Sie sind auf Seite 1von 888

MyMopar.

com
MyMopar.com
2 INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL INFORMATION 0

LICENSE DATA
The following method of numbering vehicles and 5th Digit 6th Digit 7th Digit
their engines will be used on the 1970 models. Engine Ident. Year
The starting vehicle number will be as follows: Disdacement 1970 Assembly Plont
Dart Models 8-198 Cu. In. N-383 Cu. In. H.P. A-Lynch Road
Dart Series LL41A9B-100001 C-225 Cu. In. R-426 Cu. In. Hemi ELHamtramck
E-Special 6 T-440 Cu. In. Std. Wefferson
Challenger Models G-318 Cu. In. U-440 Cu. In. H.P. D-Belvidere
Challenger Series JH24COB-10001 Std. V-440 3 x 2 E-Los Angeles
H-340 Cu. In. Z-Special8 F-Newark
Std. G-St. Louis
VEHICLE NUMBER LOCATION L-383 H-New Stanton
The vehicle number (serial number) is located on a P-Wyorni ng
(Export)
plate which is attached to the left top side of the dash R-Wi ndsor
panel pad and visible through the windshield (Fig. 1).

VEHICLE NUMBERS
All vehicle numbers contain 13 digits. The vehicle BODY NUMBER LOCATION: The body number is
number is a code which tells the make of car (1st stamped on a plate which is attached to the left front
digit), model of car (2nd digit), body style (3rd and wheel house and will show trim code, paint code,
4th digit), engine displacement (5th digit), model body type and schedule date. (Fig. 2)
year (6th digit), assembly plant (7th digit) and vehicle
serial number (last six digits).
1st Digit 2nd Digit 3rd & 4th Digit
Car Make Model Body Style TIRE PRESSURE: A decal showing the recommended
L-Dart E-Economy tire pressure is located on the body pillar at the rear
L-Low 23-2 Door Hardtop of the left front door opening. (“B” Post). (Refer to
M-Medium 27-Convertible Group 22 Specifications.)
J-Challenger H-H igh 29-2 Door Special
P-Premium 41-4 Door Sedan
K-Po I ice
T-Taxi
Mpecial
0-S uper Stock

l o 4b CHRVSLER
CORPORATION
O I +++ +++ ++++ +++ ++++++
VEHICLE IDENTIFICATION NUMBER PLATE
ENG TRANS
INSTRUMENT PANEL LOCATED NR464 CODE CODE VIN NUMBER NU467
Fig. I-Vehicle Number Location
All information, illustrations and specifications in this manual are based on information available at the
time of publication. We reserve the right to make changes at any time without notice.

MyMopar.com
0 INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL INFORMATION 3

CAPACITY CONVERSION TABLE


~~ ~

U.S. Imperial U.S. Imperial U.S. Imperial


114 114 7 5 314 15 12 112
112 318 7 114 6 15 112 13
314 518 7 112 6 114 16 13 114
7 314 6 112 16 112 13 314
1 314 16 314 14
1 114 1 8 6 314
1 112 1 114 8 114 6 314 17 14 114
1 314 1 112 8 112 7 17 112 14 112
8 314 7 114 18 15
2 1 314 9 7 112 18 112 15 112
2 114 1 314 9 114 7 314 19 15 314
2 112 2 9 112 8 19 112 16 114
2 314 2 114 9 314 8 20 16 314
20 112 17
3 2 112 10 8 114
3 114 2 314 10 114 8 112 21 17 112
3-112 3 10 112 8 314 21 112 18
3 314 3 10 314 9 22 18 114
22 112 18 314
4 3 114 11 9 114 23 19 114
4 114 3 112 11 114 9 114 23 112 19 112
4 112 3 314 11 112 9 112 24 20
4 314 4 11 314 9 314 24 112 20 112
5 4 114 12 10 25 20 314
5 114 4 114 12 114 10 114 25 112 21 114
5 112 4 112 12 112 10 112 26 21 314
5 314 4 314 12 314 10 112 26 112 22
27 22 112
6 5 13 10 314 27 112 23
6 114 5 114 13 112 11 114 28 23 114
6 112 5 112 14 11 314 29 24 114
6 314 5 112 14 112 12 30 25

CAPACITY CONVERSION-US. GALLONS TO LITERS

Gallons 0 1 2 3 4 S
liters liters liters liters liters liters
0 00.m 3.7853 7.5707 11.3560 15.1413 18.9267
10 37.8533 41.6387 45.4240 49.2093 52.9947 56.7800
20 75.7066 79.4920 83.2773 87.0626 90.8480 94.6333
30 113.5600 117.3453 121.1306 124.9160 128.7013 132.4866
40 151.4133 155.1986 158.9840 162.7693 166.5546 170.3400

MyMopar.com
0 GROUP 0

LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE


CONTENTS
Page Page
ALTERNATOR ......................... 10 HYDRAULIC BRAKE SYSTEM ........... 8
BATTERY ............................. 10 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE
BODY MAINTENANCE .................. 23 SCHEDULE
BRAKES .............................. 8 Normal Service ...................... 3
CAPACITIES .......................... 4 Trailer Towing and Severe Service ...... 4
CARBURETOR AIR CLEANERS .......... 16 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE
CARBURETOR CHOKE VALVE SHAFT .... 17 GUIDE Dart and Challenger ........... 2
CERTIFIED CAR CARE ................. 1 MANIFOLD HEAT CONTROL VALVES .... 16
CHASSIS LUBRICATION ............... 2 MATERIALS ADDED TO ENGINE OILS ... 11
CLASSIFICATION OF LUBRICANTS ...... 1 PARKING BRAKE MECHANISM ......... 8
CLUTCH LINKAGE ..................... 8 PARTS REQUIRING NO LUBRICATION ... 26
COOLING SYSTEM ..................... 9 PROPELLER SHAFT AND UNIVERSAL
CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEMS .... 12 JOINTS ............................. 18
DISTRIBUTOR ......................... 10 REAR AXLE ........................... 6
ENGINE OIL FILTER ................... 12 SPEEDOMETER CABLE ................. 23
ENGINE OIL-SELECTION OF .......... 10 STEERING GEAR ...................... 19
ENGINE PERFORMANCE DIAGNOSIS .... 15 SUMMARY OF LUBRICATION AND
FREQUENCY OF OIL CHANGES ......... 11 MAINTENANCE SERVICES ............ 1
FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS ............. 22 ACCELERATOR LINKAGE COMPONENTS . 25
FUEL FILTER ......................... 18 TIRES ................................ 22
HEADLIGHTS ......................... 10 TRANSMISSION (Automatic) ............ 20
HOISTING ............................ 2 TRANSMISSION (Manual) ............... 19
HOOD LOCKS, RELEASE MECHANISM WINDSHIELD WIPER BLADES .......... 10
AND SAFETY CATCH ................. 23
CERTIFIED CAR CARE Information pertaining to Lubrication and Main-
tenance requirements is shown on the guide (Fig. 1)
Certified Car Care is a thorough servicing program and on the Schedule.
that helps make sure the cars you sell receive the Vehicles operated under conditions not classified as
regular attention you know they need. normal service for passenger cars, such as in trailer
Certified Car Care helps build business for you in towing service; operation at higher than normal load-
the best way known-through customer satisfaction. ing, or police or taxicab operation, require servicing at
Inform your customers that the best approach to more frequent intervals. This information is included
trouble-free driving is Certified Car Care. in each group under the heading “Trailer Towing
This is a practical plan to help you build up sales Package and Severe Service”.
and service volume, by providing regular service cus-
tomer visits. CLASSIFI CAT10N 0F LUBRICA NTS
SUMMARY OF LUBRICATION AND Oils, lubricants and greases are classified and graded
MAINTENANCE SERVICES according to standards recommended by the Society
of Automotive Engineers (SAE), the American Petro-
Maintenance and lubrication service recommenda- leum Institute (API) and the National Lubricating
tions for Chrysler Corporation-built Dodge vehicles Grease Institute (NLGI).
have been compiled to provide maximum protection
for the car owner’s investment against all reasonable Engine Oil
types of driving conditions. The SAE grade number indicates the viscosity of
Since these conditions vary with the individual car engine oils, for example, SAE 30, which is a single
owner’s driving habits, the area in which the car is grade oil. Engine oils are also identified by a dual
operated and the type of service to which the car is number, for example, SAE 1OW-30,which indicates a
subjected, it is necessary to prescribe lubrication and multigrade oil.
maintenance service on a time frequency as well as The API classification system defines oil perform-
mileage interval basis. ance in terms of engine usage. Only engine oils desig-

MyMopar.com
0-2 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE GUIDE


DART AND CHALLENGER

STEERING LINKAGE PlVO


AND SUSPENSION BALL
JOINTS

LIFT POINTS

COOLING SYSTEM
DRAINS

(1) CRANKCASE DIPSTICK (5) MANIFOLD HEAT VALVE


(OTHER V8, OPPOSITE SIDE) (6) CRANKCASE INLET AIR CLEANER
(2) FUEL FILTER (7) PCV VALVE
(3) 011 FILL CAP (8) OIL FILTER
(4) CARBURETOR CHOKE SHAFT (OTHER V8, LEFT FRONT)

PYW
Fig. I-Lubricotion ond Mointenonce Guide
nated “For Service MS” should be used. These oils Floor Jack
contain sufficient chemical additives to provide maxi- A regular floor jack may be used under the rear
mum engine protection. Both the SAE grade and the axle housing, or under the front suspension lower
API designation must be found on the container. control arms, however, a floor jack must never be
used on any parts of the underbody.
Gear Lubricants CAUTION: Do not attempt to raise one entire side of
The SAE grade n d r also indicates the viscosity the vehicle by placing a iack midway between the
of Multi-Purpose Gear Lubricants, defined by MILL front and rear wheels. This practice may result in
2105B.An example is SAE 75, which is a light viscos- permanent damage to the body.
ity lubricant.
Bumper Jack
Lubricants-Greases The bumpers are designed to accept a bumper jack
Semi-solid lubricants, such as specified for suspen- in an emergency, if it becomes necessary to change
sion ball joints, bear the NLGI designation. They are a tire on the road. Notches are provided in the bump-
further classified as grades “0” or “2.” ers for the purpose of raising the vehicle with the
bumper jack.
H0lSTlN G
CHASSIS LUBR ICAT10N
Pasf Type
Special care should be taken when raising the ve- Front Suspension Ball Joints
hicle on a frame contact type hoist. The hoist must be The front suspension ball joints (Figs. 4 and 5) are
equipped with the proper adapters in order that the semi-permanently lubricated with a special lubricant
vehicle will be supported in the correct locations at the factory.
(Figs. 2 and 3). The ball joints should be inspected every six
Conventional hydraulic hoists may be used after months, or whenever vehicle is serviced for other
determining that the adapter plates will make firm reasons, for damage to the seals which can result in
contact with the lower control arms and the rear axle loss or contamination of lubricant. Clean accumulated
housing. dirt and lubricant from outside surface of seals to

MyMopar.com
0 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-3
LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE
Service
Service
Interval Item Page Service

Every 2 Months Battery 10


cooling System 9 X
3 Months or 4,000 Miles, Engine Crankcase Oil 10 X
whichever occurs first
Every Engine Manifold Heat Control Valve 16 X
Oil Change
Power Steering Fluid 19 X
Carburetor Air Filter-PaDer** 16 X
Every Second Oil Change Engine Oil Filter 12 X
Tire Rotation 22 X

Every 6 Months

When Necessary

Floor-Mounted Gearshift Controls 20 X


Parking Brake Mechanism 8 X
SDeedometer Cable 23 X
Points That Should Not Be Lubricated [ 26 1
*Replace linings if necessary.
**Vehicles equipped with Fresh Air Induction System

MyMopar.com
0-4 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE


TRAILER T O W I N G PACKAGE AND SEVERE SERVICE
Service
Interval

ever occurs first

*And every 12 months or 12,000 miles thereafter


**Police and Taxi

CAPACITIES
U.S. Imperial
Measure Measure
CRANKCASE
Challenger Models only when
equipped with 426 Hemi, 440
HP or 440 Three 2BBL engines. 6 qts. 5 qts.
All other engines add 1qt.
(314 Imperial qt.) when filter
is replaced. 4 qts. 3-114 qts.
COOLING SYSTEM
Dart (198,225 Cu. In. Engine) 13 qts.** 10-314 @a**
Challenger (225 Cu. In. Engine) 13 qts.** 10-314 qta**
Dart (318 Cu. In. Engine) 16 qts.** 13-114 qts.**
Challenger (318 Cu. In. Engine) 16 qts.*** 13-114 qts.***
Dart (340 Cu. In. Engine) 15 qts. 12-112 qts.
Challenger (340 Cu.-ln. Engine) 15-112 qts. 13 qts.
(383 Cu. In. Engine) 14-112 qts.* 12 qts.*
(440HP or 3-2BBL and 426 Hemi) 17 qts. 14-114 qts.
For Maximum Cooling or Air Conditioning
* Add 112 qt.
** Add 1qt.
*** Add 1-112 qts.
TRANSMISSION (Torqueflitel
198,226 and 318 Cu. In. Engines 17 pts. 14-114 pts.
340,383 (4 BBL) Cu. In. Engines 16.3 pts. 13-112 pts.
383 (2 BBL) and 440 Cu. In. Engines 19 pts. 15-314 pts.
426 Hemi 16.8 pts. 14 pts.
TRANSMISSION (Manual)
3 Speed Model A-903 (6 Cyl. Dart) 6-112 pts. 5112 pts.
3 Speed Model A-230 4-314 pts. 4 pts.
4 Speed Model A-833 (Dart) 7 pts. 5-314 pts.
(ChaI lenger) 7-112 PtS. 6-114 pts.
REAR AXLE
7-114” Axle 2.0 pts. 1.314 pts.
8-314” Axle 4.4 pts. 3.5 pts.
9-314” Ax le 5.5 pts. 4.5 pts.
FUEL TANK
All Models 18 gals. 15 gals.

MyMopar.com
0 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-5

LIFTING PAD MUST EXTEND


BEYOND THE SIDES OF
THE SUPPORTING STRUCTURE

PAD POSITION WITHIN THESE


LIMITS SATISFACTORY

FOUR PADS

ALL MODELS 111"

4 FRONT WHEELS 4 REAR WHEELS


NN191B

Fig. 2-Support Locutions-frumo Contud Hoist Dart Models

26.5"
-y C

20
- C
II
A

SQ. '' MINIMUM


R -
APPROXIMATE CE

L--L
15.6"

m
- I> PAD POSITION WITHIN THESE
LIMITS SATISFACTORY

20 SQ. MINIMUM 29.V'


FOUR PADS

I+-CHALLENGER 1i v ~ 4
1
$ FRONT WHEELS
I
$ REAR WHEELS PY761
Fig. 3-Support Locutions-Frume Contud Hoist

MyMopar.com
0-6 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE n

U
TIE ROD END FITTINGS '*\\e .'
' >
FITTINGS NK5566

Fig. &Steering Linkage fDort Models)


nently lubricated with a special lubricant at the
factory.
The ball joints should be inspected every six
Fig. 4-Upper and Lower Ball Joints (Dart Modelsj months, or whenever vehicle is serviced for other
permit thorough inspection. Replace damaged seals reasons, for damage to seals which can result in loss
or joints immediately to prevent contamination of of lubricant. Clean accumulated dirt and lubricant
lubricant or damage to parts. Lubricate ball joints, if from outside surfaces of seals to permit thorough in-
necessary. spection.
BALL JOINTS ARE DESIGNED TO OPERATE Replace damaged seals or joints immediately to
WITH SOME FREE PLAY. REPLACEMENT SHOULD prevent contamination of the lubricant or failure of
BE MADE ONLY WHEN FREE PLAY EXCEEDS parts. Lubricate ball joints, if necessary.
Relubrication of tie rod ball joints is required every
THE SPECIFICATIONS SHOWN IN "FRONT SUS-
36 months or 36,000 miles, whichever occurs first.
PENSION", Group 2.
Relubrication i s required every 36 months or 36,000
When lubricating steering linkage ball joints, use
only the special long-life chassis greases such as
miles, whichever occurs first.
Multi-Mileage Lubricant Part Number 2525035 or
When lubricating control arm ball joints, use only
the special long-life chassis greases such as Multi- equivalent. Remove threaded plug from each ball
joint and temporarily install lubrication fittings. In-
Mileage Lubricant, Part Number 2525035 or equiva-
ject lubricant until it flows freely from seal bleed
lent. Remove threaded plug from each ball joint and
area at top or base of seal. Stop when seal begins to
temporarily install lubrication fittings. Inject lubri-
balloon. Remove fittings and reinstall threaded plugs.
cant until it flows freely from seal bleed areas at base
CAUTION: High pressure lubrication equipment may
of seal. Stop when seal begins to balloon. Remove
be used if time i s allowed for grease to bleed from
fittings and reinstall threaded plugs.
seal base.
CAUTION: If high pressure lubrication equipment
is used, stop filling when lubricant begins to flow
REAR AXLE
freely from bleed area at base or at top of seal, or if
seal begins to balloon. Stundurd und Sure-Grip
The lubricant installed in the rear axle at time of
Steering Linkage Bull Joints assembly is a high quality product and regularly
The four tie rod end ball joints and the steering scheduled changes of the lubricant are not recom-
gear arm ball joint (Figs. 6 and 7 ) are semi-perma- mended in vehicles where operation is classified as
normal passenger car service.

Fig. 5-Upper and Lower Ball Joints


(Challenger Models) Fig. 7-Steering Linkage fChallenger Models)

MyMopar.com
0 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-7

ND 78

Fig. 8-Removing Rear Axle Lubricant


(7-114 Inch Axle)
The only exceptions, however, would be where the Fig. 9-Removing Rear Axle Lubricant
lubricant has become contaminated with water or to (8-314 Inch Axle)
provide the correct viscosity grade for the anticipated
temperature range, as indicated by the accompanying
table.
The factory fill lubricant is satisfactory to -30°F.
ambients.

Anticipated Temperature Viscosity Grade


Range
Above -10°F. SAE 90
A s low as -30°F. SAE 80
Below -30” F. SAE 75
If necessary to change lubricant in 7-1/4 or 8-3/4
inch axle remove old lubricant with suction pump
through filler plug hole (Figs. 8 and 9). 93h” AXLE ONLY
NP157A
For 9-3/4 inch axle remove the drain plug from
the bottom of the axle housing (Fig. 10). Fig. I 0-Drain and Filler Plug Locations
(9-314 Inch Axle)
Every six months check the fluid level in the axle
through the filler plug hole. When checking the level, pose Lubricants intended for use in Limited Slip
be sure the vehicle is in a level position, on an axle Differentials. Use lubricants listed below, or there
or drive-on type hoist, and the fluid level is as indi- equivalent, for axles indicated.
cated in the accompanying chart. Special Sure-Grip Lubricant Part Number 2585318
or its equivalent, for use in heavy duty axles used
Type of Lubricant with 426 cubic inch Hemi and 440 cubic inch High
Chrysler Corporation recommends that Multi-Pur- Performance engines. These axles have rectangular
pose Gear Lubricant as defined by MIL-L-2105B (API shaped identification tags on the axle carrier stating
GL-5) should be used in all rear axles with conven- “Use Limited Slip Lube Only.”
tional differentials; Chrysler Hypoid Lubricant (Part Chrysler Hypoid Lubricant Part Number 2933565
Number 2933565) or equivalent, is an oil of this type or equivalent, for use in all limited slip axles that do
and is recommended. not have a special identifying “Limited Slip” identi-
In Sure-Grip axles use only the special Multi-Pur- fication tag on the axle carrier housing.

AXLE IDENTIFICATION CHART


Axle Filler Cover Capacity Lubricant
Size Location Fastening Pints Level
7-114 Cover 9 Bolts 2.0 Bottom of Filler Hole to 518 inch Below
8-314 Carrier Welded 4.4 Maintain at Bottom of Filler Hole
9-314 Cover 10 Bolts 5.5 Bottom of Filler Hole to 1/2 inch Below

MyMopar.com
0-8 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE-
Trailer Towing Service If necessary, add fluid to bring level to within 1/4
For vehicles equipped for trailer towing service, the inch of the top of the reservoir. With disc brakes the
axle fluid level should be checked every 3 months or fluid level can be expected to fall as the brake pads
4,000 miles, whichever occurs first. The lubricant wear. No noticeable drop in level should occur in a
should be drained and axle refilled with the specified car equipped entirely with drum brakes. Low fluid
lubricant, every 36,000 miles. level may have been caused by a leak and a checkup
If the axle is submerged in water, such as on a boat may be needed.
launching ramp where water can enter the axle vent, Only brake fluid conforming to SAE 51703 (70R3
and contamination is suspected or evident, replace the type) should be used. Chrysler Parts Brake Fluid or
lubricant immediately to avoid early axle failure. equivalent, is recommended to provide best brake
performance. Use of a brake fluid that may have a
BRAKES lower initial boiling point, such as fluid identified as
70R1 or unidentified as to specification, may result
The brakes on all models equipped with drum in sudden brake failure during hard prolonged brak-
brakes, except heavy duty, are equipped with a self- ing.
adjusting mechanism which makes it unnecessary to
perform major brake adjustments. Brake Hoses
Inspect brake linings for wear every 12 months or Inspect brake hoses for cracking abrasion, cuts or
12,000 miles, whichever occurs first. Replace linings, tears in the outer covering. Examine all connections
if necessary. At this time, lubricate contact areas of for fluid leakage. Correct leakage and replace hose
brake shoe supports, on models with drum brakes, where cover damage exposes the fabric braid.
with a very thin film of high-temperature lubricant
such as Chrysler Support Plate Lubricant available PARKING BRAKE MECHANISM
under Part Number 2932524 or equivalent.
To perform this service, first remove the brake Dart Models use a hand-operated parking brake
shoes. Next, clean the contact surfaces on the shoes lever (Fig. 12). Challenger models use a foot-operated
and supports by sanding lightly with fine sandpaper. lever (Fig. 13).
Then, carefully apply lubricant. Pivot points should be lubricated, as required, to
On models equipped with disc brakes, inspect the maintain ease of operation. Apply a film of smooth,
discs, calipers and lining every 12 months or 12,000 white body hardware lubricant conforming to NLGI
miles, whichever occurs first, as outlined under grade 1. Lubriplate, Part Number 1064768, or equiva-
“Brakes”, Group 5. lent, is recommended for this purpose.
When the hand lever can be pulled to more than
HYDRAULIC BRAKE SYSTEM four inches, or the foot pedal depressed more than
four and one half inches, the brake cable should be
Every 6 months the fluid level in the master cylin- adjusted. For adjusting procedure, refer to “Parking
der should be checked. (Fig. 11). Before removing the Brakes,” Group 5.
master cylinder cover wipe it clean to prevent dirt
and other foreign matter from dropping into the CLUTCH LINKAGE
master cylinder.
Clutch Torque Shaff Bearings
11% Inspect clutch torque shaft bearings (Fig. 14) for

Fig. 12-Hand-Operatmf Parking Brake


Fig. I 1-Brake Master Cylinder fbart Models)

MyMopar.com
n LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-9
RKING BRAKE fork pads on sleeve, contact areas of fork fingers,
pivot contact area of fork and fork pivot (Fig. 14).

COOLING SYSTEM
The cooling system of all cars is protected against
corrosion and freezing as they leave the factory. A
permanent type anti-freeze is added to provide pro-
tection to -20°F. Higher percentages of anti-freeze
must be added where temperatures below -20°F. are
anticipated.
Vehicles equipped with 383 cubic inch engines with
2 barrel carburetors and 440 cubic inch standard en-
FRONT CABLE ASSEMBLY
gines are equipped with 195 degree thermostats. All
\ other engines are equipped with 190 degree thermo-
PY366
stats and only permanent type anti-freeze should be
Fig. 13-Foot Operated Parking Brake used. Alcohol base anti-freeze products should not
(Challenger Models) be used because of there low boiling point.
Inspect coolant level every two months and refill
wear and relubricate every 36 months or 36,000 miles,
as necessary. Once a year, preferably in the fall, the
whichever occurs first. To perform this service, refer
cooling system should be drained and refilled. This
to “Clutch,” Group 6. After removing torque shaft
draining and refilling procedure, however, need not
assembly, disassemble and thoroughly clean all parts
be performed until the fall following the vehicle’s
in a suitable solvent and inspect for wear. Damaged
first full year of operation. Drain V-8 engine cooling
bearings and/or ball studs should be replaced.
system by removing drain plugs in sides of cylinder
When reassembling shaft, coat inside surfaces at
block and opening drain cock in lower radiator tank.
ends of shaft, inside and outside surfaces of bearings
On 6-cylinder engines, remove the single drain plug
and ball studs with Multi-Mileage Lubricant, Part
in right side of engine and open drain cock in lower
Number 2525035, or equivalent.
radiator tank. Discard old solutions.
Flush the system thoroughly with water. If there
Clutch Drive Lugs, Release Bearing Sleeve, is an indication that the system contains a consider-
Release For&and For& Pivot able amount of sediment, use a reliable cooling system
Whenever effort required to depress the clutch ped-
cleaner to loosen the sediment. Rinse thoroughly to
al becomes excessive, or when servicing clutch torque remove deposits.
shaft bearings, lubricate drive lugs, sleeve, fork and At this time, check water pump belt tension and
pivot (Fig. 14). To gain access to this area, first re- check hose connections for tightness.
move inspection plate at bottom of clutch housing. In areas where protection from freezing is required,
CAUTION: Care must be taken to avoid getting lubri- refill cooling system with clean, soft water and a suit-
cant on clutch disc and/or pressure plate. able high quality, permanent type anti-freeze, in suf-
Fill cavity in sleeve with Multi-Mileage Lubricant, ficient quantity to provide full protection for the low-
Part Number 2525035, or equivalent. Apply a film of est anticipated temperature, but never less than 40
same lubricant to clutch drive lugs, clutch release percent of the cooling system capacity to ensure ade-
quate protection against corrosion. If it becomes
BEARING
necessary to add coolant during the cold weather
INSIDE SURFACE A season, be sure the system contains sufficient anti-
RELEASE FORK freeze to provide protection at least to -20 degrees
(BOTH SIDES)
/ F. A suitable high quality permanent type anti-freeze
c I ‘I DE A r c / SLEEVE is available under Part Number 2932531 or equiva-
lent, should be used.
When vehicle is operated in areas where protection
from freezing is not required, and vehicle is not
equipped with air conditioning, refill cooling system
with clean, soft water and add a high quality corrosion
inhibitor, such as Chrysler Rust Resistor, Part Num-
FORK-PADS ber 2421778 or equivalent. This need not be done
PIVOT‘AREA NH172C until the first yearly service.
Fig. 14-Clvtch Torque Shaft Bearings and Linkage If the vehicle is equipped with air conditioning,

MyMopar.com
0-10 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE n

the cooling system must contain anti-freeze all year Lubricant, Part Number 1473595, or equivalent. At
round. This is necessary because in the reheat-cycle this time, apply 1 drop of light engine oil to felt wick
system used on all vehicles, except Dart models, cold, under rotor.
refrigerated air passes through the heater core. CAUTION: Avoid over-oiling and applying an excet
Anti-freeze is necessary to prevent coolant in the sive amount of cam lubricant to prevent lubricants
heater core from freezing in hot weather when the from getting on breaker contacts.
air conditioner is being used. For complete informa-
tion refer to “Air Conditioning”, Group 24. HEADLIGHTS
ALTERNATOR To assure correct adjustment of headlight aiming,
it is recommended that the headlights be checked and,
The alternator is provided with prelubricated bear- if necessary, re-aimed properly every six months.
ings, which require no periodic lubrication. Changes in front and rear suspension, such as front
suspension height and/or deflection of rear springs
BATTERY due to heavy loading, will change the headlight beam
Every two months, or more often in hot weather pattern and may cause unsafe nighttime driving con-
and on long trips, check fluid level of cells. Restore ditions.
level to 3/8 inch above plates, using only water of a If a vehicle is to be loaded abnormally, such as for
known low mineral content. Do not overfill. a vacation trip, or with a salesman’s products, the
Check specific gravity, using a reliable hydrometer, headlight aiming should be checked and adjusted to
every 12 months or 12,000 miles, whichever occurs serve the new conditions. Refer to “Electrical Sys-
first, or more often if there is excessive use of water. tem,” Group 8, for adjusting procedures.
Clean battery posts and cable terminals and tighten
terminals. Coat connections with light mineral grease WINDSHIELD WIPER BLADES
or petrolatum.
Refer to “Electrical,” Group 8, for complete servic- Long exposure to heat and road splash tend to
ing. harden rubber wiper blades, thus destroying their
efficiency. When blades smear or in general do not
DlSTRl BUTOR satisfactorily clean the windshield, they should be re-
placed.
Two types of distributors are used. One type (with To replace, depress release on top of blade bridge
double breaker points) is provided with an oil cup. and slide out rubber blade. Slide new rubber blade
When servicing breaker points apply 3 to 5 drops of
refill into bridge and lock it in place. Refer to Parts
light engine oil in the cup.
List for the correct rubber blade refill.
Distributors without the oil cup have permanent
lubrication and no periodic lubrication is required.
Whenever breaker contacts are serviced, lubricate ENGINE OIL-SELECTION OF
cam surfaces. Wipe old lubricant from cam and rub- For best performance, and to provide for maximum
bing block (Fig. 15) and apply a thin film of Cam protection of all engines for all types of operation,
only those lubricants should be selected which:
(a) Conform to the requirements of the API classi-
fication “FOR SERVICE MS.”
(b) Have the proper SAE grade number for the ex-
pected ambient temperature range.
Lubricants which do not have both an SAE grade
number and an MS Service classification on the con-
tainer should not be used.
Oils used in our engines, labeled “For Service MS”,
should equal or exceed the Engine Oil Performance
Rating Sequence Tests for varnish, sludge and rust-
ing, when tested according to the methods estab-
lished by the car manufacturer.
All Season Supreme and Supreme Motor Oils, or
equivalent, available through the Parts Division, meet
Fig. I 5-Distributor lubrication these requirements.

MyMopar.com
0 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-11

Oil Viscosity Recommendat ions gine oils for most types of driving when MS quality
Multigrades oils are used.
SAE 20W-40 Where temperatures are consistently In some instances, such as infrequent operation or
SAE 1OW-40 above +32"F. short trips only, and during break-in after a major
or overhaul, addition of special materials containing
SAE 1OW-30 anti-rust and anti-scuff additives is beneficial. A prod-
SAE 1OW-30 Suitable for year long operation in uct suitable for this purpose is Engine Oil Supple-
or many parts of the U.S.;may be used ment, Part Number 1879406 or equivalent.
SAE 10W-40 where temperatures occasionally
drop as low as -10°F.
SAE 5W-30 Recommended where minimum tem- FREQUENCY OF ENGINE OIL CHANGES
or peratures are consistently below
SAE 5W-20 + 10"F. The by-products of combustion, such as unburned
Single Grades fuel, condensation and carbon deposits, in addition to
SAE 30 Where temperatures are consistently dust and other abrasive materials, tend to contaminate
above +32"F. engine oil. If permitted to remain in the crankcase for
SAE 1OW Where temperatures range between too great a period of time, the contaminants reduce
+32"F. and -10°F. the lubricating qualities of the oil causing excessive
IMPORTANT: If the vehicle is to be used for maxi- wear which can materially affect the operating effi-
mum performance service (very high speeds or very ciency of the engine.
rapid acceleration), the engine requires heavier than To provide maximum protection to engine parts, it
normal lubricating oil. This is due to the high speeds, is recommended under normal operating conditions,
loads, and temperature of moving parts developed that engine oil be drained and replenished with new
in these engines during this type of operation. oil of the proper viscosity and API classification, every
FOR BEST PROTECTION OF THE ENGINE UN- three (3) months or 4,000 miles, whichever occurs
DER THESE CONDITIONS, THE HEAVIEST ENGINE first.
OIL OF MS QUALITY SHOULD BE USED THAT When draining the old oil, it is recommended that
WILL PERMIT SATISFACTORY COLD STARTING. the engine be at normal operating temperature, as the
SAE 30 AND 40 ARE RECOMMENDED. MULTI- warmed oil will drain more readily and carry with it
VISCOSITY OILS SAE 20W-40 AND 2OW-50 MAY such foreign matter which might otherwise cling to
ALSO BE USED. the sides of the crankcase and the various moving
When outside temperatures are consistently be- parts.
low 30"F, SAE 1OW-30 or SAE 1OW-40 are recom- A greater degree of contamination of the engine
mended for ease in cold starting. However, even in oil takes place when the vehicle is operated under
cold weather, these grades should not be used if the adverse conditions, such as frequent driving in dusty
vehicle is driven in competition or other forms of areas, short trips, stop-and-go driving and where long
maximum operation. periods of idling are experienced. For oil change
frequencies under these operating conditions, refer to
MATERIALS ADDED TO ENGINE OILS the recommendations in the paragraphs under Severe
Operating Conditions and Taxi and Police Operation.
It is not necessary to add any other products to en-
During Break-ln
Cars should be driven moderately during the first
300 miles. Speeds up to 50 to 60 mph are desirable.
While cruising, brief full-throttle accelerations con-
tribute to a good break-in. Wide-open throttle ac-
celerations in low gear can be detrimental and should
be avoided for at least 500 miles.
The oil installed in the engine at the factory is a
high quality lubricant, classified "For Service MS,"
and should be retained until the first regularly
scheduled three-month or 4,000 mile oil change,
whichever occurs first. If it becomes necessary to add
oil during this initial period, an oil with the "For
NK575
Service MS" classification and of the proper viscosity
grade should be used. Nondetergent or straight min-
Fig. 1&Shaded Area Cover Region Where Minimum eral oils must never be used.
Temperatures May Be Consistently Below
+
1 0 ° F During Some Winter Months Oil level should be checked during each stop for

MyMopar.com
0-12 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

Fig. 17-Engine Oil Filter (6 Cylinder Engines) Fig. IO-Engine Oil Filter (340 Cu. In. Engine)
gasoline. Oil should be added only when level on oil filtering of engine oil for maximum engine protection.
level indicator is at or below “ADD OIL” mark. The filter should be replaced every second oil
Frequently, a new engine will consume some oil change. Since filters vary widely in quality, it is rec-
during its first few thousand miles of operation. This ommended that a Chrysler Corporation Engine Oil
should be considered as a normal part of the break-in Filter, or equivalent, be used for replacement to
and not be interpreted as an indication of difficulty. assure most efficient service.
Severe Operating Conditions CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEM
Severe operating conditions, such as frequent driv-
ing on dusty roads, or in sandy geographic areas, or All models are equipped with a closed crankcase
unusually short trip driving in cold weather may rea- ventilating system (Figs. 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 or 26).
sonably require oil changes more frequently than This system consists of a crankcase ventilator valve
every three months. Under these conditions, consult mounted on the cylinder head cover, and a car-
and follow the advice of any Chrysler Motors Corpora- buretor with a hose from its base connected to the
tion Authorized Dealer’s Service Manager. ventilator valve.
A closed crankcase inlet air cleaner with a hose
Taxi and Police Operation connecting it to the carburetor air cleaner housing
Severe service such as taxi and city police driving, provides the air inlet for the system.
which is principally short trip operation, including The crankcase inlet air cleaner is also provided
frequent and prolonged idling, requires oil changes with inlet fittings for a bowl vent hose and vent line
more frequently on a regular schedule. For this type hose (eight cylinder engines), or vent line only (six
of service, it is recommended that engine oil be cylinder engines), where evaporative control system
changed and the crankcase ventilation system serv- (ECS) is required.
iced every two months, not to exceed 2,000 miles.
Replace filter every second oil change. VE NTILATlON SYSTEM 0PERAT10 N
The ventilating system operates by manifold vac-
ENGINE OIL FILTER uum. Air is drawn from the carburetor air cleaner
All engines are equipped with full-flow, throwaway through the air cleaner hose and crankcase inlet air
oil filters (Figs. 17, 18, 19 or 20) to provide efficient

NN359
NR80
Fig. 20-Removing Engine Oil Filter
Fig. I 8-Engine Oil Filter (318 Cu. In. Engine) (383,426,440 Cu. In. Engines)

MyMopar.com
I> LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-13

DISTRIBUTOR VACUUM HOSE /VENTILATOR VALVE

HOSE 2 BOWL VENT


LINE
HOSE
._
HOSE

ECS (IF SO EQUIPPED)


PY774

Fig. 23-Crankcase Ventilation System (383 Cu. In.


Engine with 2 Barrel Carburetion)
Servicing Frequencies
Proper maintenance of the crankcase ventilation
system is required to keep the system clean and
maintain good engine performance and durability.
Fig. 2 1 -Crankcase Ventilation System
(6 Cylinder Models) Periodic servicing is required to remove combustion
products from the ventilator valve, hoses, carburetor
cleaner into the crankcase, (where ECS systems are passages and crankcase inlet air cleaner.
used the fuel tank and float bowl vapors are also Every six months the system must be tested for
drawn into the crankcase through the crankcase inlet proper operation and cleaned if necessary. This in-
air cleaner), circulated through the engine and drawn cludes inspecting the operation of the valve, checking
out through the ventilator valve, pass through the the hoses and carburetor passages for deposits and
ventilator valve hose and passage in the carburetor cleaning the crankcase inlet air cleaner and car-
throttle body, into the combustion chamber, are buretor air cleaner.
burnt and expelled with the exhaust gasses.
\ *.
AIR CLEANER VENTILATOR VALVE

ECS (IF SO EQUIPPED)

(IF SO EQUIPPED)
CRANKCASE INLET AIR CLEANER \
ECS (IF so EQUIPPED)/
PYn3 PPYn5

Fig. 22-Crankcase Ventilation System Fig. 24-Crankcase Ventilation System


(318 Cu. In. Engines) (383 and 440 Cu. In. Engines)

MyMopar.com
0-14 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

VENTILATOR VALVE VENTILATOR VALVE


HOSE 1
/

CRANKCASE ‘
INLET AIR CLEANER PY776 Fig. 27-Checking Vacuum at Ventilator Valve Inlet

Fig. 25-Crankcase Ventilation System 440 Cu. In. will be heard as air passes through the valve,
Engine with three 2 BBL. and a strong vacuum should be felt when a
The crankcase ventilator valve must be replaced finger is placed over the valve inlet (Fig. 27).
with a new one every year. The carburetor air cleaner 2. Reinstall the ventilator valve, then remove
filter element must be replaced every year on High the crankcase inlet air cleaner. Loosely hold
Performance Vehicles equipped with “Fresh Air In- a piece of stiff paper, such as parts tag, over
duction System”, and every 2 years for vehicles the opening in the rocker cover (Fig. 28).
equipped with standard air cleaner.
After allowing about a minute for the crank-
If the car is used extensively for short trips with case pressure to reduce, the paper should be
frequent idling, the ventilation system may require sucked against the opening in the rocker
servicing more frequently. cover with a noticeable force.
inspection and Service Procedure: NOTE: For 6 cylinder 198 and 225 CID en-
a. With engine idling- gines, it will be necessary to clamp-off or plug
1. Remove ventilator valve from rocker cover. the carburetor bowl vent to fuel pump hose
If the valve is not plugged, a hissing noise (Fig. 21) in order to perform this check.

VENTILATOR VALVE HOSE / VALVE

Fig. 2bCrankcase Ventilation System Fig. 28-Checking Vacuum at Crankcase Inlet Air
(426 Cu. In. Hemi) Cleaner Opening

MyMopar.com
-LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-15
necessary. Remove the crankcase inlet air cleaner
and wash it thoroughly in kerosene, or similar sol-
vent. Lubricate or wet the filter, by inverting the
crankcase inlet air cleaner and filling with SAE-30
engine oil. Position the air cleaner to allow excess
oil to drain thoroughly through the vent nipple lo-
cated on the top of the air cleaner.

Hoses
Clean hoses by immersing in Carburetor Cleaner,
Part Number 2933500 or equivalent, followed by
drying with compressed air. Hoses should not remain
in solvent more than one-half hour.

ENGINE PERFORMANCE DIAGNOSIS


Fig. 29-Shaking Ventilator Valve
b. With engine stopped- The following services should be performed every
1. Remove ventilator valve from rocker cover 12,000 miles or 12 months to provide best vehicle
and shake (Fig. 29). operation and lowest emissions of hydrocarbons and
A clicking noise should be heard to indicate carbon monoxide.
that the valve is free. 1 C P A R K PLUGS-Remove and inspect each
c. If the ventilation system meets the tests in (a) spark plug. Most plugs can be cleaned, adjusted, and
and (b) above, no further service is required; if reinstalled. Rough idle, hard starting, frequent en-
not, the ventilation valve should be replaced and gine miss at high speeds, or apparent physical de-
the system rechecked. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO terioration; are indications that the spark plugs
CLEAN THE VENTILATOR VALVE! should be replaced.
On the 6 cylinder 198 cu. in. engine, use the 2-CABLES-Check all secondary distributor
Chrysler Ventilator Valve identified by a white cables for cleanliness and proper connection. Re-
end washer (Part No. 2951244 or 2951892) or place all cracked, damaged, or faulty cables. See
equivalent. On the 6 cylinder 225 cu. in. engine “Ignition System” Group 8-Electrical for tests.
and all V-8 engines, use the valve identified by a 3-DISTRIBUTOR -Inspect distributor cap and
black end washer (Part No. 2951243 or 2951891) rotor, for carbon tracking and abnormal wear. Check
or equivalent. condenser, and points for abnormal pitting, blueing,
d. With a new ventilator valve installed, if the paper or misalignment, and adjust, if serviceable, or re-
is not sucked against the crankcase inlet air clean- place. Lubricate cam and wick. See “Ignition System”
er opening in the rocker cover with notiwable Group 8-Electrical for tests and adjustments.
force, it will be necessary to clean the ventilator 4-AIR CLEANER-Clean and/or replace if neces-
hose, vent tube and passage in the lower part of sary. See “Carburetor Air Cleaners.”
the carburetor. &CRANKCASE VENT VALVE-Replace. Check
function of the entire crankcase ventilating system.
Carburetor Vent Tube See page 12.
-. - - - ot u - i c1fin7wrvrhn7 I**.- *-
r i ~I I IU~Y . Imii imv~i~i1i 7cr-LnecK
1*
“ming and set as
Remove Carbiiretor. uip lower end ot carburetor

~ TI
in carburetor cleaner, part number 2933500 or equiv- required. See decal located in engine compartment
alent. Hand turnL a 1/4 inch drill through vent tube or “Ignition System” Group &El( ectrical.
passage to dislocIge solid particles, then blow clean. 7-IDLE RPM-Check after carbiuretor or ignition
IMPORTANT: make sure drill size used will not re- timing service. See decal located in engine compart-
move any metal,, Use smaller size if nocessary. It is ment or “Fuel System” Group 14.
not necessary 1o disassemble carburetor for this &MANIFOLD HEAT CONTROI VALVE-Clean
service. pivot areas as necessary.
9-BATTERY-Check specific giravity, clean and
Crankcase lnlet Air Cleaner tighten
. -
terminals;
- . .
apply grease tc posts and ter-
Disconnect the hoses from the crankcase inlet air minals after tightening.
cleaner. Inspect the hose from the crankcase inlet 10-VALVE LASH-(198, 225, and 426 cu. in en-
air cleaner to the carburetor air cleaner and clean if gines): If engine continues to be noisy and/or the

MyMopar.com
0-16 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

4; ~ COUNTER/WEIGHT NR87

I
Fig. 32-Manifold Heat Control Valve
(340 Cu. In. Engine)
Fig. 30-Manifold Heat Control Valve (6 Cylinder)
idle rough after the above services have been per-
formed, adjust the valve lash to specifications. See
“Engine” Group 9 for lash specifications. Idle ad-
justments of the carburetor should be rechecked
after setting lash.
MANIFOLD HEAT CONTROL VALVE
Freedom of movement of the heat control valve by
removing lead deposits from the valve shaft bearings
is assured by application of a suitable solvent. Such a
solvent is available under Part Number 2525054,
Manifold Heat Control Valve Solvent, or equivalent.
Every engine oil change apply solvent to both ends
of valve shaft where it rotates in bushings (Figs. 30, Fig. 33-Manifold Heat Control Valve
31, 32, 33 or 34). APPLY SOLVENT ONLY WHEN (383 and 440 Cu. In. Engine)
MANIFOLD IS COOL. Allow solvent to soak a few carburetor air cleaner should be cleaned every six
minutes, then work valve shaft back and forth until months and replaced every two years. On high per-
it moves freely. formance vehicles equipped with “Fresh Air Induc-
CARBURETOR AIR CLEANER tion System” clean filter every oil change and replace
every year.
Paper Element Type Use a Chrysler Corporation filter element or equiv-
The paper filter element (Figs. 35 and 36) in the alent, for replacement.

- COUNTERWEIGHT

THERM~STAT NN963
Fig. 31-Manifold Heat Control Valve Fig. 34-Header H e a t Control Valva
(318 Cu. In. Engine) (426 Cu. In. Engine)

MyMopar.com
n LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-17

FILTER ELEMENT

NY861

Fig. 37-Cleaning Filter Element


HOUSING PV83
At this time, also service the Carburetor Choke
Shaft, as outlined.
Fig. 35-Carburetor Air Cleaner (Dry Type)
If the filter element is saturated with oil for more Oil Bath Type (Extra Equipment)
than one-half its circumference, replace the filter The sediment level in the air cleaner should be
element and check the rest of the crankcase venti- examined every second oil change, or more fre-
lating system for proper functioning. quently under severe operating conditions, such as
To clean, remove air cleaner from carburetor. Re- in dusty areas.
move cover and filter element and clean cover and If the sediment builds up to within 3/8 inch of the
housing. Using compressed air, gently clean element shelf, discard old oil and thoroughly clean the air
by holding air hose nozzle at least two inches from cleaner. In any event, the cleaner should be serviced
inside screen (Fig. 37). at least once a year.
CAUTION: Do not use compressed air on outside sur- To clean, remove cover and filter element. Wash
face of element as this will embed foreign matter in element thoroughly in kerosene and drain. Element
the element paper. should be washed in an upright position to prevent
Examine element for punctures. Discard an ele- the accumulation of dirt on the top side of the ele-
ment that has small pin-point punctures. Examine soft ment, and the underside of the cover during the wash-
plastic sealing rings on both sides of element for ing operation, dirt accumulation due to improper ele-
smoothness and uniformity. Replace element if not ment cleaning will result in increased engine wear
satisfactory. rate. Clean reservoir thoroughly and fill to indicated
level with SAE 1OW-30engine oil. This grade is suit-
VER able for all temperatures.
Reassemble cleaner and install on carburetor.

