit was partially videoed and intended to show real life
application of unit objectives. Students enjoyed the learning opportunity and were able to
increase and expand understanding. Further reflection of this lesson will be expanded
upon below.
 The fourth lesson began with the same introduction game played in the first lesson.
Students were able to work through the complex problems that were unfamiliar,
successfully and accurately. Once again repeating academic vocabulary and the same
video, students were able to participate more completely and with comprehensive
fluency. A reflection on the previous day’s activity shared insightful information
regarding student learning. A brainstorming activity was done to help students create
connections with the objectives and prepare them for the upcoming technology activity.

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After the brainstorming was over and instructions identified, students worked on laptop
computers to fulfill the assignment requirement.
 The final lesson in the unit plan was a review using the prior knowledge. Whiteboards
were passed around and students were able to show their overall understanding. A
collaborative engagement activity provided a creative pathway to learning that students
appreciated as they created math problems for each other as a way of reviewing and
preparing for the summative assessment.

Summary of Student Learning:

 Throughout the unit, students with various learning styles were able to internalize the lesson. By
implementing visual, auditory, and kinesthetic activities, all learning styles were accommodated.
 Engagement was also emphasized continuously as students were selected at random to
participate, grouped with peers to apply and practice, and attended to one-on-one by the teacher
during independent work time.
 Various instructional changes were made throughout the unit to encourage students to respond
and interact. During instruction when the same few students continued to volunteer responses,
engagement strategies were switched to encourage more students to participate. During the third
lesson, the main activity required an outside class presentation and activity, but the weather
turned and prevented a predictable outcome. Instead, modifications included a change of plans
that redirected the students to the cafeteria for a quickly modified version of the planned activity.
In this environment, students were easily distracted and struggled to engage. Students who ended
up further away from the instruction point struggled to hear, and allowed themselves to be
preoccupied by the inevitable diversions.
 Because of these students, the collaborative portion of the pre-planned lesson was disposed of and
after the real-life application introduction, the class returned to the classroom to follow up. This
ended up being a positive decision since students were able to re-focus when back in their seats
and better engage in the discussion and follow-up activity.
 An initial perception of learning at the conclusion of the unit leads one to believe students,
overall, understood the intended standards and were well prepared for the summative assessment.
This insight is based on the continuous increase in engagement, interaction, and response to
questioning throughout the unit.

Reflection of Video Recording:

 Preliminary perceptions of teaching performance are directed to verbal instructions,


distracted students, and classroom management. Throughout the viewing of the
recording, it was noticed that there seemed to be a lack of confidence in the delivery.
Although well prepared and knowledgeable about the standards, language choice seems
hesitant and could use intentional thought and planning. Generally, students tend to get
distracted in a classroom, holding a lesson in a cafeteria, a place where they are
encouraged daily to talk and interact with their peers, is not an ideal learning

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environment. Students near the front were well engaged and participated openly in the
lesson, whereas students at the back, which was the perspective of the recording, students
talked and squirmed each time the instructor’s back was turned.
 Considering this, investigating front facing teaching methods, such as teaching with an
ipad, or on a document camera, could help decrease this behavior.
 Strengths lie in engaging and managing classroom behavior. Not seen, other than the
teacher leaving the frame then shortly returning, without breaking instruction, students
that are not engaged get a gentle tap on their desk to bring them back to the discussion
and warn them they will be selected soon to answer. Teacher also uses a variety of
attention prompts to quickly collect the student’s attention.
 This will continually be built upon with consistency, and additional strategies to prevent
passive familiarity. Considering future lesson preparation, coming up with a suitable
alternate activity in case of inclement weather will be beneficial.

STEP Standard 6 - Analysis of Student Learning

Post-Test Data: Whole Class - Once you have assessed your students’ learning on the topic, collect and
analyze the post-test data to determine the effectiveness of your instruction and assessment.
Number of Students Number of Students
Pre-Test Post-Test
Highly Proficient
(90%-100%) 0 14

Proficient
(80%-89%) 1 3

Partially
Proficient
5 4
(70%-79%)

Minimally
Proficient
23 8
(69% and below)

Post-Test Analysis: Whole Class

Based on the post test, a little more than 50% of the class performed at the anticipated 80% or
above. Considering recent comprehension assessments, about half of the class is comprehending
below grade level. Since there were two story problems on the 8 question assessment, it could be
concluded that many students that struggle with literacy did not understand the operation being
requested in the story problems. Another commonality with the incorrect answers were numbers
4-5, with the double-digit whole number multiplied by a second double-digit whole number.
During formative assessments, students were highly proficient with this skill when the numbers
were side-by-side. Aligning them vertically seems to be an unrecognizable format and will need
more explicit instruction.

© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Page 19 of 22


Based on assessment outcome, instruction during this lesson was partially effective. During class
discussions, formative assessments were done through observations, direct questioning, small
assignments, group work and one-on-one interaction. Strategies for solving each problem were
appropriately modeled, and reciprocated by the students, but instruction failed to implement
vertical number alignment or story problem solving strategies to help students who struggle with
literacy components. This is evident in the overall outcome of the assessment results.

Post-Assessment Analysis: Subgroup Selection

Comparing the results of the summative assessment, it is clear students with lower reading
comprehension scored at partial or minimally proficient. When grouped in two sections,
proficient, or highly proficient, vs. partially or minimally proficient, the commonality with those
who underperformed was a unanimous low literacy score in comprehension. With only one
student as an anomaly, who is one of the higher readers and did not miss the story problems, but
numbers 1, 3-5, all others who underperformed missed the two story problems.
Post-Assessment Data: Subgroup (Remedial Readers)

Number of Students Number of Students


Pre-Test Post-Test

Exceeds

Meets

Approaches 4

Falls Far Below 12 8

Post-Assessment Analysis: Subgroup (Remedial Readers)

Based on the results of the sub-group learning, 11 out of 12 students who fell below expectations
were considered remedial readers. Comparing each of their pre-tests, where they missed 7 or 8
questions (out of 8), with the pots-test where they missed 3-6, it is clear they are beginning to
understand the concepts but could use some further instruction. A deeper understanding of place
value will help with the students who missed questions 1-5, and some story problem solving
strategies could be an intervention option for students who missed problems 7-8. A surprising
result was that 100 percent of the students answered number 6 correctly.

Based on the mentioned subgroup, small-group learning with a focus on place value and it’s
influence on multi-digit multiplication would have been effective and impact learning. In the
future, to aid with unit objectives, it will be effective to provide more in-depth instruction of the
place-value strategy of multi-digit multiplication. A common thread with the subgroup, and the
students who missed problems 1-3 multiplied the digit in the ones place, but failed to consider
place value when multiplying numbers in ten’s, hundred’s or thousand’s place. The place-value

© 2018. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Page 20 of 22


method will put the process in a visual form helping these students with future learning and
understanding.

Post-Assessment Data: Remainder of Class

Number of Students Number of Students


Pre-Test Post-Test
Exceeds 0 14

Meets 1 3

Approaches

Falls Far Below

Post-Assessment Analysis: Subgroup and Remainder of Class

Comparing the subgroup of 12 with the rest of the class, it is believed the instruction was
marginally effective. 17 students understood the new concepts and were able to prove
understanding by getting 100% or missing one question. It would have been effective to
implement small group classroom RTI and implement other strategies to extend knowledge for
the remainder of the class while a deepening of concepts was introduced to the 12 that struggled.

Going forward with instruction, based on student learning outcomes, it would be effective to
incorporate a learning objective that would allow the subgroup to spend more time learning
alternative methods and reinforcing taught strategies to practice the unit standards. Attainable
objectives for the subgroup could state: Students understand and incorporate place value when
multiplying 2, 3, & 4 digit numbers by a single digit. Students will establish story problem
strategies when solving word problems. This objective will build upon prior learning and deepen
current understanding of multiplication concepts.

STEP Standard 7 – Reflecting on Instruction to Improve Student


Progress
Improved Practice Based on the Unit of Study

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Based on the experience of developing and delivering your instructional unit, list three short-
term goals to improve specific areas of your teaching practice based on the unit of instruction
and describe your plan to reach each short-term goal.

Plan to Reach the Goal (i.e., professional


Short-Term Goal development, research on the Internet,
observation of a veteran teacher, etc.)
1. Establish an effective recording This goal will be reached by discussing the
strategy for which students need need and idea with educational mentor.
further understanding, extended Together, we will create and develop a plan
practice, or extension activities. to implement and carry out in the
educational environment.

2. Create developmental intervention This goal will be reached by researching the


activities that cater to the individuals internet and consulting a veteran teacher.
needing deeper understanding. There are many ideas that have been
researched and published that are available
online that can help meet this goal. A
veteran teacher is a good resource to help
provide alternative methods for struggling
students. It is also a good idea to contact an
experienced teacher in an earlier grade that
may have scaffolded strategies to help meet
student’s needs.

3. Create developmental enhancement This goal will be reached by researching


activities that cater to the individuals internet and consulting a veteran teacher. It
with solid understanding of unit to is important to provide continuous learning
provide an extension of knowledge. for all students, even those who meet grade
standards. The internet is ripe with
researched strategies and ideas that are ready
to implement. Finding and discussing these
options with a veteran teacher will help meet
the needs of these high-achieving students.

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