CARBURETOR CHOKE VALVE SHAFT


Every six months, apply Carburetor Cleaner, Part
Number 2933500 or equivalent, to both ends of
choke shaft where it passes through the air horn (Fig.
38). At same time, move choke shaft back and forth
until deposits are flushed out. Run engine at idle to
clean out excess cleaner from carburetor and intake
VENT manifold.
Also, apply same type of cleaner to fast idle cam
LTER
and pivot pin to remove dirt, oil and any other de-
AlNER posits that may have collected and cause sticking
or erratic motion.
NU323 This service will assure freedom of movement of
Fig. 56-Carburetor Air Clwner (Fresh Air System) the choke mechanism.

MyMopar.com
0-18 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

Fig. 4 I -Fuel Filter (383,426,440 Cu. In. Engines)


amount of foreign matter accumulate in fuel tank,
78A filter may require replacing more frequently.
After installing new filter, run engine for several
Fig. 38-Choke Valve Shaft and Fast Idle Cam minutes and check for leaks at connections.
FUEL FILTER
PROPELLER SHAFT AND UNIVERSAL JOINTS
The fuel filters (Figs. 39, 40 or 41), are of the dis-
posable type. Under normal operating conditions, Under normal operating conditions, relubrication
filter should be replaced every 24 months or 24,000 of the propeller shaft universal joints is not recom-
miles. whichever occurs first. Should an excessive mended. Every six months, however, the front and
rear joints (Figs. 42 and 43) should be inspected for
external leakage or damaged seals.
If external leaks or damage is evident, the uni-
versal joint should be replaced.

Fig. 39-Fuel Filter (6 Cylinder Engines)


NN688

Fig. 42-Front Universal Joint

Fig. 40-Fuel Filter (318,340 Cu. In. Engines) Fig. 43-Rmr Universal Joint

MyMopar.com
r LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 9-19
Severe Service Requirements
When the vehicle is operated under the severe I1 -*

conditions as in police and taxi service the uni- I


versal joints should be disassembled, cleaned, and i

relubricated every 36,000 miles or 3 years. The


units should be disassembled, cleaned, and relubri-
i
cated with Multipurpose Grease, NLGI Grade 2,
E.P., such as Multi-Mileage Lubricant part number
2525035, or equivalent.

STEERING GEAR
Manual
The lubricant installed in the steering gear at time Fig. 45-Power Steering Pump Reservoir
of assembly is a high quality product and regularly (1.06 Pump)
scheduled changes are not required. fluid is checked when hot, the fluid level will be a p
Every six months, remove plug in steering gear proximately 1/2 to 1 inch below the top of the filler
housing (Fig. 44) and check lubricant level. Lubri- neck.
cant should cover worm gear. At room temperature (approximately 70°F) the
If lubricant is below prescribed level, replenish fluid level should be above the joint of the filler
with Multi-Purpose Gear Oil S A E 90, as defined by neck and reservoir (between 1-1/2 to 2 inches below
MILG2105B. This is suitable for all temperatures. the top of the filler neck).
Special Sure-Grip Lubricant, Part Number 2585318 If necessary, add fluid to restore these levels.
and Chrysler Hypoid Lubricant, part number Units equipped with a dipstick should be filled to
2933565, or their equivalent, are lubricants of this the required indicated oil level. Only petroleum
type and are recommended. fluids specially formulated for minimum effect on
CAUTION: When filling, do not use a pressure gun as the rubber hoses should be used. Power Steering
high pressure may damage the seals. Fluid part number 2084329, or its equivalent, is
recommended.
Power Steering CAUTION: Before removing the reservoir cover,
At every engine crankcase oil change, the power wipe outside of cover and case 50 that no dirt can
steering fluid level should be checked at the power fall into the reservoir.
steering pump reservoir (Figs. 45 or 46). When the
TRANSMISSION (Manual)
Three-Speed
The lubricant installed in the transmission at the
time of assembly is a high quality product and regu-
larly scheduled changes are not required for vehicles
FILLER CAP

NP168
Fig. 44-Manual Steering Gear Filler Plug Fig. 46-Power Steering Pump Reservoir t.94 Pump)

MyMopar.com
0-20 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

Multi-Purpose Gear Lubricant SAE 140 in warm


weather. No other lubricants should be used.

Trailer Towing and Severe Service


For vehicles equipped for trailer towing service, or
if the regular operation of the vehicle is classified
as severe, the transmission lubricant level should be
checked every 3 months or 4,000 miles, whichever
occurs first.
The transmission should be drained and refilled
with the specified lubricant, initially after 36 months
or 36,000 miles, whichever occurs first, and every
12 months or 12,000 miles, thereafter, whichever
occurs first.

Column-Mounted Transmission
Gearshift Control
If operation of gearshift controls becomes noisy, or
shift effort becomes objectionable, lubricate linkage
Fig. 47-Transmission Filler and Drain Plugs at lower end of steering column (Fig. 48).
Apply a film of Multi-Mileage Lubricant, Part
whose operation is classified as normal service for
Number 2525035, or equivalent, or Multi-Purpose
passenger cars. Grease, NLGI grade 2 EP, to contact surfaces on
The fluid level should be checked every six months. levers (Fig. 48).
The correct level is at the bottom of the filler plug
hole (Fig. 47). Replenish if necessary with automatic F loor-Mounted Manual
transmission fluid. Use only fluids of the type labeled Gearshift Mechanism
DEXRON Automatic Transmission Fluid or Chrysler If operation of the mechanism becomes difficult,
Automatic Transmission Fuid AQ-ATF-2848A or their remove rubber boot on floor panel and apply a few
equivalent, available under Part Number 1843314. drops of light engine oil to the mechanism.
In warm climates, if desired, the Automatic Trans- In addition, from under the vehicle, apply light en-
mission may be drained (Model A-903, use suction gine oil to rod ends in operating levers (Fig. 49).
gun) and the transmission refilled with Multi-Purpose
Gear Lubricant SAE 90, as defined by MILL-2105B. TRANSMISSION (Automatic)
When vehicle is used for other than normal service
or, for towing trailers, refer to “Trailer Towing Serv- Automatic transmissions should be maintained and
ice,” for recommended servicing. serviced by an authorized Chrysler Corporation deal-
er or service center to obtain best performance and
Four-Speed long life. It is important that the transmission fluid
The transmission is fflled at the factory with a be maintained at the level prescribed.
special gear lubricant and regularly scheduled
changes are not required for vehicles whose operation
is classified as normal service for passenger cars.
The fluid level, however, should be checked every
six months. The correct level is at the bottom of the
filler plug hole (Fig. 47). If lubricant is below the
specified level, replenish with Multi-Purpose Gear
Lubricant SAE 140, as defined by MIGL2105B.
During cold weather, if, shift effort becomes ex-
tremely high, transmission should be drained
and refilled with Multi-Purpose Gear Lubricant SAE
80 or SAE 90, as defined by MILL2105B or with
automatic transmission fluid types labeled “DEXRON
Automatic Transmission Fluid” or Chrysler Auto-
matic Transmission Fluid AQ-ATF-2848A available
under Part Number 1843314, or their equivalent,
Automatic transmission Fluid should be redaced with Fig. 48-Column-Mounted Gearshift Control

MyMopar.com
0 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-21

Fig. 4 9 J f o o r Mounted Transmission Gearshift


Mechanism Lubrication
Fig. 50-Transmission Level Indicator Markings
Selection of Lubricant
Use only fluids of the type labeled DEXRON Auto- ditions, the transmission fluid and filter will provide
matic Transmission Fluid or Chrysler Automatic satisfactory lubrication and protection to the trans-
Transmission Fluid AQ-ATF-2848A, or their equiva- mission. Therefore, periodic fluid changes are not
lent. required.
IMPORTANT: If, for any reason, the factory fill fluid
Special Additives i s replaced with another fluid, the fluid and filter must
Chrysler Corporation does not recommend the ad- be changed every 36 months or 36,000 miles, which-
dition of any fluids to the transmission other than ever occurs first, in normal service. A band adjust-
those from the automatic transmission fluids listed ment should be made at time of oil change.
above. Exceptions to this policy are the uses of special
dyes to aid in detecting fluid leaks, and the use of Frequency of Fluid Change (Vehicles
Chrysler Automatic Transmission Sealer which in- Equipped with 426 Hemi Engine)
troduces a small amount of swelling of the seals to The factory fill fluid should be changed after the
reduce fluid leakage resulting from hardening or first 24 months or 24,000 miles, whichever occurs
shrinking of the seals in high mileage vehicles. Such first, and periodically, thereafter, every 12 months or
a product is available under Part Number 2298923 12,000 miles, whichever occurs first. The filter should
Transmission Sealer, or its equivalent. be changed and the band adjustment checked with
each fluid change.
Fluid Level Check If, for any reason, the factory fill fluid is replaced
The fluid level should be checked every six months.
with another fluid, prior to the 24 months or 24,000
This check should be made when engine temperature
miles interval, the fluid and filter should be changed
gauge indicates a normal warmed-up condition and
and bands adjusted every 12 months or 12,000 miles,
transmission fluid is heated to its normal operating
thereafter, whichever occurs first, after the change
temperature. Check level with parking brake applied
to the field fluid.
firmly and engine idling.
CAUTION: Before removing level indicator, wipe off
cap and top of filler tube to prevent accumulated dirt Trailer Towing Service and Severe Usage
from dropping into transmission filler tube. (All models except those equipped with
After engine has idled for about two minutes, move 426 Hemi engine)
gearshift lever slowly through all gear positions, paus- If the regular operation of a car is classified as
ing momentarily in each and ending with lever in “N’ severe, the fluid level should be checked every 3
position. months or 4,000 miles, whichever occurs first, and the
When fluid is “hot,” level should be at ‘‘FULL” transmission should be adjusted and the fluid and
mark, or slightly below, but never above “FULL” oil filter changed after the first three years or 36,000
mark (Fig. 50). Fluid should be added or extracted, de- miles of operation, whichever comes e s t , and every
pending upon the reading, to restore level as specified. 12,000 miles or 12 months of operation thereafter,
whichever comes first.
Frequency of Fluid Change (All Models Typical examples of the type of service that comes
except with 426 Hemi Engine) within this category are:
For vehicles operated under normal service con- (a) Police and taxicab operation.

MyMopar.com
0-22 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

(b) Frequent towing of trailers.


(c) Continuous operation at higher than normal
1oading .
For transmission fluid draining and refilling serv-
ice, filter replacement and band adjustment proce-
dures, see “TorqueFlite Transmission”, Group 21.

FRONT WHEEL BEARINGS


The condition and quantity of the lubricant in the
front wheel bearings on cars equipped with either
drum or disc type brakes should be inspected when-
ever the wheels are removed to inspect or service
the brake system. Brake system inspection is recom-
mended every 12 months or 12,000 miles, whichever
occurs first. Fig. 52-Front Wheel Beuring Adjustment
When inspection of the wheel bearing lubricant in- Challenger models, to 65 foot-pounds.
dicates it is low in quantity, contains dirt, or has been (2)Tighten wheel bearing adjusting nut (Fig. 52)
contaminated by water to produce a milky appear- to 70-inch pounds on Dart models and 90 inch-
ance, bearings and hub should be cleaned, inspected pounds on Challenger models, while rotating wheel.
and relubricated. (3)Position nut lock on adjusting nut so one pair
CAUTION: To avoid possible contamination of Iubri- of cotter pin slots align with hole in spindle.
canf’by mixing lubricants that are not compatible, do (4) Back off adjusting nut and nut lock to the next
not add lubricant to bearings. slot and install cotter pin.
Thoroughly clean old lubricant from bearings and (5) Install wheel covers.
hubs. After cleaning, carefully examine cups, roll-
ers, and inner race of cone for brinnelling or spall- TIRES
ing. Bearing should be replaced if any defects exist. All tires, especially wide tread, 70 Series and
Discard old seals. Repack bearings and hubs with Fiberglass belted tires should be rotated no later
new Multi-Purpose Grease, NLGI grade 2 EP, such than every second oil change (Fig. 53) and should be
as Multi-Mileage Lubricant, Part Number 2525035, in correct balance to obtain the most uniform tread-
or equivalent. When repacking hubs (Fig. 51), make wear.
sure all surfaces of hub and outer grease cup in- If. owner insists on a four tire switch only, rotate
teriors are covered with lubricant to minimize con- tires according to diagram (Fig. 54).
densation and lubricant travel out of bearing. DO Tires should be examined at every oil change for
NOT OVER FILL. unusual wear patterns, foreign material and proper
Adjust bearings as follows: inflation pressures. If irregular tread wear has de-
(1)Install wheel and drum assemblies and tighten veloped, rotation is suggested at this time.
wheel nuts on Dart models to 55 foot-pounds, on Unusual wear conditions may indicate a need for
a change in driving habits or that mechanical cor-
rections are necessary.

I Y
I/\ I
l
Y ILEFT REAR RIGHT REAR
WHEEL HUB GREASE CAVITY

ND41B KP23A
Fig. 5 I-Front Wheel Bearing Lubricution Fig. 53-Tire Rotation Diagram-5 Tires

MyMopar.com
0

,
LEFT FRONT TNO , ;
LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE

SLIDING
0-23

SLIDING
CONTACT
P,VS, AREA

LEFT REAR I/ \I RIGHT REAR P


LOCK
-’ PIVOT AREA
SAFETY CATCH

NP158
Fig. 54-Tire Rotation Diagram-4 Tires
A decal showing the recommended tire pressure is
located on the body pillar at the rear of the left front
door opening (“B”post). Refer to “Tires”, Group 22, Fig. 55-Hood Lock Lubrication (Dart Models)
for additional information. sary to maintain ease of operation and to provide pro-
tection against rust and wear.
SPEEDOMETER CABLE Prior to applying any lubricant, wipe the parts
To service a noisy speedometer cable, disconnect clean to remove dust and grit. After lubricating parts,
housing at speedometer head. Remove shaft and clean remove excess oil or lubricant.
it thoroughly. Apply a very thin film of speedometer Relubricate mechanisms as outlined in the follow-
cable lubricant on the shaft. Such a lubricant is avail- ing paragraphs. Where Lubriplate is specified, use a
able under Part Number 1243632, Speedometer Cable smooth, white body hardware lubricant conforming to
Lubricant, or equivalent. Wipe excess lubricant from NLGI grade 1. Chrysler Parts Lubriplate, Part Num-
the top one-foot of the shaft and from the ferrule. ber 1064768 or equivalent, is a suitable lubricant.
CAUTION: Excessive lubricant may cause malfunc- Where Door Ease Lubricant is specified, use a stain-
tion of the speedometer. less wax type lubricant such as Chrysler Parts Door
Ease, Part Number 774512 o r equivalent.
HOOD LOCK, RELEASE MECHANISM AND
SAFETY CATCH Lock Cylinders
Lubrication of the hood latch release mechanisms When necessary, apply a thin film of Lubriplate or
and safety catch is of vital importance and should be equivalent, directly to key. Insert key into lock and
inspected, cleaned and lubricated every 6 months t o actuate several times. Wipe excess lubricant from
assure ease of operation and freedom from binding.

All Models
Apply Multi-Purpose Lubricant NLGI grade 2 EP,
such as Multi-Mileage Lubricant, Part Number
2525035 or equivalent, sparingly to all sliding con-
tact areas of latch and release lever, and ends of
hood lock release links, if so equipped. (Figs. 55 or
56). SLIDING CONTACT
AREAS
Work lubricant into the lock mechanism until all
frictional surfaces are covered. Also apply a film of
the same lubricant to the pivot contact areas of the
safety catch.
RELEASE
HANDLF:
A
/ I /
/
/ \ ‘in HOOD LOCK
SUPPORT

BODY MAINTENANCE ’ LOCK


A
. SSEMBLY PY816
Body and other operating mechanisms should be
inspected, and relubricated as needed. This is neces- Fig. 56-Hood Lock Lubrication (Challenger Models)

MyMopar.com
0-24 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

PIVOT AND ROLLER


PIN CONTACT POINTS PIN ENDS

TORSION
SPRING
CONTACT
POINTS

FRONTDOOR LOWET
REAR DOOR LOWER NN388A

Fig. 59-Door Hinge Lubrication (Dart Models)


Fig. 57-Hood Hinge Lubricotion (Dart Models)
A PIN ENDS
key. Particular attention should be given to external
lock cylinders during fall and winter months to insure
protection from water and ice.
TORSION SPRING
Hood Hinges (All Models) CONTACT POINTS
Apply engine oil to all link or hinge pivots and A
Lubriplate or equivalent, to gear teeth and sliding
contact areas (Figs. 57 or 58).
PIVOT AND ROLLER
Door Hinges CONTACT POINTS
On all hinges, apply engine oil to hinge pin ends
(Figs. 59 or 60).
On lower hinges, in addition, apply engine oil to
DOOR HINGE LUBRICATION PY812
torsion spring contact points and all pivot contact
points. Fig. 60-Door Hinge Lubricotion (Challenger Models)
Door Lock Ratchet and Striker Bolt
Apply light engine oil, sparingly, to ratchet pivot
areas (Fig. 61). Wipe off excess oil. Apply Door Ease
Lubricant or equivalent, to contact area of striker
bolt.

Door Locks and Locking Control Linkage (All


Models)
If necessary to inspect operation of and relubricate
these parts, remove door trim panel. Apply a film of

Fig. 58-Hood Hinge Lubricotion (Challenger Models) Fig. 6 1 -Door Lock Ratchet and Striker Boh

MyMopar.com
-LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-25

Fig. 62-Deck Lid Latch Lubric$on-(;;lj'Mols) PY815


Lubriplate or equivalent, to all pivot and sliding con- fig. 64-Deck Lid Hinge Lubrication
tact areas. (Challenger Models)
Deck Lid Latch (All Models)
Door Remote Control Link (All Models) Apply Lubriplate or equivalent, sparingly, to all
If necessary to inspect operation of and relubricate
pivot and sliding contact surfaces (Fig. 62).
these parts, remove door trim panel. Apply a film of
Lubriplate or equivalent, to all link end pivots.
Deck Lid Hinges (All Models)
Apply Lubriplate or equivalent, sparingly, to all
Window Regulator, Glass Lower Frame (All torsion bar support bearing areas and interior sur-
Models) face of torsion bar slide (Figs. 63 and 64).
If necessary to inspect operation of and lubricate Also, apply same lubricant sparingly, to contact
these parts, remove door or quarter trim panel.
surface of hinge cam slide.
Apply Lubriplate or equivalent, sparingly, to regu-
lator sector gear teeth, assist spring and pivots. Apply ACCELERATOR LINKAGE COMPONENTS
same lubricant sparingly, to glass lower frame roller
slide tracks and roller and bracket assembly pivot Every 12 months the accelerator linkage compo-
points. nents should be lubricated with Multi-Purpose Grease,
NLGI grade 2 EP, such as Multi-Mileage Lubricant,
CONTACT AREA Part Number 2525035 or equivalent, as described in

SUPPORT

TORSION BAR SLIDE

CONTACT AREA

(EXCEPT CONVERTIBLE) SURFACES


NPl77C Fig. 6 d t h r o t t l e Linkage Lubrication
Fig. 63-Deck Lid Hinge Lubrication (Dart Models) ( 4 Cylinder Models)

MyMopar.com
0-26 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

INSULATOR
CABLE ASSEMBLY -
I

VIEW I N DIRECTION
OF ARROW A

SPRING
ACCELERATOR

I PEDAL N

SPRING
PAD
PIN

PEDAL
CHALLENGER
-
DART PAD
VIEW I N DIRECTION OF ARROW A
VIEW I N DIRECTION OF ARROW B (SHOWN SPRING INSTALLED)
SHOWING SPRING INSTALLED PY740
Fig. 65-Accelerator Components Lubrication
the following paragraphs. Do not lubricate ball joints Engine Compartment
or throttle control cable. On models with automatic transmissions (except
Challenger models with 318 or 383 Cu. In. engines
Passenger Compartment with 2 barrel carburetors) apply a thin film of the
On models with manual and Automatic transmis- prescribed lubricant to the bellcrank pivot areas
sions, apply a thin film of the prescribed lubricant on (Figs. 66, 67, 68, 70 or 71).
both ends of the accelerator shaft where it turns in
the bracket and where it is contacted by the anti- PARTS REQUIRING NO LUBRICATION
rattle spring, if so equipped?(Fig.65).
Also, lubricate the pedal.'pivot pin, cable ball and There are many points that should not be lubri-
pocket in the accelerator shaft. Be sure plug is in cated, some because they are permanently lubricated,
place. some because lubricants will be detrimental to their

L..

PY737 PY738
Fig. 67-Thrott le Linkage Lubrication (Dart Models Fig. 69-Thrott le Linkage-Challenger Models (318
with 3 18 Cu. In. Engines) or 383 Cu. In. Engines with 2 Barrel Carburetors)

MyMopar.com
0 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0-27

BELLCRANK PIVOT POINT-UPPER

BELLCRANK PIVOT
POINT-LOWER
(AUTOMATIC

NP413B
Fig. 70-Throttle Linkage Lubrication (Challenger Models with 383 or 440 Cu. In. Engines
with 4 Barrel Carburetors)

---

rn
J
440 THREE-2BBL
426 HEMI

BELLCRANK LOWER
PY739
Fig. 7 I-Throttle Linkage Lubriccrtion (Models with 426 Hem; & 440 Three 2 BBL Carburetors)

MyMopar.com
0-28 LUBRICATION AND MAINTENANCE 0

Fig. 68-rhrottle Linkage Lubrication (Dart, Challenger Models with 340 Cu. In. Engines)
operating characteristics, and some because lubri-
cants will cause component failures. In any event,
rubber bushings should not be lubricated, not only
because lubricants will cause rubber to fail, but also
will destroy their necessary friction characteristics.
The following parts should not be lubricated.
All Rubber Bushings Drive Belts
Alternator Bearings Fan Belt Idler Pulley
Automatic Transmission Rear Springs
Controls and Linkage Rear Wheel Bearings
Carburetor Air Cleaner Starting Motor Bushings
(Paper Element Type) Throttle Linkage Ball
Clutch Pedal Push Joints
Rod Ends Throttle Control Cable
Clutch Adjustment Upper and Lower Control
Rod Ends Arm Bushings
Clutch Release Bearing Water Pump Bearings

MyMopar.com
0 GROUP 1

ACCESSORIES
CONTENTS
Page Page
DEFOGGER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 RADIO AND ANTENNA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
ELECTRIC CLOCK ..................... 1 SPEED CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

ELECTRIC CLOCK
GENERAL INFORMATION
The electric clocks have a self-regulating mecha- to the correct time. Push in the time set shaft.
nism for automatically correcting time gain or lag (2) If the clock runs slow, pull the time set shaft
when the hands are reset to the correct time. Clocks out and reset the hands in a “clockwise” direction to
should be reset as follows: the correct time. Push in the time set shaft.
(1) If the clock runs fast pull the time set shaft out (3) Repeat steps (1) and/or (2) frequently for sev-
and reset the hands in a “counterclockwise” direction era1 days until the correct rate of time is achieved.

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
CLOCK DOES NOT (a) Wire loose or off terminal. (a) Install connector on terminal.
0 PERAT E (b) Internal short. (b) Repair or replace the clock as neces-
sa ry.
(c) Faulty ground. (c) Tighten clock retaining screws on
cluster housing and/or cluster.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
CLOCK Removal-Challenger (Rallye Cluster)
(1) Disconnect battery ground cable.
Removal-Challenger (Standard Cluster) (2) Remove radio. See “Radio Removal”.
(1) Disconnect battery ground cable.
(3) Remove clock reset from rear of clock.
(2) Remove radio. See “Radio Removal”.
(4) Disconnect clock lead.
(3) Disconnect lead. Remove the two clock mount-
(5) Remove clock from rear of cluster (three
ing screws.
screws).
(4) Carefully remove clock assembly from panel.
lnstallation lnstallat ion
(1) Position clock assembly in panel. (1) Position clock assembly in panel, install three
(2) Install mounting screws and connect electrical mounting screws and electrical lead.
lead. (2) Install clock reset at rear of clock.
(3) Install radio. See “Radio Installation”. (3) Install radio. See “Radio Installation”.
(4) Connect battery ground cable and check clock (4) Connect battery ground cable and check clock
operation. operation.

R A D I O AND ANTENNA
INDEX
Page Page
Antennas ..................................... 5 Radio ........................................ 5
Antenna Trimming ............................. 4 Radio Speaker ................................ 5
General Information ........................... 2 Service Diagnosis ............................. 3
Fader Control ................................. 2 Stereo Multiplex ............................... 6
Interference Elimination ....................... 4 Stereo Speakers ............................... 5

MyMopar.com
1-2 RADIO AND ANTENNA n

GENERAL INFORMATION
OPERATION Tape Cartridge
(1) Stereophonic tape players are designed to use a
RADIO-Push Button AM (Optional) pre-recorded, four program (eight-track)stereophonic
To operate the radio, the ignition switch must be in tape contained in a special tape cartridge. Do Not Use
the “on” or accessory position. Operation is by two Four Track Cartridges.
rotary controls and five push buttons. (2) Protect open end of the cartridge from damage,
Left Center Knob-On-Off and Volume dirt, water, oil and grease, etc.
Left Outer (Ring) Knob-Tone Control (3) Do not attempt to pull out the tape from the
Right Center and Outer Knob or the cartridge.
Five Push Buttonfitation Selection (4) Do not attempt to open up the cartridge.
(5) To assure maximum life, tape cartridges should
Push Buttom AM/FM Multiplex (Optional) be stored in a cool, clean and dry place, with the open
Operating controls consist of four thumbwheels.
Left outside-On-Off and Volume (tape) end down to keep dust out of the cartridge.
Left inside-speaker Balance (6) Do not expose cartridge to direct sunlight or
Right inside-Tone Quality other temperature extremes.
Right out s i d e 4tation Selection (7)Remove or disengage cartridge approximately
Push buttons may be set for either AM or F’M stations. one inch when not in use.
Mode switch is between left and right controls. Stereo (8) Do not turn on tape player with the cartridge
multiplex light is near front side of dial. engaged.
PLAYBACK HEAD AND CAPSTAN CLEANING
Combination AM Radio and Stereo Tape The playback head and capstan in your tape
Player (Optional) player may accumulate tape coating residue (oxide)
The operating controls consist of four thumb- as the tape passes over the head. This accumula-
wheels and a selector button. tion should be periodically removed, as part of nor-
The operating controls of four thumbwheels and a mal maintenance. Clean the playback head with a
selector button. cotton swab, slightly moistened with alcohol while
This four program eight-track stereo tape player holding the player cartridge door open. To clean the
provides full stereo reproduction. capstan, hold the player cartridge door open and
To operate, insert the tape cartridge, label side up, swab the surface of the capstan with alcohol after
into opening provided. The door will swing inward pressing upon the tape player motor switch (contact
and the tape player will begin to play when the car- points in rear at upper left hand side of the tape
tridge is in position. cartridge cavity) with a pencil. Do not use carbon tet-
At any given time the listener has a choice of four rachloride. Dry parts with a clean rag.
different selections by depressing the selector button
located to the left of the radio dial. FADER CONTROL
Do not store tape cartridges in high temperature The speaker fader control, located remotely from
areas, such as on top of the instrument panel or the the stereo unit, serves to proportion the sound level
rear package shelf. between the front and rear speakers.

VOLTAGE LIMITER

d-2
CAPACITOR
I

&L ; ,APACITOR

-jr VOLTAGE\ LIMITER


PY716
PY717

Fig. I-Radio Interference Capacitor to Cluster Fig. 2-Radio Interference Capocitor to Cluster
Installation (Standard Cluster) Installation (Rollye Cluster)

MyMopar.com
0 RADIO AND ANTENNA 1-3

COIL PRIMARY BATTERY POST


/

BRACKET I

UPPER ADAPTER
MOU
R A 1T
I--.

CAPACITOR - -
KP A139 B

Fig. 3-lgnition Coil Capacitor Fig. &Antenna Mast Removing or Installing

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
RADIO INOPERATIVE (a) Blown fuse. (a) Replace fuse, check for short or open
in wiring harness.
(b) Antenna open or shorted. (b) Test with an auxiliary antenna with
lead-in plugged into the receiver set
and test antenna lead outside of car.
If radio plays with test antenna, use
original antenna and check antenna
mostly for shorts to ground while
rocking antenna slightly. Unplug an-
tenna lead from radio and use ohm-
meter to check from center contact of
antenna to outside of case. If reading
on ohmmeter is less than 500,000
ohms, replace antenna.
(c) Receiver or Speaker connections (c) Test the voltage at the fuse and tight-
loose or faulty. en all connections. With speaker con-
trol tuned to either stop,‘rotate con-
trol to other stop. If radio plays, re-
place faulty speaker. If radio does not
play, remove radio receiver for servic-
ing.

RADIO RECEPTION (a) Unbalanced antenna trimmer. (a) Carefully adjust the antenna trimmer.
WEAK See “Service Procedures”.
(b) Shorted antenna lead-in. (b) Turn on radio and wiggle antenna. If
speaker static is heard, check for an-
tenna mounting tightness. If speaker
static is still heard after tightening,
disassemble antenna and test for
faulty insulators or presence of mois-
ture. Make an ohmmeter check step
(b) under “Radio Inoperative. If no
static is heard, test for faulty or loose
receiver or antenna connections at
receiver. Also check antenna lead-in
at antenna. If antenna checks OK, re-
move radio receiver for servicing.

RADIO NOISY (a) Outside electricaI interferences. (a) Move the car or eliminate interfer-
ence.
(b) Insufficient or faulty interference sup- (b) Install effective capacitor in ignition
pression. system or a t fuel gauge on instrument
panel.
(Cl Faulty antenna. (c) Turn on radio and wiggle antenna
lead and listen for speaker static. If

MyMopar.com
1-4 RADIO AND ANTENNA 0

Condition Possible Couse Correction


static is heard, disassemble antenna
and check for faulty insulators or
presence of moisture. Make an ohm-
meter test, Step (b) “Radio Inopera-
tive”. If no static is heard, check for
a loose or faulty capacitor. If capaci-
tor is OK, remove antenna plug from
radio receiver and bump receiver with
heel of hand. If no static is heard,
start engine, turn on headlights and
slowly, accelerate engine speed. If a
whining noise is heard, turn off head-
lights and if whining noise is still
present, tune in AM to a weak station
at left end of dial. R u n antenna up
and down; if a loud whirring noise is
present in the radio unit, the antenna
cable connection is loose and should
be tightened to 20 to 40 inch pounds.
Check alternator for burned out di-
odes, and voltage regulator setting.
If O.K. remove radio receiver for
servicing.
RADIO RECEPTION (a) Speaker voice coil leads rubbing on (a) Install an auxiliary speaker and com-
DISTORTED speaker cone. pare. Replace if improved.
(b) Torn speaker cone. (b) Replace the speaker.
(c) Faulty radio. (c) Send radio to authorized radio service
station for repair.
(d) Foreign material in speaker. (d) Clean or replace speaker.
(e) Torn cover. (e) Replace speaker.
I NTERMllTENT (a) Broken or shorted antenna lead-in (a) Test with a substitute antenna and re-
RECEPTION wire. place if necessary.
(b) Faulty radio. (b) Send radio to authorized radio service
station for repair.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
INTERFERENCE ELIMINATION whenever a radio is being installed after repair, or if
verification of trimmer adjustment is desired, proceed
,Three capacitors are used to suppress engine inter- as follows:
ference. The alternator is equipped with an internal (1)Extend antenna to 40 inches.
capacitor integral with the output stud. A second (2) Manually tune radio to noise or a weak signal
capacitor is mounted on the back of the instrument between 1400 and 1600 K.C.
cluster with a self tapping screw (Fig. 1 and 2). The (3) Increase radio volume.
lead wire of this capacitor is connected to the input (4) Using a short screwdriver under instrument
terminal of the voltage limiter (center terminal of fuel panel locate antenna trimmer in bottom right hand
gauge). A third capacitor is installed on the ignition corner of radio chassis.
coil with the lead connected to the positive primary (5) Adjust antenna trimmer by carefully turning it
terminal of the coil (Fig. 3). Radio resistance type back and forth until position is found that gives a
wires in the high tension circuit of the ignition sys- peak response in volume. Maximum output indicates
tem complete the interference suppression. proper point of antenna trimmer adjustment.
If radio noises are evident, be sure the capacitor
lead wires are making good contact on their respec- Push Buttans
tive terminals and are securely mounted. Faulty or (1) Extend the radio antenna fully.
deteriorated spark plug wires should be replaced. (2) Turn the radio ON and allow a warm-up period
of 15 minutes.
ANTENNA TRIMMING (3) Unlock the push button by pulling it out toward
the rear of the vehicle.
All radios are trimmed at the factory and should (4)Using the manual tuning control, tune in the
require no further trimmer adjustment. However, desired station.

MyMopar.com
0 RADIO AND ANTENNA 1-5
(4) Install inner fender shield and attaching screws.
(5) Install antenna mast into antenna body until
CAPNUT
sleeve bottoms on antenna body.
\ (6) Reroute antenna lead through hole in dash
\ ,
I ,

GASKET
panel and behind fresh air duct hose to radio receiver
(Fig. 6).
ADAPTER
FENDER SECTION
REFERENCE
RADIO
MOUNTING
COLLAR CAUTION: Do not operate the radio with speaker
W leads detached since damage to the transistors may
A COWL SIDE PANEL
REFERENCE result.

Removal
(1) Disconnect battery ground cable at battery.
(2) Remove channel selector shaft and knobs (if so
equipped).
(3) Remove the two radio mounting bolts at lower
Fig. 5-Antenna (Disassembled) front of radio.
(5) Relock the push button by pushing it all the (4) Disconnect electrical leads and antenna lead at
way in toward the front of the vehicle. radio.
(5) While holding radio in position, remove rear
ANTENNAS support bracket and remove radio.

Removal InSfallation
(1) Unplug antenna lead from radio receiver. (1) Carefully enter radio into position on the in-
(2) Remove antenna by unscrewing mast from an- strument panel.
tenna body (Fig. 4). (2) Install two mounting screws at lower front of
(3) Remove capnut (Figs. 5 and 6).
radio and rear support bracket and connect electrical
(4) Remove the screws attaching inner fender leads and anenna lead.
shield and remove shield. (3) Install channel selector shaft and knobs.
(5) Remove the antenna snapon fender adapter (4) Connect battery ground cable at battery and
and gasket. test operation of radio and controls.
(6) From under fender remove the mounting col-
lar and antenna lead. RADIO SPEAKER
Removal
/nSfallation (1)From top of instrument, remove the four speak-
(1) Assemble mounting collar to antenna body (Fig. er grille mounting screws and remove grille.
4). (2) Remove the two speaker mounting screws.
(2) Enter antenna body from underneath fender (3) Lift speaker from instrument panel and discon-
and insert through fender mounting hole. nect leads.
(3) Install gasket, adapter and capnut. Tighten
capnut to 155 inch pounds plus or minus 25 inch /nstallation
pounds with Tool (2-4085, (Fig. 5). (1) Connect leads, position speaker in panel and
install screws.
(2) Position grille on panel, install mounting screws
and check operation of speaker.
STEREO SPEAKERS-LEFT OR RIGHT
Removal-Challenger
(1) From top of instrument panel remove the two
speaker grille mounting screws.
(2) Lift grille and speaker assembly from panel
ANTENNA ADAPTER
and disconnect electrical leads.
(3) Remove the two speaker to grille mounting
Fig. 6-Tightening Antenna Capnut screws and separate speaker from grille.

MyMopar.com
1-6 RADIO AND ANTENNA 0

lnstallation lnstallation
(1) Position grille on speaker and install the two (1) Connect electrical leads and position crossover
mounting screws. under panel.
(2) Connect electrical leads. Position assembly on (2) Install mounting screws.
panel and install the two mounting screws. (3) Connect battery ground cable and check cross-
(3) Check operation. over operation.
REAR WINDOW DEFOGGER
STEREO SPEAKER CONTROL
To service the blower motor or fan, the assembly
Removal-Challenger must be removed from the shelf panel from inside the
(1) Disconnect battery ground cable. luggage compartment.
(2) Remove knob, mounting nut and bezel from After disconnecting the outlet hose and wire con-
panel. nector, remove the mounting screws from the mount-
(3) Remove radio. See “Radio Removal”. Discon- ing clips and remove the assembly from the vehicle
nect control connector and remove control from bezel. for service.
Disassembly
lnstallcrtion (1) Remove the blower motor adapter plate to
(1) Position control in bezel and connect electrical
housing mounting screws and withdraw motor and
connector. fan assembly from housing.
(2) Install radio. See “Radio Installation”. Install
(2) Loosen fan set screw on fan hub and slide fan
bezel mounting nut and knob. from motor shaft.
(3) Connect battery ground and check ‘On- (3) Remove the motor adapter late mounting nuts
trol operation.
and separate motor from plate.
STEREO CROSSOVER Assembly
(1) Position adapter plate on motor studs and in-
Removal-Challenger stall the mounting nuts.
(1) Disconnect battery ground cable. (2) Install fan on motor shaft and insert assembly
(2) Open glove box. Remove crossover mounting in housing. Check fan to housing clearance and ad-
screws. just if necessary.
(3) From under panel disconnect leads and remove (3) Install the blower motor adapter plate to hous-
crossover. ing mounting screws.

SPEED CONTROL SYSTEM


INDEX
Page Page
General Information ........................... 6 Service Diagnosis ............................. 7
lnstallation ................................... 11 Test and Adjustments ......................... 8
Removal ...................................... 11
GENERAL INFORMATION
The speed control system (Fig. 1) is electrically memory and engaging system. Remove foot from ac-
actuated and vacuum operated. The turn signal lever celerator. Speed will be maintained at this level.
on the steering column incorporates a CONTROL Turning the control ring from “OFF” to “ON” while
RING which when rotated, turns the system “OF””, the vehicle is in motion establishes memory without
“ON” or “RESUME SPEED”. A SPEED SET button is system engagement at that speed.
located in the end of the lever. This device is designed TO DISENGAGE: Normal brake application or a soft
to operate at speeds above approximately 30 M.P.H. tap on the brake pedal will disengage control units
WARNING: The use of “Speed Control” is not recom- without erasing speed memory. Fully rotating the
mended when driving conditions do not permit main- control ring in the “OFF’ direction or turning the
taining a constant speed, such as heavy traffic or on ignition “OFF” also disengages the system and in
roads that are winding, icy, snow-covered or slippery. addition erases the speed memory.
TO ENGAGE: Rotate control ring to the “ON” posi- TO RESUME: Rotate control ring fully in the “RE
tion, attain desired speed then momentarily depress SUME” direction. Vehicle will resume to the previous-
and release “SPEED SET” button establishing speed ly memorized speed.

MyMopar.com
0 RADIO AND ANTENNA 1-7

CABLE TO SPEEDOMETER
I
SERVO

‘y CLAMP(2)
ITY WWER BRAKE)

BRAKE
/
(WITH MANUAL BRAKE) BOOSTER
BRACKET ROUTE BEHIND SPEEDOMETER
CABLES AS SHOWN PY449
Fig. I -Speed Control Servo Adaptation-Challenger
TO VARY SPEED SETTING: To increase speed, de- speed can also be attained by holding set button de-
press accelerator to desired speed and momentarily pressed until desired speed is attained. Releasing
depress and release SPEED SET button. When speed the button engages the system at that speed.
control unit i s engaged, tapping SPEED SET button TO ACCELERATE FOR PASSING: Depress accelera-
may increase speed setting incrementally. tor as needed, when passing i s completed, release
To decrease speed, tap brake pedal lightly disengag- accelerator and vehicle w ill return to previous speed
ing system. When desired speed has been obtained setting.
depress and release SPEED SET button. Decrease in

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
NOSPEEDCONTROL (a) Control ring in “OFF” position. (a) Turn ring to “ON” position.
WHEN BUTTON PRESSED. (b) Fuse blown. (b) Replace fuse.
(c) Vacuum leak. (c) Check vacuum lines.
(d) Speed control throttle cable discon- (d) Disconnect and adjust control cable.
nected. See “Tests and Adjustments.”
(e) Improper stop lamp and speed con- (e) Adjust stop lamp and speed control
trol switch adjustment. switch. See “Tests and Adjustments.”
(f) Faulty electrical circuit. (f) See “Electrical Tests”.
NO RESUME WHEN (a) Insufficient rotation of control ring. (a) Rotate ring fully toward “Resume”.
CONTROL RING I S (b) Faulty electrical circuit (b) See “Electrical Tests”.
ROTATED.
NO SYSTEM DlSEN- (a) Improper adjustment of stop lamp (a) Adjust switch. See “Tests and Adjust-
GAGEMENT WHEN BRAKE and speed control switch. ments”.
PEDAL IS DEPRESSED. (b) Faulty electrical circuit. (b) See “Electrical Tests”.
SPEED CONTROL (a) Faulty electrical circuit. (a) See “Electrical Tests”.
ENGAGES WITHOUT
ACTUATING SWITCH.

MyMopar.com
1-8 SPEED CONTROL SYSTEM 0

Condition Possible Cause Correction


CARBURETOR DOES NOT (a) Speed control throttle cable malad- (a) Adjust speed control throttle cable.
RETURN TO NORMAL justed. See “Tests and Adjustments”.
IDLE. (b) Speed control throttle cable kinked (b) Repair or replace cable.
or damaged.
(c) Standard throttle linkage faulty. (c) Repair or replace linkage.
SPEEDOMETER NOISE, (a) Speedometer cable kinked or dam- (a) Align cables to avoid sharp bends or
EXCESSIVE NEEDLE aged. replace cable.
WAIVER OR ERRATIC (b) Cable core bent or too long. (b) Replace core.
SERVO LOCK-IN (c) Cable ferrule nut loose at speed- (c) Tighten cable ferrule nuts.
PERFORMANCE. orneter head, transmission or speed
control servo.
(d) No lubricant on speedometer cable (d) Lubricate cables.
core,
(e) Noisy speedometer head assembly. (e) Repair or replace the speedometer as
necessary.
SPEED SETTING AFTER (a) Improper adjustment of speed control (a) Adjust speed control throttle cable.
LOCK-IN, TOO HIGH OR throttle cable.
TOO LOW. (b) Vacuum leak. (b) Check all vacuum hose connections.
(c) Improper speed control servo lock-in (c) See “Servo Lock-in Screw Adjust-
adjustment. ment”.
UNIT DISENGAGES (a) Improper adjustment of stop lamp (a) Adjust as necessary. See “Tests and
ON ROUGH ROAD. and speed control. Adjustments”.
RESUME SPEED IS (a) Faulty low speed inhibit switch in (a) Replace servo unit.
POSSIBLE BELOW servo unit.
20 M.P.H. (b) Faulty electrical circuit. (b) See “Electrical Tests”.
SPEED CONTROL (a) Faulty electrical circuit. (a) See “Electrical Tests”.
ENGAGES WHEN ENGINE
I S STARTED, OR DOES
NOT DISENGAGE WHEN
BRAKE PEDAL I S
DEPRESSED.

SERVICE PROCEDURES

Test and Adjustments IMPORTANT: Lock-in accuracy will be affetted by:


(a) Poor engine performance (need for tune-up
Servo Lock-in Screw Adjustment etc.)
The Lock-in Screw Adjustment (Fig. 2) controls (b) Power to weight ratio (loaded gross weight of
the accuracy of the speed control unit. When the car; trailering).
SPEED-SET button is depressed and released at (c) Improper slack in throttle control cable, (See
speeds above approximately 30 M.P.H.; the speed “Throttle Control Cable Adjustment”).
control system is activated, the system “locks in” This screw should never be adjusted indiscrimi-
and should hold the vehicle at virtually the same nately. Need for adjustment can be determined only
speed at which it is traveling. after accurate diagnosis of the Speed Control System
operation.
After the steps (a) (b) and (c) have been considered
and speed “sags” (drops) more than 2 to 3 M.P.H.
when speed control is activated, the lock-in adjusting
screw should be turned counter-clockwise (approxi-
mately 1/4 turn per one M.P.H. correction required).
If “Pull-up” (speed increase) of more than 2 to 3
M.P.H. occurs, the lock-in adjusting screw should be
turned clockwise approximately 1/4 turn per one
M.P.H. correction required. If the screw is loose, stake
side of servo housing adjacent to screw to INSURE a
Fig. 2-Lock-in Screw Adjustment snug fit.

MyMopar.com
SPEED CONTROL SYSTEM 1-9
CAUTION: This adjustment must not exceed two (b) Connect a twelve volt positive source to the
turns in either direction or damage to unit may occur. black wire terminal in the speed control harness con-
nector (male).
Speed Control Throttle Cable Adjustment (c) With the lever rotary switch in the ON position,
Optimum servo performance is obtained with a attach one lead of a test lamp to the connector
given amount of free play in the throttle control yellow wire, other lead to a good ground; test lamp
cable. To obtain proper free play, insert a 1/16 inch should light and should go off when the Speed Set
diameter pin between forward end of slot in cable button is depressed.
end and carburetor linkage pin. Use hair pin clip re- (d) Move the test lamp lead to the connector blue
moved from carburetor linkage pin as a gauge (Fig. 3). wire; test lamp should light and should go off when
With choke in full open position and carburetor at the rotary switch is turned to the OFF position.
curb idle, pull back on cable (toward dash panel) with- (e) With the rotary switch in the ON position,
out moving carburetor linkage until all free play is move test lamp lead to the connector white wire; test
removed. Tighten cable clamp bolt to 45 inch-pounds, lamp should light by either depressing the Speed Set
remove 1/16 inch diameter pin and install hair pin button or by rotating the rotary switch fully toward
clip if removed. the “Resume” position.
(f) Reconnect speed control lever harness connec-
Stop Lamp and Speed Control Switch tor to harness connector.
Adjustment (3) Stop lamp and speed control switch test:
Refer to Figure (4),for proper switch adjustment as (a) Disconnect the double connector at the switch
follows: pigtail and connect a twelve volt source to either ter-
(1) Loosen switch bracket. minal and connect a test lamp from other terminal to
(2) Insert proper spacer gauge between brake push a good ground: test lamp should light when brake
rod and switch with pedal in free position. pedal is in the normal position and should go off
(3) Push switch bracket assembly toward brake when the brake pedal is depressed to a maximum of
push rod until plunger is fully depressed and switch approximately one half inch after proper adjustment
body contacts spacer. as outlined under “Stop Lamp and Speed Control
(4)Retighten switch bracket bolt to 100 inch- Switch Adjustment”.
pounds. (b) Remove test lamp and reconnect pigtail con-
(5) Remove spacer. nector to harness conductor.
(4) Servo unit tests:
Electrical Tests: (a) Locking coil test; turn ignition switch to the
Accessory or ON position and rotate the speed control
Refer to “Speed Control Wiring Diagram”, (Fig. 5).
rotary switch to the ON position.
It is suggested that the electrical tests be made in the
(b) Momentarily disconnecting and connecting the
following sequence:
double connector at the servo terminals should pro-
(1) Check accessory fuse for continuity.
duce a clicking sound in the servo. Replace the servo
(2) Speed control switch (turn signal lever) test.
if no clicking sound is heard.
(a) Disconnect the four wire electrical connector
(c) Holding coil and Low Speed switch test; with-
at the steering column.
out removing either connector at servo, place a test
7 lamp probe to the black (with tracer) wire terminal of
servo, other probe to a good ground. Block front
wheels; raise rear wheels and drive rear wheels to
35 miles per hour; with speed control lever rotary
switch in the ON position and ignition switch in the
ON position, depress and release Speed Set button.
The speed should increase above 35 miles per hour
and the test lamp should remain ON until the brake
pedal is depressed to disengage the system and test
light should go off.
(d) Remove test lamp.

Speed Control Servo (Fig. 1)


Removal
NR397 ( 1 ) Remove two self-locking nuts attaching the
Fig. 3-Servo Throttle Cable Adjustment servo cable cover to servo housing. Pull cover away

MyMopar.com
d,
h
Y

MyMopar.com
0 SPEED CONTROL SYSTEM 1-11
STOP LAMP AND PUSH BUTTON
SPEED BRAKE SWITCH ACTUATOR

TURN SIGNAL
AND SPEED
CONTROL SWITCH
LEVER
TO ACCESSORY
FEED (SEE ACCESSORY
WIRING DIAGRAM)

X30B-20DBL

X33-20BK
X31-18Y“

COLOR CODE

DBL DARK BLUE


-TO SPEED CONTROLUNIT- WITH TRACER
(ENGINE COMPARTMENT)
PY246

Fig. %-Speed Control Wiring Diagram


from servo to expose cable retaining clip (Fig. 6) and (3) Disconnect cable at servo (Fig. 6) and remove
remove clip attaching cable to servo diaphragm pin. cable assembly.
(2) Disconnect speedometer and transmission drive
cables at the servo housing. hastallation
(3) Disconnect vacuum hoses at servo housing (Fig. (1) Locate cable through routing brackets on dash
7)and electrical connectors. panel and on brake booster studs, (so equipped).
(4) Remove servo from mounting bracket (2 self- (2) Connect cable at servo housing.
locking nuts). (3) Route cable through retaining clamp and con-
nect at carburetor lost motion link lever pin.
lnstallation (4) Adjust cable free play as described under
(1) Position Servo on mounting bracket studs and “Speed Control Throttle Control Cable Adjustment”.
install attaching nuts. Tighten to 95 inch-pounds.
(2) Install vacuum hose and clamp. Make sure the Speed Control Switch (Turn Signal Lever)
hose clamp is locked securely. Removal
(3) Connect speedometer and transmission drive (1) Disconnect battery negative terminal at battery
cables at servo.
(4) With choke in full open position, align throttle
cable to servo pin and install retaining clip.
(5) Install cable cover on servo studs and install
attaching nuts. Tighten nuts securely.
(6) Install electrical connectors at servo.

Servo Throttle Cable Assembly (Servo to


Carburetor)
Removal
(1) Remove air cleaner.
$99
(2) Disconnect cable at retaining clamp and at
carburetor lost motion link, removing hair pin clip. Fig. 6-Removing or installing Throttle Cable Cover

MyMopar.com
1-12 SPEED CONTROL SYSTEM 0

Fig. 7-Removing or Installing Servo Hose


negative post and speed control connector at lower
end of column.
I!
_- PY906

(2) Remove steering wheel. See Group 19 “Steer- Fig. 8-Removing W i r e Terminals with Tool C 4 135
ing”. lnstallation
(3) Remove turn signal switch and lever attaching (1) Make a guide wire and thread the harness
screw. through the opening in column. Make guide wire long
(4) Remove steering column cover plate and sup- enough so that it can be reached at bottom of column
port steering column while clamp is removed to pre- before harness is attached to the upper hook. When
vent column from sagging. harness has been pulled through, install terminal
(5) Remove wire harness trough to facilitate reach- clips into switch connector and connect to harness
ing the lower end of speed control switch lead wires connector (be sure wires are connected to proper
(Figs. 4 through 5) and remove wires and terminals cavity (Fig. 4).
from connector with Wire Harness Tool C-4135 (Fig. (2) Install harness trough, steering column cover
8). plate and column support clamp.
CAUTION: Check color coding of wires to insure they (3) Install turn signal lever (speed control lever
are installed in the proper connector at reassembly. switch) and turn signal switch attaching screw.
See Figures 4 and 5. (4) Install steering wheel, steering column cover
(6) Tape terminals, then turn direction indicator plate. See Group 19 “Steering”.
lever sideways and pull lever up and wires out (5) Connect battery negative terminal at battery
through opening between column and tube. negative post.

MyMopar.com
0 GROUP 2

FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LI NKAGE

Page Page
LOWER BALL JOINTS .................. 10 TORSION BAR ........................ . . . . 5
LOWER CONTROL ARM AND SHAFT ..... 8 UPPER BALL JOINTS .................. 13
LOWER CONTROL ARM STRUT .......... 10 UPPER CONTROL ARM ................. 11
PRE-ALIGNMENT INSPECTION .......... 4 WHEEL ALIGNMENT ................... 3
Height Adjustment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Camber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 3
SPECIFICATIONS ...................... 14 Caster .............................. 3
STEERING KNUCKLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Steering Axis Inclination .............. 3
STEERING LINKAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Toe-in .............................. 3
SWAY BAR ............................ 8 T o e a t On Turns (Turning Radius) .....
TIGHTENING REFERENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 14
GENERAL INFORMATION
The torsion bar rear anchors are integral with the Service replacement ball joints are equipped with a
engine rear support member and the front anchors, "Knock-Off" type lubrication fitting. After lubrica-
which are part of the lower control arms, provide the tion, knock off that portion of the fitting over which
means of adjusting vehicle front height. The lower the lubrication gun was installed. A ball check is in-
ball joints are integral with the steering arms. Com- stalled in the remaining portion of the fitting to pre-
pression type lower balljoints are used on all Models. vent foreign materials from passing through.
All ball joints and the torsion bars at the front of The tie rod ends are serviced separately and
the rear anchors are effectively sealed against road should be inspected for damage at all oil change
splash by tightly fitted balloon type flexible seals. The periods.
ball joints and tie rod ends are of the semi-permanent Caster and camber adjustments are controlled by
lubricated type. cams on the upper control arm pivot bolts.
When re-lubrication of the ball joints and tie rod All front suspension points that contain rubber
end assemblies is required remove the plugs and should be tightened while the suspension is at the
install a lubrication fitting. After the lubrication is specified height (see specifications), with full weight
completed reinstall the plugs. of vehicle on its wheels.
Lower ball joints, steering arm assemblies, should Rubber bushings should not be lubricated at any
not be replaced for looseness if the axial end play (Up time.
and Down movement) is under .070 inch. Looseness ON MODELS EQUIPPED WITH DISC BRAKES, RE-
of this nature is not detrimental and will not affect FER TO GROUP 5 FOR BRAKE DISC REMOVAL
front wheel alignment o r vehicle stability. AND INSTALLATION PROCEDURES.

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
FRONT END NOISE (a) Ball joint needs lubrication. (a) Lubricate ball joint.
(b) Shock absorber inoperative or bush- (b) Replace bushings, shock absorber or
ings worn, or loose shock absorber tighten shock absorber mounting nuts.
mounting.
(c) Worn strut bushings. (c) Replace bushing.
(d) Loose struts. (d) Inspect bushings and tighten strut
nuts.
(e) Loose steering gear on frame. (e) Tighten steering gear mounting bolts.
(f) Worn upper control arm bushings. (f) Replace worn bushings.
(g) Worn lower control arm shaft bush- (g) Replace worn bushings.
ings.
(h) Excessively worn upper ball joint. (h) Replace ball joint.
(i) Excessively worn lower ball joint. (i) Replace ball joint.
(j) Worn tie rod ends. (j) Replace tie rod end.
(k) Loose or worn front wheel bearings. (k) Adjust or replace bearings a s neces-
sary.
(I) Steering arm contacting the control (I) Smooth off contacting areas and lu-
arm wheel stops. bricate with a water resistant grease.

MyMopar.com
2-2 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 0

Condition Possible Cause Correction


POOR DIRECTIONAL (a1 Low or uneven tire pressure. (a) Inflate tires to correct pressure.
STAB1LlTY (b) Loose wheel bearings. (b) Adjust wheel bearing.
(C) Improper steering cross shaft adjust- (c) Adjust steering cross shaft.
ment.
(d1 Steering gear not centered. (d) Adjust steering gear.
(e) Worn idler arm bushing. (e) Replace bushing or idler arm as
necessary.
Loose or failed front strut bushings. (f) Replace bushings.
Weak or broken rear spring. (g) Replace spring.
Incorrect front wheel alignment or (h) Measure and adjust front wheel
suspension heights. alignment and suspension heights.
Shock absorber inoperative. (i) Replace shock absorber.
Un-horizontal center link (cocked) (j) Align steering gear or replace cross-
member.
HARD STEERING Ball joints need lubrication. (a) Lubricate ball joints.
Low or uneven tire pressure. (b) Inflate tires to the recommended
pressures.
Low power steering fluid level. (c) Fill power steering pump reservoir to
correct leveI.
Lack of assist of power steering (d) Inspect and test power steering pump
system. and gear. Service as required.
Low front suspension height. (e) Adjust heights to specifications.
Incorrect front wheel alignment (Par- (f) Replace bent parts and adjust front
ticularly caster) resulting from a bent wheel alignment.
control arm steering knuckle or steer-
ing knuckle arm.
Steering gear not adjusted properly. (g) Adjust steering gear.
Idler arm binding. (h) Replace idler arm.
EXCESSIVE PLAY Worn or loose front wheel bearings. (a) Adjust or replace wheel bearings as
IN STEERING necessary.
Incorrect steering gear adjustment. (b) Adjust steering gear.
Loose steering gear to frame mount- (c) Tighten steering gear to frame bolts.
ing bolts.
Worn tie rod ends. (d) Replace tie rods as necessary.
Worn steering gear parts. (e) Replace worn steering gear parts and
adjust steering gear as necessary.
Worn upper control arm ball joints. (f) Replace ball joints.
Worn lower control arm ball joints. (g) Replace ball joints.
Worn idler arm bushing. (h) Replace bushing.
FRONT WHEEL Tire and wheel out of balance. (a) Balance wheel and tire assembly.
SHIMMY Unever tire wear, or excessively worn (b) Rotate or replace tires as necessary.
tires.
Worn or loose wheel bearings. (c) Replace or adjust wheel bearings.
Worn tie rod ends. (d) Replace tie rod ends.
Strut mounting bushings loose or (e) Replace strut mounting bushings.
worn.
Incorrect front wheel alignment and (f) Adjust front wheel alignment and car
car height (particularly caster). height.
Upper ball joints loose or excessively (g) Tighten to specifications or replace
worn. as necessary.
VEHICLE PULLS TO (a 1 Low or uneven tire pressure. (a) Inflate tires to the recommended pres-
ONE SIDE sure.
(b) Front brake dragging. (b) Adjust brakes.
(C) Grease, lubricant or brake fluid leak- (c) Replace brake shoe and lining as
ing onto brake lining. necessary and eliminate all leaks.
Loose strut bushings. (d) Inspect bushings and replace as
necessary.
Power steering control valve out of (e) Adjust steering gear control valve.
adjustment.
Incorrect front wheel alignment (par- (f) Adjust front wheel alignment
ticularly caster).
Broken or sagging front or rear (g) Replace spring.
spring.

MyMopar.com
0 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 2-3
Condition Possible Cause Correction
(h) Excessively worn suspension pivot (h) Replace bushings.
bushings.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
WHEEL ALIGNMENT tire wear factor; negative camber causes wear on
the inside of the tire, while positive camber causes
Front wheel alignment is the proper adjustment of
wear to the outside.
all the interrelated suspension angles affecting the
Toe-in is measured in inches and is the distance
running and steering of the front wheels of the ve-
the leading edges of the tires are closer than the
hicle. The importance of wheel alignment and wheel
trailing edges. Toe-in is considered the most serious
balancing is considered essential in order to main-
cause for excessive tire wear. Toe-in is the last of
tain ease of steering, good directional stability and
the alignment angles to be set in the front wheel
to prevent abnormal tire wear. alignment operation.
Under every day driving conditions the front wheel Steering Axis Inclination is measured in degrees
alignment angles change and therefore it becomes and is the amount the spindle support center line is
necessary that every vehicle should have an align- tilted from true vertical. It has a fixed relation-
ment check at least once a year. Such an inspection of ship with camber settings and does not change except
the front suspension and steering components is a
when a spindle or ball joint is damaged or bent.
preventative maintenance service and also has a
This angle is not adjustable and damaged parts must
definite bearing on the safe operation of the vehicle.
be replaced.
The method of checking front wheel alignment
Toe-out on Turns (Turning Radius) is measured in
will vary depending on the type of equipment being
degrees and is the amount one front wheel turns
used. The instructions furnished by the manufacturer
sharper than the other on a turn. This angle is
of the equipment should always be followed, with the
designed into the steering arms in relationship to
exception that the specifications recommended by
the wheelbase of the vehicle and is not adjustable.
the Chrysler Motors Corporation be used. When checking the turning radius and it is found not
There are six basic factors which are the founda-
tion to front wheel alignment; height, caster, camber,
toe-in, steering axis inclination and toe-out on turns
(Fig. 1).All are mechanically adjustable except steer-
ing axis inclination and toe-out on turns. The latter
two are valuable in determining if parts are bent or
damaged particularly when the camber and caster
adjustments cannot be brought within the recom-
mended specifications.
Do not attempt to modify any suspension or steer- I

ing components by heating or bending. 1 STEERING AXIS INCLINATION


All adjustments should be made in the following POSITIVE NEGATIVE
sequence: CASTER CASTER
FRONT OF CAR-
(a) Front suspension height
(b) Caster and Camber
(c) Toe in
(d) Steering Axis Inclination
PlVO
(e) Toe-out on Turns.
I
Caster is the number of degrees of forward or POSITIVE NEGATIVE I I ,TOE-OUT ON TURNS
backward tilt of the spindle support arm at the top. CAMBER CAMBER
Forward tilt of the spindle support arm at the top is n0"
negative caster. Backward tilt of the spindle support
arm at the top from true vertical is positive caster.
Camber is the number of degrees the top of the WHEELS TURN
wheel is tilted inward or outward from a true verti- ABOUT COMMON
cal. Inward tilt of the top of the wheel from true
vertical is negative camber. Outward tilt of the wheel
at the top is positive camber. Excessive camber is a Fig. 1-Wheel Alignment Factors

MyMopar.com
2-4 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 0

to be within the recommended specifications, look Height


for possible bent or damaged components. Front suspension heights must be held to specifica-
tions for a satisfactory ride, correct appearance,
PRE-ALIGNMENT INSPECTION proper front wheel alignment and reduced tire wear.
The heights should only be measured after the ve-
Before any attempt is made to change or correct hicle has the recommended tire pressures, a full
the wheel alignment factors the following inspection tank of fuel, no passenger or luggage compartment
and necessary corrections must be made on those load and is on a level floor or alignment machine rack.
parts which influence the steering of the vehicle. (1) Clean all foreign material from bottom of steer-
(1) Check and inflate tires to recommended pres- ing knuckle arm assemblies and from lowest area of
sure. All tires should be same size and be in good the height adjusting blades directly below center of
condition and have approximately same wear. Note lower control arm inner pivots.
type of tire tread wear which will aid in diagnosing (2) Jounce vehicle several times releasing it on
(Group 22). downward motion.
(2) Check and adjust front wheel bearings (Group (3) Measure distance from lowest point of one ad-
22). justing blade to floor (Measurement A) and from low-
(3) Check front wheel and tire assembly for radial est point of steering knuckle arm, at the centerline,
and lateral runout (follow the Equipment Manu- on same side (Measurement B) to floor (Fig. 2). Meas-
facturers Instructions (Group 22). ure only one side at a time.
(4) Check wheel and tire for unbalance conditions The difference between A and B (A always being
both static and dynamic which could affect steering. greater than B) i s the front suspension height.
(5) Inspect ball joints and all steering linkage pivot (4) Refer to Specifications and adjust if necessary
points for excessive looseness. by turning torsion bar adjusting bolt clockwise to in-
(6) Check shock absorbers for leaks and jounce crease height and counterclockwise to decrease
vehicle to determine if shock absorbers have proper height.
control. (5) After each adjustment, jounce vehicle before
(7) Check steering gear for roughness, binding or remeasuring. Both sides should be measured even
sticking condition and adjust as necessary. though only one side has been adjusted.
( 8 ) Check rear springs for cracks or broken leaves (6) Measure other side in same manner. The maxi-
and “U” bolts for proper tightness and measure mum allowable difference in suspension height from
height differential between left and right sides of side to side is 1/8 inch on all Models.
vehicle. (Vehicle should be on level floor or on align-
ment rack) with a full tank of fuel and no luggage or Camber and Caster
passenger load. Access holes to loosen upper control arm cam bolt
(9) Front suspension heights must only be checked nuts have been provided for in the fender side shields
after the vehicle has the recommended tire pres- (Fig. 3) of the Challenger model vehicles. The front
sures, full tank of fuel, no passenger load and is on access hole is made available by removing splash cov-
a level floor or alignment rack. er tapping screws and cover.
To obtain accurate readings, vehicle should be (1) Prepare vehicle for measuring wheel alignment.
jounced in following manner just prior to taking each (2) Remove all foreign material from exposed
measurement (Height - Caster - Camber and Toe): threads of cam adjusting bolts.
Grasp bumpers at center (rear bumper first) and
(3) Record initial camber and caster readings be-
jounce up and down several times. Always release
bumpers on the down cycle after jouncing both rear fore loosening cam bolt nuts.
and front ends an equal number of times.

WHEEL ALIGNMENT ADJUSTMENTS


Front wheel alignment settings must be held to
specifications to hold tire wear to a minimum and to
maintain steering ease and handling of vehicle.
The equipment manufacturers recommended pro-
cedure should always be followed. Any parts of the
front suspension system should be replaced if they
are found to be bent. Do not attempt to straighten any
bent part. Fig. 2-Measuring Front Suspension Height

MyMopar.com
0 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 2-5

JBUSHtNG
/RETAINER
LOCK RING
/

SHOCK ABSORBER

ND32t
NR360

Fig. 3-Access Opening in Fender Shield Fig. 4-Torsion Bar


(4) Camber settings should be held as close as pos- toward rear of torsion bar to allow sufficient room for
sible to the “preferred” setting. Caster should be held striking the striking pad of tool. Do not apply heat to
as nearly equal as possible on both wheels. See speci- torsion bar, front anchor or rear anchor.
fications at rear of group. (6) Remove tool and slide rear anchor balloon seal
from anchor to facilitate removal of torsion bar.
Toe-ln (7)Remove torsion bar by sliding bar out through
The toe setting should be the final operation of the rear of anchor. Use care not to damage balloon seal
front wheel alignment adjustments. The front wheels when it is removed from torsion bar.
must be in a straight ahead position. Follow the
equipment manufacturers procedure. The steering inspection
wheel should also be centered during this operation. (1) Inspect balloon seal for damage and replace if
Turning the tie rod sleeve will “center” the steer- necessary.
ing wheel spokes. If the steering wheel was centered, (2)Inspect torsion bar for scores and nicks. Dress
make the toe-in adjustment by turning both sleeves down all scratches and nicks to remove sharp edges,
an equal amount.
Tighten adjusting sleeve clamp bolt nuts 115 inch- then paint repaired area with a good rust preventa-
pounds. Make sure clamp bolt nuts are on the bottom. tive.
(3) Remove all foreign material from hex openings
TORSION BAR in anchors and from hex ends of torsion bars.
(4) Inspect adjusting bolt and swivel and replace
The torsion bars are not interchangeable side for
side. The bars are marked either right or left by an
“R” or an “L” stamped on one end of the bar.

Removal I
(1) Remove upper control arm rebound bumper.
(2)If vehicle is to be raised on a hoist, make sure it
is lifted on body only so that front suspension is in
full rebound (under no load). If vehicle is to be raised
on jacks, placed under center of crossmember it will
be necessary that, a support first be placed between
the crossmember and the iack.
(3)Release all load from torsion bar (Fig. 4) by
turning anchor adjusting bolt (Fig. 5) counterclock-
I
wise.
(4) Remove lock ring from torsion bar rear an-
chor (Fig. 4).
(5)Using Tool C-3728,remove torsion bar (Fig. 5)
from its anchors. It is advisable to place Tool C-3728 Fig. 5-Removing Torsion Bar

MyMopar.com
2-6 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 0

if any corrosion or other damage is noted. Lubricate prevent damage to brake hose when lower bolts are
for easy operation. removed.

lnstallation lnstallation
(1)Insert torsion bar through rear anchor. (1) Position steering knuckle on brake support and
(2) Slide balloon seal over torsion bar (cupped end install upper mounting bolts and nuts. Tighten nut
toward rear of bar). finger tight only.
(3)Coat both hex ends of torsion bar with Multi- (2) Position steering knuckle arm on steering
Mileage Lubricant or equivalent. knuckle and install mounting bolts and nuts finger
(4) Slide torsion bar into hex opening of lower con- tight only.
trol arm. (3) Install upper ball joint stud in steering knuckle
(5) Install lock ring in rear anchor. and tighten ball joint stud nut 55 foot-pounds (Dart)
(6) Pack the annular opening in rear anchor com- and 100 foot-pounds (Challenger). Install cotter pin.
pletely full of Multi-Mileage Lubricant or equivalent. (4)Tighten steering knuckle upper bolt nuts 55
(7) Position balloon seal on rear anchor so lip of foot-pounds. Tighten lower bolt nuts 100 foot-pounds
seal engages with groove in anchor. (Dart) 120 foot-pounds (Challenger models).
(8) Turn adjusting bolt clockwise to place a load on (5) Place a load on the torsion bar by turning ad-
torsion bar. justing bolt clockwise.
(9) Lower vehicle to floor and adjust front suspen- (6) Install tie rod end in steering knuckle arm and
sion height. install nut, tighten 40 foot-pounds and install cotter
(10)Install upper control arm rebound bumper and pin.
tighten nut 200 inch-pounds. (7)Install wheel, tire and drum assembly and ad-
just front wheel bearings (Group 22).
STEERING KNUCKLES (8) Lower vehicle to floor and install upper control
arm rebound bumper. Tighten nut 200 inch-pounds.
ON MODELS EQUIPPED WITH DISC BRAKES, RE- (9) Measure and adjust front suspension heights
FER TO GROUP 5 FOR BRAKE DISC REMOVAL and wheel alignment as necessary.
AND INSTALLATION PROCEDURES.
STEERING LINKAGE (Figs. 6,7)
Removal
(1)Remove upper control arm rebound bumper. The tie rod end seals should be inspected for
(2) Raise vehicle so front suspension is in full re- damage at all oil change periods.
bound (under no load).
(3)Remove wheel, tire and drum as an assembly. Removal
Removal of tie rod ends from the steering knuckle
(4) Remove all load from torsion bar by turning
arm or center link by methods other than using Tool
adjusting bolt counterclockwise.
C-3894 will damage tie rod end seal.
(5) Remove tie rod end from steering knuckle arm
Using To01 C-3894. When removing tie rod ends, idler arm or steering
'
(6)Remove upper ball joint stud from steering ' I
knuckle using Tool (2-3711.It may be necessary to
KNUCKLE (
add approximately 7/16 inch of flat washers over / '\ \ TIE ROD END
lower ball joint stud to allow the use of Tool C-3711
without damaging threads on lower ball joint stud.
Place Tool C-3711over stud. Turn threaded portion of
tool locking it securely against the upper stud (Fig.
17). To use Tool C-3711 as outlined, it may be neces-
sary to modify the tool (Fig. 19). Spread tool enough
to place upper stud under a load, then strike steering
knuckle sharply with a hammer to loosen stud. Do not
attempt to force stud out of steering knuckle with
tool alone. --.
(7) Remove two upper bolts attaching steering
knuckle to brake support.
(8) Remove two lower bolts attaching steering arm
to steering knuckle and remove steering knuckle. NR373
Sumort
- -r. the brake assemblv durina
" this omration to Fig. &Steering linkage ( D a d )

MyMopar.com
SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 2-7

KNUCKLE ARM
KNUCKLE
, TIE ROD END

Fig. 6-Steering Linkage (Dart)


gear arm, all seals should be closely inspected for
wear or damage. The tie rod ends are of the semi-
permanently lubricated type.
Damaged seals require removal of the seals and Fig. 7-Steering linkage (Challenger)
inspection of the tie rod assembly end at the throat (6) Remove steering gear arm.
opening. If the parts have not lost all the lubricant or
are not contaminated, worn or rusted, use new seals lnstallat ion
and reinstall, otherwise, a new complete tie rod end Replace all tie rod and steering arm assemblies that
assembly should be installed. Lubricate the tie rod are damaged or worn.
end assembly with special long-life chassis greases (1) Position idler arm assembly in bracket and in-
such as Multi-Mileage Lubricant, Part Number stall bolt. Tighten nut 65 foot-pounds and install cot-
2525035 intended for this purpose. ter pin.
(1) Remove tie rod ends from steering knuckle (2)Place center link over idler arm and steering
arms (Fig. 8). Use care not to damage seals. gear arm studs and tighten nuts 40 foot-pounds. In-
stall cotter pins.
(2)Remove inner tie rod ends from center link. (3) Connect tie rod ends to steering knuckle arms
(3) Remove idler arm stud from center link. and centerlink. Tighten nuts 40 foot-pounds and in-
(4) Remove idler arm bolt from crossmember. stall cotter pins.
(5)Remove steering gear arm stud from center (4) Measure and adjust front wheel toe.
link.

NK387

KNUCKLE ARM
Fig. 8-Removing Tie Rod End Stud from
Fig. 7-Steering Linkage (Challenger) Steering Knuckle Arm

MyMopar.com
2-8 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 0

The sway bar cushions are not serviced separately.

NuT3
RETAINER
INSULATOR
If replacement is necessary, install a new sway bar
assembly.

Installation-hrt
(1) Position link with retainer and rubber insula-
tor in lower control arm bracket, followed by rubber
insulator and retaicer (concave side toward rubber
insulator) and nut. Tighten nut to 100 inch-pounds.
(2) Position sway bar assembly in vehicle and in-
stall attaching bolts and nuts and tighten to 200 inch-
pounds.
(3) Install retainer on link, followed by rubber
insulator and sway bar. Using a screwdriver or pinch
! bar between strut and sway bar, if necessary apply
INSULATOR^ pressure and install upper rubber insulator, retainer
RETAINER- and nut, tighten nuts 100 inch-pounds.
NUT4
NN43C
Removal-Challenger'
Fig. 9-Sway Bar Assembly (Dart] (1) Loosen and remove upper link nut retainer and
rubber insulator on both sides of car.
SWAY BAR (Figs. 9, 10) (2) Loosen and remove bolts and nuts attaching
both retainer brackets to front crossmember.
Removal-Dart (3) Remove sway bar link bolt from sway bar fol-
(1) Loosen and remove upper link nut, retainer and lowed by rubber insulators, retainers, sleeve spacer.
rubber insulator on both sides. (4) Remove the center rubber insulator bracket and
(2) Loosen and remove bolts attaching both brack- turn sway bar toward front of car and remove by slid-
ets to front crossmember. ing out thru opening in front crossmember.
(3) Remove sway bar from vehicle. (5) If the rubber insulator bushings show excessive
(4) Loosen and remove nuts, retainers and rubber wear or deterioration of rubber, install new bushings.
insulators and remove links from lower control arm The sway bar cushions are serviced separately.
bracket.
(5) If the rubber insulator bushings show exces- Installation-Challenger
sive wear or deterioration of rubber, install new (1) With sway bar ends pointed toward front of car,
bushings. insert sway bar thru hole in front crossmember into
its correct position.
(2) Install sway bar cushion retainer brackets and
attaching bolts and nuts and tighten to 200 inch-
pounds.
(3) Position link bolt with retainer and rubber in-
sulator thru sway bar mounting hole. Install other
mounting components in correct sequence (Fig. 11).
(Always making sure the concave side of retainers are
toward the rubber insulators).
(4) Position the link bolt, sway bar and the stack
up of partssthru mounting bracket hole in lower con-
trol arms. Install upper rubber insulator, retainer and
nut. Tighten link nut to 100 inch-pounds.

RETAINER
SWAY BAR
/ a- RETAINER

3 - 7uYJJLATOR
3
LOWER CONTROL ARM AND SHAFT
(Figs. 11, 12)

/
RETAINER
LINK- 7
Fig. 10-Sway Bar Assembly (Challenger)
PY84
Removal
ON MODELS EQUIPPED WITH DISC BRAKES, RE-
FER TO GROUP 5 FOR BRAKE DISC REMOVAL
AND INSTALLATION PROCEDURES.

MyMopar.com
- I I \ W I W I SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 2-9
-1
I

NR362
STKUT KNUCK~EARM

Fig. I I-Lower Control Arm (Dart)


(1) Remove the wheel, tire and drum as an as-
sembly.
(2) Remove lower shock absorber attaching bolt and
push up and out of way, and remove torsion bar from Fig. 13-Removing Lower B a l l Joint Stud (Dart)
lower control arm.
(3) Remove tie rod end from steering knuckle arm vise and remove strut nut.
using Tool C-3894 (Fig. 8). Use care not to damage (2) Remove strut from control arm.
seal. (3) Remove torsion bar adjusting bolt and swivel.
(4) Remove sway bar link from lower control (4) Place lower control arm assembly in an arbor
arm. press with torsion bar hex opening up and with a
(5) Remove steering knuckle arm to brake support support under outer edge of control arm.
bolts and remove steering knuckle arm. Move brake (5) Place a brass drift into hex opening and press
support assembly out of way. shaft out of lower control arm. The bushing inner
(6) Remove ball joint stud from lower control arm shell will remain on shaft.
using Tool C-3964 (Fig. 13). The bottom portion of (6) Cut and remove rubber portion of bushing from
tool must be positioned between seal and control control arm shaft.
arm to avoid seal damage. (7) Remove bushing outer shell by cutting with a
(7) Remove strut spring pin, front nut and bushing chisel. Use care not to cut into control arm.
retainer (Fig. 11)from forward end of cross-member. (8) Remove bushing inner shell from pivot shaft.
(8) Remove nut and washer from lower control arm Cut off if necessary.
shaft.
(9) Tap end of lower control arm shaft with a "soft Assembly
end" hammer to aid in removal of shaft from cross- (1) Position new bushing on shaft (flange end of
member. bushing first) press shaft into inner sleeve until bush-
(10) Remove lower control arm, shaft and strut as ing seats on shoulder of shaft.
an assembly. (2) Press shaft and bushing assembly into lower
(11) Remove strut bushing from crossmember only
control arm using Tool C-3848 and an arbor press.
if damaged; replace bushing. All models (except Dart)
use a two piece bushing and sleeve arrangement (Fig. In some instances it may be necesssary to reduce the
14). diameter of shaft shoulder to facilitate use of tool.
(12) Remove strut bushing inner retainer from (3) Install torsion bar adjusting bolt and swivel.
strut. (4) Position strut in lower control arm and tighten
nut 100 foot-pounds.
bisassembly
(1) Place strut portion of control arm assembly in a

RETAINER

NR361 STRUT KNUCK'LE ARM


Fig. 12-Lower Control Arm (Challenger) Fig. 14-Strut Crossmember Bushings (Challenger)

MyMopar.com
2-10 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 0

lnstallation lnstallation
(1) On Dart models, install new strut bushing in (1) Install new strut bushings, if necessary.
crossmember with a twisting motion. Water may be (2) Position strut into control arm and tighten nut
used as a lubricant to aid in installation. Do not use 100 foot-pounds.
oil or grease. (3) Position strut bushing inner retainer and strut
(2) Place strut bushing inner retainer on strut and rear bushing on strut and position lower control arm
install lower control arm, shaft, and strut assembly. shaft and strut assembly into crossmember. Install
Install strut bushing outer retainer and nut finger strut front bushing, sleeve and retainer. Tighten nut
tight only. finger tight only.
(3) On Challenger models, position front strut bush- (4) Install control arm pivot shaft washer and
ing half and sleeve into crossmember. Place rear re- nut finger tight only.
tainer and rear strut bushing on strut and position (5) Connect shock absorber to lower control arm
control arm, shaft and strut assembly into cross- and tighten nut finger tight only.
member. Install strut bushing outer retainer and (6) Lower vehicle to floor so full weight is on its
nut finger tight only. wheels.
(4) Install lower control arm shaft washer and nut (7) Adjust front suspension heights to specifica-
finger tight only. tions.
(5) Position lower ball joint stud into lower control (8) Tighten front strut nut to 45 foot-pounds Dart,
arm and tighten nut 85 foot-pounds, and install cotter (52 foot-pounds Challenger), and install spring pin.
pin. Tighten pivot shaft nut 145 foot-pounds. Tighten
(6) Position brake support on steering knuckle and shock absorber nut 50 foot-pounds.
install two upper bolts and nuts finger tight only. (9) Adjust front wheel alignment as necessary.
(7) Position steering knuckle arm on steering
knuckle and install two lower bolts and nuts. LOWER BALL JOINTS
(8) Tighten upper bolt nuts 55 foot-pounds. Tighten ON MODELS EQUIPPED WITH DISC BRAKES, RE-
lower bolt nuts 100 foot-pounds (Dart) 120 foot- FER TO GROUP 5 FOR BRAKE DISC REMOVAL
pounds (Challenger). AND INSTAL LATlON PROCEDURES.
(9) Inspect tie rod end seal and replace if damaged.
Connect tie rod end to steering knuckle arm and lnspection
tighten nut 40 foot-pounds and install cotter pin. (1) Raise the front of vehicle and install safety floor
(10) Connect shock absorber to control arm and stands under both lower control arms as far outboard
tighten finger tight only. (Dart install bolt from rear as possible. The upper control arms must not contact
only). the rubber rebound bumpers.
(11) Install wheel, tire and drum assembly and ad- (2) With the weight of vehicle on the control arm,
just front wheel bearing (Group 22). - install dial indicator and clamp assembly io lower
control arm (Fig. 15).
(12) Lower vehicle to floor, adjust front suspension
(3) Position dial indicator plunger tip against ball
heights and tighten strut nut, at crossmember 45 foot- joint housing assembly and zero dial indicator.
pounds and install strut pin Dart (52 foot-pounds (4) Measure axial travel of the ball joint housing
Challenger). Tighten shock absorber nut 50 foot-
pounds.
(13) Tighten lower control arm shaft nut 145 foot-
pounds, and tighten shock absorber lower bushings
to 50 foot-pounds.
(14) Measure and adjust front wheel alignment as
necessary.

LOWER CONTROL ARM STRUT


Removal
(1) Remove lower control arm, shaft and strut as
an assembly.
(2) Remove nut holding strut to lower control arm
and remove strut from control arm.
(3) Inspect strut bushings (Fig. 14). If bushings are _.

worn or deteriorated, install new bushings. Fig. 15-Measuring Lower Ball Joint Axial rrorvel

MyMopar.com
0 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 2-11
arm with respect to the ball joint stud, by raising and
10 INCH BRAK
lowering the wheel using a pry bar under the center
of the tire.
(5) If during measurement you find the axial travel
of the housing arm is .070” or more, relative to the
ball joint stud, the ball joint should be replaced.

Removal
The lower ball joint is integral with the steering
arm and is not serviced separately. Compression type
lower ball joints are used on all models.
(1) Remove upper control arm rebound bumper. ---__
(2) Raise vehicle so front suspension is in full re-
bound. Remove all load from torsion bar by turning
adjusting bolt counterclockwise. If jacks are used to Fig. 16-Upper Control Arm (Dart)
raise vehicle it is essential that a support be used
between the crossmember and jack. UPPER CONTROL ARM (Figs. 16,171
(3) Remove wheel, tire and drum as an assembly. It Removal and Disassembly
may be necessary to back-off the brake shoes to facili- (1) Place a jack under lower control arm as close to
tate removal of drum assembly. wheel as possible and raise vehicle until wheel clears
(4) Remove two lower bolts from the brake support floor.
attaching steering arm and ball joint assembly to (2) Remove wheel and tire as an assembly.
steering knuckle. (3) Remove upper and lower ball joint stud using
(5) Remove tie rod end from steering arm using Tool C-3711. On Dart models, it may be necessary to
Tool C-3894. Use care not to damage seal. add approximately 7/16 inch of flat washers over
(6) Using Tool C-3964 remove ball joint stud from lower ball joint stud to allow the use of Tool (2-3711
lower control arm (Fig. 13), and remove steering arm without damaging threads on lower ball joint stud.
and ball joint assembly. Place Tool C-3711 over stud. Turn threaded portion
of tool locking it securely against the upper stud (Fig.
lnstalfation 18).
(1) Place a new seal over ball joint and using Tool To use Tool C-3711 as outlined, it may be necessary
C-4039 press retainer portion of seal down on ball to modify the tool (Fig. 19).
joint housing until it is securely locked in position. (4) Spread tool enough to place upper stud under a
(2)Position steering arm and ball joint assembly on load, then strike steering knuckle sharply with a
steering knuckle and install two mounting bolts. hammer to loosen stud. Do not attempt to force stud
Tighten nuts 100 foot-pounds (Dart), 120 foot-pounds out of steering knuckle with tool alone.
(Challenger). (5) Remove nuts, lockwashers, cams and cam bolts
(3) Insert ball joint stud into opening in lower con-
trol arm. CAM ASSEMBLY
(4) Install stud retaining nut and tighten 85 foot-
pounds. Install cotter pin and lubricate ball joint, see
Lubrication Section Group “0”.
(5) Inspect tie rod seal for damage and replace if
damaged. Connect tie rod end to steering knuckle
arm, tighten nut 40 foot-pounds, and install cotter pin.
(6) Place a load on torsion bar by turning adjusting
bolt clockwise.
(7) Install wheel, tire and drum assembly and ad-
just front wheel bearing (Group 22).
( 8 ) Lower vehicle to floor, install upper control arm -
w
FWD KNU CKLE
rebound bumper and tighten nut 200 inch-pounds.
(9) Measure front suspension height and adjust if
necessary.
ND55C
(10) Measure front wheel alignment and adjust if
necessary. Fig. 17-Upper Control Arm (Challenger)

MyMopar.com
2-12 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 0

ND?8D Fig. 20-Removing or Installing Upper Ball Joint


Fig. 18-Removing Upper Ball Joint Stud (Dart) adaptor SP-3827 in place of SP-3233A cup on tool and
install support sleeve on rear bushing only (Fig. 22).
attaching upper control arm and bushings (Figs. 16,
(2) Install ball joint into arm using Tool (2-3714
17), to support brackets. Lift control arm up and
away from support. (Tool C-3560 Challenger). Tighten until seated (125
(6) Remove ball joint (Fig. 20) using Tool (2-3714 foot-pounds minimum). The ball joint will cut threads
(Tool C-3560 Challenger). The seal will come off as ball into a new arm during tightening operations.
joint is removed. (3) Install a new ball joint seal using a ‘2” socket,
(7) Assemble Tool C-3710A over bushing and press making sure it is seated fully on ball joint housing.
bushing out of arm (from inside out) (Fig. 21). To On Dart Models install seal using Tool C-4039.
remove upper control arm rear bushing support
sleeve (used on Dart models with 10 inch front brakes lnstallation
and police and taxi application) assemble Tool C- (1) Slide control arm into position and install cam
3710A, using adaptor SP-3826 in place of adaptor bolts, cams, washers and nuts (Figs. 16 and 17).
SP-3088, over bushing and press bushing out of arm Tighten nuts in preparation for final adjustments.
(Fig. 21). (2) Slide upper ball joint stud into position in steer-
ing knuckle and install nut. Tighten nut 100 foot-
Assembly pounds, (Dart 55 foot-pounds). Install cotter pin and
When installing new bushings, be sure control arm
is supported squarely at point where bushing is being
pressed in. Do not use oil or grease to aid in instal-
lation.
(1) Position flange end of new bushing in Tool C-
3710A, support control arm squarely, and press bush-
ings into control arm (from outside) until tapered
portion of bushing seats on the arm. On Dart models
with 10 inch front brakes and police and taxi applica-
tion, (using bushing support sleeve) remove Tool C-
3710A after bushing has been installed and install

A. REMOVE 1/16 INCH FROM LOWER PART OF TOOL.


B. ROUND OFF PORTION OF THE TOOL THAT IS
POSITIONED NEXT TO THE STEERING KNUCKLE ARM.
NDl27

Fig. I9-Tool C-371 I Modified Fig. 2 I -Removing Upper Control Arm Bushing

MyMopar.com
0 FRONT SUSPENSION AND STEERING LINKAGE 2-13
Place Tool C-3711 over studs. Turn threaded portion
SLEEVE of tool locking it securely against upper stud (Fig. 18).
To use Tool C-3711as outlined it will be necessary to
modify it, as shown in Figure 19.
(4) Spread tool enough to place upper stud under a
load, then strike steering knuckle sharply with a
hammer to loosen stud. Do not attempt to force stud
out of steering knuckle with tool alone.
(5) Remove tool, then remove ball joint stud from
steering knuckle.
(6)Using Tool C-3560,(Tool C-3714Dart) unscrew
ball joint from upper control arm (Fig. 20). The
seal will come off as ball joint is being removed.

lnsfallation
When installing a ball joint, make certain the ball
joint threads engage those of the control arm square-
ly if original arm i s being used. Balloon type seals
should always be replaced once they have been re-
moved.
(1)Screw ball joint squarely into control arm as far
Fig. 22-Instalhg Support Sleeve on Bushing as possible by hand.
(2)Using Tool C-3560 (Tool (2-3714Dart) tighten
lubricate ball joint. Tighten lower stud nut 85 foot-
ball joint until it bottoms on housing. Tighten to a
pounds. minimum of 125 foot-pounds.
(3)Install wheel and tire. Adjust wheel bearing
If ball joint cannot be torqued to 125 foot-pounds,
(Group 22).
inspect threads on ball joint and also in control arm
(4)Measure and adjust vehicle height and wheel
and replace as necessary.
alignment. Tighten cam bolt nuts 65 foot-pounds.
(3)Position a new seal over ball joint stud and in-
UPPER BALL JOINTS stall using a 2” socket making sure it is seated fully
ON MODELS EQUIPPED WITH DISC BRAKES, RE-
on ball joint housing. On Dart Models, install seal
FER TO GROUP 5 FOR BRAKE DISC REMOVAL
using Tool C-4039.
AND INSTALLATION PROCEDURES. (4) Position ball joint stud in steering knuckle and
install a retaining nut.
Removal
(1) Raise vehicle by placing a jack under lower con- (5)Tighten nut 100 foot-pounds, (Dart 55 foot-
trol arm as close as possible to wheel. pounds). Install cotter pin, lubricate ball joint.
(2) Remove wheel, tire and drum. (6)Install lower ball joint stud nut and tighten
(3)Remove upper and lower ball joint stud nuts 85 foot-pounds.
using Tool C-3711.On Dart models, it will be neces- (7)Install wheel, tire and drum assembly and
sary to add approximately 7/16” of flat washers over adjust front wheel bearings (Group 22).
lower ball joint stud to allow the use of Tool (2-3711 (8)Lower vehicle and adjust front suspension
without damaging threads on lower ball joint stud. height.

MyMopar.com
2-14 TIG HTENI NG R EFERENC E 0

SPECIFICATIONS
Dart Challenger
~____ ~~

CAMBER-Left ................................................. +1/40 to +3/40 (+1/2O preferred)


-Right ................................................ 00 to +1/2" (+1/4O preferred)

CAST€R-Ma nua I Steering ...................................... 00 to -1" (-1/2" preferred)


-Power Steering ....................................... +
+ 1/40 to 1-1/4° (+3/4" preferred)
HEIGHT (inches) Standard & Heavy Duty ........................ 2-118-C1/8 13/16I+118
Side to Side Difference (Maximum) ...................... ...
118
STEERING AXIS INCLINATION 7-112"
TOE-IN ...................................................... 3/32 to 5/32 inch (1/8 preferred)
TOE-OUT ON TURNS
When Inner Wheel is 20" outer wheel is ........................ 17.6" 17.8'
TORSI ON BARS-Length (inches) ............................... 35.8 41
-Diameter (inches)
.
Std Suspension (6 cyl.) ...................... 0.83 0.86
WlAir Conditioning .......................... 0.85 0.86
.
318. 340 C I . Engine ......................... 0.87 0.88
..
383 C I Engine .............................. 0.89
-
0.88
Police. 426 & 440 Engine ..................... 0.92
Heavy Duty Suspension ...................... 0.87 0.90
TREAD (inched-Front .......................................... 57.4 59.7
-Rear .......................................... 55.6 58.7
WHEELBASE (inches) .......................................... 111 110

TIGHTENING REFERENCE
Foot Inch Foot Inch
Pounds Pounds
Ball Joint-Upper ................... 125 (Min.) (Dart) ...................... 100
Nut-Lower ...................... 85 (Disc Brakes) ............... 120
-Upper (Challenger) .......... 100 Upper ............................ 55
(Dart) ................. 55 Strut Nuts
Control Arm Front (Dart) ...................... 45
Pivot Shaft Nut .................... 145 (ChaIlenger) ................
52
Rebound Bumpers ................. 200 Rear ............................. 105
Crossmember Bolts ................. 150 Sway Eliminator Shaft
Engine Mounting Bolts .............. 85 Frame Bracket Bolt Nut (Dart) .....
...
200
Idler Arm Bolt Nut .................. 65 Link Insulator Retainer Bolt Nuts 100
Shock Absorber Nuts-Front Tie Rod Ends
Lower ............................ 50 Sleeve Clamp Bolt Nut ............ 115
Upper ............................ 25 Stud Nuts ........................
40
Steering Gear Mounting Bolts ........ 80 Wheel Nuts
Steering Knuckle Bolt Nuts Challenger ........................
65
Lower (Challenger) ................ 120 Dart ..............................
55

MyMopar.com
0 GROUP 3

REAR AXLE
CONTENTS
Page Page
REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY (7V4") RING GEAR 4 SERVICE DIAGNOSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY (83/4") RING GEAR 14 SPECIFICATIONS ...................... 51
REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY (93/qff) RING GEAR 32 SURE-GRIP DIFFERENTIAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
REAR AXLE NOISE DIAGNOSIS . . . . . . . . . . 2 TIGHTENING REFERENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Ccndition Possible Cause Correction
REAR WHEEL NOISE (a) Wheel loose. (a) Tighten loose wheel nuts.
(b) Spalled wheel bearing cup or cone. (b) Check rear wheel bearings. If spalled
or worn, replace.
(c) Defective, brinelled wheel bearing. (c) Defective or brinelled bearings must
be replaced. Check rear axle shaft
end play.
(d) Excessive axle shaft end play. (d) Readjust axle shaft end play.
(e) Bent or sprung axle shaft flange. (e) Replace bent or sprung axle shaft.
SCORING OF (a) Insufficient lubrication. (a) Replace scored gears. Scoring marks
DIFFERENTIAL GEARS on the pressure face of gear teeth
AND PINIONS or in the bore are caused by instan-
taneous fusing of the mating surfaces.
Scored gears should be replaced. Fill
rear axle to required capacity with
proper Iubr ica nt.
See Specification section.
(b) Improper grade of lubricant (b) Replace scored gears. Inspect all
gears and bearings for possible dam-
age. Clean out and refill axle to re-
quired capacity with proper lubricant.
See Lubrication section.
(c) Excessive spinning of one wheel. (c) Replace scored gears. Inspect all
gears, pinion bores and shaft for
scoring, or bearings for possible dam-
age. Service as necessary.
TOOTH BREAKAGE (RING (a) Overloading. (a) Replace gears. Examine other gears
GEAR AND PINION) and bearings for possible damage.
Replace parts as needed. Avoid Over-
loading.
(b) Erratic clutch operation. (b) Replace gears, and examine remain-
ing parts for possible damage. Avoid
erratic clutch operation.
(c) Ice-spotted pavements. (c) Replace gears. Examine remaining
parts for possible damage. Replace
parts as required.
(d) mproper adjustment. (d) Replace gears. Examine other parts
for possible damage. Make sure ring
gear and pinion backlash is correct.
REAR AXLE NOISE (a1 nsuff icient lubricant. (a) Refill rear axle with correct amount
of the proper lubricant. See Specifica-
tion section. Also check for leaks and
correct as necessary.
(b) Improper ring gear and pinion adjust- (b) Check ring gear and pinion tooth
ment. contact.
(c) Unmatched ring gear and pinion. (c) Remove unmatched ring gear and
pinion. Replace with a new matched
gear and pinion set.
(d) Worn teeth on ring gear or pinion. (d) Check teeth on ring gear and pinion
for contact. If necessary, replace with
new matched set.

MyMopar.com
3-2 REAR AXLE 0

Condition Possible Cause Correction


(e) End play in drive pinion bearings. (e) Adjust drive pinion bearing preload.
(f) Side play in differential bearings. (f) Adjust differential bearing preload.
(g) Sure-Grip Differential moan and chat- (g) Drain and flush lubricant. See proce-
ter. dure in Sure-Grip section of Group 3.
LOSS OF LUBRICANT (a) Lubricant level too high. (a) Drain excess lubricant by removing
filler plug and allow lubricant to level
at lower edge of filler plug hole.
(b) Worn axle shaft oil seals. (b) Replace worn oil seals with new ones.
Prepare new seals before replacement.
(c) Cracked rear axle housing. (c) Repair or replace housing as required.
(d) Worn drive pinion oil seal. (d) Replace worn drive pinion oil seal
with a new one.
(e) Scored and worn companion flange. (e) Replace worn or scored companion
flange and oil seal.
(f) Clogged vent. (f) Remove obstructions.
(g) Loose carrier housing bolts or hous- (g) Tighten bolts or cover screws to
ing cover screws. specifications and fill to correct level
with proper lubricant.
OVERHEATING OF UNIT (a) Lubricant level too low. (a) Refill rear axle.
(b) Incorrect grade of lubricant. (b) Drain, flush and refill rear axle with
correct amount of proper lubricant.
See Specification Section.
(c) Bearings adjusted too tightly. (c) Readjust bearings.
(d) Excessive wear in gears. (d) Check gears for excessive wear or
scoring. Replace as necessary.
(e) Insufficient ring gear to pinion clear- (e) Readjust ring gear and pinion back-
ance. lash and check gears for possible
scoring.
REAR AXLE NOISE DIAGNOSIS tires, road surfaces, wheel bearings, engine, transmis-
sion, exhaust, propeller shaft vibration, universal joint
Most rear axle failures are relatively simple to noise or body drumming. A thorough and careful
locate and correct, although rear axle noise is a little check should be made to determine the source of the
more difficult to diagnose and make the necessary noise before any disassembly and teardown of the
repairs. The most essential part of the rear axle serv- rear axle is attempted.
ice is proper diagnosis of the problem. The complete isolation of noise in any one unit re-
All rear axles are noisy to a certain degree. Gear quires considerable skill and previous experience.
noise is usually associated with older axles, but this Eliminating certain type noises often baffle even the
is not always true. New axles can also be noisy if they most experienced personnel. Often such practices as
are not properly adjusted or lack lubrication. Usually raising tire pressures to eliminate tire noise, listening
when new improperly set gears are noisy; the disturb- for the noise at varying speeds under different load
ing noise cannot be “adjusted out” once the gears are conditions such as; drive, float and coast, and under
broken in. Recent experience has shown that axle certain highway conditions, turning the steering wheel
gears can often be readjusted to reduce excessive gear from left to right to detect wheel bearing noise, will
noise, if they have been operated at normal break-in aid even the beginner in detecting certain alleged axle
speeds for less than 500 miles. Regardless of what noises. Axle noises normally fall into two categories:
you’ve heard to the contrary, noisy gears will not get gear noise and bearing noise.
quieter with added mileage . . . they will stay the To make a good diagnostic check for rear axle noise
same or get worse. a thorough road test is necessary. Select a level smooth
Slight axle noise heard only a certain speeds or blacktop or asphalt road. This will reduce tire noise
under remote conditions must be considered normal. and body drumming. Drive the car far enough to
Axle noise tends to “peak” at varying speeds and the thoroughly warm up the axle to normal operating
noise is in no way indicative of trouble in the axle. temperature.
If axle noise is present in an objectionable form, Drive the car and note speed at which noise occurs.
loud or at all speeds, an effort should be made to Then stop car and, with clutch disengaged or auto-
isolate the noise as being in one particular unit of the matic transmission in neutral, run engine slowly up
vehicle. Many noises, reported as coming from the rear and down through engine speeds, corresponding to
axle actually originate from other sources such as car speed at which noise was most pronounced, to de-

MyMopar.com
n REAR AXLE 3-3

termine if it is caused by exhaust roar, or other engine GEAR NOISE


conditions. Repeat, while engaging and disengaging
clutch (transmission in neutral), to determine if noise Abnormal gear noise can be recognized easily be-
can only be isolated by removing propeller shaft and cause it produces a cycling tone and will be very
operating transmission in high). pronounced through the speed range in which it oc-
curs. Gear noise may be developed under one or more
TIRE NOISE of the following conditions, “drive”, “road load”,
“float” or “coast”. Gear noise usually tends to peak in
Tire noise is often mistaken for rear axle noise even a narrow speed range or ranges. Gear noise is more
though the noisy tires may be located on the front prominent between 30 to 40 mph and 50 to 60 mph.
wheels. Tires that are unbalanced or worn unevenly Abnormal gear noise is quite rare and if present it
or have surfaces of non-skid type design, or worn in a usually originates from scoring of the ring and drive
saw tooth fashion are usually noisy and often produce pinion gear as a result of insufficient or improper
noises that seem to originate in the rear axle. lubrication of the axle assembly. The differential side
Tire noise changes with different road surfaces, but gears and pinions very seldom cause trouble as they
rear axle noise does not. Inflate all tires to approxi- are only under loads when the rear wheels travel at
mately 50 pounds pressure (for test purposes only). different speeds; such as when turning corners.
This will materially alter noise caused by tires, but When objectionable axle noise is heard, note the
will not affect noise caused by rear axle. Rear axle driving condition and speed range. Remove the hous-
noise usually ceases when coasting at speeds under ing cover on the 7-1/4” and 9-3/4” axles or remove
30 miles per hour; however, tire noise continues but the differential and carrier from the axle housing on
with lower tone, as car speed is reduced. Rear axle the 8-3/4” axle. Perform a tooth contact pattern check
noise usually changes when comparing drive and to determine if the best possible pattern has been ob-
coast, but tire noise remains about the same. tained. If pattern is found to be unacceptable, reshim
Distinguish between tire noise and differential noise and adjust to obtain the best possible tooth pattern.
by noting if noise varies with various speeds or sudden If after readjustment noise still persists, replace with
acceleration and deceleration; exhaust and axle noise new gear set.
show variations under these conditions while tire noise
remains constant and is more pronounced at speeds of PR E-DISASSEMBLY INVESTlGAT10 N
20 to 30 miles per hour. Further check for tire noise
by driving car over smooth pavements or dirt roads A close examination of the rear axle assembly prior
(not gravel) with tires at normal pressure. If noise is to disassembly can often reveal valuable information
caused by tires, it will noticeably change or disappear as to the extent and type of repairs or adjustments
and reappear with changes in road surface. necessary. This information coupled with the road
test results will provide a basis for determining the
FRONT WHEEL BEARING NOISE degree of disassembly required. Since the most fre-
quent causes of axle noise are improper backlash or
Loose or rough front wheel bearings will cause noise differential bearing preload, or both a few simple ad-
which may be confused with rear axle noises; however, justments may be all that is necessary to correct the
front wheel bearing noise does not change when com- complaint .
paring drive and coast. Light application of brake Therefore, before disassembly the following checks
while holding car speed steady will often cause wheel should be made; drive gear and pinion backlash,
bearing noise to diminish, as this takes some weight pinion bearing preload, and tooth contact pattern and
off the bearing. Front wheel bearings may be easily these results recorded and analyzed. It is felt that
checked for noise by jacking up the wheels and spin- these measurements and their results will aid you in
ning them, also by shaking wheels to determine if making the necessary repairs to the axle assembly.
bearings are loose.
Rear suspension rubber bushings and spring insula- BEARING NOISE (DRIVE PINION AND
tors help to dampen out rear axle noise when properly DIFFER ENTIAL)
and correctly installed. Check to see that no metallic
interference exists between the springs and springs Defective or damaged bearings generally produce a
hangers, shackles or “U” bolts. Metal to metal contact rough growl or grating sound, that is constant in pitch
at these points may result in telegraphing road noise and varies with the speed of the vehicle. This fact will
and normal axle noise which would not be objection- allow you to diagnose between bearing noise and gear
able if properly installed and tightened to specifica- noise.
tions. Drive pinion bearing noise resulting from defective

MyMopar.com
3-4 REAR AXLE 0

or damaged bearings can usually be identified by a must be reset to original settings upon reinstallation.
constant rough sound. Front pinion bearing noise is
usually most pronounced on “coast”, whereby rear BACKLASH CLUNK
pinion bearing is loudest on “drive”. Pinion bearings Excessive clunk on acceleration and deceleration
are rotating at a higher rate of speed than the differ- can be caused by anyone of the following items or a
ential side bearings or the axle shaft bearings. These combination; (excessive clearance between) (1)Differ-
particular noises can be picked up best by road test- ential pinion shaft to differential case, (2) Axle shaft
ing the vehicle in question on a smooth road (black to differential side gear splines, (3) Differential side
top). However, extreme caution should be taken not gear hub to differential case counterbore, (4) Differen-
to confuse tire noise with bearing or gear noise. If tial side gear to pinion, (5) Worn thrust washers, (6)
doubt should exist tire treads should be examined for Drive gear backlash. Measure and inspect components
irregularities that will often produce such noise. and replace as required and/or adjust to proper speci-
Differential bearing noise will usually produce a fications.
constant rough tone which is much slower than the
noise caused by the pinion bearings. ENGINE AND TRANSMISSION NOISE
Sometimes noises which seem to originate in the
REAR WHEEL BEARING NOISE rear axle are actually that of the engine or transmis-
Defective or damaged rear wheel bearings produce sion. To diagnose which unit is actually causing the
a vibration or growl which continues with car coasting noise, observe the approximate vehicle speed and con-
and transmission in neutral. A brinneled rear wheel ditions under which the noise is most pronounced; stop
bearing causes a whirring noise. Spalled rear wheel the vehicle in a quiet place to avoid any interfering
bearings normally produce a noise similiar to a growl, noises. With engine running and transmission in neu-
created from either flaked or pitted rollers or bearing tral, run engine slowly up and down through engine
races. Unless the damage is severe, rear axle bearing speeds corresponding to approximate car speed at
noise is seldom heard above 30 mph. which the noise was most pronounced. If a noise simi-
To differentiate between wheel bearings and gear lar is produced in this manner it usually can be as-
noise, road test the vehicle on a smooth road (black- sumed that the noise was caused by the engine or
top) at medium and low speed. With traffic permitting, transmission and not that of the rear axle.
swerve the vehicle sharply right to left. If the noise in
question is caused by wheel bearings, it will usually PROPELLER SHAFT VIBRATION
increase when the vehicle is swerved and will probably Objectionable vibrations at high speed (65 MPH or
be coming from the bearing on the loaded side. If the higher) may be caused by a propeller shaft that is out
noise in question cannot be isolated an inspection of of balance or worn universal joints. Out of balance
bearings will be necessary. may be due to a damaged or bent shaft.
To determine whether propeller shaft is causing
KNOCK AT LOW SPEEDS the vibration in question; road test the vehicle through
Low speed knock is usually caused by brinneled speed range and note speed at which vibration is most
universal joints or differential side gear hub to coun- pronounced. Shift transmission into lower gear range
terbore clearance being too great. Inspect and replace and drive car at same engine speed as when vibration
universal joint or differential case and side gear as was most pronounced in direct drive and note any
required. effect on vibration.
If the vibration is still present at the same engine
DRIVE-LINE SNAP speed, whether in direct drive or in the lower gear,
A snap on a sudden start, either forward or reverse, since the propeller shaft speed varies, this cannot be
may be caused by a loose companion flange. Remove the fault. If the vibration decreases or is eliminated
the flange and reinstall 180 degrees from original posi- in the lower gear, then propeller shaft is at fault and
tion. Pinion bearing preload and pinion nut torque should be rebalanced or replaced.

REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY 7%” R I N G GEAR


INDEX
Page Page
Axle Shafts and Bearings ...................... 5 Pinion Installation and Bearing Preload ........ 10
Differential ................................... 7 Rear Axle Assembly ............................ 6
Drive Gear and Pinion Backlash ................ 12 Removal .................................... 6
Drive Pinion Depth of Mesh .................... 10 Installation ................................. 13
Pinion Bearing Cup Installation ................ 10 Lubrication .................................. 14

MyMopar.com
c REAR AXLE 3-5
GENERAL INFORMATION
The 7-1/4” Rear Axle Assembly shown in (Fig. l), axle. Refer to the Sure Grip Differential Section of the
is a semi-floating type which incorporates a unitized Axle Group for the Servicing procedure.
rear axle housing assembly. The drive pinion and the A hooded breather is attached to the left leg of the
differential case with drive gear are mounted directly axle housing approximately 15” inboard of the flange
into the center section of the rear axle housing as- face. Gear ratio identification is stamped on the front
sembly. Access to the differential, drive gears and face of the pad at the bottom of housing.
bearings is obtained by removal of the carrier cover. SHOULD THE REAR AXLE BECOME SUBMERGED
Axle shaft bearings, oil seals and drive pinion oil seal IN WATER, THE LUBRICANT MUST BE CHANGED
can be removed and serviced without removing the IMMEDIATELY TO AVOID THE POSSIBILITY OF
complete axle assembly from the vehicle, but the unit EARLY AXLE FAILURE RESULTING FROM CON-
should be removed for any additional operations. TAMINATION OF THE LUBRICANT BY WATER
A Sure Grip Differential is available in the 7-1/4” DRAWN INTO THE VENT HOLE.
Axle Assembly, similar to those used in the 8-3/4”

SERVICE PROCEDURES
AXLE SHAFTS AND BEARINGS (3) Using access hole in axle shaft flange, remove
retainer nuts.
CAUTION: It is absolutely necessary that anytime an (4) Attach axle shaft remover tool C-3725 to axle
axle assembly is serviced, and the axle shaft i s 1006 shaft flange and remove axle shaft. Remove brake
ened and removed, both brake support plate gaskets assembly (Fig. 2).
and the inner axle shaft seal must be replaced. (5) Remove axle shaft oil seal from housing.
CAUTION: Under no circumstances should axle
Removal and Disassembly shaft collars or bearings be removed using a torch.
(1) With wheels removed, remove clips holding The use of a torch in the removal of the axle shaft
brake drum on axle shaft studs and remove brake collars or bearings is an unsafe practice, becauso
drum. heat is fed into the axle shaft bearing journal and,
(2) Disconnect brake lines at wheel cylinders. thereby weakens this area.
SHAFT RETAINER
WASHER NUT
‘\ \ BEARING FLANGE I i
\ ‘! \
COLLAR
I SEAL
SEAL

CONE AND ROLLERS


\ HOOD
CUP i I

CONE AND ROLLE


COLLAR
BEARING
GEAR AND PINION RETAINER


5 \ I W’ASHER 1)
, I

\,

I
1 ‘ 4
, ,
I \! i
1
PINION
GEAR CUP

PLUG / C O V E R ’
GEAR BOLT
NY1606D
S C R E W GASKETWASHER CONE AND ROLLERS

Fig. 1-7-1 f 4** Rear Axle Assembly

MyMopar.com
3-6 REAR AXLE 0

Fig. 2-Removing Axle Shaft


(6) Position axle shaft bearing retaining collar on a
heavy vise or anvil and using a chisel cut deep
grooves into retaining collar at 90" intervals (Fig. 3).
This will enlarge bore of collar and permit it to be
driven off of axle shaft. The bearing can now be
removed using tool (2-3725and C-3926(Fig. 4).
On models equipped with 7-1/4 inch axle assembly NK391A
to remove bearing use tool C-3971 and adapter C-4000
Fig. 8-Removing Axle Shaft Bearing
and protective sleeve over bearing race. Tool must be
installed with two bolts (Fig. 5) on each side of the seal and engage splines in differential side gear. .
hole in axle shaft flange. (6) Tap end of axle shaft lightly with a non-metal-
lic mallet to position axle shaft bearing in housing
Assembly and lnstallation bearing bore. Position retainer plate over axle hous-
(1) Install axle shaft retainer plate, bearing, and ing studs. Install retainer nuts and tighten 35 foot-
bearing retainer collar on axle shaft. The axle shaft pounds.
bearing and bearing retainer collar must fit tightly on
bearing journal of axle shaft. Using tool C-3725 and
C-3926 press them into place by tightening bolts in REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY
tool alternately (Fig. 6) Models equipped with 7-1/4
inch axle, install bearings and retainer collars using
Removal
Should it become necessary to remove rear axle
Tool C-3971 and adapter C-4000.
assembly for overhaul or repair, proceed as follows:
(2)Install new axle shaft oil seals in axle housing, (1) Raise rear of vehicle until rear wheels clear
using tool C-3734(Fig. 7). floor. Support body at front of rear springs.
(3)Apply a light film of Multi-purpose Lubricant (2)Block brake pedal in the up position using a
NLGI grade 2 EP or equivalent on outside diameter of wooden block.
bearing to prevent rust and corrosion. (3)Remove rear wheels.
(4) Install a foam gasket on studs of axle housing
(4) Disconnect hydraulic flexible line.
and position brakes support plate assembly on axle (5) Disconnect parking brake cable.
housing studs, followed by outer gasket.
(5) Carefully slide axle shaft assembly through oil

NK365

Fig. 3-Removing Axle Shaft Collar Fig. 5-1001 C-3725 Installed on Axle Shaft

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-7

-3926

C-3725

NK366
NY 1038
Fig. 6-Installing Rear Axle Shaft Bearing Fig. 8-Measuring Drive Gear Runout
To maintain proper drive line balance when reas- THERE SHOULD BE NO SIDE PLAY.
sembling, make scribe marks on the propeller shaft (4)In preparing to measure drive gear runout on
universal joint and the pinion flange before removal. differential case, (provided no side play was found)
(6) Disconnect propeller shaft at differential pinion mount a dial indicator tool C-3339 on pilot stud C-
yoke and secure in an upright position to prevent 3288, and load the indicator stem slightly when
damage to front universal joint. plunger is at right angles to back face of drive gear
(7) Remove shock absorber from spring plate studs (Fig. 8).
and loosen rear spring “U” bolt nuts and remove “U” (5) Measure drive gear runout by turning drive
bolts. gear several complete revolutions and reading dial
(8)Remove axle assembly from vehicle. indicator. Mark drive gear and differential case at
point of maximum runout. The marking of differential
DIFFERENTlAL case will be very useful later in checking differential
case runout. Total indicator reading should be no
Removal and Disassembly more than .005 inch. If runout exceeds .005 inch the
Side play and runout checks taken during disas- differential case may be damaged. A test for case
sembly will be very useful in reassembly. runout will be described later.
(1) Remove drain plug in cover assembly and (6) Remove drive pinion nut and washer. Using
drain lubricant from housing. Tool C-452 and holding Tool C-3281,remove drive
(2) Remove cover and with a suitable cleaning sol- pinion flange (Fig. 9).
vent, clean inside the axle housing and differential (7) Using Tool C-748 remove drive pinion oil seal
case and drive gear assembly. (Fig. 10). Remove front pinion bearing cone and pre-
(3) Measure for differential side play. Position a load shim.
screwdriver or pinch bar between left side of axle
housing and differential case flange, then using a t T03LS
prying motion determine if side play is present.

YOKE
TOOL
NY IO23 NY1037

Fig. 7-Installing Axle Shaft Oil Seal Fig. 9-Removing Companion Flange

MyMopar.com
3-8 REAR AXLE c\

NY1036 ~ ~ 1 0 3 4
Fig. IO-Removing Pinion Oil Seal Fig. I 2-Spreading Rear Axle Housing
(8)Mark axle housing and differential bearing (14) Using a flat end brass drift, remove front and
caps for location in reassembly (Fig. 11). rear bearing cups from housing.
(9) Remove differential bearing caps and locate (15) Mount differential case and ring gear assem-
spreader Tool C-3721 with tool dowel pins seated bly in a vise equipped with soft jaws (brass).
in locating holes of axle housing. Turn tool screw (16)Remove drive gear bolts. BOLTS ARE LEFT
finger tight at this time. HAND THREAD. With a non-metallic hammer tap
(10) Install pilot stud, Tool C-3288,on left side of drive gear loose from differential case pilot and
axle housing. Attach dial indicator and load indicator remove.
stem slightly against opposite side of axle housing (17)If a drive gear runout exceeded .005 inch in
(Fig. 12). step 4, differential case flange runout should be re-
(11) Tighten spreader tool nut sufficiently to obtain measured. Install differential case with appropriate
.012 to .015 inch movement of dial indicator to per- bearing cups and shims in axle housing. Loosen nut
mit removal of differential case assembly. (Do not of spreader tool and remove, mount dial indicator in
spread over .020inch.) contact with drive gear flange face to take runout
(12)Remove dial indicator and remove differential readings as in steps 3, 4 and 5. Total allowable run-
and ring gear assembly from axle housing. A light out should not exceed .003 inch. It is often possible to
prying action must be used to unseat the differential reduce high runout by positioning drive gear 180"
assembly from the housing (Fig. 13). Differential from point of maximum runout when re-assembling
bearing cups and preload adjusting spacers must be ring gear on differential case.
kept with respective bearing cones. Do not remove (18)With small drift remove differential pinion
spreader tool. shaft lock pin from drive gear side of case.
(13)Remove drive pinion and rear bearing assem- (19) With a brass drift remove differential pinion
bly from axle housing. shaft.

PUNCH MARKS

Fig. I I-Bearing Cap Identification Fig. 13-Loosening Differential Assembly

MyMopar.com
n REAR AXLE 3-9
(20) Rotate differential side gears until differential
pinions appear at differential case windows and re-
move.
(21) Remove differential side gears and thrust
washers.
(22) Remove differential bearings using Tool C-293
and #44 plates (Fig. 14).
(23) Remove rear pinion bearing cone from pinion
stem using Tool C-293 and #40 plates (Fig. 15).

Cleaning and Inspection


(1) Clean all parts except axle shaft bearings with
a suitable cleaning solvent. With oil dampened cloth
wipe axle shaft bearing outer race. Clean off all rust
and corrosion. To clean axle housing tubes insert a
stiff wire into tube, attach a clean cloth to wire at Fig. I5-Removing Rear Pinion Bearing Cone
center section and withdraw from center outward. bearing cone and cup assemblies should have a
(2) All machined contact surfaces in the axle hous- smooth appearance with no broken or dented sur-
ing and differential bearing caps should be smooth faces on rollers or roller contact surfaces. The bearing
and free of any raised edges. Front and rear pinion roller retainer cages must not be distorted or cracked.
bearing cup bore machined surfaces should be (7) Differential side gears and pinions should have
smooth. Raised metal on shoulders of bores incurred smooth teeth with a uniform contact pattern without
in removal of cups should be flattened by use of a excessive wear or broken surfaces. The differential
flat nosed punch. side gear hub surfaces and thrust washer contact sur-
(3) The axle drive shaft bearing and oil seal bores faces should be smooth and free from any scoring or
at both ends of housing should be smooth and free of metal pickup.
rust and corrosion. This also applies to the brake sup- (8) The machined thrust washer surface areas in-
port plate and housing flange face area. side the differential case should be polished and with
(4) The axle shaft splines should be smooth and no surface imperfections. The pinion shaft bore in
free of excessive wear. The axle shaft oil seal journal differential case should be round and smooth. The
should be smooth and free of nicks, scratches or differential pinion shaft should be round and without
blemishes. To remove any imperfections polish with excessive wear in areas of contact with either differ-
#600 crocus cloth (without reducing diameter of axle ential case or differential pinions.
shaft oil seal surface). (9) The ring gear and drive pinion teeth should
(5) If axle shaft bearings, collars and retainers are have a uniform contact pattern with smooth and un-
removed from shafts they are unfit for further use broken surfaces without excessive wear. Machined
and MUST BE REPLACED. Refer to axle shaft assem- surfaces of the pinion stem (at points of contact with
bly procedure. either rear pinion bearing contact journal or rear pin-
(6) Differential bearings and front and rear pinion ion bearing mounting shim surface) should be smooth.
TOOL
Assembling the Differential
Lubricate all parts when assembling and adjusting.
(1) Install thrust washers on differential side gears
and position gears in case.
(2) Place thrust washers on both differential pinion
gears and mesh the pinion gears with the side gears,
having pinion gears exactly 180" apart.
(3) Rotate side gears to align pinion gears and
washers with differential pinion shaft holes in case.
(4) Install differential pinion shaft with care not to
damage thrust washers. Hole in pinion shaft must
align with lock pin hole in differential case.
(5) Install lock pin in differential case from drive
gear tooth side.
(6) Position drive gear on differential case to sepa-
Fig. I 4-Removing Differential Bearing Cone rate the points of maximum runout 180" apart and

MyMopar.com
3-10 REAR AXLE 0

start all bolts through case into drive gear. Finger


tighten. (LEFT HAND THREAD.)
(7) Tap drive gear against differential case flange
with non-metallic mallet. Tighten bolts to 55 foot-
:ROSS
MAIN TOOL
BORE ARBOR \ WASHER^^^
CENTRALIZING

'
.&
/
OMPRESSION
pounds. NUT
(8)Install differential bearing cones with Tool COMPRESSION
C-4107 (Fig. 16). SLEEVE
CENTRALIZING
PINION BEARING CUP INSTALLATION SLEEVE

Rear axle gauge Tool (2-3715is used to install drive


pinion bearing cups as well as to determine pinion
NY1028
depth of mesh (Fig. 17).
(1)Start both drive pinion bearing cups into axle Fig. 17-Pinion Setting Gauge Tool C-37 15
housing. (3) Select rear pinion bearing mounting shim
(2) Place rear spacer SP-3244 on main tool. Seat which will fit between cross bore arbor and gauge
rear pinion bearing cone on spacer and hold tool in block. This fit must be snug but not too tight (similar
housing. to the pull of a feeler gauge) (Fig. 18).
(3) Place centralizing sleeve SP-3245 on tool and If the mark on the pinion head is plus (+2), select
place front pinion bearing cone on centralizing sleeve, a shim that many thousandths thinner for installation.
followed by tool sleeve, centralizing washer and nut. If mark on pinion has a minus (-2), select a shim
(4)While holding compression sleeve from turning that many thousandths thicker for installation. Treat
with Tool C-3281,tighten nut, thereby drawing pin- other pinion markings in a similar manner. Spacers
ion bearing cups into axle housing bearing cup bores. are available in one thousandths of an inch incre-
Permit tool to turn several revolutions during tighten- ments from .084to .lo0inch.
ing operation to permit bearing rollers to align. Leave (4) Remove tool arbor and tool from axle housing.
tool in carrier for determining depth of mesh.
PINION INSTALLATION AND BEARING
DRIVE PINION DEPTH OF MESH PRELOAD
(Using Tool C-3715)
Pinion bearing mounting shims are chamfered on
(1)With main tool left in axle housing after install- one side and must be installed on the pinion stem
ing drive pinion bearing cups, loosen tool nut and with chamfered side toward pinion head.
re-tighten to produce 15-25 inch-pounds of turning (1)Place selected shim and rear pinion bearing
torque. Attach gauge block to main tool using allen cone on pinion stem. Using installing sleeve Tool C-
screw. 3717,press bearing on pinion stem (Fig. 19).
(2) Position cross bore arbor in axle housing dif- (2) Hold drive pinion and bearing assembly in axle
ferential bearing seats and install bearing caps. housing and install original preload shim (chamfered
Tighten cap bolts lightly.
-
side toward shoulder), followed by front pinion bear-

TOOL-! 1

SPACER (SELECTIVE) NY 1027


- N Y 1030
Fig. 18-Measuring Housing For Pinion Shim
Fig. 16--lnstalling Differential Bearing Cone Thickness

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-11

TOOL J NY1024
Fig. 2 I-Installing Companion Flange
upright position. Correct preload is 15-25 inch-
pounds. Bearing preload should be uniform during
Fig. 19-Installing Pinion Shim and Rear Bearing
Cone
full revolution. A reading which varies during rota-
tion indicates a binding condition which should be
ing cone, pinion flange, belleville washer (convex corrected. Use thinner shim to increase preload and
side of washer up) and pinion nut. thicker shim to decrease preload. Always perform
(3) Position housing with nose up. Tighten pinion steps 3 and 4 in exactly the same manner each time
nut to 240 foot-pounds (minimum) with torque
to obtain accurate readings. Preload shims are avail-
wrench C-4053,using holding Tool C-3281 on pinion
flange. Position holding Tool (2-3281in several posi- able in one thousandths of an inch increments from
tions to make a complete revolution while tightening. .074to .lo6inch.
Remove holding tool and rotate pinion assembly sev- (5)When front pinion bearing preload is correct,
eral revolutions in both directions to align rollers. remove pinion nut, washer and flange.
Recheck torque to 240 foot-pounds. Torque may have (6)Apply a light coat of sealer in drive pinion oil
diminished as bearing rollers were aligned by seal bore of axle housing.
rotating. (7) Install drive pinion oil seal (lip toward pinion
(4)Using inch pound torque wrench C-685,meas- head) with Tool C-4002 (double lip synthetic rubber
ure pinion bearing preload by rotating pinion with oil seal) or Tool C-3719 (single lip leather oil seal).
handle of wrench floating. Take readings while han- The proper tool must be used in order to position the
dle is moving through several revolutions. Accurate seal the proper depth into the housing (Fig. 20).
readings can be made only with nose of axle in (8)Install drive pinion flange using Tool C-496
and holding Tool C-3281(Fig. 21).
(9)Remove Tool C-3718 and install belleville
washer, (convex side of washer up) and pinion nut.

.254" SPArcn

\
-
Tighten nut to 240 foot-pounds.

Fig. 20-Installing Pinion Oil Seal Fig. 22-Temporarily Install Thinnest Spacer

MyMopar.com
3-12 REAR AXLE 9

SURE BACKLASH

*”I””

Fig. 23-Feeler Gauges Measuring Thickness


Fig. 24-Determining Minimum Backlash
DRIVE GEAR AND PINION BACKLASH (10)Tighten spreader tool nut sufficiently to obtain
.012” to .015” movement of dial indicator to permit
(1)With drive pinion and bearings installed and installation of differential case assembly. Do not
bearing preload set, install differential case and ring spread over .020inch.
gear assembly, and cups. Insert a .254 inch preload (11)Remove dial indicator.
adjusting spacer on ring gear side (Fig. 22) of axle (12)Holding differential assembly with bearing
housing. Do not install bearing caps. cups on respective bearing and selected preload
(2)Install a preload spacer on right side of housing
spacers, carefully install differential and ring gear
that will fit snugly but still leave a slight amount of
assembly into axle housing.
end play.
(3)To measure, move differential to the left side (13)Loosen spreader tool nut and remove spread-
or ring gear side of rear axle housing. Using two sets er.
of feeler gauges, insert feeler gauges between the (14)Install differential bearing caps on respective
spacer and the right side of the axle housing above sides and alternate tightening bolts to 40 foot-
the center line of the case (Fig. 23). Insert the same pounds.
thickness of feeler gauges between the spacer and (15)Install dial indicator to axle housing with indi-
the axle housing below center line of case. Increase cator parallel to drive gear. With pointer of indicator
thickness of gauges until heavy drag is felt. contacting the drive side of ring gear tooth, measure
(4)Rotate differential and ring gear assembly sev- drive gear backlash. At least four readings should be
eral times in both directions to seat bearings and cups taken on teeth approximately 90” apart to find the
and recheck feeler gauge drag. point of least backlash, and mark the tooth.
(5) Install a spacer totaling the combined thickness (16)At point of minimum backlash, dial indicator
of spacer and feeler gauge. This w i l l provide zero should read .004 to .007inch. If reading is not within
end play. this tolerance, it will be necessary to refer to chart
(6) Measure drive gear backlash at 4 positions at and Install Differential Spacers and re-check backlash
approximately 90 degrees intervals (Fig. 24). Refer to to bring within proper specifications.
“Differential Preload Spacer Chart” for selection of
(17)Apply a thin film of red or white lead on both
proper spacers to provide .004” to .007” backlash.
(7)Remove differential case and ring gear assem- the drive and coast side of the drive gear teeth. Ro-
bly from axle housing. tate drive gear one complete revolution in both direc-
(8)With proper spacers selected for left and right tions while prying with a round bar or screwdriver
sides of assembly as specified by “Differential Pre- between the casting and differential case flange. This
load Spacer Chart”, attach spreader Tool C-3721with action creates a load and produces a distinct tooth
tool dowel pins seated in locating holes of axle hous- contact pattern on the drive gear teeth.
ing. Tighten tool screw only finger tight at this time. (18)Observe the contact pattern on the drive gear
(9) Install pilot stud Tool C-3288 on left side of teeth and compare with those in (Fig. 25) to deter-
axle housing. Attach dial indicator and load indicator mine if pattern is properly located. If pinion depth
stem slightly against opposite side of axle housing of mesh and gear backlash are correct, the heaviest
(Fig. 12). most distinct part of contact pattern should be cen-

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-13

DIFFERENTIAL PRELOAD SPACER SELECTION CHART


Backlash Change left Change Right Backlash Change Left Change Right
at Zero Spacer Thickness Spacer Thickness at Zero Spacer Thickness Spacer Thickness
End Play by: by : End Play by: by:
,020 + .026 -.016 .010 +.012 -.002
.019 +.024 -.014 .009 +.010 -.Ooo
+.002
.018 +.022 - .012 .008 +.008
.017 +.022 -.012 .007 + .008 +.002
+.004
.016 + .020 - .010 .006 +.006
.015 + .020 -.010 .005 +.004 +.006
.014 +.018 -.008 .004 +.002 +.008
.013 + .016 - .006 .003 +.002 +.008
.012 + .014 -.004 .002 +.Ooo +.010
.011 +.014 -.004 .001 +.Ooo +.012
Should the zero end play backlash measure more than .020(Maximum chart figure) increase the thickness of
the left spacer from the specified .254” to a thickness great enough to reduce the zero end play backlash within
the chart limits; then follow the recommended procedure.
tered on both drive and coast sides of the drive gear clean, install cover with new gasket on housing and
teeth. insert cover bolts and tighten to 20 foot-pounds.
If your tooth contact resembles that in (Fig. 26),
the drive pinion is too far away from centerline of REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY
the ring gear, the contact pattern will appear high on
the heel on drive side and high on toe on coast side. installation
To correct this type tooth contact pattern, increase Refer to Paragraph “Axle Shaft Assembly“ when
the thickness of the rear pinion bearing mounting installing the rear axle shafts.
spacer (Fig. 27), which will cause the high heel con- (1) With body supported at front of rear spring,
tact on drive side to lower and move toward the toe; position rear axle assembly spring seats over the
the high toe contact on coast side will lower and move spring center bolts.
toward the heel. (2) Install spring “U” bolts and tighten nuts to 45
If the tooth contact pattern resembles that in (Fig. foot-pounds and install shock absorbers on spring
28), the drive pinion is too close to the ring gear, the plate studs.
pattern will appear low on the toe on drive side and (3) Connect hand brake cable.
low heel contact on the coast side. To correct this (4) Install propeller shaft (match scribe marks on
type tooth contact pattern, decrease the thickness of propeller shaft universal joint and pinion flange).
the rear pinion bearing mounting spacer (Fig. 29), Tighten clamp screws to 15 foot-pounds.
which will cause the low toe contact on drive side to (5) Connect brake lines to rear wheel cylinders and
raise and move toward the heel; low heel contact on connect hydraulic flexible line and bleed wheel cyl-
coast side will raise and move toward the toe. inder.
(19) When correct tooth contact pattern is ob- (6) Install brake drums, and rear wheels and tight-
tained, and cover and gasket surface is thoroughly en to 55 foot-pounds and adjust brakes.

PATTERN CLOSE TO CENTER THICKER SPACER NEEDED

v_

HEEL END-DRIV? HEEL ENDICOAST HEEL END-DRIVE HEEL END-COAST


SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NR198 SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NR’99

Fig. 25-Desired Tooth Contact Pattern Fig. 26-Incorrect Tooth Contact Pattern
Under Light Load (Increase Spacer Thickness)

MyMopar.com
3-14 REAR AXLE 0

PATTERN MOVES TOWARD CENTER


AND D O W N PATTERN MOVES INWARD AND UP

HEEL END- DRIVE HEEL E N D ~ C O A S T HEEL END-DRIVE HEEL END-COAST


SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NR200 SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NRB2

Fig. 27-Effect on Tooth Contact Pattern a s Spacer Fig. 29-Effect on Tooth Contact Pattern a s Spacer
Thickness is Increased Thickness is Decreased
Chrysler Hypoid Lubricant part number 2933565 is an
THINNER SPACER NEEDED oil of this type and is recommended or an equivalent
A TOE n be used.
In Sure-Grip axles on all 1970 Vehicles it is recom-
mended that only Chrysler Hypoid Lubricant part
number 2933565 or an equivalent be used. This lubri-
cant, recommended for conventional differentials too,
contains special. additives to provide proper differen-
tial durability and performance
Anticipated Temperature Viscosity Grade
Above -10°F. SAE 90
HEEL END-DRIVE HEEL END-COAST As low as -3OOF. SAE 80
SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NR201 Below -30°F. SA€ 75
Fig. 2 8 - k o r r e c t Tooth Contact Pattern ”SHOULD THE REAR AXLE BECOME SUBMERGED
(Decrease Spacer Thickness) IN WATER, THE LUBRICANT MUST BE CHANGED
IMMEDIATELY TO AVOID THE POSSIBILITY OF
LUBR ICAT10 N EARLY AXLE FAILURE RESULTING FROM CON-
Refill axle assembly with Multipurpose Gear Lubri- TAMINATION OF THE LUBRICANT BY WATER
cant, as defined by MILL-2105B (API GL5) should be DRAWN INTO THE VENT HOLE.”
used in all rear axles with conventional differentials;

REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY 8%” R I N G GEAR


INDEX
Page Page
Axle Shafts and Bearings ...................... 15 Pinion Bearing Preload and Pinion
Axle Shaft End Play ........................... 18 Setting Using Tool C-758-D-4 ................. 23
Differential and Carrier (Removal) .............. 19 Small Stem Step Pinion ..................... 24
Differential and Carrier (Installation) ............ 30 Large Stem Step Pinion ...................... 25
Differential Case .............................. 20 Large Stem Pinion With Collapsible Spacer .... 27
Drive Gear and Pinion Backlash ................ 29 Pinion Bearing Preload and Pinion
Gear Tooth Contact Pattern .................... 30 Setting Without Using Tool C-758-D4 .......... 28
Lubrication ................................... 31 Rear Axle Housing ............................ 18
Pinion Bearing Cup Installation ................ 23 Removal and Replacement of Drive Pinion
Flange and Oil Seal in Vehicle ................ 31

GENERAL INFORMATION
The 8-3/4” Rear Axle Assembly shown in (Fig. l),is with carrier, and the axle housing. Servicing of the
a semi-floating type and may be divided into four sub- above mentioned subassemblies, with exception of the
assemblies; flanged axle drive shafts with related axle housing may be performed without removing the
parts (Fig. 2.) differential with drive gear, drive pinion complete rear axle assembly from the vehicle.

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-15
Gear ratio identification numbers will be stamped A new Sure-Grip Differential is available as optional
on a metal tag and attached by means of the rear equipment in both the 7-1/4” and 8-3/4” rear axle
axle housing-to-carrierbolt. assembly. The Sure-Grip Differential is of a two
Some 8-3/4”large stem differential and carrier as- piece construction similar to the old type and is com-
semblies have incorporated a collapsible spacer which pletely interchangeable with the previous type and
bears against the inner races of the front and rear will be serviced as a complete assembly only. Refer
bearing. This collapsible spacer is used to establish to the “Sure Grip Differential” Section of the Axle
preload on the pinion bearings. Group for the servicing procedure.
Adjustment of pinion depth of mesh is obtained by SHOULD THE REAR AXLE BECOME SUBMERGED
placing a machined shim between the pinion head and IN WATER, THE LUBRICANT MUST BE CHANGED
the rear bearing cone. IMMEDIATELY TO AVOID THE POSSIBILITY OF
The differential bearings are larger on both the con- EARLY AXLE FAILURE RESULTING FROM CON-
ventional and Sure-Grip Differentials and are not in- TAMINATION OF THE LUBRICANT BY WATER
terchangeable with previous years bearings. DRAWN INTO THE VENT.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
AXLE SHAFTS AND BEARINGS retainer plate will have a lock under one of the studs
that should be removed at this time.
CAUTION: It is absolutely necessary that anytime an (3)Remove parking brake strut.
axle assembly is serviced, and the axle shafts are (4) Attach axle shaft remover Tool C-3971 (Fig. 3)
loosened and removed, the axle shaft gaskets and to axle shaft flange and remove axle shaft. Remove
inner axle shaft oil seals must be replaced. brake assembly and gaskets.
(5) Remove axle shaft oil seal from axle housing
Removal using Tool (2-637(Fig. 4).
(1) With wheels removed, remove clips holding (6) Wipe axle housing seal bore clean and install a
brake drum on axle shaft studs and remove brake new axle shaft oil seal using Tool C-839(Fig. 5).
drum.
(2) Using access hole in axle shaft flange, remove Disassembly
retainer nuts, the right shaft with threaded adjuster in CAUTION: To prevent the possibility of damaging

I ADJUSTER ,OIL SEAL

BUMPER
GASKET
HOUSING /COLLAR

RETAINER‘ NK967B
Fig. 1-8-3/4‘8 Rear Axle Assembly

MyMopar.com
3-16 REAR AXLE 0

=
,, LOCK SEAL BEARING
NK59A
-
Fig. 2-Axle Shaft Disassembled NK56
axle shaft seal surface, slide protective sleeve SP-5041
Fig. 4-Removing Axle Shaft Oil Seal
over the seal surface next to bearing collar.
CAUTION: Under no circumstances should axle shaft
collars or bearings be removed using a torch. The
use of a torch in the removal of the axle shaft collars
or bearings is an unsafe practice, because heat is fed
into the axle shaft bearing journal and, thereby weak-
ens this area.
(1) Position axle shaft bearing retaining collar on a
heavy vise or anvil and using a chisel, cut deep
grooves into retaining collar at 90" intervals (Fig. 6).
This will enlarge bore of collar and permit it to be
driven off of axle shaft.
(2) Remove bearing roller retainer flange by
cutting off lower edge with a chisel (Fig. 7).
(3) Grind a section off flange of inner bearing NK57
cone (Fig. 8) and remove bearing rollers (Fig. 9).
(4) Pull bearing roller retainer down as far as pos- Fig. 5-Installing Axle Shaft Oil Seal
sible and cut with a pair of side cutters and remove CAUTION: Sleeve SP-5041 should not be umd as a
(Fig. 10). protector for the seal journal when pressing off the
(5) Remove roller bearing cup and protective bearing cone, as it was not designed for this purpose.
sleeve SP-5041from axle shaft. (6) To avoid scuffing seal journal when bearing
cone is being removed, it should be protected by
BLOCKS BEARING ADAPTER
REMOVING SP- single wrap of .002 thickness shimstock held in place
by a rubber band (Fig. 11).
(7) Remove the bearing cone using Tool C-3971

SLEEVE RING-BLOCK
SP-5041 HOLDING SP-5017 NK360A

Fig. 3-1001 Set C-397t Fig. 6-Notching Bearing Retainer Collar

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-17

SLEEVE

Fig. 7-Removing Roller Retainer Fig. 1 O-Cutting Out Roller Bearing Retainer

/“-.002 SHIM STOCK

Fig. 8-Flange Ground Off Inner Cone Fig. 1 1 -Seal Journal Protection
(Fig. 3). Tighten bolts of tool alternately until cone is shaft.
removed (Fig. 12). (2) Lubricate wheel bearings with Multi-Purpose
( 8 ) Remove seal in bearing retainer plate and re- Grease NLGI, grade 2 E.P. or an equivalent.
place with new seal. (3) Install a new axle shaft bearing cup, cone and
collar on shaft using Tool C-3971(Fig. 13)and tighten
Assembly bolts of tool alternately until bearing and collar are
(1) Install retainer plate and seal assembly on axle seated properly.

Fig. 9-Removing Bearing Rollers Fig. 12-Removing Bearing Cone with Tool C-397 1

MyMopar.com
3-18 REAR AXLE 0

I
NK362
NK

Fig. 13-Installing New Bearing And Collar Fig. 14-Meosuring Axle Shaft End Ploy
(4) Inspect axle shaft seal journal for scratches and TERCLOCKWISE APPROXIMATELY FOUR NOTCH-
polish with #600 crocus cloth if necessary. ES TO ESTABLISH AN AXLE SHAFT END PLAY
OF .00&.018 INCH.
lnstallation (2) Tap end of left axle shaft lightly with a non-
(1) Clean axle housing flange face and brake sup- metallic mallet to seat right wheel bearing cup
port plate thoroughly. Install a new rubber asbestos against adjuster, and rotate axle shaft several revolu-
gasket on axle housing studs, followed by brake sup- tions so that a true end play reading is indicated.
port plate assembly on left side of axle housing. (3)Remove one retainer plate nut, install adjuster
(2) Apply a thin coating of Multi-Purpose Grease, lock. If tab on lock does not mate with notch in ad-
NLGI grade 2 E.P. or equivalent to the outside diam- juster, turn adjuster slightly until it does. Install nut
eter of the bearing cup prior to installing in the and tighten 30-35foot-pounds.
bearing bore. This operation is necessary as a corro- (4)Recheck axle shaft end play. If it is not within
sion preventative. the tolerance of .008-.018 inch, then repeat adjust-
(3) Install foam gasket on the studs of axle housing ment procedure.
and carefully slide axle shaft assembly through oil ( 5 ) Remove dial indicator and install brake drum,
seal and engage splines in differential side gear. drum and wheel.
(4) Tap end of axle shaft lightly with a non-
metallic mallet to position axle shaft bearing in hous- REAR AXLE HOUSING
ing bearing bore. Position retainer plate over axle
Removal
housing studs. Install retainer nuts and tighten 30-35 Should it become necessary to remove rear axle
foot-pounds. Start by tightening bottom nut. assembly for repair proceed as follows:
(5) Repeat step (1)for right side of axle housing. (1) Raise vehicle and support body at front of rear
(6) Back off threaded adjuster of right axle shaft springs.
assembly until inner face of adjuster is flush with (2) Block brake pedal in the up position using a
inner face of retainer plate. Carefully slide axle shaft wooden block.
assembly through oil seal and engage splines in dif- (3)Remove rear wheels.
ferential side gears. (4) Disconnect hydraulic brake hose at connection
(7) Repeat step (4). on left side of underbody.
(5)Disconnect parking brake cable.
AXLE SHAFT END PLAY To maintain proper drive line balance when reas-
sembling, make scribe marks on the propeller shaft
CAUTION: When setting axle shaft end play, both universal joint and the pinion flange before removal.
rear wheels must be off the ground, otherwise a false (6) Disconnect propeller shaft at differential yoke
end play setting will occur. and secure in an upright position to prevent damage
(1) Using a dial indicator mounted on the left to front universal joint.
brake support (Fig. 14), TURN THE ADJUSTER (7) Remove shock absorber from spring plate studs
CLOCKWISE UNTIL BOTH WHEEL BEARINGS ARE and loosen rear spring “U” bolt nuts and remove “U”
SEATED AND THERE IS ZERO END PLAY IN THE bolts.
AXLE SHAFTS. BACK OFF THE ADJUSTER COUN- (8) Remove the assembly from vehicle.

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-19
lnstallcrtion
(1) With body of vehicle supported at front of rear
springs, position the rear axle assembly spring seats
over the spring center bolts.
(2) Install spring “U” bolts and tighten nuts to 45
foot-pounds and install shock absorbers on spring
plate studs. (DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN “U” BOLT
NUTS.)
(3) Install propeller shaft (match scribe marks on
propeller shaft universal joint and pinion flange).
Tighten clamp screws to 15 foot-pounds.
(4) Connect parking brake cable.
(5) Connect hydraulic brake hose, bleed and adjust
brakes.
(6) Install rear wheels.
(7) If carrier was removed from axle housing dur- Fig. 1 5 4 h e c k i n g for Runout and Zero End Play
ing the removal operation, fill axle with proper
amount and type of lubricant; see “Specifications” in exceeds .005 inch the differential case may be dam-
aged, and a second reading will be required after
Lubrication section Group “0”.
drive gear has been removed. This operation is cov-
ered during “Differential Disassembly”. Remove dial
Welding Rear Axle Housing indicator.
The axle housing should be completely disassem-
bled if it is to be welded with arc welding equip- (3) With Tool (2-3281 hold companion flange and
ment. It is also possible to weld the assembled hous- remove drive pinion nut and Belleville washer.
ing with gas welding equipment, if precaution is (4) Install companion flange remover Tool C-452
and remove flange (Fig. 16).
taken to protect gaskets and heat treated parts.
(5) Using a screwdriver and hammer, remove the
drive pinion oil seal from the carrier.
DIFFERENTIAL AND CARRIER (6) While holding one hand over nose end of car-
rier, invert carrier in stand. The front pinion bearing
Removal cone, shim pack and bearing spacer (where used) will
(1) Remove flanged axle drive shafts.
drop from carrier.
(2) Disconnect rear universal joint and support
(7) Apply identifying punch marks on differential
propeller up and out of the way to prevent damage
bearing pedestals of carrier, differential bearing caps
to the front universal joint.
and bearing adjusters for reassembly purposes (Fig.
(3) Remove the rear axle lubricant.
17).
(4) Loosen and remove the carrier-to-housing at-
(8) Remove both differential bearing adjuster lock
taching nuts and lift the carrier assembly from axle
screws and locks.
housing. (9) With a 3/4 inch socket, loosen bearing cap bolts
(one on each side) and back off bearing adjusters
Disassembly
Side play and runout check taken during disassem- slightly using spanner wrench Tool C-4064 to re-
bly will be very useful in reassembly. move differential bearing preload. Remove bearing
(1) Mount carrier in Stand DD-1014 and attach dial cap bolts, caps and bearing adjusters.
indicator Tool C-3339 to differential carrier flange in
a position so pointer of indicator squarely contacts
TOOL
back face of ring gear (Fig. 15). With a screw driver FLANGE I
positioned between bearing cap and differential case
flange, then using a prying motion determine if side
play is present. If side play is evident, remove adjuster
lock and loosen adjuster slightly and retighten ad-
juster sufficiently to eliminate side play.
(2) Rotate drive gear several complete revolutions
while noting total indicator reading. Mark drive gear
and differential case at point of maximum runout. The
marking of differential case will be very useful later KPSB
in checking differential case runout. Total indicator
reading should be no more than .005 inch. If runout Fig. 16-Removing Companion Flange

MyMopar.com
3-20 REAR AXLE 0

(3) If drive gear runout exceeded .005 inch in


step 2 (under “Carrier Disassembly”), recheck the case
as follows: Install differential case and respective
bearing cups in carrier.
(4) Install bearing caps, cap bolts and bearing ad-
justers. Tighten bearing cap bolts down tightly and
screw in both adjusters with spanner wrench Tool
C-406A.
( 5 ) Tighten cap bolts and adjusters sufficiently to
prevent any side play in bearings.
(6) Attach a dial indicator Tool C-3339 to carrier
flange so pointer of indicator squarely contacts drive
gear surface of differential case flange between outer
edge flange and drive gear bolt holes (Fig. 19).
(7) Rotate differential case several complete revo-
lutions while noting total indicator reading. This
reading must not exceed .003 inch runout. If runout
Fig. 17-Marking Bearing Caps und Adjusters is in excess of .003 inch, differential case must be re-
(10) Remove differential and ring gear assembly placed. In a case where the runout does not exceed
with bearing cups. Differential bearing cups must be .003 inch it is often possible to reduce the runout by
kept with respective bearing cones. positioning the drive gear 180° from point of maxi-
(11) Remove drive pinion and rear bearing assem- mum runout when reassembling drive gear on dif-
bly from carrier. ferential case.
(8) With a flat nose drift and hammer, remove dif-
Rear Pinion Bearing Removal ferential pinion shaft lock pin from back side of drive
(1) Remove drive pinion rear bearing from small gear flange. (The hole is reamed only part way
stem pinion with Tool C-293 and four (4) No. 36 plates, through, making it necessary to remove lock pin from
or four (4) No. 37 plates on large stem step pinion or one direction.)
large stem pinion using a collapsible spacer (Fig. 18). (9) With a brass drift and hammer, remove dif-
(2) Using a flat end brass drift, remove front and ferential pinion shaft and axle drive shaft thrust
rear pinion bearing cups. block.
(10) Rotate differential side gears until each dif-
DIFFERENTIAL CASE ferential pinion appears at large opening of case.
Remove each pinion and thrust washer at that time.
Disassembly (11) Remove both differential side gears and thrust
(1) Mount differential case and ring gear assembly washers.
in a vise equipped with soft jaws (brass).
(2) Remove drive gear bolts. BOLTS ARE LEFT Cleaning and Inspection (Figs. 20,2 I and 22).
HAND THREAD. With a non-metallic hammer, tap (1) Clean all parts in a fast evaporating mineral
drive gear loose from differential case pilot and
remove.

KP7A

KD 3748 Fig. 1 9 4 h e c k i n g Drive Gear Mounting Flange


Fig. 18-Removing Drhre Phion Rear Bearing Face Runouf

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-21

THRUST
BOLT AND LOCKWASHER
SHAFT /
IFFERENTIAL CASE

DRIVE GEAR AND

ADJUSTING WAS

BOLT AND LOCKWASHER


THRUST BLOCK
THRUST WASHER THRUST WASHER KPPB
Fig. 20-Differential Carrier Assembly (Small Stem Step Pinion)
spirits or a dry cleaning solvent and with the excep- wear in contact area of differential pinions. Shaft
tion of bearings, dry with compressed air. should be smooth and round with no scoring or metal
(2)- Inspect differential bearing cones, cups and pickup.
rollers for pitting, spalling or other visible damage. If (5) Inspect differential side gears and pinions, they
replacement is necessary, remove bearing cones from should have smooth teeth with a uniform contact pat-
differential case with Tool C-293 and adapter plates tern without excessive wear or broken surfaces. The
No. 43 (Fig. 23). differential side gear and pinion thrust washers
(3) Inspect differential case for elongated or en- should be smooth and free from any scoring or metal
larged pinion shaft hole. The machined thrust pickup.
washer surface areas and counterbores must be (6) Inspect axle shaft thrust block for excessive
smooth and without metal deposits or surface imper- wear or visible damage. The wear surface on the
fections. If any of the above conditions exist, satisfac- opposite ends of the blocks, must be smooth.
tory correction must be made or the case replaced. (7)Inspect differential pinion shaft lock pin for
Inspect case for cracks or other visible damage which damage or looseness in case. Replace pin or case as
might render it unfit for further service. necessary.
(4) Inspect differential pinion shaft for excessive (8) Inspect drive gear and pinion for worn or
SHAFT
THRUST WASHER 1 BOLT AND LOCKWASHER

CONE \ 1 1 /
DIFFERENTIAL CASE
PIN
\
\ LPCK
BEARING COYE
-FLANGE
. . . .- -
\

GUARD
\
CUP

THRUST BLOCK

,1
PINION
SIDE GEAR ADJUSTING WASHER
THRUST WASHER KP1 B

Fig. 2 I-Differential Carrier Assembly (Large Stem Step Pinion)

MyMopar.com
3-22 REAR AXLE 0

BOLT AND LOCKWASHER


IFFEREMIAL CASE

cu EARING CONE
BO

BOLT AND LOCKWASf%R

%RWJT WASHER KP1D

Fig. 22-Differential Carrier Assembly (Large Stem Tapered Pinion)


chipped teeth or damaged attaching bolt threads. If visible damage which would render it unfit for
replacement is necessary, replace both the drive gear further service. Raised metal on the shoulder of bear-
and drive pinion as they are available in matched sets ing cup bores incurred in removing pinion cups
only. should be flattened by use of a flat nose punch.
(9) Inspect drive pinion bearing cones, cups and (11) Inspect drive pinion for damaged bearing
rollers for pitting, spalling, excessive wear, or other journals and mounting shim surface on excessively
visible damage. If inspection reveals that either are worn splines. If replacement is necessary, replace
unfit for further service, replace both cup and cone. both the drive pinion and drive gear as they are
(10) Inspect differential carrier for cracks or other available in matched sets only.
(12) Inspect companion flange for cracks, worn
splines, pitted, rough or corroded oil seal contacting
surface. Repair or replace companion flange as
necessary.
(13) Inspect drive pinion bearing shim pack for
broken, damaged or distorted shims, or Collapsible
spacer. Replace if necessary during establishment of
pinion bearing preload.

ASS EMB LY
LUBRICATE ALL PARTS BEFORE ASSEMBLY
WITH LUBRICANT AS SPECIFIED IN (LUBRICA-
TION GROUP " 0 )
(1) Install thrust washers on differential side gears
and position gears in case.
(2) Place thrust washers on both differential pin-
ions and through large window of differential case,
mesh the pinion gears with the side gears, having
pinions exactly 180 degrees opposite each other.
(3) Rotate side gears 90 degrees to align pinions
and thrust washers with differential pinion shaft
holes in case.
(4) From pinion shaft lock pin hole side of case,
insert slotted end of pinion shaft through case, and
the conical thrust washer, and just through one of the
Fig. 23-Removing Differential Bearings pinion gears.

MyMopar.com
REAR AXLE 3-23
(5) Install thrust block through side gear hub, so GAUGE BLOCK SP-528 OR SP-3250 8%'' SLEEVE SP-2920
that slot is centered between the side gears.
(6) While keeping all of these parts in proper
alignment, push pinion shaft into case until locking
pin hole in pinion shaft is in exact alignment with its
respective hole in case. Install pinion shaft lock pin COMPRESSION
through hole in case from pinion shaft side of drive
gear flange. The contacting surfaces of the drive gear
and differential case flange must be clean and free of
all burrs.
(7) Using an Arkansas stone, relieve the sharp edge
SP-1370 CENTRALIZING
of the chamfer on the inside diameter of the ring gear
(Fig. 24). This is very important otherwise during the
installation of ring gear on differential case, the sharp
COMPRESSION
edge will remove metal from the pilot diameter of NUT SP-533
case and can get imbedded between differential case
flange and gear; causing gear not to seat properly. SP-2919 SP-539
NU418A
(8) Position drive gear on differential case pilot, Fig. 25-Rear Axle Setting Gauge Tool C-75844
aligning threaded holes of drive gear with those in
differential case flange. ing spacer SP-2919 followed by rear pinion bearing
(9) Insert drive gear screws (LEFT HAND cone over main screw of tool and inserting it into
THREADS) through case flange and into drive gear. carrier from gear side.
After all cap screws are properly started, tap drive (2) Place front pinion bearing cone over main
gear against differential case flange with a non- screw of tool followed by compression sleeve SP-535,
metallic mallet. centralizing washer SP-534, and main screw nut SP-
(10) Position unit between brass jaws of a vise and 533. Hold compression sleeve with the companion
alternately tighten each cap screw to 55 foot-pounds. flange holding Tool (2-3281 and tighten nut (Fig. 26),
(11) Position each differential bearing cone on hub allowing tool to rotate as nut is being tightened in
of differential case (taper away from drive gear) and order not to brinnel bearing cone or cups. Do not
with installing Tool C-4086, install bearing cones. remove tool after installing cups.
An arbor press may be used in conjunction with in-
stalling tool. PINION BEARING PRELOAD AND DEPTH OF
CAUTION: Never exert pressure against the bearing MESH SETTING USING TOOL C-758-D4
cage, since this would damage the bearing.
The 8-3/4" axle incorporates three types of pinions.
The method of determining pinion depth of mesh and
PINION BEARING CUP INSTALLATION bearing preload are the same for the small and large
(1) Position pinion bearing cups squarely in bores stem step pinions; however, the sequence of making
of carrier. Assemble Tool C-758-D4 (Fig. 2% by plac- the two adjustments change. Small stem pinions re-
quire the bearing preload adjustment first while large
stem step pinions require the depth of mesh adjust-
I,
ment first. The large stem pinion using a collapsible

NU403 KP13 B

Fig. 24-Stoning Chamfer of Ring Gear Fig. 26-Seating Bearing Cups in Carrier Housing

MyMopar.com
3-24 REAR AXLE 0

spacer for bearing preload requires the depth of mesh


setting first also.
The position of the drive pinion with respect to the
drive gear (depth of mesh) is determined by the loca-
tion of the bearing cup shoulders in the carrier and
by the portion of the pinion in back of the rear bear-
ing. The thickness of the rear pinion bearing mount-
ing shim suitable for the carrier can be determined
by using Tool C-758-D4.

PINION BEARING PRELOAD WITH BEARING


SPACER (Small Stem Step Pinion)
Bearing Preload
(1) With tool installed in carrier, remove main
screw nut, centralizing washer, compression sleeve
and front pinion bearing cone.
(2) Install the pinion bearing spacer, larger bore of Fig. 28--lnstalling Gauge Block on tool
spacer next to rear bearing. wrench is moving through several complete revolu-
(3) Position sleeve (SP-1730) in front bearing cone tions. Correct preload setting is 20-30 inch-pounds
making sure sleeve is flush with rear of bearing. for a new bearing and 0-15 inch-pounds for orig-
(4) Position original shims, previously removed inal bearing. Bearing preload should be uniform
from drive pinion stem, over the sleeve and slide the during complete revolution. A reading that varies
sleeve, bearing and shims over main screw of tool considerably during rotation of pinion indicates a
until shims rest against spacer (Fig. 27). binding condition which requires correction. Use a
(5) Install tool compression sleeve (SP-535) (square thinner shim pack to increase preload and a thicker
end out), centralizing washer (SP-534) and main screw shim pack to decrease preload. Preload shims are
nut (SP-533). Turn carrier in stand to bring nut on top. available in two thousandths of an inch increments
(6) Tighten tool nut to 240 foot-pounds with a from .014-.026 inch.
torque wrench, using holding Tool C-3281 on the After correct pinion bearing preload is set, DO
compression sleeve to hold the assembly in several NOT REMOVE THE TOOL.
positions to make a complete revolution while tight-
ening. Remove holding tool and rotate the pinion Depth of Mesh
several revolutions in both directions to seat the (1) Reverse carrier in stand and install gauge block
bearing rollers. Recheck torque to 240 foot-pounds SP-528 on end of tool and securing it to tool with
(torque may have diminished as bearing rollers were Allen screw. The flat portion of gauge block should
seated by rotating). Correct bearing preload reading
be facing differential bearing pedestals (Fig. 28).
can only be obtained with nose of carrier up.
Tighten screw with Allen wrench.
(7) Using inch-pound torque wrench (2-685, meas-
(2) Position arbor SP-561 (part of Tool C-758-D4)
ure pinion bearing preload by rotating pinion with
in differential bearing pedestals of carrier (Fig. 29).
handle of wrench floating, read the torque while Center the arbor so that an approximate equal dis-
tance is maintained at both ends. Position differential
Al
/ 11 PINION LOCATING WASHER OR SHIM
1

A E

c/
$/
(T BLOCK
(TOOL)

KP152A

Fig. 27-Pinion Preload with Spacer


(8-3/4" Ring Gear) Fig. 29-Installing Arbor in Carrier

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-25
bearing caps and attaching bolts on carrier pedestals, (10) Using installing Tool DD-996 press bearing on
and insert a piece of .002 inch shim stock between pinion stem. An arbor press may be used in conjunc-
arbor and each cap. Tighten cap bolts to 10 foot- tion with tool.
pounds. (11) Install bearing tubular spacer on pinion stem
(3) Select a rear pinion bearing mounting shim (large bore facing rear bearing cone).
which will fit between cross arbor and gauge by--'- LOCK. (12) Install selected shim pack.
This fit must be snug but not too tight (similar tcI the (13) Lubricate front and rear pinion bearing cones
pull of a feeler gauge) (Fig. 30). This shim is 'then with lubricant as specified in (Lubrication Group
used in determining the correct thickness shim for ''( 3'').
installation. (14) Position front pinion bearing cone in its cup in
(4) To select a shim for installation, read the mark- carrier.
ing on end of pinion head (-0, -1, -2, +1, + 2 etc.). (15) Apply a light coat of sealer in seal bore of
When marking is -(minus), add that amount to the carrier and install drive pinion oil seal into carrier
thickness of shim selected in step (3). When the mark- using Tool (2-4109 or C-3980 (double lip synthetic rub-
ing is + (plus), subtract that amount. Example: With ber oil seal) or Tool C-3656 (single lip leather oil seal).
a shim .086 inch thick and a pinion marked -2, The proper tool must be used in order to position the
install a shim .088 inch thick. (.086 1- .002 = .088). seal the proper depth into the carrier casting.
Example: With a shim .086 inch thick and a pinion (16) Insert drive pinion and bearing assembly up
marked t 2, install a washer .084 inch thick, (-086 through carrier. While supporting pinion in carrier,
- .002 = .084) or when a shim .086 inch thick is too install companion flange with installing Tool C-496 or
loose and .088 inch too tight, use .086 inch shim. DD-999 and holding Tool C-3281.
Treat other pinion markings in a similar manner. (17) Remove tools and install Belleville washer
Shims are available in two thousandths of an inch (convex side of washer up) and pinion nut.
increments. Mounting shims differ in diameter, de- (18) Hold companion flange with holding Tool C-
pending on which pinion they are used on. 3281 and tighten pinion nut to 240 foot-pounds. Ro-
(5) Remove tool arbor from carrier. tate pinion several revolutions in both directions to
(6) Remove tool and bearings out of carrier. seat bearing rollers. Recheck torque to 240 foot-
(7) Remove shims, spacer, tool sleeve and rear pounds (torque may have diminished as bearing
bearing cone from tool main screw. rollers were seated by rotating).
(8) With stem of pinion facing up, install correct
shim on pinion stem. Shims are chamfered on one PINION BEARING PRELOAD
side and must be installed on the pinion stem with (Large Stem Step Pinion)
chamfered side toward pinion head.
Inspect bearing cups and carrier for grit and dirt or
(9) Position rear bearing cone on pinion stem
other foreign material. Clean all parts in a fast evapo-
(small side away from pinion head). Make certain that rating mineral spirits or a dry cleaning solvent and
the contacting surfaces of correct shim, pinion head with the exception of bearing cones, dry with com-
shim contact surface and rear bearing cone are per- pressed air.
fectly clean and free of any foreign particles. (1) Assemble spacer SP-2921 to main section of
tool followed by spacer SP-1730. Install rear pinion
bearing cone over spacer SP-1730 and against spacer
SP-2921 (Fig. 31).
SP-561 PINION LOCATING WASHER

~ .. I

sp-5387 ASSEMBLYlOF SP-526 NU419


115
Fig. 31-Tool C-758-D4 Installed in Housing
Fig. 30--Determining Spacer Thickness (8-314" Large Pinion)

MyMopar.com
3-26 REAR AXLE n

(2) Insert assembly into carrier and install front (11) Remove rear pinion bearing cone from tool.
pinion bearing cone over tool shaft and in its proper (12) Remove front pinion bearing cone from carrier
position in bearing cup. Install tool spacer, tool thrust housing.
washer and tool nut on shaft. (13) With stem of drive pinion facing up, add rear
(3) With nose of carrier up, place flange holding pinion bearing mounting shim you selected on pinion
Tool C-3281 on compression sleeve. Allow assembly stem. Shims are chamfered on one side and must be
to rotate while tightening nut to not more than 25-50 installed on the pinion stem with chamfered side to-
foot-pounds. Always make sure bearing cones are ward pinion head.
lubricated with hypoid gear lubricant. (14) Position rear pinion bearing cone on pinion
(4) Turn tool several complete revolutions in both stem (small side away from pinion head). Make cer-
directions to permit bearing rollers to seat. After tain that the contacting surfaces of correct shim,
bearing rollers are properly seated, check bearing pinion head shim contact surface and rear bearing
preload by rotating tool with an inch-pound torque cone are perfectly clean and free of any foreign par-
wrench. The correct bearing preload should be from ticles.
20-30 inch-pounds for new bearings and 0-15 inch- (15) Lubricate front and rear pinion bearing cones
pounds for the original bearings. with hypoid gear lubricant. Install rear bearing cone
(5) With proper bearing preload set, invert carrier onto pinion stem, using Tool DD-996, press bearing
in stand and install gauge block SP-528 or SP-3250 cone into place. An arbor press may be used in con-
to the main screw attaching it with Allen screw se- junction with tool.
curely (Fig. 28). The flat portion of gauge block should (16) Insert pinion and bearing assembly up through
be facing differential bearing pedestals. carrier and install the original preload shim pack on
(6) Position tool arbor SP-561 in differential bear- pinion stem.
ing pedestals of carrier (Fig. 29). Center the arbor so (17) Install front pinion bearing cone on pinion
that an approximate equal distance is maintained at stem followed by drive pinion flange, bellville wash-
both ends. Position differential bearing caps and at- er and nut. Using flange holding Tool (2-3281 and
taching bolts on carrier pedestals, and insert a piece torque wrench, tighten pinion nut to 240 foot-pounds.
of .002 inch shim stock between arbor and each cap. Hold the assembly in several positions to make a com-
Tighten cap bolts to 10 foot-pounds. plete revolution while tightening.
(7) Select a rear pinion bearing mounting shim (18) Remove holding tool and rotate tool several
which will fit between cross arbor and gauge block. complete revolutions in both directions to permit
This fit must be snug but not too tight (similar to the bearing roller to seat. Recheck torque to 240 foot-
pull of a feeler gauge. (Fig. 30). This shim is then pounds (torque may have diminished as bearing roll-
used in determining the correct thickness shim for ers seated).
installation. (19) Measure pinion bearing preload by rotating
(8) To select a shim for installation, read the mark- pinion using an inch-pound torque wrench. The cor-
ing on end of pinion head (-0, -1, -2, +1, +2, rect preload specifications are 20-30 inch pounds for
etc.). When marking is - (minus), add that amount to new bearing and 0-15 for original bearings. Correct
the thickness of shim selected in step (7). When the bearing preload readings can only be obtained with
marking is + (plus), subtract that amount. Example: nose of carrier in up right position. Bearing preload
With a shim .086 inch thick and a pinion marked -2, should be uniform during complete revolution. A
install a shim .088 inch thick (.086 + .002 = .088). reading that varies during rotation indicates a bind-
Example: With a shim .086 inch thick and a pinion ing condition which should be corrected. Use a thin-
marked +2, install a washer .084 inch thick, (.086 ner shim pack to increase preload and a thicker shim
- .002 = .084) or when a shim .086 inch thick is too pack to decrease preload. Preload shims are available
loose and .088 inch too thick, use .086 inch shim. in two thousandths of an inch increments from .014-
Treat other pinion markings in a similar manner. .026 inch.
Shims are available in two thousandths of an inch (20) Loosen and remove drive pinion nut, washer
increments. Mounting shims differ in diameter, de- and flange after proper bearing preload has been
pending on which pinion they are used on. established.
(9) Remove differential bearing caps and remove (21) Apply a light coat of sealer in seal bore of
tool arbor from carrier. carrier and install drive pinion oil seal into carrier
(10) Reverse carrier in stand so nut of tool is in up- using Tool C-4109 or C-3980 (double lip synthetic rub-
right position. Loosen compression nut, and support ber oil seal) or Tool C-3656 (single lip leather oil seal).
lower portion of tool in carrier with one hand, re- The proper tool must be used in order to position the
move tool nut, centering washer and compression seal the proper depth into the carrier casting.
sleeve. Lower tool down and out of carrier. (22) While supporting pinion in carrier, install

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-27
companion flange with installing Tool C-496 or DD- used in determining the correct thickness shim for
999 and holding Tool C-3281. installation.
(23) Remove tools and install Belleville washer (8) To select a shim for installation, read the mark-
(convex side of washer up) and pinion nut. ing on end of pinion head (-0, -1, -2, +1, +2,
(24) Hold universal joint flange with holding Tool etc.). When marking is - (minus), add that amount to
C-3281 and tighten pinion nut to 240 foot-pounds. the thickness of shim selected in step (7). When the
Rotate pinion several revolutions in both directions to marking is + (plus), subtract that amount. Example:
seat bearing rollers. Recheck torque to 240 foot- With a shim .036 inch thick and a pinion marked -2,
pounds (torque may have diminished as bearing install a shim .038 inch thick (.036 + .002 = .038).
rollers were seated by rotating). Example: With a shim .036 inch thick and a pinion
marked +2, install a washer .034 inch thick, (.036
DEPTH OF MESH - .002 = .034) or when a shim .036 inch thick is too
loose and .038 inch too thick, use .036 inch shim.
(Large Stem Pinion With Collapsible Spacer) Treat other pinion markings in a similar manner.
Inspect differential bearing cups and cones, carrier Shims are available in one thousandths of an inch
for grit and dirt or other foreign material. Clean all increments.
parts in fast evaporating mineral spirits or a dry (9) Remove differential bearing caps and remove
cleaning solvent and with the exception of bearing tool arbor from carrier.
cones, dry with compressed air. Front Pinion Bearing (10) Reverse carrier in stand so nut of tool is in up-
Cone and Cup Must Never Be Reused Under Any right position. Loosen compression nut, and support
Circumstances. lower portion of tool in carrier with one hand, re-
(1) Assemble spacer SP-5387 to main section of move tool nut, centering washer and compression
tcol followed by spacer SP-1730. Install rear pinion sleeve. Lower tool down and out of carrier.
bearing cone over spacer SP-1730 and against spacer (11) Remove front pinion bearing cone from carrier
SP-5387 (Fig. 31). housing.
(2) Insert assembly into carrier and install front (12) With stem of drive pinion facing up, add rear
pinion bearing cone over tool shaft and in its proper pinion bearing mounting shim you selected on pinion
position in bearing cup. Install tool spacer, tool thrust stem.
washer and tool nut on shaft.
(3) With nose of carrier up, place flange holding PINION BEARING PRELOAD
To01 C-3281 on compression sleeve. Allow assembly (Large Stem Pinion With Collapsible Spacer)
to rotate while tightening nut to not more than 25-50
foot-pounds. Always make sure bearing cones are (1) Position rear pinion bearing cone on pinion stem
lubricated with hypoid gear lubricant. (small side away from pinion head). Make certain that
(4) Turn tool several complete revolutions in both the contacting surfaces of selected shim, rear bearing
directicns to permit bearing rollers to seat. After cone and pinion head are perfectly clean and free of
bearing rollers are properly seated, check bearing any foreign particles.
preload by rotating tool with an inch-pound torque (2) Lubricate front and rear pinion bearing cones
wrench. The correct bearing preload should be from with hypoid gear lubricant. Install rear pinion bearing
20-30 inch-pounds for new bearings. cone onto pinion stem, using Tool C-3095, press bear-
(5) With proper bearing preload set, invert carrier ing cone into place. An arbor press may be used in
in stand and install gauge block SP-528 or SP-3250 conjunction with tool.
to the main screw attaching it with Allen screw se- (3) Insert drive pinion and bearing assembly up
curely (Fig. 28). The flat portion of gauge block shoulc! through carrier and install collapsible spacer followed
be facing differential bearing pedestals. by front pinion bearing cone on pinion stem. Install
(6) Position tool arbor SP-561 in differential bear- companion flange using Tool C-496 or DD-999 and
ing pedestals of carrier (Fig. 29). Center the arbor so holding Tool (2-3281. This is necessary in order to
that an approximate equal distance is maintained at properly install front pinion bearing cone on stem
both ends. Position differential bearing caps and at- due to interference fit. Remove tool from pinion stem.
taching bolts on carrier pedestals, and insert a piece CAUTION: During the installation of the front pinion
of .002 inch shim stock between arbor and each cap. bearing be careful not to collapse the spacer.
Tighten cap bolts to 10 foot-pounds. (4) Apply a light coat of sealer in seal bore of car-
(7) Select a rear pinion bearing mounting shim rier casting and install drive pinion oil seal into car-
which will fit between cross arbor and gauge block. rier using Tool C-4109 or C-3980 (double lip synthetic
This fit must be snug but not too tight (similar to the rubber oil seal) or Tool C-3656 (single lip leather oil
pull of a feeler gauge. (Fig. 30). This shim is then seal). The proper tool must be used in order to position

MyMopar.com
3-28 REAR AXLE n
"

the seal the proper depth into the carrier casting. stem pinion with collapsible spacer).
(5) With pinion supported in carrier, install anti- To select the proper thickness shim, proceed as fob
clang washer on pinion stem. Install companion flange lows: It will be noted that the head of the drive pinion
with installing Tool C-496 or DD-999 and holding Tool is marked with a plus (+)or minus (-) sign followed
C-3281. by a number ranging from 1 to 4, or zero (0) marking.
(6) Remove tools and install Belleville washer (con-
vex side of washer up) and pinion nut. Depth of Mesh
(7) Hold universal joint flange with holding Tool If the old and new pinion have the same marking
C-3281 and tighten pinion nut to remove end play in and if the original bearing is being reused, use a
pinion, while rotating the pinion to insure proper bear- mounting shim of the same thickness. But if the old
ing seating. pinion is marked zero (0) and the new pinion is
(8) Remove holding tool and rotate pinion several marked -t2, try a .002 inch thinner shim. If the new
complete revolutions in both directions to permit bear- pinion is marked -2, try a .002 inch thicker shim.
ing rollers to seat.
(9) Tighten pinion nut to 100 foot-pounds and meas- Pinion Bearing Preload
ure pinion bearing preload by rotating pinion using an If the bearings are being replaced, place the new
inch-pound torque wrench. The correct preload speci- bearing cup in position in the carrier and drive the
fications are 20-35 inch-pounds for new bearings or cups in place with a suitable drift. After properly
10 inch-pounds over the original if the old rear pinion positioning the bearing cups in the carrier, assemble
bearing is being reused. Correct bearing preload read- the drive pinion mounting shim (chamfered side
ings can only be obtained with nose of carrier in up- down toward gear) on the drive pinion stem. Install
right position. Continue tightening of pinion nut in the tubular spacer (if so equipped) and the preload
small increments and checking pinion bearing preload shims on the pinion stems. Insert the pinion assembly
until proper preload is obtained. Bearing preload into the carrier. Install the front pinion bearing cone,
should be uniform during complete revolution. A pre- universal joint flange, Belleville washer (convex side
load reading that varies during rotation indicates a of washer up) and nut. DO NOT INSTALL THE OIL
binding condition which has to be corrected. The as- SEAL. Rotate the drive pinion after tightening the
sembly is unacceptable if final pinion nut torque is flange nut to 240 foot-pounds, to properly seat the
below 170 foot-pounds or pinion bearing preload is not bearing rollers in the bearing cups. The preload
within the correct specifications. torque required to rotate the pinion with the bearings
NOTE: UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD THE oiled should be 20-30 inch-pounds for new bearing
PINION NUT BE BACKED OFF TO LESSEN PRE- and 0-15 inch-pounds for used bearings. Use a
LOAD. IF THIS IS DONE A NEW COLLAPSIBLE thinner shim pack to increase preload and a thicker
SPACER MUST BE INSTALLED AND NUT RE- shim pack to decrease preload. After the correct pin-
TIGHTENED UNTIL PROPER PRELOAD IS OB- ion depth of mesh has been established and correct
TAINED. bearing preload obtained, remove the drive pinion
flange. Apply a light coat of sealer to drive pinion oil
PINION BEARING PRELOAD AND PINION seal and carrier casting bore and install drive pinion
SETTING (Without Using Tool C-758-D4) oil seal with Tool C-4109 or C-3980 (synthetic rubber
If the differential assembly was satisfactorily quiet seal) or Tool C-3656 (leather seal). Install the pinion
before being disassembled, the drive pinion may be flange, washer and nut and tighten nut to 240 foot-
assembled with the original components. If replace- pounds.
ment parts are installed, a complete readjustment is
necessary; the proper thickness shim must be selected Pinion Bearing Preload (Large Stem Pinion
and installed. The drive gear and pinion are manu- with Collapsible Spacer)
factured and lapped in matching sets and are avail- After selecting the correct pinion bearing mounting
able in matched sets only. The adjustment position in shim and installing it behind the rear pinion bearing
which the best tooth contact is obtained is marked on cone proceed as follows: Install the pinion assembly
the end of the pinion head. into the carrier. Install the new collapsible spacer fol-
To obtain the proper pinion setting in relation to lowed by new front pinion bearing cone on pinion
the drive gear, the correct thickness mounting shim stem. Press front pinion bearing cone on pinion stem,
must be selected before the drive pinion is installed being careful not to collapse the spacer.
in the carrier. The pinion bearing mounting shims are Apply a light coat of sealer to drive pinion oil seal
available in two thousandths increments from .084 to and carrier casting bore and install drive pinion oil
.lo0 inch, (small stem or large stem step type pinions) seal with Tool C-4109 or C-3980 (synthetic rubber seal
or .020-.038 inch in increments of .001 inch (large or Tool C-3656 (leather seal). Install anti-clang washer

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-29
and universal joint flange, Belleville washer (convex properly set is .006 to .008 inch at point of minimum
side of washer up) and nut. Tighten the pinion nut to backlash. Rotate drive gear and ring gear several
170 foot-pounds and using an inch-pounds torque revolutions in both directions in order to seat the
wrench rotate the pinion to determine preload. The bearing rollers. This is necessary before setting back-
correct preload specifications are 20-30 inch-pounds lash.
for new bearings or 10 inch pounds over the original (1) Attach a dial indicator Tool C-3339 to carrier
if the old rear pinion bearing is being reused. If pre- flange so pointer of indicator is squarely contacting
load is not correct, continue to tighten pinion nut in one drive gear tooth (drive side) (Fig. 33).
small increments and checking preload until preload (2) Measure backlash between drive gear and pin-
on pinion bearings is correct. A minimum of 170 foot- ion at four positions, approximately 90 degrees apart.
pounds of torque is required on pinion nut. Under no After point of least backlash has been determined,
circumstances should the pinion nut be backed off to mark drive gear. Do not rotate drive gear from point
lessen preload. If this is done a new pinion bearing of least backlash until all adjustments have been
collapsible spacer must be installed and nut retight- completed.
ened until proper preload is obtained. (3) Using Tool C-406A (spanner wrench) turn both
bearing adjusters equally (in same direction) until
lnstallation of Differential and Ring Gear in backlash between drive gear and pinion is .0005 to
Carrier .0015 inch. This backlash variation is given to permit
(1) Holding differential and ring gear assembly alignment and installation of the bearing adjuster
with bearing cups on respective bearing cones, care- lock, lackwasher and attaching screw. The adjuster
fully install the assembly into carrier. must only be turned in a clockwise direction and
(2) Install differential bearing caps, on respective under no circumstances should be backed off.
sides, making certain that identification marks on (4) Install adjuster lock on bearing cap, back-face
caps correspond with those on carrier. Install cap bolts side of drive gear. Tighten lock screw to 15 to 20
and tighten bolts of each cap by hand. foot-pounds.
(3) Install differential bearing adjusters, on respec-
tive sides, making certain that identification marks
Differential Bearing Preload
correspond. Screw adjuster in by hand. No attempt (11 Turn bearing adjuster (tooth side of drive gear)
should be made to apply any excessive pressure at (Fig. 33) in a notch at a time (notch referred to is the
this time. adjuster lock holes) until backlash between drive gear
(4) Using spanner wrenches Tool C-406A to square
and pinion is a minimum of .006 to .008 inch. This
bearing cups with bearing cone, turn adjusters “IN”
until cups are properly square with bearings and end will preload differential bearings and establish cor-
play is eliminated with some backlash existing be- rect backlash.
tween the drive gear and pinion (Fig. 32). (2) Tighten the remaining two differential bearing
(5) Tighten one differential bearing cap bolt on cap bolts to 85-90 foot-pounds.
each side to 85-90 foot-pounds. (3) Install remaining adjuster lock, lockwasher and
attaching screw. Tighten to 15-20foot-pounds.
DRIVE GEAR AND PINION BACKLASH
*- .P
Correct drive gear and pinion backlash when --

KP2l
KPPOA
Fig. 33-Measuring Backlash Between Drive
Fig. 32-Adjusting Differential Bearings Gear and Pinion

MyMopar.com
3-30 REAR AXLE 0

GEAR TOOTH CONTACT PATTERN THICKER SPACER NEEDED

The gear tooth contact pattern will disclose whether


the correct rear pinion bearing mounting shim has
been installed and the drive gear backlash set prop-
erly. Backlash between the drive gear and pinion
must be maintained within the specified limits until
correct tooth contact pattern is obtained.
(1) Apply a thin film of red or white lead on both
the drive and coast side of the drive gear teeth. Ro-
tate drive gear one complete revolution in both direc-
tions while load is being applied with a round bar or
- -
HEEL END-DRIVE HEEL END-COAST
screwdriver between the carrier casting and diff eren- SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NR’w
tial case flange. This action will leave a distinct con- Fig. 35-Incorrect Tooth Contact Pattern
tact pattern on both the drive and coast side of the (Increase Spacer Thickness)
drive gear teeth.
(2) Observe the contact pattern on the drive gear PAllERN MOVES TOWARD CENTER
AND D O W N
teeth and compare with those in figures 34, 35 and
37 to determine if pattern is properly located. With
pinion depth of mesh and gear backlash set properly,
your contact pattern should resemble that in (Fig. 34),
Notice that the correct contact pattern is well cen-
tered on both drive and coast sides of the teeth. When
tooth contact patterns are obtained by hand, they are
apt to be rather small. Under the actual operating
load, however, the contact area increases. I
(3) If after observing the contact pattern and you
find it resembles that in (Fig. 35), the drive pinion HEEL END-DRIVT HEEL END-COAST
SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NRm
is too far away from centerline of the ring gear, the
contact pattern will appear high on the heel on drive Fig. 36-Effect Tooth Contact Pattern as Spacer
side and high on toe on coast side. To correct this Thickness Is Increased
type tooth contact pattern, increase the thickness of mounting spacer (Fig. 38), which will cause the low
the rear pinion bearing mounting spacer (Fig. 36), toe contact on drive side to raise and move toward
which will cause the high heel contact on drive side the heel; low heel contact on coast side will raise and
to lower and move toward the toe; the high toe con- move toward the toe.
tact on coast side will lower and move toward the
heel. DIFFERENTIAL AND CARRIER
(4) If after observing the contact pattern and you
find it resembles that in (Fig. 37), the drive pinion is installation
too close to the ring gear, the pattern will appear (1) Thoroughly clean the gasket surfaces of the car-
low on the toe on drive side and low heel contact on rier and rear axle housing.
coast side. To correct this type tooth contact pattern, (2) Using a new gasket, install the carrier assembly
decrease the thickness of the rear pinion bearing
THINNER SPACER NEEDED
PATTERN CLOSE TO CENTER

?
- -
HEEL END-DRIVE HEEL END-COAST
HEEL END-DRIVE
SIDE (CONVEX)
HEEL END-COAST
SIDE ( CONCAV E ) NR201
SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NR198
Fig. 37-Incorrect Tooth Contact Pcrttern
Fig. 34-Desired Tooth Contact under Light Load (Decrease Spacer Thickness)

MyMopar.com
REAR AXLE 3-31

PATTERN MOVES INWARD AND UP


propeller shaft universal joint, drive pinion flange
and end of pinion stem.
(2) Disconnect propeller shaft at pinion flange and
secure in an upright position to prevent damage to
front universal joint.
(3) Remove the rear wheels and brake drums to
prevent any drag or a possible false preload reading
could occur.
(4) Using inch-pound torque wrench C-685 measure
pinion bearing preload by rotating pinion with handle
of wrench floating, read the torque while wrench is
HEEL END-DRIVE HEEL END- COAST
SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE ICONCAV E 1 NRm2
moving through several complete revolutions and re-
cord. This operation is very important because pre-
Fig. 38-Effect on Tooth Contact Pattern a s Spacer load must be carefully reset when reassembling.
Thickness Is Decreased (5) With Tool C-3281 hold companion flange and
into the axle housing. Tighten the carrier to axle hous- remove drive pinion nut and Belleville washer.
ing nuts to 45 foot-pounds. (6) Install companion flange remover Tool C-452
(3) Refer to “Installation of Rear Axle Shaft,” when and remove flange. Lower rear of vehicle to prevent
installing and setting axle shaft end play. lubricant leakage.
(4) Install propeller shaft (match scribe marks on (7) Using a screwdriver and hammer, remove the
propeller shaft universal joint and pinion flange). pinion oil seal from the carrier and clean the oil seal
Tighten clamp screws to 15 foot-pounds. seat.
(5) Remove wooden block from under brake pedal (8) Check splines on pinion shaft stem to be sure
and bleed and adjust brakes. they are free of burrs or are not worn badly. If burrs
(6) Install rear wheel and tighten to 65 foot-pounds. are evident remove them using crocus cloth by work-
ing in a rotational motion. Wipe the pinion shaft clean.
LUB R I CAT10 N (9) Inspect companion flange for cracks, worn
splines, pitted, rough or corroded oil seal contacting
Refill axle assembly with Multipurpose Gear Lubri- surface. Repair or replace companion flange as neces-
cant, as defined by MIL-L-2105B (API GG5) should be sary.
used in all rear axles with conventional differentials; (10) Apply a light coat of sealer in seal bore of car-
Chrysler Hypoid Lubricant part number 2933565 is rier and install drive pinion oil seal into carrier using
an oil of this type and is recommended or an equiva- Tool (2-4109 or C-3980 (Double lip synthetic rubber oil
lent be used. seal) or Tool C-3656 (single lip leather oil seal). The
In Sure-Grip axles on all 1970 Vehicles it is recom- proper tool must be used in order to properly position
mended that only Chrysler Hypoid Lubricant part the seal the correct depth into the carrier casting.
number 2933565 or an equivalent be used. This lubri- (11) Position companion flange on pinion stem be-
cant, recommended for conventional differentials too, ing careful to match scribe marks made previously
contains special additives to provide proper differen- before removal.
tial durability and performance. (12) Install companion flange with installing Tool
Anticipated Temperature Range Viscosity Grade C-496 or DD-999 and holding Tool C-3281.
(13) Remove tool and install Belleville washer (con-
Above - 10OF. SAE 90
vex side of washer up) and pinion nut.
As low as - 3OOF. SAE 80
Below - 30°F. SAE 75 (14) Hold universal joint flange with holding Tool
C-3281 and tighten pinion nut to 170 foot-pounds. Ro-
REMOVAL AND REPLACEMENT OF DRIVE tate pinion several complete revolutions to assure
PINION FLANGE AND OIL SEAL IN VEHICLE that bearing rollers are properly seated. Using an
inch-pound torque wrench C-685 measure pinion bear-
On large stem carriers which use the collapsible
spacer to obtain pinion bearing preload, the following ing preload. Continue tightening pinion nut and check-
procedure for the removal and replacement of the ing preload until preload is at the original established
drive pinion flange and pinion oil seal must be fol- setting you found in step 4. Under no circumstances
lowed to assure that the proper bearing preload is should the preload be more than 5 inch-pounds over
maintained in the axle assembly. If this procedure is the established setting found at time of checking in
not followed it could result in a premature failure of step 4 of procedure.
the axle. Bearing preload should be uniform during a com-
(1) Raise vehicle on hoist and make scribe marks on plete revolution. A preload reading that varies during

MyMopar.com
3-32 REAR AXLE 0

rotation indicates a binding condition which has to be (15) Install propeller shaft (match scribe marks on
corrected. The assembly is unacceptable if final pinion propeller shaft untiversal joint and pinion flange).
nut torque is below 170 foot-pounds or pinion bearing Tighten clamp screws to 15 foot-pounds.
preload is not within the correct specifications. (16) Install the rear brake drums and wheels and
CAUTION: Never back off the pinion nut to lessen tighten nuts 65 foot-pounds.
pinion bearing preload. If the desired preload i s ex- (17) Raise the vehicle to a level position so axle
ceeded a new collapsible spacer must be installed and assembly is at correct running position and check
nut retightened until proper preload is obtained. In lubricant level. Add the correct type of lubricant re-
addition, the universal joint flange must never be ham- quired to bring lubricant to proper level.
mered on, or power tools used.

REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY 9%'' R I N G GEAR


INDEX
Page Page
Axle Shafts and Bearings ...................... 34 Drive Pinion Depth Of Mesh Setting
Differential (Removal and Disassembly) ......... 37 (Using Pinion Depth Gauge Tool DD 1244) ..... 43
Differential (Cleaning and Inspection) .......... 40 Drive Pinion Depth Of Mesh Setting
Differential Bearing Preload and Drive Gear (Using Tool C-758-D4) ....................... 44
and Pinion Backlash ........................ 46 Gear Tooth Contact Pattern .................... 46
Differential Case and Drive Gear (Installation) ... 42 Lubrication ................................... 48
Differential Case (Sure-Grip) ................... 38 Pinion Bearing Preload ........................ 46
Differential Noise ............................. 33 Rear Axle Assembly (Removal) ................. 37
Rear Axle Assembly (Installation) .............. 47

GENERAL INFORMATION
With the increased torque output of the 440 cubic and ring gear, and by dividing the larger number
inch engine with Power Pak and the 426 cubic inch (ring gear teeth) by the smaller number (drive pin-
Hemi engine in vehicles equipped with 4-speed man- ion) the axle ratio can be determined.
ual transmission, the 9-3/4" rear axle assembly will The drive pinion is supported by two preloaded
appear on Challenger and Dart models that are so taper roller bearings. The rear pinion bearing cone is
equipped (Fig. 1). a tight press-fit on the pinion stem. The front pinion
The standard differential case used in both in- bearing is a light-press fit to a close sliding fit on
stances will be of the plate clutch type Sure-Grip Dif- the pinion stem. The front and rear bearing cups are
ferential. In some instances where a high numerical a press-fit against a shoulder recessed in the carrier.
ratio gear set is installed, a new differential case will The drive pinion depth of mesh adjustment is con-
have to be purchased and installed due to the differ- trolled by locating shims, which are installed between
ence in ring gear mounting dimensions. The standard the rear pinion bearing cup and the carrier casting.
ratio gear set used with both the 440 and 426 engines Drive pinion bearing preload is maintained by
will be 3.54 ratio. Optional matched gear sets with using W e r e n t thicknesses of shim packs between
ratios of 4.10,4.56 and 4.88 will be available for deal- the drive pinion bearing shoulder and front pinion
er installation on models equipped with the 9-3/4" bearing cone.
diameter axle assembly. The differential case is supported by two taper
The rear axle is of the integral carrier-housing, roller bearing cones which are a press-fit on the dif-
hypoid gear type in which the centerline of the drive ferential case hubs. Shims installed between the bear-
pinion is mounted below the centerline of the ring ing cone and shoulder of hub of differential case, per-
gear. form three functions: They eliminate the differential
The rear axle housing is an iron casting with tubu- case side play; they adjust and maintain the backlash
lar legs pressed into and welded to the carrier to between the ring gear and drive pinion; and establish
form a carrier and tube assembly. A removable a means of obtaining differential bearing preload.
stamped steel cover is bolted to the rear of the carrier The rear axle shafts are mounted on taper roller
to permit visual inspection of the differential without bearings which are located at the outer ends of the
removing the complete rear axle from the vehicle. axle housing tubes. The bearings are pressed onto
A small metal tag is attached beneath one of the the shoulder of the shaft and held in place by a collar
cover screws to identify the axle ratio. This tag is that has a very tight interference fit. The bearings are
stamped with the number of teeth on the drive pinion lubricated with Multi-Purpose Grease NLGI Grade

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-33

SIDE GEAR RING

DRIVE PINION

NN1019A
Fig. 1-9-3/4” Rear Axle Assembly
2 E.P. or equivalent. Oil seals are pressed into the also clamps the brake support plate to the studs of the
outer ends of the housing tubes to prevent oil leakage housing tube. Axle shaft end play is adjusted by
from the center section of the axle into the wheel bear- means of a threaded adjuster located in the right
ings and onto the brake assembly. The outer retainer axle shaft bearing retainer. Axle shaft end play must
clamps the bearing and cup into the housing bore and be maintained at .008”-.012”.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
CAUTION: When servicing cars equipped with 9-3/4” (1) With lubricant of rear axle assembly at operat-
axles, DO NOT use the engine to rotate axle com- ing temperature raise car on hoist so rear wheels are
ponents unless both wheels are clear. These axles can free to turn.
exert significant driving force with one wheel. (2) Loosen and remove drain plug and drain out as
much of the oId lubricant as possible.
DIFFERENTIAL NOISE (3) Fill to proper level with special Sure-Grip Lubri-
(Chatter- Moa n) cant Part Number 2585318 or equivalent. Reinstall
It is suggested that before the axle assembly is fill plug and tighten.
disassembled for any type noise complaint, that the (4) Start engine of vehicle and engage in gear and
lubricant be changed. An improper lubricant can run on hoist with rear wheels free to turn at ap-
cause such noises as chatter and moan as well as proximately 40 (MPH) for ten (10) minutes. This
scoring of the differential clutch plates and discs re- thoroughly circulates the lubricant and brings it to
sulting in a possible failure of the unit. operating temperature.

MyMopar.com
3-34 REAR AXLE .o

(5) Stop vehicle and remove drain plug and drain


BLOCKS BEARING ADAPTER
as much of the old lubricant as possible.
REMOVING SP
(6) Refill axle to proper level with new Sure-Grip
Lubricant Part Number 2585318 or equivalent. Rein- SCREWS
SP-5026
stall fill plug and tighten.
(7) Lower car on hoist and return to customer to
drive and evaluate for approximately 100 miles to
determine if lubricant corrects the noise condition. ,.-,.. . .
dW..WASHERS SD-Wl'i O R
If after driving vehicle approximately 100 miles
and the differential noise is still evident, remove the
axle assembly and service the differential with the
necessary parts.

AXLE SHAFTS AND BEARINGS


CAUTION: It is absolutely necessary that anytime an
axle assembly is serviced, and the axle shafts are
loosend and removed, the axle shaft gaskets and
inner axle shaft oil seals must be replaced.
SLEEVE RING-BLOCK
HOLDING SP-5017 NK360A
SP-5041
CAUTION: Under no circumstances should axle shaft
Fig. 2-1001 Set C-397 I
collars or bearings be removed using a torch. The use
of a brch in the removal of the axle shaft collars or axle shaft seal surface, slide protective sleeve SP-5041
bearings is an unsafe practice, because heat is fed over the seal surface next to bearing collar.
into the axle shaft bearing journal and, thereby (1) Position axle shaft bearing retaining collar on a
weakens this area. heavy vise or anvil and using a chisel, cut deep
Whenever the rear axle shafts have been removed grooves into retaining collar at 90" intervals (Fig. 5).
from the axle assembly, always determine that the This will enlarge bore of collar and permit it to be
thrust spacers have not fallen out of the pinion shaft. driven off of axle shaft.
The spacers may be observed through the axle shaft (2) Remove bearing roller retainer flange by cutting
opening of the axle housing. This may be done with off lower edge with a chisel (Fig. 6).
the aid of a small flashlight. If the spacers are out of (3) Grind a section off flange of inner bearing cone
place, it will be necessary to disassemble the differen- (Fig. 7), and remove bearing rollers (Fig. 8).
tial to reinstall them. (4) Pull bearing roller retainer down as far as pos-
sible and cut with a pair of side cutters and remove
Removal (Fig. 9).
(1) With wheels removed, remove clips holding (5) Remove roller bearing cup and protective
brake drum an axle shaft studs and remove brake sleeve SP-5041from axle shaft.
drum. CAUTION: Sleeve SP-5041 should not be used as a
(2) Using access hole in axle shaft flange, remove protector for the seal journal when pressing off the
retainer nuts, the right shaft with threaded adjuster in bearing cone, as it was not designed for this purpose.
retainer plate will have a lock under one of the studs (6) To avoid scuffing seal journal when bearing
that should be removed at this time.
(3) Remove parking brake strut.
(4) Attach axle shaft remover Tool C-3971 (Fig. 2)
to axle shaft flange and remove axle shaft. Remove
brake assembly and gaskets.
(5) Remove axle shaft oil seal from axle housing
using Tool C-637 (Fig. 3).
(6) Wipe axle housing seal bore clean and install a
new axle shaft oil seal using Tool (2-4026 (Fig. 4).
The above tool positions the seal the proper dimension
from the axle shaft bearing shoulder in the axle
housing in order that seal will definitely contact the
machined sealing surface of the axle shaft.
NK56
Disassembly
CAUTION: To prevent the possibility of damaging - - Fig. 3-Removing Axle Shaft Oil Seal

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-35

NK57

Fig. U-fnstallfng Axle Shaft Oil Seal


Fig. 7-Flange Ground Off Inner Cone

Fig. 5-Notching Bearing Retainer Collar


cone is being removed, it should be protected by
single wrap of .002 thickness shimstock held in place Fig. &Removing Bearing Rollers
by a rubber band (Fig. 10). Assembly
(7) Remove the bearing cone using Tool C-3971 (1) Install retainer plate and seal assembly on axle
(Fig. 2). Tighten bolts of tool alternately until cone is shaft.
removed (Fig. 11). (2) Lubricate wheel bearings with Multi-Purpose
(8) Remove seal in bearing retainer plate and re- Grease NLGI, grade 2 E.P. or equivalent.
place with new seal. (3) Install a new axle shaft bearing cup, cone and

SLEEVE

Fig. &Removing Roller Retainer Fig. 9-Cutting Out Roller Bearing Retarinor

MyMopar.com
3-36 REAR AXLE

6 ‘-DO2 SHIM STOCK


”.,
A

i
I
I
NK362

Fig. 1 0-Seal Journal Protection Fig. 12--lnstalling New Bearing and Collar
collar on shaft using Tool C-3971 (Fig. 12), and tighten housing studs. Install retainer nuts and tighten 30-35
bolts of tool alternately until bearing and collar are foot-pounds. Start by tightening bottom nut.
seated properly. (5) Repeat step (1)for right side of axle housing.
(4) Inspect axle shaft seal journal for scratches and (6) Back off threaded adjuster of right axle shaft
polish with #600 crocus cloth if necessary. assembly until inner face of adjuster is flush with
inner face of retainer plate. Carefully slide axle shaft
lnstallation assembly through oil seal and engage splines in dif-
(1) Clean axle housing flange face and brake sup- ferential side gears.
port plate thoroughly. Install a new rubber asbestos (7) Repeat step (4).
gasket on axle housing studs, followed by brake sup-
port plate assembly on left side of axle housing. AXLE SHAFT END PLAY
(2) Apply a thin coating of Multi-Purpose Grease, CAUTION: When setting axle shaft end play, both
NLGI grade 2 E.P. or equivalent to the outside diam- rear wheels must be off the ground, otherwise a false
eter of the bearing cup prior to installing in the bear- end play setting will occur.
ing bore. This operation is necessary as a corrosion (1) Using a dial indicator mounted on the left
preventive. brake support (Fig. 13), TURN THE ADJUSTER
(3) Install foam gasket on the studs of axle housing CLOCKWISE UNTIL BOTH WHEEL BEARINGS ARE
and carefully slide axle shaft assembly through oil SEATED AND THERE IS ZERO END PLAY IN THE
seal and engage splines in differential side gear. AXLE SHAFTS. BACK OFF THE ADJUSTER COUN-
(4) Tap end of axle shaft lightly with a non- TERCLOCKWISE APPROXIMATELY FOUR NOTCH-
metallic mallet to position axle shaft bearing in hous- ES TO ESTABLISH AN AXLE SHAFT END PLAY
ing bearing bore. Position retainer plate over axle OF .008-.012 INCH.
€4 n

NK

Fig. I 1 -Removing Bearing Cone with Tool C-397 1 Fig. 13-Measuring Axle Shaft End Play

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-37
(2) Tap end of left axle shaft lightly with a non-
metallic mallet to seat right wheel bearing cup
against adjuster, and rotate axle shaft several revolu-
tions so that a true end play reading is indicated.
(3)Remove one retainer plate nut, install adjuster
lock. If tab on lock does not mate with notch in ad-
juster, turn adjuster slightly until it does. Install nut
and tighten 30-35foot-pounds.
(4)Recheck axle shaft end play. If it is not within
the tolerance of .008-.012 inch, then repeat adjust-
ment procedure.
(5)Remove dial indicator and install brake drum
and wheel.

REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY NN1020

Removal Fig. 14-Measuring Drive Gear Runout


Should it become necessary to remove rear axle
assembly for overhaul or repair, proceed as follows: (5) Measure drive gear back face runout by ro-
(1) Raise rear of vehicle until rear wheel clear tating drive gear several complete revolutions and
floor. Support body at front of rear springs. reading dial indicator. Mark drive gear and differen-
(2) Block brake pedal in the up position using a tial case at point of maximum runout. The marking of
wooden block. differential case will be very helpful later in check-
(3) Remove rear wheels. ing differential case runout. Total indicator readings
(4) Disconnect hydraulic brake lines at wheel cyl- in excess of .006 inch might indicate possible loose
inders and cap fittings to prevent loss of brake fluid. drive gear or damaged differential case. A test for
(5) Disconnect parking brake cables.
differential case runout will be described later.
To maintain proper drive line balance when reas- (6) Check the clearance between the differential
sembling, make scribe marks on the propeller shaft
bearing cap and bearing cup by trying to insert a
universal joint and the pinion flange before removal.
piece of .003 inch feeler stock between them. A .003
(6) Disconnect propeller shaft at differential pin-
inch feeler should not enter between the bearing cap
ion flange and secure in an upright position to pre- and cup. A clearance of more than .003 inch could be
vent damage to front universal joint. caused by bearing cup having turned in carrier,
(7) Remove shock absorbers from spring plate
causing excessive wear.
studs and loosen rear spring “U” bolts nuts and re- (7) Note identifying letters stamped on bearing caps
move “U”bolts. and face of carrier housing seal surface (Fig. 15). Let-
(8) Remove axle assembly from vehicle. ters stamped on left side are in horizontal position
while right side are in vertical position. Always match
DIFFERENTIAL identifying letters for proper reassembly.
(8) Loosen and remove the differential bearing caps
Removal and Disassembly
(1) Position carrier and tube assembly in a suitable
holding device; such as the jaws of a vise with the
carrier cover facing upward. Thoroughly clean the
outer area of carrier and tubes with a suitable clean-
ing solvent and blow dry with compressed air.
(2) Loosen and remove cover screws and remove
carrier cover. Tilt assembly and drain lubricant into
a container.
(3)Using a suitable cleaning solvent wash and clean
differential, bearings, ring gear and pinion and inter-
nal surfaces and blow dry with compressed air.
(4)In preparing to measure drive gear back face
runout (provided no side play was found) mount a dial
indicator Tool C-3339on pilot stud (Fig. 14), and load
the indicator stem slightly when plunger is at right \--
s/ NN1021
angles to back face of drive gear. Fig. 15-Bearing Cap Identification

MyMopar.com
3-38 REAR AXLE r)

and locate spreader Tool W-129 with tool dowel pins


seated in locating holes of axle housing. Turn tool
screw finger tight at this time.
(9) Install pilot stud on left side of axle housing.
Attach dial indicator and load indicator stem slightly
against opposite side of axle housing (Fig. 16).
(10) Tighten spreader tool nut sufficiently to ob-
tain .015 inch movement of dial indicator to permit
removal of differential case and ring gear assembly.
DO NOT SPREAD OVER .020 INCH AS IT WILL
RESULT IN PERMANENT DAMAGE TO CARRIER
CAST1NG.
(11) Remove dial indicator and remove differential
li;
case and ring gear assembly from axle housing. A NN1023
light prying action with a screwdriver or pinch bar
Fig. 17-Removing Differential and Drive
will loosen assembly for easy removal (Fig. 17). Pry Gear Assembly
up differential case and ring gear as straight up as
possible using leverage against differential case and (15) Using Tool C-748, remove drive pinion oil seal.
carrier to prevent damage. Keep respective bearing Remove slinger, gasket, front pinion bearing cone
cups with bearing cones, if they are not worn or dam- and preload shim pack. Record the thickness of the
aged and are to be reassembled. shims in case they should be lost.
(12) Place the differential case between the soft (16) Position the carrier and tube assembly on an
jaws of a vise and remove the drive gear screws and arbor press, then press out the drive pinion stem and
discard. Using a fiber mallet, tap the drive gear loose rear bearing cone assembly.
from the differential case pilot and remove. (17) With the aid of a brass drift and hammer, drive
(13) If the drive gear runout exceeded .006 inch out the front and rear pinion bearing cups from hous-
in step 5 differential case flange runout should be re- ing. Remove the shim from behind the rear bearing
measured. Install differential case with respective cup and record the thickness of shim pack.
bearing cups into axle housing. Loosen nut of spreader (18) Remove rear bearing cone from drive pinion
tool and remove. Install bearing caps and tighten stem using Tool DD-914C or Tool C-293 and adapters
snugly. Mount dial indicator in contact with flange No. 37.
face of differential case (Fig. 18), and measure runout (19) Remove differential bearing cones from dif-
as described in Step 5. Total allowable runout should ferential case hubs using Tool DD-914C or Tool C-
not exceed .003 inch. It is often possible to reduce 293 and adapters No. 62 (Fig. 19). Care must be taken
excessive runout by positioning drive gear 180 degrees to insure that bearing remover adapters are located
from point of maximum runout when reassembling so as not to pull on bearing cage.
ring gear on differential case. (20) Remove the shims located behind each bear-
(14) Position carrier and tube assembly in vise ing and record thickness to aid in reassembly.
with nose of carrier in the up position. Remove drive
pinion nut and washer. Using Tool (2-452 and holding DIFFERENTIAL CASE
Tool C-3281, remove drive pinion flange. The sure-grip differential (Figs. 20, 21 and 22) is

Fig. 18-Measuring Differential Case Drive Gear


Fig. 1&Spreading Rear Axle Housing Mounting Flange Face Runout

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-39

Fig. 19-Removing Differential Bearings


similar to the conventional differential except for the
addition of friction plates and Belleville plates and
discs for clutching the differential case to the differ-
ential gears and a means for engaging these plates.
The Belleville plates and discs accomplish a positive Fig. 2 1- P o w e r Flow Axle Shafts Turning at
engagement of the clutch discs and plates at all times Same Speed
by placing a preload on the plates and discs. It has
four pinion gears, positioned in the case by two pin-
ion shafts which are at right angles to each other and
loose fitting at their inter-section. Both ends of each
shaft have two flat surfaces, or ramps, which mate
with identical ramps in the differential case. There is
additional clearance in the case to permit a slight
peripheral movement of the ends of the pinion shafts
within the case.

DIFFERENPAL PINION

PINION SHAFT

CLUTCH PLATES

PINION SHAFT

THRUST MEMBER

DIFFERENTI'AL PINION
KR260A
Fig. 22-Power Flow Axle Shafts Turning ut
Fig. 20-Sure-Orip Differential (Schematic) Differenf Speeds

MyMopar.com
3-40 REAR AXLE

BEL1.EVIL1 .UTCH
PLAl .ATES

GEAR
RETAlNER

- _--- . _---
--- l_l
s-
KR720B

Fig. 25-Removing lnstalling Clutch Plates (Cap Sidel


Fig. 23-Case Halves Scribed for Proper Reassembly
Disassembly
(1) Remove axle drive gear. Measure runout of the
drive gear mounting flange. Replace both case halves
if runout exceeds .003inch.
(2) Before disassembling case halves, place scribe
marks on each half to aid in aligning the case when
reassembling (Fig. 23). Remove case cap attaching
bolts and remove case cap (Fig. 24). Remove clutch
SIDE GEAR
plates (Fig. 25). RETAINER
(3) Remove side gear retainer (Fig. 26), and side
gear (Fig. 27).
(4) Remove pinion shafts with pinion gears (Fig.
28).
(5) Remove remaining side gear (Fig. 29), side gear
retainer (Fig. 30), and clutch plates (Fig. 31). KR721A
Fig. 26-Removing or Installing Side Gear Retainer
CLEANING AND INSPECTION (Cap Side)
(1) Wash and clean all parts in a suitable cleaning insert a stiff wire into tube, attach a clean cloth to
solvent and with the exception of bearing cones, dry wire at center section and withdraw from center
with compressed air. To clean axle housing tubes, outward.

CASE CAP-

KR 722

Fig. 24-Removing or Installing Differential Case Cap Fig. 27-Removing or Installing Side Gear (Cap Side)

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-41

DIi

KR725A

Fig. 30-Removing or Installing Side Gear Retainer


Fig. 28-Removing or Installing Pinion Shafts
and Gears or corrosion. To remove any imperfections, polish
the area with #600 crocus cloth (without reducing
(2) All machined contact surfaces in the axle hous- diameter of axle shaft oil seal journal).
ing and differential bearing caps should be smooth (6) Differential bearings and front and rear pinion
and free of any raised edges. Front and rear pinion bearing cone and cup assemblies should have a smooth
bearing cup bore machine surfaces should be smooth. appearance with no broken or dented surfaces on rol-
Raised metal on shoulders of bores incurred in re lers or roller contact surfaces. The bearing roller
moval of cups should be flattened by use of a flat retainer cages must not be distorted or cracked. When
nosed punch. replacing bearings, always replace the cup and cone
(3) Axle shaft oil seal bores at both ends of housing in a set only.
should be smooth and free of rust and corrosion. (7) Inspect drive gear and pinion for worn or
This also applies to brake support plate and housing chipped teeth or damaged attaching bolt threads. If
flange face surface. replacement is necessary, replace both the drive gear
(4) Axle shaft bearings should be washed and and drive pinion as they are available in matched sets
cleaned and inspected for any pitting, spalling or im- only.
perfections in surface of bearing cup. If bearings are (8) Inspect universal joint flange for cracks, worn
found to be unfit for further use they must be re- splines, pitted, rough or corroded oil seal contacting
placed. See “Axle Shaft Assembly Procedure.” surface. Repair or replace universal joint flange as
(5) Axle shaft splines should be smooth and straight necessary.
and free of excessive wear. The axle shaft oil seal (9) Inspect drive pinion bearing shim pack for
journal should be smooth and free of nicks, scratches
BELL
PI
SIDE
RE l

4A - l i l
KR726A
Fig. 29-Removing or lnstalling Side Gear from Fig. 3 I-Removing or Installing Clutch Plates and
Differential Case Discs

MyMopar.com
3-42 REAR AXLE
broken, damaged or distorted shims. Replace, if nec-
essary, during establishment of pinion bearing pre-
load.
(10) Clean all differential parts and inspect parts
for wear, nicks and burrs. The inner and outer flat
clutch plates and outer flat clutch disc should be re-
placed if they are worn or distorted. If either case
half is worn, it will be necessary to replace both
halves.

ASSEMBLING THE DIFFERENTIAL CASE


(1) Position clutch plates and discs in their proper
location in each half of the case (Fig. 32).
(2) Place side gears in their retainers. Insert splines Fig. 33-Installing Differential Bearing Cones
of retainers through the splines of clutch discs. I NSTALLATI0 N-D I FFERENTlAL CASE
(3) Place aligning pin through one axle shaft thrust AND DRIVE GEAR
spacer. Assemble pinion shafts on aligning pin.
(4) Place pinion gears on shafts and install assem- The contacting surfaces of the drive gear and dif-
bly in drive gear half of case. ferential case flange must be clean and free of all
(5) Slide cap half of case over the edge of bench burrs. Dress down surfaces with a file as needed.
far enough to insert one finger up through the as- (1) Position drive gear on differential case pilot,
sembly to hold it together. Place the assembly on aligning threaded holes of drive gear with those in
drive gear half, matching scribe marks. differential case flange.
(6) Make sure markings on each differential case (2) Insert drive gear screws through case flange
half coincide. Install the differential case bolts and and into drive gear. After all cap screws are properly
started, tap drive gear against differential case flange
turn in a few threads.
with a non-metallic mallet.
(7)With shafts installed, center the cross shafts be- (3) Clamp unit between brass jaws of a vise and
tween the two ramp surfaces in differential case. alternately tighten each cap screw to 100-120 foot-
Tighten differential case bolts evenly by alternately pounds.
turning opposite bolts until all are tightened to 45 (4) Position each differential bearing cone on hub
foot-pounds. To keep splines of the side gear and of differential case (without shims), small end away
clutch plates in exact alignment during the tightening from drive gear, using Tool C-4025 (Fig. 21). An arbor
procedure, move axle shafts back and forth as bolts press may be used in conjunction with installing Tool.
are being tightened. After assembly, slight misalign- CAUTION: Never exert pressure against the bearing
ments of the splines can be corrected by moving axle cage, since this would damage the bearing and make
shafts back and forth until free. Remove axle shafts. it unfit for further use.
(5) Position differential bearing cups on their re-
FLAT PLATE, FLAT DISC DISHED DISC spective cones and insert differential case in carrier.
Install bearing caps in their correct positions and
tighten bearing cap bolts finger tight.
(6) Install dial indicator fixture with indicator
pointer contacting back face of drive gear.
(7)Insert a screwdriver blade between bearing
cup and housing and pry case assembly as far as pos-
sible to one side of housing (Fig. 34). Set dial indica-
tor at zero. Using screwdriver, pry case to opposite
side of housing and record the reading.
This reading indicates the amount of shims needed
to take up the clearance between the differential bear-
ing cups and the case. The shim pack thickness to be
SIDE GEAR
placed on bearing hub between bearing cone and dif-
A N D RETAINER ferential case will be calculated later in the procedure
after installation of drive pinion and depth of mesh
Fig. 32-Arrangement of Plates and Djscs
9-314" Differential setting.

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-43

PINION
i NN1027

Fig. 34-Determining Shims to Obtain "0" End


Clearance KD 382

(8) Remove dial indicator, loosen bearing cap bolts Fig. 36-lnstalling Rear Pinion Bearing Cone
and remove bearing caps. Remove differential as- between the rear cup and carrier can be determined
sembly from housing. from the shims removed and the etched marking on
DRIVE PINION DEPTH OF MESH SETTING the pinion. The + or - figure indicates the variation
(Using Pinion Depth Gauge Tool 001244) from the nominal distance between the front of the
pinion and the center line of the carrier. For example,
Note the figures etched on the head of the drive if a pinion marked +2 was originally installed with a
pinion and observe (Fig. 35). One figure is found on shim pack .035 inch and the new pinion is marked
both the drive pinion and ring gear and indicates a -1, the shim pack should be increased .003 inch to
matched gear set. Directly opposite this figure will bring the new pinion to its correct position and the
be one with a + or - before it, or if not a + or -, new shim pack would be .038 inch. This will give an
the figure will be 0. This number must be positively approximate setting of the pinion. A pinion depth
identified before continuing with the assembly pro- gauge should be used for final setting of the pinion,
cedure. Midway between the two sets of figures de- see steps 6 through 14. Shims are available in .003,
scribed above are numbers and letters. These numbers .005 and .010 inch thickness.
and letters are etched for manufacturing purposes (2) Install front pinion bearing cup in carrier.
only, but as one of these numbers may be 0, it might (3) Lubricate rear drive pinion bearing cone with
be confused with the number needed for assembly Sure-Grip Lubricant, Part Number 2585318, or equiva-
procedure. A rule to follow would be to first examine lent, and install bearing cone on pinion stem with
+ +
the shaft end for a or -number. If a or - num- Tool C-3095 (Fig. 36).
ber is not etched on the pinion head, then the num- (4) Position drive pinion and bearing assembly in
ber will be 0. carrier and install front pinion bearing cone on pinion.
(1) Install rear drive pinion bearing cup and shim stem. Do not install preload shims behind front pinion
pack in carrier. The starting shim pack to be placed bearing at this time.
(5) Install universal joint pinion flange followed
by washer and nut. Tighten nut just enough to obtain
10-30 inch-pounds of preload. Rotate drive pinion
while tightening to seat bearing rollers.
(6) The pinion depth gauge Tool DD-1244 (Fig. 37),
is a direct reading precision micrometer, mounted in
an arbor and is calibrated to show the distance from
the end of the anvil to the centerline of the gauge set.
To check the accuracy of the gauge, install the micro-
meter and arbor in the master gauge. Install the
checking block and read the micrometer, it should be
/ accurate within less than .0005 inch (Fig. 38).
GEAR MATING MARE
(SAME AS ON DRIVE GE. .... - NY425A
(7) Select the proper adapters from the gauge set
that fits the differential bearing cup bores. Install the
Fig. 35-Drive Pinion Markings adapters on the arbor and position in carrier housing.

MyMopar.com
3-44 REAR AXLE 0

Fig. 39-Determining Pinion Depth Setting


Fig. 37-Pinion Depth Gauge Tool DD- 1244 3,127.
(11)If pinion setting is within -.001 inch to +.003
Install bearing caps and tighten cap bolts up snug. inch, the pinion position can be assumed to be cor-
(8) Install the step plate clamp assembly on the
rect. If the setting is outside these limits, it should be
carrier housing. Position step plate over pinion and corrected by adding or removing the proper thick-
tighten step plate screw against step plate. Make sure ness shim behind the rear pinion bearing cup.
the four step plate feet are squarely positioned on (12)Remove the drive pinion depth gauge and
the pinion. drive pinion.
(9) Adjust the micrometer so it is directly over (13) If shim adjustment is necessary, remove drive
and at a 90 degree angle to the step plate. Screw the pinion rear bearing cup and add or remove shims as
micrometer down until the anvil contacts the top of determined in preceding Step 9. Measure each shim
the step plate (Fig. 39). Read the micrometer and separately with a micrometer.
make a note of the reading. The step plate measures (14)Reinstall drive pinion rear bearing cup and
.400 inch thick, therefore, add the .400 inch step plate shims and recheck pinion depth measurement, de-
thickness to the micrometer reading. scribed previously.
(10) Figure 40 shows the nominal pinion setting
dimensions for 0 (zero) marked pinion. Pinions with DRIVE PINION DEPTH OF MESH
+
a or - marking require a different pinion setting. (Using Tool C-758-D4)
For example, if a pinion marked +2 is being installed
in a 9-3/4”axle, add the +2 to pinion setting dimen- Rear axle setting gauge Tool C-758-D4is used to
sions 3.125 which will be the corrected dimension of install drive pinion bearing cups as well as to deter-
mine pinion depth of mesh.
(1) Start both drive pinion bearing cups into axle
housing.

AXLE PINION
I MODEL SETTING I

Fig. 38-Checking Gauge in Master Gauge Assembly Fig. 40-Pinion Setting Dimension

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-45
(2) Assemble Tool C-758-D4 by positioning spacer the markings on the end of pinion head (-0, -1,
SP-5184 on main screw of tool. Position rear pinion -2, t l , f 2 , etc.). When marking is - (minus), add
bearing cone on tool screw and insert into axle hous- that amount to the thickness of shim pack selected
ing. +
in step (9). When the marking is (plus), subtract that
(3) Position front pinion bearing cone over main amount. Treat other pinion markings in a similar
screw of tool followed by compression sleeve SP-535, manner. Shims are available in .003, .005, and .010
centralizing washer SP-534, and main screw nut inch thickness.
SP-533. (11) Remove the tool arbor and tool from axle
(4) Lubricate drive pinion bearing cones with Sure- housing.
Grip Lubricant, Part Number 2585318, or equivalent. (12) Using a brass drift or soft punch and hammer,
(5) To install pinion bearing cups, hold compres- remove rear pinion bearing cup from casting.
sion sleeve from turning with Tool C-3281, tighten (13) Position the correct shim pack in axle hous-
nut, thereby drawing pinion bearing cups into axle ing cup bore and install rear bearing cup as de-
housing bearing cup bores. Permit tool to turn several scribed previously in steps (1 thru 5). When cup is
revolutions during tightening operation to permit properly seated, remove tool and pinion bearing
bearing rollers to align and prevent brinnelling of cones.
bearing cups. Do not remove tool after installing (14) Lubricate rear drive pinion bearing cone with
cups. Pinion depth of mesh will be determined next. Sure-Grip Lubricant, Part Number 2585318 or equiva-
(6) With main tool left in axle housing after in- lent and install bearing cone on pinion stem using
stalling drive pinion bearing cups, loosen tool nut Tool C-3095. An arbor press may be used in conjunc-
and re-tighten nut to produce 10-30 inch-pounds of tion with tool (Fig. 36).
preload. Rotate while tightening to align bearing (15) Install drive pinion and bearing assembly in
rollers. carrier and install the original front pinion bearing
(7) Install gauge block SP-528 on main tool and shim pack followed by the bearing cone. Do not install
tighten screw with an Allen wrench securely. oil seal at this time.
(8) Position cross bore arbor SP-5183 in axle hous- (16) Install universal joint flange, washer and nut.
ing differential bearing seats. Center the arbor so that Tighten nut 250-270 foot-pounds. Rotate pinion sev-
an approximate equal distance is maintained at both eral complete revolutions to seat bearing rollers.
ends. Correctly position differential bearing caps (17) Using an inch-pound torque wrench C-685,
and insert bolts and tighten to 10 foot-pounds. measure pinion bearing preload by rotating pinion
(9) Using a feeler gauge select the proper thick- with handle of wrench floating (Fig. 42). Take read-
ness of shims that will snugly fit between arbor and ing while handle is moving through several complete
gauge block. This fit must be snug but not too tight revolutions. Accurate reading can be made only
(similar to the pull of a feeler gauge). This measure- with nose of axle in upright position. Correct preload
ment is then used in determining the correct thick- is 10-20 inch-pounds. Add shim to decrease preload
ness shim pack for installation behind the rear pin- and Subtract shims to increase preload. Shims are
ion bearing cup and carrier casting (Fig. 41). available in the following thicknesses: .003, .005,
(10) To select a shim pack for installation, read .010, and .030 inch.
(18) After the correct pinion bearing preload has

NP414
NN1030
Fig. 4 1-Determining Shim Pack Thickness for
Drive Pinion Depth of Mesh Fig. 42-Checking Pinion Bearing Preload

MyMopar.com
3-46 REAR AXLE 0

been established, remove the universal joint flange, point against back face of ring gear. Move the differ-
nut and washer. ential and ring gear assembly tight against the drive
(19) Install oil slinger and gasket. Using pinion pinion, set the dial indicator on 0. Move the differen-
seal installing Tool C-3719, install drive pinion oil tial and ring gear assembly in the opposite direction
seal. as far away from pinion as possible and note the read-
(20) Install universal joint flange washer and nut. ing on dial indicator.
Tighten nut 250-270 foot-pounds. This reading represents the thickness of shim pack
necessary to take up the clearance between the bear-
PINION BEARING PRELOAD ing cup and the case on the ring gear side of the dif-
ferential assembly. Subtract this reading from the
(1) Remove universal joint flange, washer, nut previously recorded total reading to obtain the
and front pinion bearing cone. amount of shims necessary to take up the clearance
(2) Install the original front pinion bearing shim between the bearing cup and the case at the pinion
pack followed by the bearing cone. Do not install oil side of the differential.
seal at this time. (3) Remove differential and ring gear assembly
(3) Install universal joint flange washer and nut. from carrier.
Tighten nut 250-270 foot-pounds. Rotate pinion sev- (4) Remove differential bearing cones. Install the
eral complete revolutions to align and seat bearing correct thickness shim pack as determined in step 2
rollers. between bearing cone and differential case hub
(4) Using an inch-pound torque wrench C-685, shoulder using Tool C-4025. Add an additional .015
measure pinion bearing preload by rotating pinion inch shims to the drive gear side of differential and
with handle of wrench floating (Fig. 42). Take reading install the differential bearing cones. This additional
while handle is moving through several complete .015 inch shim pack provides the correct bearing pre-
revolutions. Accurate reading can be made only with load and backlash.
nose of axle in upright position. Correct preload is (5) Position spreader Tool W-129 in locating holes
10-20 inch-pounds. Add shims to decrease preload and of carrier and tighten screw finger tight. Install dial
subtract shims to increase preload. Shims are avail- indicator and spread carrier .015 to .020 inch Do not
able in the following thicknesses: .003, ,005, .010, and exceed this limit to permit placing of differential
.030 inch. and ring gear assembly in carrier.
(5) After the correct bearing preload has been es- (6) Install the bearing caps in their respective
tablished, the pinion depth setting should be re- positions as indicated by identification marks on caps
checked. and carrier. Remove the spreader tool. Coat the bear-
(6) Remove universal joint flange nut and washer. ing cap bolt threads with sealing compound and install
(7) Install oil slinger and gasket. Using Tool C- and tighten bolts snugly.
3719, install drive pinion oil seal. (7) Tap the drive gear lightly with a rawhide ham-
(8) Install universal joint flange, washer and nut. mer to properly seat the differential bearing and cups.
Using Tool (2-3281 to hold flange, tighten pinion nut Care must be taken in this operation to prevent nick-
250-270 foot-pounds. Recheck pinion bearing pre-load. ing the teeth of ring gear or drive pinion as they are
meshed together. Tighten the bearing cap bolts to 70-
DIFFERENTIAL BEARING PRELOAD AND 90 foot-pounds.
DRIVE GEAR AND PINION BACKLASH (8) Attach a dial indicator to carrier and with in-
dicator contact point contacting ring gear tooth (Fig.
(1) With drive pinion and bearings installed and 43), measure the backlash between the ring gear and
bearing preload set, install differential case and ring drive pinion.
gear assembly with their respective bearing cups. In- (9) Check backlash at four equally spaced points
stall bearing caps in their positions, align identifica- around circumference of ring gear. Backlash must be
tion marks and tighten cap bolts finger tight. held between .004-.009 inch and cannot vary more
Refer to the measurement taken previously in step than .002 inch between the four positions checked.
(7) of “Installation-Differential Case and Drive Gear”.
If backlash does not fall within these specifications,
This reading taken before the drive pinion was change shim pack thickness on both differential bear-
installed represents the total clearance between the ing hubs to maintain proper bearing preload and
differential bearing cups and the carrier casting. Per- backlash.
form the following steps to determine the thicknesses
of shims required behind each bearing cone to take up GEAR TOOTH CONTACT PATTERN
the clearance and establish the correct bearing pre-
load and backlash. The gear tooth contact pattern will disclose whether
(2) Install a dial indicator and position the contact the correct rear pinion bearing mounting shim has

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-47
THICKER SPACER NEEDED

/'
- --L---

HEEL END-DRIVE HEEL END-COAST


SIDE (CONVEX) SIDE (CONCAVE) NR199

Fig. 45-Incorrect Tooth Contact Pattern


v (Increase Shim Pack thickness)
NN1031
is too far away from centerline of the ring gear, the
Fig. 43-Checking Backlash Between Drive Gear contact pattern will appear high on the heel on drive
and Pinion side and high on toe on coast side. To correct this
been installed and the drive gear backlash set prop- type tooth contact pattern, increase the thickness of
erly. Backlash between the drive gear and pinion shim pack located behind the rear pinion bearing
must be maintained within the specified limits until cup (Fig. 46), which will cause the high heel contact
correct tooth contact pattern is obtained. on drive side to lower and move toward the toe; the
(1) Apply a thin film of red or white lead on both high toe contact on coast side will lower and move
the drive and coast side of the drive gear teeth. Ro- toward the heel.
tate drive gear one complete revolution in both direc- (4) If after observing the contact pattern and you
tions while load is being applied with a round bar or find it resembles that in (Fig. 47), the drive pinion is
screwdriver between the carrier casting and diff eren- too close to the ring gear, the pattern will appear low
tial case flange. This action will leave a distinct con- on the toe on drive side and low heel contact on coast
tact pattern on both the drive and coast side of the side. To correct this type tooth contact pattern, d e
drive gear teeth. crease the thickness of shim pack located behind the
(2) Observe the contact pattern on the drive gear rear pinion bearing cup (Fig. 48), which will cause
teeth and compare with those in figures 44, 45 and 47 the low toe contact on drive side to raise and move
to determine if pattern is properly located. With toward the heel; low heel contact on coast side will
pinion depth of mesh and gear backlash set properly, raise and move toward the toe.
your contact pattern should resemble that in (Fig.
44). Notice that the correct contact pattern is well REAR AXLE ASSEMBLY
centered on both drive and coast sides of the teeth. lnstallation
When tooth contact patterns are obtained by hand, (1) Making sure the gasket surfaces of both the
they are apt to be rather small. Under the actual cover and carrier housing are clean, install a new
operating load, however, the contact area increases. gasket followed by the cover and tighten the cover
(3) If after observing the contact pattern and you bolts to 15-25 foot-pounds. Beneath one of the cover
find it resembles that in (Fig. 45), the drive pinion
PATTERN MOVES TOWARD CENTER
AND D O W N
PATTERN CLOSE TO CENTER

HEEL END-DRIVE
SIDE (CONVEX)
-
HEEL END-COAST
SIDE (CONCAVE) NR198
HEEL END- DRIVE
SIDE (CONVEX)
HEEL E N D ~ C O A S T
SIDE (CONCAVE) NR200

Fig. 46-Effect on Tooth Contact Pattern us Shim


Fig. 44-Desired Tooth Contact Under Light Load Pack Thickness is Inereused

MyMopar.com
3-48 REAR AXLE 0

THINNER SPACER NEEDED PATTERN MOVES INWARDAND UP

HEEL END-DRIVE
SIDE (CONVEX)
HEEL E N D ~ C O A S T
SIDE ( CONCAVE) f‘W201
-- -
HEEL END-DRIVE
SIDE (CONVEX)
HEELEND-TOAST
SIDE (CONCAVE) NRm2

Fig. 47-Incorrect Tooth Contact Pattern Fig. 48-€ffect on Tooth Contact Pattern a s Shim
(Decrease Shim Pack Thickness) Pack Thickness is Decreased
bolts, install the ratio identification tag. Tighten universal joint clamps to 170-200 inch pounds.
(2) For correct procedure when installing axle (8) Install rear wheel and tighten nuts to 65 foot-
shafts and bearings and setting axle shaft end play, pounds in the proper tightening sequence.
see “Axle Shafts and Bearings”.
(3) With body supported at front of rear springs, LUBR ICAT10N
position rear axle assembly spring pads over the Refill axle housing and carrier assembly with 5-1/2
spring center bolts. pints of lubricant. Sure-Grip differentials, use only
(4) Install spring “U” bolts and tighten nuts to 45 the special multi-purpose gear lubricant intended for
foot-pounds and install shock absorbers on spring axles equipped with plate-clutch Sure-Grip diff eren-
plate studs. tials. Such a lubricant is available under Part Number
(5) Connect parking brake cables. 2585318, Special Sure-Grip Lubricant or equivalent.
(6) Connect hydraulic brake lines at wheel cyl- “SHOULD THE REAR AXLE BECOME SUBMERGED
inders and bleed brakes, install brake drums and IN WATER, THE LUBRICANT MUST BE CHANGED
adjust brakes. IMMEDIATELY TO AVOID THE POSSIBILITY OF
(7) Install rear universal joint of propeller shaft EARLY AXLE FAILURE RESULTING FROM CON-
in same position as removed (match scribe marks on TAMINATION OF THE LUBRICANT BY WATER
propeller shaft universal joint and pinion flange). DRAWN INTO THE VENT HOLE.”

SURE-GRIP DIFFERENTIAL
INDEX
Page Page
Installing Sure Grip Differential and Sure Grip Differential .......................... 50
Carrier Assembly ............................ 51 Removal .................................... 50
Lubrication ................................... 51 Cleaning & Inspection ....................... 50
Sure Grip Differential Identification ............. 49 Assembly ................................... 51
Sure Grip Differential Noise .................... 49 Testing Sure Grip Differential .................. 49

GENERAL INFORMATION
A new Sure-Grip differential being offered as a is ordinarily desirable and satisfactory. However, the
special equipment option in the 7-1/4” and 8-3/4” total driving torque can be no more than double the
rear axles only (Fig. 1). torque at the lower-traction wheel. When traction con-
The Sure-Grip differential design is basic and sim- ditions are not the same for both driving wheels, a
ple and consists of a two piece case construction and portion of the available traction cannot be used.
is completely interchangeable with the conventional The SURE-GRIP differential allows the driving
differential and also the previous type Sure-Grip dif- wheel with the better traction condition to develop
ferential (Fig. 2). more driving torque than the other wheel, so that the
A conventional differential allows the driving total driving torque can be significantly greater than
wheels to rotate at different speeds while dividing the with a conventional differential.
driving torque equally between them. This function SURE-GRIP is not a locking differential. In normal

MyMopar.com
0 REAR AXLE 3-49
cones that clutch the side gears to the differential
case. The grooves assure maximum lubrication of the
clutch surface during operation. The cones and side
gears are statically spring preloaded to provide an
internal resistance to differential action within the
differential case itself. This internal resistance pro-
vides pulling power while under extremely low trac-
tive conditions such as mud, snow or ice when en-
countered at one of the rear wheels.
During torque application to the axle, the initial
spring loading of the cones is supplemented by the
gear separating forces between the side gears and
differential pinions which progressively increases the
friction in the differential. It should be remembered
NU404 that the Sure-Grip differential is not a positive lock-
ing type and will release before excessive driving
Fig. 1 -Sure-Grip Differential force can be applied to one wheel.
driving conditions the controlled internal friction is
easily overcome during cornering and turning so that SU RE-GR IP DIFFERENTlAL I D ENTlFlCATlON
the driving wheels can turn at different speeds. Ex-
treme differences in traction conditions at the driving Identification of sure-grip differential assembly can
wheels may permit one wheel to spin. easily be made by lifting both rear wheels off the
SURE-GRIP has been engineered to perform its ground and turning them. If both rear wheels turn in
specialized functions with minimum effect on normal the same direction simultaneously, the vehicle is
vehicle operations. equipped with a Sure-Grip Differential. Another
The cone clutch SURE-GRIP differentials are simi- means of identification is by removing the filler plug
lar to corresponding 8-3/4” conventional differentials and using a flashlight to look through the filler plug
except for the incorporation of the helix-grooved hole to identify the type of differential case.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
SURE-GRIP DIFFERENTIAL NOISE lent. Reinstall fill plug and tighten.
(C hatter-Moan) (4) Start engine and engage in gear and run on
hoist with rear wheels free to turn at approximately
Noise complaints related to rear axles equipped 40 MPH for ten (10) minutes. This thoroughly cir-
with cone-clutch SURE-GRIP should be checked to culates the lubricant and brings it to operating tem-
determine the source of the noise. If a vehicle ride perature.
check produces the noise in turns but not straight (5) Stop vehicle and remove the fill plug and using
ahead, the probable cause is incorrect or dissipated a suction gun remove as much of the lubricant as pos-
rear axle lubricant. The following draining and flush- sible.
ing procedure has been established for the Sure-Grip (6) Refill axle to proper level with multi-Purpose
Differential before it is removed from the vehicle and Hypoid Gear Lubricant Part Number 2933565 or
replaced. equivalent. Reinstall fill plqg and tighten.
CAUTION: When servicing vehicles equipped with (7)Lower vehicle on hoist and return to owner to
Sure-Grip differentials do not use the engine to rotate drive and evaluate for approximately 100 miles to de-
axle components unless both rear wheels are off the termine if lubricant corrects the noise complaint.
ground. Sure-Grip equipped axles can exert a signifi- If after the vehicle is driven approximately 100
cant driving force if one wheel is in contact with floor miles and the noise condition is still evident, remove
and could cause the vehicle to move. the differential and carrier assembly and replace the
(1) With lubricant of rear axle assembly at oper- Sure-Grip Differential. The Sure-Grip Differential and
ating temperature raise car on hoist so rear wheels are the internal parts are serviced as an assembly only.
free to turn.
(2) Loosen and remove fill plug and using a suction TESTING SURE-GRIP DIFFERENTIAL
gun remove as much of the old lubricant as possible.
(3) Fill axle to proper level with Multi-Purpose Hy- The Sure-Grip differential can be checked to deter-
poid Gear Lubricant Part Number 2933565 or equiva- mine if its performance is satisfactory without remov-

MyMopar.com
3-50 REAR AXLE 0

n CASE

PINIONS ,SIDE GEARS

COIL SPRING - CONE CLUTCH

u NU405

Fig. 2-Sure-Grip Differential (Schematic)


ing the differential and carrier assembly from the Removal
vehicle. Follow the same procedure outlined under conven-
(1) Position vehicle on a hoist with engine off and tional differential removal.
the transmission selector lever in park if automatic
or in low gear if manual. Cleaning and inspection
(2) Attempt to rotate wheel by applying turning (1) Clean the Sure-Grip differential assembly in a
force with hands gripping tire tread area (Fig. 3). fast evaporating mineral spirits or a dry cleaning sol-
(3) If you find it extremely difficult, if not impos- vent and with exception of bearings, dry with com-
sible to manually turn either wheel, you can consider pressed air.
the sure-grip differential to be performing satisfac- (2) Inspect differential bearing cones, cups and roll-
torily. If you find it relatively easy to continuously
turn either wheel the differential is not performing
properly and should be removed and replaced. The
Sure-Grip Differential and internal parts are serviced
as a complete assembly only. Under no circumstances
should the differential be removed and disassembled
and reinstalled.

SU RE-GR IP DIFFERENTIAL
CAUTION: During removal and installation of axle
shafts, DO NOT rotate on axle shaft unless both are
in position. Rotation of one axle shaft without the
other in place may result in misalignment of the two
spline segments with which the axle shaft spline en-
gages, and will necessitate difficult realignment pro-
cedures when shaft i s installed. Fig. 3-Teding Sure-Grip Differential Effectiveness

MyMopar.com
0 SPECIFlCAT10 NS 3-51
ers for pitting, spalling or other visible damage. If (6) Position differential case unit between brass
replacement is necessary, remove bearing cones from jaws of a vise and alternately tighten each cap screw
differential case using Tool C-293 and adapter plates to 55 foot-pounds.
No. 43. NOTE: Before installation of differential case into car-
(3) Visually inspect differential case for cracks or rier lubricate the inside of differential assembly with
other visible damage which might render it unfit for Multi-Purpose Hypoid Gear Lubricant Part Number
further service. 2933565 or equivalent. Do not use any other lubricant
other than this special lubricant.
Assembly (7) Follow procedure outlined in conventional axle
If during cleaning and inspection the differential assembly for setting drive pinion depth of mesh, drive
bearings were found to be unfit for further use and gear backlash adjustment and bearing preload adjust-
were removed follow this procedure for installation ment.
of new bearings.
(1) Position each differential bearing cone on hub INSTALLING SURE-GRIP DIFFERENTIAL
of differential case (taper away from drive gear) and AND CARRIER ASSEMBLY
with installing Tool C-4086, install bearing cones. An
arbor press may be used in conjunction with installing (1) Using a new gasket install carrier assembly in
tool. CAUTION: Never exert pressure against the axle housing. Tighten mounting nuts to 45 foot-
bearing cage, since this would damage the bearing. pounds.
(2) If the ring gear was removed from the sure- (2) Refer to “Installation of Rear Axle Shaft”, when
grip differential case or is being replaced with a new installing axle shafts.
ring gear for any reason, new nylok drive gear screws (3) Connect the rear universal joint.
must be installed. (4) Before lowering the rear wheels of the vehicle
IMPORTANT: The procedure for installing the ring to the floor, adjust rear brakes. CAUTION: Both rear
gear on differential case for the 8-3/4” axle differs wheels must be raised off the floor when adjusting
from that of the 7-1/4“ axle. This procedure must be brakes.
followed so the ring gear seats on the differential case
properly. LUBRlCATlON
(3) Using an Arkansas stone, relieve the sharp edge
of the chamfer on the inside diameter of the ring gear Every six months check the fluid level in the axle
(Fig. 241, in 8-3/4” Axle section of this group). This is through the filler plug hole. When checking the level,
very important, otherwise during the installation of be sure the vehicle is in a level position on an axle or
ring gear on differential case, the sharp edge will re- drive on type hoist. “See Lubrication Section” for
move metal from the pilot diameter of case and can proper level of specific axle assembly.
get imbedded between differential case flange and In Sure-Grip Differentials, use only the Multi-Pur-
gear; causing gear not to seat properly. pose Hypoid Gear Lubricant Part Number 2933565 or
(4) Position ring gear on differential case pilot equivalent. Do not use any other lubricant other than
aligning threaded holes of ring gear with those in dif- this special lubricant.
ferential case flange. Anticipated Temperature Range Viscosity Grade
(5) Insert drive gear screws (left hand threads) Above - 10°F. SAE 90
through case flange and into ring gear. After all cap A s low a s - 30°F. SAE 80
screws are properly started, tap ring gear against dif- Below - 30°F. SAE 75
ferential case flange with a non-metallic mallet.

S PECI FI CAT IONS


7-114” Axle
TYPE ............................................................. Semi-Floating Hypoid
Ring Gear Diameter .............................................. 7.250
Number of Differential Pinions .................................... 2
DIFFERENTIAL BEARINGS
Adjustment by ................................................... Spacer Washer
.254-.284 inch in .002 inch graduations
Carrier Bearing Preload Spread ................................... .003-.006
PINION AND DRIVE GEAR BACK LASH .............................. .004-.007“at point of minimum back lash
PINION BEARING PRELOAD ADJUSTMENT BY ...................... Spacer Washers
.074-.lo6 inch in .001 variations

MyMopar.com
3-52 SPECIFICATIONS 0

~ ~~~ ~~ ~

PINION BEARING DRAG TORQUE .................................. 15-25 inch-pounds


PINION DEPTH OF MESH ADJUSTMENT BY ......................... Spacer Washers
.084-.100 inch in .002 inch graduations
RUNOUT-CASE AND DRIVE GEAR ................................... .005 inch Maximum
WHEEL BEARING TYPE ............................................ Single Row Sealed Ball
LUBR ICATION
Capacity ......................................................... 2 pints (1-3/4 Imperial)
Type ...... Multi-Purpose Gear Lubricant as defined by MIL-L-2105B (API GL-5) should
be used on all rear axles; such a lubricant is available under Part No.
2933565 Chrysler Hypoid Gear Lubricant or an equivalent be used.

8-314“ Axle
TYPE ............................................................. Semi-Floating Hypoid
Ring Gear Diameter .............................................. 8.750
PINION BEARINGS
Type ............................................................ Tapered Roller
Number Used .................................................... 2
Adjustment (Small Stem or Large Stem Step Pinions) .............. Select Shims
(Large Stem Tapered Pinion) .......................... Collapsible Spacer
Pre-Load Torque (Seal Removed) ................................. 20-30 inch-pounds
DIFFERENTIAL BEARINGS
Type ............................................................ Tapered Roller
Number Used ................................................... 2
Adjustment ...................................................... Adjusting Nut
RING GEAR AND PINION
Serviced in ...................................................... Matched Sets
Ring Gear Runout ................................................ .005” Max.
Back Lash ....................................................... .OWto .008”
DIFFERENTIAL SIDE GEAR CLEARANCE
With Gauge ...................................................... .001 to .012”
WHEEL BEARINGS
Type ............................................................ Tapered Roller
Adjustment ..................................................... Adjusting Nut
End Play ........................................................ .008-.018
Lubrication ...................................................... Multi Purpose
Grease NLGl grade 2 E.P.
LUBRICATION
Capacity ........................................................ 4.4 Pints (3-1/2 Imperial)
Type ...... Multi-Purpose Gear Lubricant as defined by MIL-L-2105B (API GL-5) should
be used on all rear axles; such a lubricant is available under Part No.
2933565 Chrysler Hypoid Gear Lubricant or an equivalent be used.

9-314” Axle
~~

TYPE .............................................................. Sem-Floatng Hypoid


Ring Gear Diameter .............................................. 9.750
PINION BEARINGS
Type ............................................................. Taper Roller
Number Used .................................................... 2
Adjustment ...................................................... Select Shims
Pinion bearing drag Torque (seal removed) ........................ 1WO inch-pounds
DIFFERENTIAL .................................................... Sure-Grip
;.
Bearings (Type) ............. ................................... Taper Roller
Number Used .................................................... 2
Pre-Load Adjustment ............................................. Select Shims
RING GEAR AND PINION ........................................... Hypoid
Serviced in ...................................................... Matched Sets
Pinion depth of mesh adjustment ................................. Select Shims
Pinion and Ring Gear Backlash ................................... .004-.W’at point
of minimum backlash
Runout-differential case and ring gear backface .................... .006” maximum
WHEEL BEARINGS

MyMopar.com
C TIGHTENING R EFERENCE 3-53
~~

Type ............................................................ Taper Roller


Adjustment ...................................................... Threaded Adjusting Nut
End Play ........................................................ .008-.012
Lubrication ...................................................... Automotive Multi Purpose
Grease NLGl grade 2
LUBR 1CAT10N
Capacity ......................................................... 5 1 / 2 Pts. (4-1/2 Imperial)
Type.. . . . . . . . . Use only the special multi-purpose lubricant intended for use in Plate-
Clutch Sure-Grip differentials. Such a lubricant is available under Part
No. 2585318, Special Sure-Grip Lubricant or an equivalent be used.

TIGHTENING REFERENCE
7-114" Axle
Pounds
Foot Inch
Differential Bearing Cap Bolts ........................................... 40
Ring Gear to Differential Case Bolts (Left Hand Thread) .................... 55
Drive Pinion Flange Nut ................................................. 240 (Min.)
Carrier Cover Bolts ...................................................... 20
Axle Shaft Retainer Nuts ................................................ 35
Propeller Shaft Bolts (Rear) ............................................. 15
Spring Clip (U Bolt) Nuts ................................................ 40 (Max.)
Wheel Stud Nuts ........................................................ 55
Shock Absorber Stud Nuts (Lower) ....................................... 50
0-314" Axle
Pounds
Foot Inch
Differential Bearing Cap Bolts ............................................ 90
Ring Gear to Differential Case Bolts (Left Hand Thread) .................... 55
Drive Pinion Flange Nut (Small Stem or Large Stem Step Pinions) .......... 240 (Min.)
(Large Stem Tapered Pinions) .................... 170 (Min.)
Carrier to Axle Housing Bolt Nuts ........................................ 45
Axle Shaft Retainer Nuts ................................................ 35
Propeller Shaft Bolts (Rear) .............................................. 15
Spring Clip (U Bolt) Nuts ................................................ 45
Wheel Stud Nuts ........................................................ 65
Shock Absorber Stud Nuts (Lower) ....................................... 50
9-314" Axle
Pounds
Foot Inch
Differential Bearing Cap Bolts ........................................... 70-90
Differential Case Half Retaining Bolts ................................... 3545
Ring Gear To Differential Case Bolts .....................................
Drive Pinion Flange Nut .................................................
Carrier Cover Bolts ..................................................... 1525
Axle Shaft Retainer Nuts ............................................... 30-35
Propeller Shaft Bolts (Rear) ............................................. 17@200
Spring Clip (U-Bolts) Nuts .............................................. 45
.-
Wheel Stud Nuts ....................................................... 65
Shock Absorber Stud Nuts .............................................. 50

MyMopar.com
0 GROUP 5

BRAKES
CONTENTS
Page Page
KELSEY-HAYES DISC BRAKES POWER BRAKES (BENDIX) . . . . . . . . . . . 20-21
(FOUR PISTON) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 POWER BRAKES (MIDLAND-ROSS). ... 18
KELSEY-HAYES DISC BRAKES SERVICE BRAKES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5
(FLOATING CALIPER) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 SERVICE DIAGNOSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
GENERAL INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SPECIFICATIONS ...................... 54
MASTER CYLINDERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-33-49 WHEEL CYLINDERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
PARKING BRAKES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
GENERAL INFORMATION
The new Models are equipped with servo contact, adjusters. The lower ends of the brake shoes are con-
two shoe, internal expanding brakes with application nected by a tubular star wheel adjusting screw (Fig. 1).

SERVICE BRAKES
SERVlC E DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction

PEDAL GOES TO (a) Fluid low in reservoir. Fill and bleed master cylinder.
FLOOR (b) Air in hydraulic brake system. Fill and bleed hydraulic brake system.
(c) Improperly adjusted brake. Repair or replace self-adjuster as re-
qui red.
(d) Leaking wheel cylinders. Recondition or replace wheel cylinder
and replace both brake shoes.
(e) Loose or broken brake lines. Tighten all brake fittings or replace
brake line.
(f) Leaking or worn master cylinder. Recondition or replace master cyl-
inder and bleed hydraulic system.
(g) Excessively worn brake lining. Reline and adjust brakes.
SPONGYBRAKEPEDAL (a) Air in hydraulic system. Fill master cylinder and bleed hy-
draulic svstem.
Improper brake fluid (low boiling (b) Drain, flush and refill with brake fluid.
point).
Excessively worn or cracked brake (c) Replace all faulty brake drums.
drums.
Broken pedal pivot bushing. (d) Replace nylon pivot bshing.
BRAKES PULLING Contaminated Iining. (a) Replace contaminated brake lining.
Front end out of alignment. (b) Align front end.
Incorrect brake adjustment. (c) Adjust brakes and check fluid.
Unmatched brake Iining. (d) Match primary, secondary with same
tvDe of lining:on all wheels.
Brake drums out of round. (e) Ghnd or r e p h e brake drums.
Brake shoes distorted. (f) Replace faulty brake shoes.
(g) Restricted brake hose or line. (g) Replace plugged hose or brake line.
(h) Broken rear spring. (h) Replace broken spring.
SQUEALING BRAKES (a) Glazed brake lining. (a) Cam grind or replace brake lining.
(b) Saturated brake lining. (b) Replace saturated lining.
(c) Weak or broken brake shoe retaining (c) Replace retaining spring.
spring.
(d) Broken or weak brake shoe return (d) Replace return spring.
spring.
(e) Incorrect brake lining. (e) Install matched brake lining.
(f) Distorted brake shoes. (f) Replace brake shoes.
(g) Bent Support Plate. (g) Replace support plate.
(h) Dust in brakes or scored brake drums. (h) Blow out brake assembly with com-
pressed air and grind brake drums.

MyMopar.com
5-2 BRAKES c

Condition Possible Cause Correction


CHIRPING BRAKES (a) Out of round drum or eccentric axle (a) Repair as necessary, and lubricate
flange pi lot. support plate contact areas (6 places).
DRAGGING BRAKES (a) Incorrect wheel or parking brake ad- (a) Adjust brakes and check fluid.
justment.
(b) Parking brakes engaged. Ib) Release Darking brakes,
(cj Weak %r broken %r';ke shoe return (cj Replace brake :hoe ! return spring.
spring.
(d) Brake pedal binding. (d) Free up and lubricate brake pedal and
I inkage.
(e) Master cylinder cup sticking. (e) Recondition master cylinder.
(f) Obstructed master cylinder relief port. (f) Use compressed air and blow out re-
lief port.
(g) Saturated brake lining. (g) Replace brake lining.
(h) Bent or out of round brake drum. (h) Grind or replace fa ulty brake drum.
HARD PEDAL (a) Brake booster inoperative. (a) Replace brake booster.
(b) Incorrect brake lining. (b) Install matched brake lining.
I-\ n--&-:-&-A L.--I,- I:-- --I----
ILI Lledll UUL or replace brake line or
I-\ P I - - - - _ _ A ^I ---I.
ILI nexriLicu urdne iirie ur 11u5e.
hose.
(d) Frozen brake pedal linkage. (d) Free up and lubricate brake linkage.
WHEEL LOCKS (a) Contaminated brake lining. (a) Reline both front or rears of all four
brakes.
(b) Loose or torn brake lining. (b) Replace brake lining.
(c) Wheel cylinder cups sticking. (c) Recondition or replace wheel cylinder.
(d) Incorrect wheel bearing adjustment. (d) Clean, pack and adjust wheel bear-
ings.
BRAKES FADE (a) Incorrect lining. (a) Replace lining.
(HIGH SPEED) (b) Overheated brake drums. (b) Inspect for dragging brakes.
(c) Incorrect brake fluid (low boiling - (c) Drain, flush, refill and bleed hydraulic
temperature). brake system.
(d) Saturated brake lining. (d) Reline both front (i r rear or all four
brakes.
PEDAL PULSATES (a) Bent or out of round brake drum. (a) Grind or replace bratke drums.
BRAKE CHATTER! AND (a) Out of round brake drum. (a) Grind or replace bralke drums.
SHOE KNOCK (b) Loose support plate. (b) Tighten support plztte bolts to proper
specifications.
(c) Bent support plate. (c) Replace support plaite.
(d) Distorted brake shoes. (d) Replace brake shoeS.
(e) Machine grooves in contact face of (e) Grind or replace braike drum.
brake drum. (Shoe Knock).
(f) Contaminated brake lining. (f) Replace either front or rear or a l l four
linings.
BRAKES DO NOT (a) Adjuster screw frozen in thread. (a) Clean and free-up all thread areas.
SELF ADJUST (b) Adjuster screw corroded at thrust (b) Clean threads and replace thrust
washer. washer if necessary.
(c) Adjuster lever does not engage star (c) Repair, free up or replace adjuster as
wheel. required.
(d) Adjuster installed on wrong wheel. (d) Install correct adjuster parts.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
ADJUSTING SERVICE BRAKES then back off parking brake cable adjustment so there
is slack in cable.
Normally self adjusting brakes will not require (4) Insert adjusting tool C-3784,into star wheel of
manual adjustment but in the event of a brake reline adjusting screw. Move handle to tool upward until
it may be advisable to make the initial adjustment a slight drag is felt when road wheel is rotated.
manually to speed up the adjusting time. (5) Insert a thin screwdriver into brake adjusting
(1) Jack up vehicle so all wheels are free to turn. hole and push adjusting lever out of engagement with
(2) Remove rear adjusting hole cover from brake star wheel. (Care should be taken so as not to bend
supports of vehicle. adjusting lever (Fig. l), while holding adjusting lever
(3) Be sure parking brake lever is fully released, out of engagement, back off star wheel to insure a

MyMopar.com
BLEEDING BRAKE SYSTEM
Clean all dirt and foreign material from the cover
of the master cylinder to prevent any dirt from falling
into the master cylinder reservoir when the cover is
removed.
Using the one man bleeder tank C-3496-B (with
adapter) provides a convenient means of keeping the
master cylinder full while pressurizing the hydraulic
system for bleeding. (Complete bleeding of the dual
master cylinder is important! See Bleeding the Master
Cylinder in this Section.) Manual Bleeding i s not rec-
ADJUSTING TOOL- ommended because of reduced fluid tlow.
&fiSCREWDRIVER Tighten the brakes of each wheel until the brakes
are locked. (This reduces the movement of the wheel
ND504B cylinder cups and assists in bleeding).
Starting with the right rear wheel clean all dirt
Fig. 1-Adjusting Brakes from the bleeder valve. Place bleeder hose C-650 on
the bleeder valve and insert the other end of the
free wheel with no brake shoe drag. bleeder hose into a clear jar half filled with clean
(6) Repeat above adjustment at each wheel. The brake fluid. (This will permit the observation of air
adjustment must be equal to all wheels. Install ad- bubbles as they are being expelled from the hydrau-
justing hole covers in brake supports. lic system and also prevent air from being drawn
(7) Adjust parking brake after wheel brake adjust- back into the system. Follow the manufacturers in-
ment. structions in the use of the bleeder tools.)
It is important to follow the above sequence to avoid Continue this bleeding operation on the other
the possibility of the parking brake system causing wheels, starting with the left rear wheel, then the
brake drag as may occur if the parking brakes are ad- right front and finishing with the left front wheel.
justed before the service brakes. If necessary, repeat this bleeding operation if there
is any indication (a low, soft or spongy brake pedal)
TESTING APPLICATION ADJUSTER of air remaining in the hydraulic system. Readjust
OPERATION the brakes as described previously.
Place the vehicle on a hoist, with a helper in the TEST FOR FLUID CONTAMINATION
driver's seat to apply the brakes. Remove the plug
from the rear adjustment slot in each brake sup- To determine if contamination exists in the brake
port plate to observe the adjuster star wheel. Then, fluid (as indicated by swollen or deteriorated rubber
to exclude the possibility of maximum adjustment; cups), the following test can be made.
that is, the adjuster refuses to operate because Place a small amount of the drained brake fluid
the closest possible adjustment has been reached; into a small clear glass bottle. Separation of the fluid
the star wheel should be backed off approximately into distinct layers will indicate mineral oil content.
30 notches. It will be necessary to hold the adjuster If there is any question of mineral oil content, as
lever away from the star wheel to allow backing off indicated by swollen or deteriorated rubber parts,
of the adjustment. drain and flush thoroughly and replace all rubber
Spin the wheel and brake drum in the reverse parts.
direction and apply the brakes vigorously. This will
provide the necessary inertia to cause the secondary WHEEL STUD NUT TIGHTENING
brake shoe to leave the anchor. The wrap up effect
will move the secondary shoe, and the cable will pull The tightening sequence and torquing of the wheel
the adjuster lever up. Upon application of the brake stud nuts is of great importance to insure efficient
pedal, the lever should move upward, turning the brake operation. The use of an impact or long
star wheel. Thus, a definite rotation of the adjuster handled wrench may distort the drum.
star wheel can be observed if the automatic adjuster A criss-cross tightening sequence should be used
is working properly. If by the described procedure (Fig. 2). Tighten all the stud nuts to one-half the
one or more adjusters do not function properly, the specified torque first, (30 ft. lbs.), and then repeat the
respective drum must be removed for adjuster serv- sequence tightening to the specified 55 foot-pounds.
icing. (65foot pounds on 10 and 11inch brakes).

MyMopar.com
5-4 BRAKES
fective flaring seats. The steel tubing is equipped with
a double flare or inverted seat to insure more positive
seating in the fitting. To repair or reflare tubing pro-
ceed as follows:
(1) Using Tool C-3478, or equivalent, cut off dam-
aged seat or damaged tubing (Fig. 3).
(2) Ream out any burred or rough edges showing
on inside edges of tubing. This will make the ends of
tubing square and insure better seating of flared end
tubing. Place compression nut on tubing prior to flar-
ing tubing.
(3) To flare tubing open handles of flaring Tool
(2-3838 and rotate jaws of tool until the mating jaws
of tubing size are centered in area between vertical
posts.
(4) Slowly close handles with tubing inserted in
Fig. 2-Wheel Stud Nut Tightening Sequence jaws but do not apply heavy pressure to handle as this
BRAKE HOSE AND TUBING will lock tubing in place.
(5) Place gauge “Form A” on edge over end of
The flexible hydraulic brake hose should always be tubing and push tubing through jaws until end of
installed in the vehicle by first tightening the male tubing contacts the recessed notch of gauge matching
end of the hose in the wheel cylinder or rear axle the size of tubing (Fig. 3).
housing tee. The hose is then clipped to the hose (6) Squeeze handles of flaring tool and lock tubing
bracket in a manner to give minimum twist. Exces- in place.
sive twist can result in hose interference problems (7)Place proper sized plug of gauge “A” down in
with possible hydraulic system failure. end of tubing. Swing compression disc over gauge and
Inspection of brake hose and tubing should be center tapered flaring screw in recess of disc.
included in all brake service operations. The hoses (8) Lubricate taper of flaring screw and screw in
should be checked for: until plug gauge has seated on jaws of flaring
(1) Correct length, severe surface cracking, pulling tool. This action has started to invert the extended
scuffing or worn spots. (Should the cotton fabric cas- end of the tubing.
ing of the hose be exposed by cracks or abrasions in (9) Remove gauge and apply lubricant to tapered
the rubber hose cover, the hose should be replaced. end of flaring screw and continue to screw down until
Eventual deterioration of the hose can take place with
possible burst failure).
(2) Faulty installation to cause twisting, wheel, tire
or chassis interference.
Always use factory recommended hose to insure
quality, correct length and superior fatigue life. Care
should be taken to make sure that the tube and hose
mating surfaces are clean and free from nicks and
burrs. New copper seal washers should be used and
the tube nuts and connections should be properly
made and tightened. Double wall steel tubing should
always be used to insure superior fatigue life. Care
should be taken when replacing brake tubing, to use
the proper bending and flaring tools and to avoid
routing the tubes against sharp edges, moving com-
ponents or in hot areas. All tubes should be properly
attached with recommended retaining clips.
Steel tubing is used to conduct hydraulic pressure
to the front and rear brakes. Flexible rubber hose is
used at both front brakes and at a rear axle junction
block. Steel tubing is used from the junction block to
both rear wheel cylinders. All fittings, tubing and
hoses should be inspected for rusted, damaged or de- Fig. 3-Cutting and Flaring Steel Tubing

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-5
tool is firmly seated in tubing. (11) Clean seat and tube of any lubricant before
(10) Remove tubing from flaring tool and inspect connecting to hydraulic system.
seat.

SERVICE BRAKES
INDEX
Page Page
Brake Drum Removal Grinding Recommendations .................... 8
Front Brake Drums .......................... 5 Brake Shoe Installation
Rear Brake Drums .......................... 5 Front Brake Shoes ........................... 8
Brake Shoe Removal Rear Brake Shoes ........................... 8
Front Brake Shoes ........................... 6 Brake Drum Installation
Rear Brake Shoes ........................... 6 Front Brake Drums .......................... 9
Cleaning and Inspection ....................... 7 Rear Brake Drums ........................... 9

SERVICE PROCEDURES
Illustrations of the various service procedures will (4) Remove wheel cover, grease cap, cotter pin,
not always show any one specific brake. lock, adjusting nut, outer wheel bearing and remove
wheel and drum assembly from spindle to expose
BRAKE D R U M REMOVAL brake linings. (Figs. 1 , 2 or 3).
(5) Inspect brake lining for wear, shoe alignment,
Removing Front Brake Drums or contamination from grease or brake fluid.
To aid in brake drum removal loosen brake star
adjusting wheel. Removing Rear Brake Drums
(1) Remove rear plug from brake adjusting access (1) Remove rear plug from brake adjusting access
hole. hole.
(2) Insert a thin screwdriver into brake adjusting (2) Insert a thin screwdriver into brake adjusting
hole and push adjusting lever away from star adjust- hole and hold adjusting lever away from notches of
ing wheel. Care should be taken not to bend adjusting adjusting screw.
lever. (3) Insert Tool C-3784 into brake adjusting hole
(3) Insert Tool C-3784 into brake adjusting hole and engage notches of brake adjusting screw. Release
and engage notches of brake adjusting star wheel. brake by prying down with adjusting tool.
Release brake adjustment by prying down with adjust- (4) Remove rear wheel and clips from wheel studs
ing tool. that holds drum on axle. Discard clips. Remove drum.
ANCHOR ANCHOR
WHEEL CYLINDER

SECONDARY SHOE
RETURN SPRING
RETURN SPRING

SUPPORT PLATE
SHOE TABS (3)
SHOE RETAINER DJUSTER CABLE

PRIMARY SHOE SHOE RETAINER RETAINING NAIL


AND LINING
AUTOMATIC

ASSEMBLY ADJUSTING FRONT OF FRONT OF


LEFT FRONT (STAR WHEEL) LEVER VEHICLE LEFT REAR VEHICLE NU52A

Fig. I-Nine Inch Brake Assembly

MyMopar.com
5-6 BRAKES s

WHEEL CYLINDER

SPRING WASHER

CABLE GUIDE

SHOE RETAINER

SHOE RETAINER (4) PARKING BRAKE


PRIMARY SHOE
OVERLOAD SPRING AND LINING ECONDARY SHOE

RIGHT FRONT FRONT OF VEHICLE+ LEFT REAR. (STAR WHEEL) C FRONT OF VEHICLE NU53A

Fig. 2--Ten Inch Brake Assembly


(5) Inspect brake lining for wear, shoe alignment or ing forward to clear pivot, then working out from
contamination from grease or brake fluid. under spring. Remove spring from pivot. Remove
automatic adjuster spring from primary shoe web
BRAKE SHOE REMOVAL and disengage from secondary shoe web. Remove
spring.
Removing Front Brake Shoes (4) Remove brake shoe retainers, springs and nails,
(1) Using Tool C-3785 remove brake shoe return using Tool C-4070, (Fig. 5).
springs (Fig. 3). (Note how secondary spring overlaps (5) Disengage primary and secondary shoes from
primary spring). (Fig. 1). push rods (if so equipped) and remove from support.
(2) Slide eye of automatic adjuster cable off anchor Remove adjusting star wheel assembly from shoes.
and unhook from adjusting lever. Remove cable, over-
load spring, cable guide and anchor plate. Removing Rear Brake Shoes
(3) Disengage adjusting lever from spring by slid- (1) Remove rear wheel, and drum retaining clips.

WHEEL CYLINDER ANCHOR PLATE SECONDARY

/ LOCK
SPRING WASHER DUST BOOT
\
RETURN SPRING

LEFT REAR C FRONT OF VEHICLE LEFT FRONT C FRONT OF VEHICLE N U ~ A

Fig. 3-Eleven Inch Brake Assembly

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-7
PRIMARY
RETUR
SPRIN

1
ANTI OE RETURN
RING I

1 ADJ%ST<R
CABLE
ADJUSTER- H
SPRING- ,DJUSTING Y LEVER
4 LEVER SPRING
PRING NU241A
ADJUSTER ADJUST I NG
Fig. 4-Removing or Installing Shoe Return Springs SPRING LEVER NU243A
(Left Front) Fig. 6-Removing or Installing Shoe Return Springs
Remove drum. (Left Rear)
(2) Using Tool (3-3785, remove brake shoe return push rods (if so equipped) and remove from support.
springs (Fig. 6 ) . (Note how secondary spring overlaps Remove adjusting star wheel assembly from shoes.
primary spring). (Fig. 1).
(3) Slide eye of automatic adjuster cable off anchor CLEANING AND INSPECTION
and then unhook from adjusting lever. Remove cable, Wipe or brush clean (dry) the metal portions of the
overload spring, cable guide and anchor plate. brake shoes. Examine the lining contact pattern to
(4) Disengage adjusting lever from spring by slid- determine if the shoes are bent. The lining should
ing forward to clear pivot, then working out from show contact across the entire width, extending from
under spring. Remove spring from pivot. Remove heel to toe. Shoes showing contact only on one side
automatic adjuster spring from primary shoe web and should be replaced. Shoes having sufficient lining but
disengage from secondary shoe web. Remove spring. lack of contact at toe and heel should be measured for
(5) Remove brake shoe retainers, springs and nails. proper grind.
Using Tool C-4070, (Fig. 7). Clean the support, using a suitable solvent, then
( 6 ) Spread anchor ends of primary and secondary inspect for burrs. Remove if necessary. Clean and
shoes and remove parking brake lever strut and anti- inspect the adjusting screws for pulled or stripped
rattle spring (Fig. 8). threads, then apply a thin film of lubricant to the
(7) Disengage parking brake cable from parking threads.
brake lever. New brake shoe return springs and hold down
(8) Disengage primary and secondary shoes from springs should be installed where the old springs
L.rsl-
SECONDARY PRIMARY SHOE
SHOE AND
LINING

/
RETAlNER \
a
Fig. 5-Removing or Installing Shoe Retainers, Fig. 7-Removing or Installing Shoe Retainers,
Springs and Nails (Right Front) Springs and Nails (Right Rear)

MyMopar.com
5-8 BRAKES 0
l_l___

tion on vehicle). The left side star wheel is cadmium


plated. The right is black, and the adjusting stud end
TAB OF ANTI is not stamped.
(3) Install adjuster spring in secondary shoe and
hook other end in web of primary. Install adjusting
lever spring over pivot pin on shoe web. Install adjust-
ing lever under spring and over pivot pin. Slide lever
slightly rearward to lock in position (Fig. 1).
(4) Spread anchor ends of brake shoes to hold star
adjusting wheel assembly in position.
(5) Holding brake shoes firmly, place assembly on
support plate, and at the same time engage shoe webs
with push rods (if so equipped). (Fig. 9).
(6) Using Tool C-4070, install shoe retaining nails,
springs and retainers. (Fig. 5).
PRIMARY SHOE (7) Install anchor plate over anchor.
AND LINING (8) Slide “eye” of adjusting cable over anchor and
Fig. 8-Removing or lnstalling Parking Brake Strut
against anchor plate. Engage end of primary shoe re-
a n d Spring (Left Rear) turn spring in shoe web and install other end over
anchor, using Tool C-3785.
have been subjected to overheating or if their strength (9) Install cable guide in secondary shoe web. Hold-
is questionable. Spring paint discoloration or distorted ing in position, engage secondary shoe return spring
end coils would indicate an overheated spring. through guide and into web. Install other end over
G R I NDING RECOMMENDATIONS anchor, using Tool C-3785. (Be sure cable guide re-
mains flat against shoe web, and that secondary spring
Brake Shoe Lining-New lining should be meas- overlaps primary). (Fig. 1).Using pliers, squeeze ends
ured and ground .060“ to .080” (maximum under the of spring loops (around anchor) until parallel.
drum diameter). When replacing brake shoe and lin-
(10) Thread adjuster cable over guide and hook
ing assemblies, always check them in the drum they
end of overload spring in lever (Fig. 1).(Be sure “eye”
are to be used with to insure that they have the
recommended radius grind. This grind, which should of cable is pulled tight against anchor and in a straight
provide at least .004 inch heel and toe clearance, is line with guide).
necessary for proper lining to drum contact during
brake application. lnstalling Rear Brake Shoes
Drum Refacing-Measure the drum runout with Lubricate with a thin film the shoe tab contact area
an accurate gauge. Drum runout should not exceed (6 places) on support plate with Chrysler support plate
.006 inch out of round. If the drum runout is in excess lubricant, Part Number 2932524 or equivalent (Fig.
of .006 inch, (total indicator run-out) the drum should 11).
(1) Install parking brake lever on inner side of sec-

-
be refaced. Remove only as much material as is nec-
essary to clean up the drum. It is recommended the ondary shoe web after lubricating pivot with support
front drums be refaced with the wheel and tire
PRIMAR‘ DARY SHOE
mounted. Do not reface more than .060 inch over the
standard drum diameter.
BRAKE SHOE INSTALLATION ANDl 7”’”“
lnstalling Front Brake Shoes
Lubricate with a thin film the shoe tab contact area
(6 places) on support plate with Chrysler support plate
lubricant, Part Number 2932524 or equivalent (Fig.
11).
(1) Match a primary with a secondary brake shoe
and place them in their relative position on a work
bench.
(2) Install adjusting star wheel assembly between
Y

.1 4
primary and secondary shoes, with a star wheel next ADJUSTING
L WHEEL USTEF
to secondary shoe (Fig. 1). (The left star wheel adjust-
ing stud end is stamped “L” which indicates its posi- Fig. 9-Installing Brake Shoes ( L e f t Front)

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-9

WAVE WASHER

Fig. 1 O-Installing Brake Shoes (Left Rear) SHOE C


AREA ( 6 ) NR107
plate lubricant. Secure with wave washer and horse- Fig. 11-Shoe Contact Area on Support
shoe clip.
(2) Engage parking brake lever with cable, then primary and secondary shoe, with star wheel next to
slide secondary shoe against support plate, and at the secondary shoe. (Fig. 1).The left star wheel adjusting
same time engage shoe web with push rod (if so stud end is stamped “L” which indicates its position
equipped), and against anchor. on vehicle. The left side star wheel is cadmium plated.
(3) Slide parking brake strut behind hub and into The right is black, and the adjusting stud end is not
slot in parking brake lever. Slide anti-rattle spring * stamped. Install adjuster spring between shoes (Fig.
over free end of strut. (Fig. 8). On ten inch brakes, be 1).(Engage secondary shoe first).
sure spring tab is pointing rearward and up on outside (8) Install adjusting lever spring over pivot pin on
of shoe web (Left Brake), and pointing frontward and shoe web. Install adjusting lever under spring and
down behind shoe web (Right Brake) (Fig. 8). On over pivot pin. Slide lever slightly rearward to lock in
eleven inch brakes, be sure spring tab is pointing for- position.
ward and down and outside of shoe web (Left Brake), (9) Using Tool (2-4070, install shoe retaining nails,
and pointing frontward and down behind shoe web retainers and springs. (Fig. 7).
(Right Brake) (Fig. 3). (10) Thread adjuster cable over guide and hook end
(4) Slide primary shoe into position and engage of overload spring in lever. (Fig. 1).(Be sure eye of
with push rod (if so equipped), and free end of strut. cable is pulled tight against anchor and in a straight
Install anchor plate over anchor, then install eye of line with guide).
adjuster cable over anchor. (Fig. 10).
(5) Engage primary shoe return spring in web of installing front Brake Drums
shoe and install free end over anchor, using Tool C- (1) Lubricate wheel bearings and install brake
3785. (Fig. 6). drum and adjust wheel bearing to proper preload.
(6) Install cable guide in secondary shoe web. Hold- (2) Adjust brakes as described under “Service
ing in position, engage secondary shoe return spring Procedures” at front of this Section.
through guide and into web. Install other end over
anchor, using Tool C-3785. (Be sure cable guide re- lnsialling Rear Brake Drums
mains flat against shoe web and that secondary spring (1) Install brake drum, reinstallation of retaining
overlaps primary). (Fig. 1).Using pliers, squeeze ends clips is not necessary. Install wheel and tire assembly.
of spring loops (around anchor) until parallel. (2) Adjust brakes as described under “Service
(7) Install adjusting star wheel assembly between Procedures’’ at front of this Section.
MASTER CYLINDER
(Drum Brakes)
INDEX
Page Page
Bleedinn Master Cylinder ...................... 12 Installins! Master Cylinder ...................... 12
Cleaning and Inspection ....................... 11 Master cylinder Rimoval ...................... 10
Disassembling Master Cylinder ................. 10 Reassembling Master Cylinder ................. 11
General Information ........................... 10 Testing Master Cylinder ....................... 12
Hydraulic System Safety Switch ............... 12

MyMopar.com
5-10 BRAKES 0

GENERAL INFORMATION
The tandem master cylinder (Fig. 1)is of the com- to the safety switch and the front brakes.
pensating type with the reservoirs cast integrally. The master cylinder used on vehicles not equipped
'The master cylinder consists of a front and rear pis- with power brake units is serviced in the same man-
ton (in tandem) two outlets, each contain a residual ner as the master cylinder with power brakes, with
pressure valve and spring (Fig. 4). one exception, the master cylinder for power brakes
The front outlet tube from the master cylinder is does not include the push rod.
connected to the hydraulic system safety switch The disc brake master cylinder is different than
(Figs. 8 and 9) and thence to the rear brakes. The rear the standard drum brake master cylinder and is cov-
outlet tube from the master cylinder is also connected ered in the disc brake section of the brake group.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
MASTER CYLINDER REMOVAL (4) Remove front piston compression spring from
bore.
(1) Disconnect front and rear brake tubes from (5) Remove rubber cups from pistons, after noting
master cylinder (residual pressure valves will keep positions of cup lips.
cylinder from draining). Do not remove the primary cup of the rear piston.
(2) Remove nuts that attach master cylinder to
If cup is damaged or worn, install a new rear piston
cowl panel and/or power brake unit (if so equipped).
assembly.
(3) Disconnect pedal push rod (manual brakes)
(6) Using Tool T109-178 (or an easy out) remove
from brake pedal.
(4) Slide master cylinder straight out from cowl
* tube seats by threading tool firmly into seat, tap tool
panel and/or power brake unit (if so equipped). and seat out of cylinder body. (Fig. 2).
(7) Remove two residual pressure valves and
DISASSEMBLING MASTER CYLINDER springs (Fig. 3).
To disassemble the master cylinder, (Figs. 1 and
4) clean outside of master cylinder thoroughly.
(1) Remove cover retaining bolt, and clamp then
remove cover and gasket. Empty brake fluid from
reservoirs.
(2) Loosen piston retainer screw then press in on
rear piston and flip retainer down to release rear
piston assembly (Fig. 3). Slide rear piston assembly
out of cylinder bore.
(3) Remove screw and gasket that retains front
piston; then, upending master cylinder, tamp (open
end down) on bench to remove front piston. If front TUBE SEAT NPISA
piston sticks in bore of cylinder, use air pressure
to force piston out of cylinder. New cups must be Fig. 2-Removing Tube Seats
installed at reassembly if air pressure is used.
RESIDUAL PRESSURE PISTON RETAINER
H O L D DOWN CLAMP

/ '
REAR- BRAKE
MASTER
TUBE OUTLET FRONT BRAKE REAR '

FRONT PISTON
TUBE OUTLET P M O N

PISTON RETAINING
CYLINDER
BODY '
RESIDUAL
PRESSURE VALVE
\R&DuAL PRESSURE-
VALVE SPRING NPl9A
R E T A I N I N G SET SCREW NPl7B
Fig. 3-Removing or Installing Residual
Fig. 1-Tandem Master Cylinder Pressure Valve

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-11

Fig. 4-Tandem Master Cylinder (Exploded View)


CLEANING AND INSPECTION (3) Carefully work front piston secondary cup (Fig.
4) into rear land, with the cup lip away from piston.
Clean master cylinder thoroughly, using a suitable (4) Slide cup retainer over front end of piston,
solvent and dry with compressed air. Wash the cyl- followed by piston spring (Fig. 4).
inder bore with clean brake fluid and inspect for (5) Install piston spring, piston cup retainer, piston
scoring or pitting. Master cylinder bore walls that and cups into bore of master cylinder (Fig. 5).
have light scratches or show signs of corrosion, can Be sure the lip of cups enter bore evenly in order
usually be cleaned with crocus cloth. However, cyl- not to damage sealing qualities of cups. (Keep well
inder bores that have deep scratches or scoring may lubricated with brake fluid.)
be honed, providing diameter of bore is not increased
more than .002 inch. If master cylinder bore does not Rear Piston
clean up at .002 inch when honed, the master cylinder (1) Carefully work secondary cup over rear end of
should be discarded and a new master cylinder in- rear piston with lip of cup toward piston (Fig. 4).
stalled. (2) Center spring retainer of rear piston assem-
If master cylinder pistons are badly scored or bly over shoulder of front piston. Push piston as-
corroded, replace them with new ones. The piston
cups and seals should be replaced when recondition- semblies into bore up to center piston cup. Carefully
ing a master cylinder. work cup into bore then push piston in up to the
When overhauling a master cylinder, use all parts rear cup. Carefully work lip of rear cup into bore,
furnished in repair kit. Discard all used rubber then push in on piston until seated (Fig. 6).
parts. (3) Holding piston in seated position, move piston
PISTON,SPRlNG ,,o,,
REASSEMBLING MASTER CYLINDER
Front Piston
Before assembling the master cylinder, dip all
component parts in clean brake fluid and place on a
clean shop towel or paper (assembling seals dry,
can ruin them).
(1) Carefully work primary cup on end of front FRONT PISTON
piston with the lip away from piston (Fig. 4). RETAINING SCREW PISTO
AND GASKET
(2) Slide “0”ring over the rear end of front pis-
ton and into correct land. Fig. 54nstalling Front Piston and Spring

MyMopar.com
5-12 BRAKES 0

PISTON REAR PISTON push rod with cowl panel opening (manual brakes)
or power brake push rod with cylinder piston.
(2) Slide over mounting studs. Install attaching
nuts and tighten to 9 foot-pounds. Connect push rod
to brake pedal.
(3) Connect front and rear brake tubes and tighten
to 150 inch-pounds.
(4) Bleed brakes at wheel cylinders using regular
procedure, being sure fluid level is maintained. (See
Bleeding the Brake System.)
FRONT PISTON
\ AND
RmiNiNG SCREW
GASKET
REAR PISTON
ASSEMBLY
~ / = "'-
NP22A TESTING MASTER CYLINDER
Fig. 6-Indulling Rear Piston Assembly
Be sure that the master cylinder compensates at
both ports. This can be done by applying the pedal
retainer over piston and tighten screw securely. lightly with the engine running (power brakes) and
(4) Install front piston retaining set screw and gas- observing for a gyser of fluid squirting up in the
ket in cylinder body and tighten securely (Fig. 1). reservoirs. This may only occur in the front chamber
(5) Install residual pressure valves and springs in and so to determine if the rear compensating port
outlet ports and install tube seats, firmly. is open, it will be necessary to pump up the brakes
rapidly and, then, hold the pedal down. Have an ob-
BLEEDING MASTER CYLINDER server watch the fluid in the rear reservoir while
the pedal is raised. A disturbance in the fluid indi-
Before installing the master cylinder on vehicle, it cates that the compensating port is open.
must be bled on the bench as follows:
(1) Clamp master cylinder in a vise and attach HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SAFETY SWITCH
bleeding tubes Tool C-4029 (Fig. 7).
(2) Fill both reservoirs with approved brake fluid. The hydraulic system safety switch (Figs. 8 and 9)
(3) Using a wooden stick or dowel (power brake is used to warn the vehicle operator that one of the
equipped vehicles) or depress push rod slowly and hydraulic systems has failed. A failure in one part
allow the pistons to return under pressure of springs. of the brake system does not result in failure of the
Do this several times until all air bubbles are ex- entire hydraulic brake system. As an example, failure
pelled. (Fig. 7). of the rear brake system will leave the front brake
(4) Remove bleeding tubes from cylinder and in- system still operative.
stall cover and gasket. (As tubes are removed, fluid
remaining in tubes will syphon out.)
(5) Install cover retaining clamp and clamp screw.
(6) Remove from vise and install master cylinder
on vehicle as follows:
STON SEAL "0" RING
INSTALLING MASTER CY LI NDER SEAL "0" RING

(1) Install master cylinder on vehicle, aligning

N ASSEMBLY
MASTER CYLINDER
STAMPED "R"

NP16A
NP23A
Fig. I - B l w d i n g Master Cylinder Fig. B-lfydraulic System Sufety Switch (Sectional)

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-13
As pressure falls in one system, the other system’s
SAFETY SWITCH
normal pressure forces the piston to the inoperative
side contacting the switch terminal, causing a red
warning light to come on in the instrument panel, SAFETY SWITCH
thus, warning the operator of the vehicle that one BODY ASSEMBLY
of the systems has failed and should be repaired.
The safety switch is mounted on the frame in a
vertical position, with the brake tubes connected.
(Fig. 8).
If a malfunction occurs within the switch, dis-
connect tubes from body assembly and install a new
assembly. The component parts of the switch body MOUNTING
BRACKET
are not serviced. However, the terminal unit can
be removed if a malfunction occurs and a new termi- Fig. 9-Hydraulic System Safety Switch
nal unit installed. (Exploded V i e w )
If a new body is installed, bleed the brake system.

WHEEL CYLINDERS
INDEX
Page Page
Assembling Wheel Cylinders .................... 13 Installing Wheel Cylinders ...................... 14
Disassembling Wheel Cylinders ................. 13 Removing Brake Supports ...................... 15
Installing Brake Supports ...................... 15 Removing Wheel Cylinders ..................... 13

GENERAL INFORMATION
A piston stop (Fig. 4) is welded to the support plates (front or rear), then slide wheel cylinder assembly out
to prevent the pistons from moving out far enough to of support.
lose brake fluid. The piston boots are of the press-on
type and prevents moisture from entering the wheel DISASSEMBLING WHEEL CYLINDERS
cylinder. Front or Rear
To perform service operations or inspections of the To disassemble the wheel cylinders, (Figs. 1 or 2)
wheel cylinders, it will be necessary to remove the proceed as follows:
cylinders from the support plate and disassemble on (1) Using a suitable tool, pry boots away from cylin-
the bench. ders and remove. Remove push rods (if so equipped).
(2) Press in on one piston and force out piston, cup,
REMOVING WHEEL CYLINDERS spring cup and piston.
(3) Wash wheel cylinder, pistons and spring in
Front or Rear clean brake fluid or alcohol; clean thoroughly and
With all the brake drums removed, inspect the. blow dry with compressed air. Inspect cylinder bore
wheel cylinder boots for evidence of a brake fluid leak. and piston for scoring or pitting. (Do not use a rag as
Visually check the boots for cuts, tears, or heat cracks, lint from the rag will adhere to bore surfaces.)
and if any of these conditions exist, the wheel cylin- Wheel cylinder bores and pistons that are badly
ders should be completely cleaned, inspected and new scored or pitted should be replaced. Cylinder walls
parts installed. (A slight amount of fluid on the boot that have light scratches, or show signs of corrosion,
may not be a leak, but may be assembly fluid used can usually be cleaned with crocus cloth, using a cir-
during assembly. cular motion. Black stains on the cylinder walls are
(1) In case of a leak, remove brake shoes, (replace caused by piston cups and will not impair operation
if soaked with grease or brake fluid.) of cylinders.
(2) Disconnect brake hose from brake tube at frame
bracket (front wheels) or disconnect brake tube from ASSEMBLING WHEEL CYLINDERS
wheel cylinder (rear wheels). Front or Rear
(3) Disconnect brake hose or tube from wheel cyl- To assemble the wheel cylinders (Figs. 1 or 2,) pro-
inder (front). Remove wheel cylinder attaching bolts ceed as follows:

MyMopar.com
5-14 BRAKES c)

REAR-HS)USIN(
B

PRESS ON-BOOT
/ '/
PISTON /
/ 5/16" B L E ~ DSCREW Lur
I
I
CLIC'rr\.I I

NR4

Fig. 1-Wheel Cylinders 9 lnch Bruke (Front & Rem)


Before assembling the pistons and new cups in the (3) Install pistons in each end of cylinder with
wheel cylinders, dip them in clean brake fluid. If the recessed end of pistons facing open ends of cylinder.
boots are deteriorated, cracked or do not fit tightly on (4) Install boots over ends of cylinder and press
the push rods (if so equipped) or shoe tang, as well as over ends until boot is seated again cylinder shoulder.
the cylinder casting, new boots must be installed. Use care so as not to damage boot.
(1) Coat cylinder bore with clean brake fluid.
(2) Install expansion spring in cylinder. Install cups INSTALLING WHEEL CYLINDERS
in each end of cylinder bithopen- end of cups facing Front or Rear
each other. (1) Slide wheel cylinder into position on support

REAR-HOUSING
I

FRONT-H~USING

Fig. 2-Wheel Cylinders 10 und 1 I lnch Bruke

MyMopar.com
n BRAKES 5-15

PRESS-ON BOOT SUPPORT NRim

Fig. 4-Wheel Cylinder Piston Stops


CABLE RETAINING CLIP support attaching nuts and washers.
(2) Remove rear axle shaft and retainer.
NF 596
(3) Disconnect hydraulic brake line from wheel
Fig. 3-Removing Broke Cable from Support cylinder.
(4) Disengage brake cable frcm parking brake lever.
(front or rear). Install mounting screws and torque to
(5) Using a suitable tool compress three flared legs
110 inch pounds. (9 inch brakes) or 220 inch pounds
of cable retainer and pull brake cable out of support
(10 and 11 inch brakes).
(2) Connect brake tube to rear wheel cylinder and (Fig. 3).
(6) Remove brake support from rear axle housing.
torque to 115 inch pounds.
(3) Challenger Only-Connect brake hose to front
wheel cylinder, using a new gasket. Torque to 25 foot
INSTALLING BRAKE SUPPORT
pounds, before attaching brake hose to frame bracket. (Front)
Should hose be connected to wheel cylinder last, tight- (1) Dart only-Place support on spindle and install
ening of the hose into wheel cylinder will twist hose attaching bolts, nuts and washers. Torque the top at-
and can result in suspension or tire interference. taching bolts to 55 foot pounds. The bottom attaching
Dart Only-Connect jumper tube into wheel cylin- bolts are to be torqued to 100 foot pounds.
der and torque to 105 inch pounds. Attach brake hose Challenger only-Place support on spindle and in-
to frame bracket and connect brake line to hose and stall attaching bolts, nuts, and washers. Torque the
torque to 105 inch-pounds. Thread jumper tube into bottom attaching bolts 55 foot pounds. The bottom at-
brake hose. Attach brake hose to stand off bracket taching bolts are to be torqued to 120 foot pounds.
and then torque jumper tube to 105 inch-pounds. (2) Connect brake hose to wheel cylinder and
(4) Connect brake line to hose and torque to 115 torque to 25 foot-pounds, before connecting brake
inch pounds. hose to frame bracket. Should hose be connected to
wheel cylinder last, tightening of hose into wheel cyl-
REMOVING BRAKE SUPPORT inder will twist hose, which can result in suspension
or tire interference problems.
(Front)
(1) Disconnect brake line from brake hose at frame (Rear)
bracket. (1) Install support onto rear axle housing.
(2) With wheel and brake drum removed, remove (2) Insert rear axle shaft and retainer into housing
four support attaching nuts and washers. and install axle retainer nuts and washers. Tighten
(3) Remove support and brake assembly from retainer nuts to 35 foot-pounds.
spindle. (3) Attach brake line to wheel cylinder and tighten
to 115 inch-pounds.
(Rear) (4) Insert parking brake cable into support plate
(1) With wheel and brake drum removed, remove and attach cable to parking brake lever.

MyMopar.com
5-16 BRAKES 0

PARKING BRAKES
INDEX
Page Page
Adjusting Parking Brake ........................ 16 Removing Front Parking Brake Cable ........... 17
General Information ........................... 16 Removing Rear Parking Brake Cable ............ 16
Installing Front Parking Brake Cable ............ 18 Service Diagnosis ............................. 16
Installing Rear Parking Brake Cable ............ 17

GENERAL INFORMATION
The rear wheel service brakes also act as parking The wheel brake cables are joined together by a for-
brakes. The brake shoes are mechanically operated by ward brake cable and equalizer extending to the park-
a lever and strut connected to a flexible steel cable. ing brake pedal or release handle (Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4).

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
DRAGGING BRAKE (a) Improper cable or brake shoe adjust- (a) Properly adjust the service brakes
ment. then adjust the parking brake cable.
(b) Broken brake shoe return spring. (b) Replace any broken return spring.
(c) Broken brake shoe retainer spring. (c) Replace the broken retainer spring.
(d) Grease or brake fluid soaked lining. (d) Replace the grease seal or recondi-
tion the wheel cylinders and replace
both brake shoes.
(e) Sticking or frozen brake cable. (e) Replace cable.
(f) Broken rear spring. (f) Replace the broken rear spring.
(g) Bent or rusted cable equalizer. (g) Straighten, or replace and lubricate
the equalizer.
(h) Heat set parking brake cable spring. (h) Replace parking brake cable.
BRAKE WILL NOT HOLD (a) Broken or rusted brake cable. (a) Replace cable.
(b) Improperly adjusted brake or cable. (b) Adjust brakes and cable as necessary.
(c) Soaked brake lining. (c) Replace the brake lining.
(d) Ratchet or pedal mechanism worn. (d) Replace pedal assembly.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
ADJUSTING PARKING BRAKE (Fig. 3) Wheel Cylinders.
(1) With vehicle jacked up or on a suitable hoist,
The service brakes must be properly adjusted be- remove rear wheels.
fore adjusting the parking brake. (2) Disconnect brake cable from equalizer.
(1) Release parking brake lever and loosen cable
adjusting nut to insure cable is slack, (Figs. 1 or 2). RIGHT REAR CABLE ASSEMBLY
Before loosening cable adjusting nut, clean threads
with wire brush and lubricate with grease.
(2) Tighten cable adjusting nut until a slight drag
is felt while rotating wheel, loosen cable adjusting nut
until both rear wheels can be rotated freely, then
back off cable adjusting nut two full turns.
(3) Apply parking brake several times, then release
and test to see that rear wheels rotate freely without
dragging.

REMOVING REAR PARKING BRAKE CABLE


The independent rear brake cables are attached to
an equalizer (Fig. 1). The front cable is adjusted at NGER BRACKET
the equalizer. REAR ENGINE
CROSSMEMBER VIEW A NN558P
Should it become necessary to remove the parking
brake cable (rear) for installation of a new cable, see Fig. I-Parking Brake Cable Routing (Challenger)

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-17

VIEW IN DIRECTION
OF ARROW B

DIRECTION OF
ARROW A

VIEW IN DIRECTION OF ARROW C

Fig. 2-Parking Brake Cuble Routing fDurtl


(3) Remove retaining clip from brake cable brack- (6) Insert brake cable into equalizer. Note different
et. size slot for corresponding cable end fitting.
(4) Remove brake drum from rear axle. (7) Adjust service brakes and parking brake cable.
(5)Remove brake shoe return springs.
(6) Remove brake shoe retaining springs. REMOVING FRONT PARKING BRAKE CABLE
(7) Remove brake shoe strut and spring from brake
support and disconnect brake cable from operating (1) Disengage front parking brake cable from
arm. equalizer bar. Refer to (Figs. 1or 2).
(8) Compress retainers on end of brake cable hous- (2) Disengage cable from guide clip.
ing and remove cable from support. (Fig. 3) Wheel (3) Using a screwdriver force cable housing and
Cylinders. PARKING BRAKE
ASSEMBLY
INSTALLING REAR PARKING BRAKE CABLE
When installing a new brake cable, lubricate the
cable with short fibre grease at the contact points.
(1) Insert brake cable and housing into brake sup-
port plate making certain that housing retainers lock
the housing firmly into place.
(2) Holding brake shoes in place on support plate,
engage brake cable into brake shoe operating lever.
Install parking brake strut and spring.
(3) Install brake shoe retaining springs, and brake
FRONT CABLE ASSEMBLY
shoe return springs.
(4) Install brake drum and wheel.
PY366
(5) Insert brake cable and housing into cable
bracket and install retaining clip. Fig. 3-Parking Brake Pedul /Challenger)

MyMopar.com
5-18

NH3lOA
Fig. 4-Parking Brake lever (Daft)
attacl,ig clip out of body crossmember. down through cable routing ,.ole in floor pan.
(4) Fold back left front edge of floor mat and re- (2) Engage upper end of cable and housing assem-
move rubber cable cover from floor pan. bly up through pedal assembly bracket and firmly
(5) Depress parking brake pedal and work brake attach housing and clip into bracket.
cable up and out of brake pedal linkage, (Figs. 3 or 4). (3) Depress parking brake pedal and insert end of
(6) Using a screwdriver force upper end of cable cable into parking brake pedal clevis.
housing and clip down out of pedal assembly bracket. (4) Insert cable through body crossmember and
(7) Remove cable to floor pan clip and work cable firmly press into housing and attaching clip.
and housing assembly up through floor pan. (5) Attach front cable to equalizer bar.
(6) Adjust service brakes and parking brake cable.
INSTALLING FRONT PARKING BRAKE CABLE (7)Apply brakes several times and test for free
wheel rotation when parking brake is in “off” posi-
(1) Insert rear end of brake cable and housing tion.

MIDLAND-ROSS POWER BRAKE


(Tandem Diaphragm)
INDEX
Page Page
Installing Power Brake ......................... 20 Service Diagnosis ............................. 19
Removing Power Brake ........................ 20

GENERAL INFORMATION
The tandem diaphragm power brake (Fig. 1) is a unit provides lighter pedal effort.
vacuum unit which utilizes engine intake manifold This lighter effort is obtained in combination
vacuum and atmospheric pressure to provide power with a reduced pedal travel, which makes it possible
assisted application of the vehicle brakes. The power to bring the pedal down to the approximate height of

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-19
the accelerator pedal when at closed throttle condi- The power brake is externally connected to the
tion. Thus, the driver, after closing the throttle, can brake system. The unit is connected by a pedal link
shift his toe from one pedal to the other without to the brake pedal, by a vacuum line to the intake
lifting his heel from the floor. manifold (through a vacuum check valve) and hy-
The power brake, which is a self contained unit, draulic tubes from the master cylinder to the wheel
eliminates all external rods and levers, and mounts units.
on the engine side of the cowl panel.

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction

DRAGGING BRAKES Brake shoes improperly adjusted. (a) Adjust brakes.


(ALL WHEELS) Brake pedal linkage binding. (b) Free up linkage.
Excessive hydraulic seal friction. (c) Lubricate seal.
Compensator port plugged. (d) Clean out master cylinder.
Fluid cannot return to master cylinder. (e) Inspect pedal return.
Parking brake not returning. (f) Free up as required.
Disc brake metering valve mal-func- (g) Replace valve.
tioning.
GRABBING BRAKES Grease or brake fluid on linings. (a) Inspect for a leak and replace lining
as required.
PEDALGOESTOFLOOR Self-adjusters not operating. (a) Inspect self-adjuster operations.
(OR ALMOST TO FLOOR) Air in hydraulic system. (b) Bleed brakes.
Hydraulic leak. (c) Locate and correct leak.
Fluid low in master cylinder. (d) Add brake fluid.
Shoe hanging up on rough platform. (e) Smooth and lubricate platforms.
HARD PEDAL (POWER Faulty vacuum check valve. (a) Replace check valve.
UNIT TROUBLE) Collapsed or leaking vacuum hose. (b) Replace hose.
Plugged vacuum fittings. (c) Clean out fittings.

HOSE GASKET
\ I DASH FANEL

FENDER SIDE SHIELD

TANDEM MASTER CYLINDER


WINDSHIELD WASHER RESERVOIR HOLE NP279

Fig. I-Power Brake Assembly

MyMopar.com
5-20 BRAKES 0

SERVICE PROCEDURES
REMOVING POWER BRAKE (3) Using lubriplate, coat the bearing surface of
bolt that connects power brake pedal link with brake
(1) Remove nuts attaching master cylinder to brake pedal linkage. Install bolt and nut. Tighten to 30 foot
unit. Remove master cylinder from unit. pounds.
(2) Disconnect vacuum hose from power brake (4) Connect vacuum hose to unit.
check valve. (5) Attach brace and support, secure with nut and
(3) Remove nut attaching brace and support to tighten to 150 inch pounds.
power unit (Fig. 1). (6)Install master cylinder to front cover mount-
(4) Remove nut and bolt that attach power brake ing studs and tighten nuts to 100 inch-pounds.
pedal link to pedal. (Under instrument panel.) Be sure power brake output push rod is set to cor-
(5) Remove nuts and washers that attach power rect length. With power brake attached to dash panel
brake unit to dash panel and remove unit. and vacuum supplied to unit, the master cylinder
should compensate (force jet of fluid up through front
INSTALLING POWER BRAKE chamber compensation port.)
(1) Install new dash panel to power brake gasket. (7) Check stop light operation.
(2) Position power brake unit on dash panel, then CAUTION: Do not attempt to disassemble brake
install attaching nuts and washers and tighten to 150 booster as this unit will be serviced by Manufacturer's
inch-pounds. Service Station.

POWER BRAKE-BENDIX
(large Single Diaphragm)
GENERAL INFORMATION
The single diaphragm type power brake (Fig. 1) ance with the foot pressure applied to the valve
is a self contained vacuum hydraulic power braking operating rod through the brake pedal linkage.
unit. It is of the vacuum suspended type which utilizes The control valve is of a single poppet type valve
engine intake manifold vacuum and atmospheric with the atmospheric port and a vacuum port. The
pressure for its power. This type of units does not vacuum port seat is a part of the valve body attached
require a vacuum reservoir. to the diaphragm assembly. The atmospheric port is a
The Bendix Power Brake Unit can be identified by part of the valve plunger which moves within the
the twist lock method of attaching the housing and valve housing and vacuum power diaphragm as-
cover together. sembly.
The basic elements of the vacuum unit are as fol- A hydraulic master cylinder which contains all
lows: of the elements of the standard brake master cylinder
A mechanically actuated control valve integral except for the special hydraulic push rod which is a
k t h the vacuum power diaphragms, controls the de- part of the power brake.
gree of power brake application or release in accord-

SERVICE PROCEDURES
REMOVING POWER BRAKE equipped) into dash panel. Install attaching nuts and
(l) Remove nuts attaching master cy1inder to brake
washers. Tighten nuts to 150 inch-pounds.
(2) Using lubdplate, coat the bearing surface of
unit. Remove master cylinder from unit.
(2) Disconnect vacuum line from check valve.
bolt that connects power brake pedal link with brake
pedal. Install bolt and nut. Tighten to 30 foot-pounds.
(3) From under instrument panel, remove nut and
bolt from power brake link and brake pedal. (On link- Install lower pivot bolt (if so equipped).
(3) Attach vacuum hose to check valve.
age type power brake, remove lower pivot bolt).
(4) Install master cylinder on power brake. Tighten
(4) From under instrument panel remove four
mounting nuts to 100 inch pounds. Be sure power
brake unit attaching nuts and washers.
brake output push rod is set to correct length. With
(5)Withdraw brake unit assembly from vehicle.
power brake attached to dash panel and vacuum sup-
plied to unit, the master cylinder should compensate
INSTALLING POWER BRAKE (force jet of fluid up through front chamber compen-
(1)Install power brake and linkage assembly (if so sation port).

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-21

REINFORCEMENT NUT AND WASHER(2)


POWER BOOSTER I \

NUT

\ BUSHING(2)
v
ACCELERATOR MOUNTING BRACKET

LEVER
CONNECTlON ASSEMBLY ASSEMBLY
\SLEEVE

VIEW IN DIRECTION OF
ARROW A
PY367

Fig. 1-Power Brake Assembly (Bendix)


(5) Inspect adjustment of stop light switch. booster as this unit will be serviced by Manufacturer's
CAUTION: Do not attempt to disassemble brake Service Station.

POWER BRAKE-BENDIX
(Tandem.Diaphragm)
GENERAL INFORMATION
The tandem diaphragm type power brake (Fig. l), with the vacuum power diaphragms, controls the de-
is a self contained vacuum hydraulic power braking gree of power brake application or release in accord-
unit. It is of the vacuum suspended type which utilizes ance with the foot pressure applied to the valve
engine intake manifold vacuum and atmospheric pres- operating rod through the brake pedal linkage.
sure for its power. This type of unit does not re- The control valve is of a single poppet type valve
quire a vacuum reservoir. with the atmospheric port and a vacuum port. The
The Bendix Power Brake Unit can be identified by vacuum port seat is a part of the valve body attached
the crimped edge method of attaching the housing to the diaphragm assembly. The atmospheric port is a
and cover together. part of the valve plunger which moves within the
The basic elements of the vacuum unit are as fol- valve housing and vacuum power diaphragm as-
lows: sembly.
(a) The vacuum power chamber consists of a front (c) A hydraulic master cylinder which contains all
and rear shell, a center plate, front and rear dia- of the elements of the standard brake master cylinder
phragm, hydraulic push-rod and a vacuum diaphragm except for the special hydraulic push rod which is a
return spring. part of the power brake.
(b) A mechanically actuated control valve integral

MyMopar.com
5-22 BRAKES 0

NUT AND WASHER

EW AND WASHER ASSEMBLY


TANDEM MASTER CYLINDER
(DRUM BRAKE) NP293

Fig. 2-Power Brake Assembly (Bencrix) Drum and Disc Brakes (426 Hemi Only)

SERVICE PROCEDURES
REMOVING POWER BRAKE (2) Using lubriplate, coat the bearing surface of
bolt that connects power brake pedal link with brake
(1) Disconnect master cylinder from power brake pedal linkage. Install bolt and nut. Tighten to 30 foot
unit. pounds.
(2) Disconnect vacuum line from check valve. (3) Attach vacuum hose to check valve.
(3) From under instrument panel, remove push rod (4) Install master cylinder on power brake. Tighten
nut and bolt from power brake and brake pedal. mounting nuts to 100 inch-pounds. Be sure power
(4) From under instrument panel remove four brake output push rod is set to correct length. With
brake unit attaching nuts and washers. power brake attached to dash panel and vacuum sup-
(5) Withdraw brake unit assembly from brake sup- plied to unit, the master cylinder should compensate
port bracket. (force jet of fluid up through front chamber compen-
INSTALLING POWER BRAKE sation port).
(5) Inspect adjustment of stop light switch.
(1) Install power brake and linkage assembly (if so CAUTION: Do not attempt to disassemble brake
equipped) into dash panel. Install attaching nuts and booster as this unit will be serviced by Manufacturer's
washers. Tighten nuts to 150 inch-pounds. Service Station.

KELSEY-HAYES DISC BRAKES


(Four Piston)
INDEX
Page Page
Assembling Caliper ............................ 30 Disassembling Master Cylinder ................. 33
Assembling Master Cylinder .................... 34 Disc Brake Service Precautions ................ 26
Bleeding Disc Brake ........................... 32 General Information .......................... 23
Brake Shoe Installation ....................... 28 Installing Brake Disc and Hub .................. 31
Brake Shoe Removal .......................... 28 Installing Caliper .............................. 31
Cleaning and Inspection (Master Cylinder) ...... 29 Installing Master Cylinder ...................... 35
Disassembling Caliper ......................... 29 Proportioning Valve ........................... 33

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-23
Page Page
Removing Braking Disc and Hub . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Routine Maintenance .......................... 24
Removing Caliper ............................. 28 Service Diagnosis ............................. 26
Removing Master Cylinder ...................... 33

GENERAL INFORMATION
The disc brake (Fig. 1) is a fixed caliper, opposed 6) and are supported radially by “ears” on the outer
piston, non-energized, ventilated disc type, actuated ends of the shoe assemblies. The shoes slide axially in
by the hydraulic system. There is no lateral move- the abutments and ride on machined ledges (bridges)
ment of either the disc or the caliper. The caliper as- when hydraulic pressure is applied to the pistons. The
sembly consists of two caliper housings, bolted to- lining assembly consists of organic friction material,
gether. Each half contains two cylinder bores of 1-5/8 bonded to a metal plate called the shoe, and is re-
inch diameter. Each cylinder contains a seal, piston placed as a unit. Brake torque is absorbed by the
and externally attached molded rubber dust boot to reaction of the shoe end against the caliper abutments.
seal the cylinder more from contamination. The pis- Two spring clips bolted in the top opening of the
tons are sealed by “rectangular section” rubber piston caliper act as shoe retaining springs. The caliper is
seals, positioned in grooves machined in the cylinder mounted directly to the front wheel spindle and at
bores, which provide hydraulic sealing between the the rear of the wheel’s vertical centerline (Fig. 4).
pistons (Fig. 2), and the cylinder bores. The cast iron braking disc is of the ventilated type
The cylinders are connected hydraulically by and incorporates forty cooling fins. This increases the
means of internal passages in the caliper housings cooling area and permits circulation of air through
and by an external transfer tube between the two the disc, resulting in more rapid cooling of the brake.
halves of the caliper assembly. A bleeder screw and a The disc is attached to the wheel hub by five flathead
fluid inlet fitting are provided on each caliper assem- serrated bolts. The outside diameter of the disc is
bly (Fig. 1). 11.04 inches and the inside is 6.91 inches. A splash
The shoe and lining assemblies are located between shield bolted to the spindle is used to prevent road
parallel machined abutments within the caliper, (Fig. contaminates from contacting the inboard side of the

,NUT LOCK
EXTERNAL TRANSFER
TUBE

STEERING ARM
-SPECIAL WHEEL
1 4 ~ 4 . 5 0J

NN423C

Fig. 1 -Disc Brake Assembly (Sectional)

MyMopar.com
5-24 BRAKES 0

disc and lining surfaces (Fig. 4). The wheel, itself, wheel cylinders which provides balanced braking ac-
provides protection for the outboard surface of the tion between the front and rear brakes under a wide
disc. range of braking conditions. The valve regulates the
Braking action begins immediately upon applica- hydraulic pressure applied to the rear wheel cyl-
tion of the brake pedal as hydraulic pressure from the inders, thus limiting rear braking action when high
master cylinder to the system applies pressure to the pressures are required at the front brakes. In this
co-axially aligned caliper pistons forcing the linings manner, premature rear wheel skid is prevented.
against both sides of the braking disc, thus applying An additional feature of this disc brake system is a
the brakes. During brake application, the piston seals “tell-tale” tab sounding device which indicates when
are deflected by the hydraulic pressure (Fig. 5). When replacement of the shoe and lining assemblies are
the pressure is released, the seals relax or retract, required (Fig. 3). The tabs located on the shoes create
pulling the pistons back from the shoe and lining as- an audible metallic scraping noise from the brake by
semblies approximately .005”.(This reaction is called metal to metal contact on the braking disc. This
“seal retraction” and provides the required running warns the driver that the lining has worn to a mini-
clearance as the linings relieve their force on the mum thickness and the vehicle should be returned to
disc.) Inherent disc runout also contributes to main- the dealer for relining of the brakes. This device is not
taining running clearance. Automatic adjustment is detrimental to the function of the braking disc.
achieved by the pistons sliding outward from the cyl-
inder bore as the lining wears. The piston assumes ROUTINE MAINTENANCE
a new position relative to the seal and maintains the
correct adjustment location at all times (Fig. 5). Check Brake Lines and Linings
There is no residual pressure in the disc brake Raise all four wheels. Remove one of the front
hydraulic system since the residual pressure valve wheel and tire assemblies and inspect the braking
normally used in drum brake system is located only in disc, caliper and linings. (The wheel bearings should
the front outlet port of the master cylinder. (See be inspected at this time and repacked if necessary.)
Master Cylinder Section of this Group). The caliper must be removed to inspect and pack the
The hydraulic system contains a proportioning inner wheel bearing.
valve between the master cyliqqsyopd the er+@y$fje Do not get oil or g r e a q m the disc or the linings. If

BLEED

CALIPER

,BRAKE TUBE
INLET

LOCKWASHER

--
(WITH TUBE SEAT) NN424B

Fig. 2-Disc Brake Cafiper Assembly (Sectional)

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-25
PISTO
PISTON SEAL
BRAKE
PRESSURE
ON\

f
---

DUST BOOT NN427B


GROOVE
Fig. 5-Piston Seal Fundion for Automatic
Adjustment
Fig. &Disc Brake Piston, Shoe and Lining Assembly
“scraping” noise from the front brakes will be heard.
the linings are worn to within .030 inch of the surface This noise is metal-to-metal contact between the tabs
of the shoe, replace both sets of shoe and lining as- on the shoe assemblies and the braking disc. When
semblies (inboard and outboard) on the front wheels. the noise becomes audible to the driver, the lining has
It is recommended that both front wheel sets be re- worn to the metal tabs and the brakes must be re-
placed whenever a respective shoe and lining is worn lined. The contact between the metal tab and disc will
or damaged. not affect the functioning of the disc brake system,
If the caliper is cracked or fluid leakage through but continued use until lining is completely worn
the casting is evident, it must be replaced as a unit. away will cause disc damage.
Shoe and Lining Wear Running Clearance
If a visual inspection does not adequately deter-
To check the shoe and lining assembly to the brak-
mine the condition of the lining, a physical check will
be necessary. ing disc clearance, remove the wheel and tire assem-
bly. Insert a feeler gauge between the lining and the
To check the amount of lining wear, remove the
wheel and tire assembly, the spring clips and the braking disc. Ordinarily, the clearance should be .003
to .006 inch. However, if the vehicle was stopped by a
shoe and lining assemblies (see “Brake Shoe Removal”
paragraph). Three (3) thickness measurements with brake application just prior to checking the clearance,
a micrometer should be taken across the middle sec- it is considered normal for the brakes to drag slightly.
tion of the shoe and lining; one reading at each side
and one reading in the center. When an assembly has Brake Roughness
worn to a thickness of .180inch, it should be replaced. The most common cause of brake chatter on disc
If shoes do not require replacement, reinstall making brakes is a variation in thickness of disc. If rough-
sure to replace to their original inner and outer ness or vibration is encountered during highway
positions (see “Brake Shoe Installation” paragraph). operation or if pedal pumping is experienced at low
When shoe and lining replacement is required, a speeds, the disc may have excessive thickness varia-
tion. To check for this condition, measure the disc at
12 (twelve) points with a micrometer at a radius
approximately one inch (1”) from edge of disc. If
thickness measurements vary by more than .0005
WITH THE HEAD AS SHOWN inch the disc should be replaced with a new one.
Braking Disc Runout
Excessive lateral runout of the braking disc will
cause a “knocking back” of the pistons, which will
create increased pedal travel and vibration when the
brakes are applied.
Before checking the runout, the wheel bearing end
play should be eliminated by tightening the adjusting
nut. The readjustment is very important and will be
required at the completion of the test to prevent bear-
ing failure. After tightening the adjusting nut, be
sure that the braking disc can still be rotated.
Fig. 4-Disc Brake Caliper Mounting Dial indicator C-3339 should be clamped to the

MyMopar.com
5-26 BRAKES 0

steering knuckle so that the stylus contacts the brak- (3) During removal and installation of a wheel and
ing disc at a point approximately one (1) inch from tire assembly, exercise care so as not to interfere with
the outer edge, (Fig. 15). Rotate the disc and check or damage the bleeder screw or the transfer tube.
the indicator reading. The maximum total indicator (4) The front wheel bearing end play is important
reading on the gauge should not exceed .0025 inch. If and must be within specifications.
the reading exceeds this specification, the disc should (5) Be sure vehicle is centered on the hoist before
be replaced. Do not attempt to refinish a disc that servicing any of front end components to avoid
indicates runout in excess of the specification. bending or damaging disc splash shield on full right
or left wheel turns.
DISC BRAKE SERVICE PRECAUTIONS (6) Before vehicle is moved after any brake serv-
(1) Grease or any other foreign material must be ice work, be sure and obtain a firm brake pedal.
kept off the caliper assembly, surfaces of the braking (7) The assembly bolts of two caliper housings
disc and external surfaces of the hub, during service should not be disturbed, unless servicing of caliper
procedures. Handling the braking disc and caliper assembly is required.
should be done in a way to avoid deformation of the (8) Riding brake pedal (common left foot applica-
braking disc and nicking or scratching the brake tion) should be avoided during vehicle operation.
linings. (9) The wheel, tire, hub and disc assembly cannot
(2) If inspection reveals the square sectioned be removed as an assembly. The caliper assembly
rubber piston seals are worn or damaged, they should must be removed before removal of hub and disc as-
be replaced immediately. sembly.

DISC BRAKE SERVICE DIAGNOSIS


Condition Possible Cause Correction
EXCESSIVE PEDAL (a) Rear brake adjustment required. (a) Check and adjust rear brakes.
TRAVEL (b) Air leak, or insufficient fluid in sys- (b) Check system for leaks.
tem or caliper.
(c) Warped or excessively tapered shoe (c) Install new shoe and linings.
and lining assembly.
(d) Excessive disc runout. (d) Check disc for runout with dial indi-
cator. Install new disc.
(e) Loose wheel bearing adjustment. (e) Readjust wheel bearings to specified
torque.
(f) Improper brake fluid (boil). (f) Drain and install correct fluid.
(g) Damaged caliper piston seal. (g) Install new piston seal.
BRAKE ROUGHNESS OR (a) Excessive out-of-parallelism of brak- (a) Check disc for runout with dial indi-
CHATTER (Pedal ing disc. cator. Install new disc.
Pulsating) (b) Rear brake drums out-of-round. (b) Loosen and retorque wheel nuts to
specifications.
(c) Excessive lateral runout of braking (c) Check disc for lateral runout with
disc. dial indicator. Install new disc.
(d) Excessive front bearing clearance. (d) Readjust wheel bearings to specified
torque.
(e) Rear brake drums distorted by im- (e) Check drums for out-of-round and re-
proper tightening of nuts. grind if necessary.
EXCESSIVE PEDAL (a) Power brake malfunction. (a) Check and correct power unit.
EFFORT (b) Frozen or seized pistons. (b) Disassemble caliper and free up pis-
tons. Clean parts.
(c) Shoe and lining worn below .155”. (c) Install new shoe and linings.
(Lining only-.30”.)
(d) Brake fluid, oil or grease on linings. (d) Install new shoe linings as required.
(e) Incorrect lining. (e) Remove lining and install correct lin-
ing.
PULL (a) Loose calipers. (a) Tighten caliper mounting bolts from
45 to 60 ft. pounds.
(b) Frozen or seized pistons. (b) Disassemble caliper and free up pis-
tons.
(c) Rear brake pistons sticking. (c) Free up rear brake pistons.
(d) Front end out of alignment. (d) Check and align front end.
(e) Broken rear spring. (e) Install new rear spring.

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-27
Condition Possible Cause Correction
(f) Out-of-round rear drums. (f) Check and regrind drums if neces-
sary.
(g) Incorrect tire pressure. (g) Inflate tires to recommended pres-
sures.
(h) Brake fluid, oil or grease on linings. (h) Install new shoe and linings.
(i) Restricted hose or line. (i) Check hoses and lines and correct as
necessary.
(j) Rear brakes out of adjustment. (j) Adjust rear brakes.
(k) Unmatched linings. (k) Install correct lining.
(I) Distorted brake shoes. (I) Install new brake shoes.
NOISE Groan-Brake noise emanating when slowly releasing brakes (creep-groan)
(a) Not detrimental to function of disc brakes-no corrective action re-
qu ired.

(Indicate to operator this noise may be eliminated by slightly increasing


or decreasing brake pedal efforts).
Rattle-Brake noise or rattle emanating at low speeds on rough roads, (front wheels
only).
(a) Excessive clearance between shoe (a) Install new shoe and lining assem-
and caliper. blies.
Scraping- (a) Loose wheel bearings. (a) Readjust wheel bearings to correct
specifications.
(b) Braking disc rubbing housing. (b) Check for rust or mud buildup on Cali-
per mounting and bridge bolt tight-
ness.
(c) Mounting bolts too long. (c) Install mounting bolts of correct
length.
FRONT BRAKES HEAT UP (a) Residual pressure valve in master (a) Remove valve from cylinder.
DURING DRIVING AND cylinder.
FAIL TO RELEASE (b) Frozen or seized piston. (b) Disassemble caliper, hone cylinder
bore, clean seal groove and install
new pistons, seals and boots.
(c) Operator riding brake pedal. (c) Instruct owner how to drive with disc
brakes.
(d) Sticking pedal linkage. (d) Free up sticking pedal linkage.
(e) Power brake malfunction. (e) Check and correct power unit.
LEAKY WHEEL CYLINDER (a) Corroded bore. (a) Hone bore and replace boots.
(b) Damaged or worn caliper piston seal. (b) Disassemble caliper and install new
seal.
(c) Scores or corrosion on surface of pis- (c) Disassemble caliper and hone cyl-
ton. inder bore. If neccessary, install new
pistons.
GRABBING OR UNEVEN (a) Causes listed under ‘‘Pull.” (a) Corrections listed under “Pull.”
BRAKING ACTION (b) Power brake malfunction. (b) Check and correct power unit.
BRAKE PEDAL CAN BE (a) Air in hydraulic system or improper (a) Bleed system.
DEPRESSED WITHOUT bleeding procedure.
BRAKING EFFECT (b) Leak in system or caliper. (b) Check for leak and repair as required.
(c) Pistons pushed back in cylinder bores (c) Reposition brake shoe and lining as-
during servicing of caliper (shoe and semblies. Depress pedal a second
lining not properly positioned). time and if condition persists, check
following causes:
(d) Leak past piston cups in master cyl- (d) Recondition mbster cylinder.
inder.
(e) Damaged piston seal in one or more (e) Disassemble caliper and replace pis-
of cylinders. ton seals as required.
(f) Leak in rear brake cylinder. (0 Hone cylinder bore. Install new pis-
ton cylinder cups.
(g) Rear brakes out of adjustment (g) Adjust rear brakes.
(h) Bleeder screw open. (h) Close bleeder screw and bleed en-
tire system.

MyMopar.com
5-28 BRAKES 0

SERVICE PROCEDURES
BRAKE SHOE REMOVAL shoe is fully seated and lining is facing disc.)
(3) Slide remaining shoe and lining into caliper,
To remove the disc brake shoe and lining assembly, using same procedure as described above.
(Fig. l),proceed as follows: (4) Place shoe retainer spring assemblies in position
(1) Raise vehicle on a hoist or jackstands. on caliper.
(2) Remove wheel covers, and wheel and tire as- (5) Pump brake pedal several times until a firm
sembly. pedal has been obtained and shoe and lining have
(3) Remove shoe retainer spring assemblies. been properly seated.
(4) Using two pair of pliers, grasp tabs on outer (6) Install wheel and tire. Tighten wheel stud nuts
ends of shoes, remove shoe and lining by pulling out- to 55 foot-pounds. Install wheel cover.
ward (Fig. 6). Due to a ridge of rust that may build up (7) Check and refill master cylinder reservoir with
on rotor surface outside of lining contact area, it may brake fluid as required.
be necessary to force piston back slightly into bores. CAUTION: Road test the vehicle and make several
Pistons can be forced back into bores by forcing shoe stops to wear off any foreign material on the brakes
back with a water pump pliers placed on corner of the and to seat the linings. The vehicle may pull to one
shoe and caliper housing (Fig. 6). side or the other if this is not done.
Check the caliper for seal leaks (evident by fluid
moisture around the cavity) and for any damage to R EMOVl NG CALI PER
the piston dust boot. Wipe the cavity clean (between
the inner and outer caliper housings) with a shop Should it become necessary to remove the caliper
towel. Check the piston dust boot for proper seating for installation of a new piston seal or boot, (Fig. 4),
in the piston bore and the caliper housing. If exces- proceed as follows:
sive fluid moisture is evident, it will be necessary to (1) Raise car on hoist or jackstands.
install a new piston seal and piston dust boot. (Refer (2) Remove wheel cover and wheel and tire as-
to “Disassembling the Caliper” paragraph.) sembly.
(3) Disconnect front brake flexible hose from brake
BRAKE SHOE INSTALLATION tube at frame mounting bracket. (Plug brake tube to
prevent loss of fluid.)
(1) Push all pistons back into their bores until (4) Remove bolts that attach caliper assembly to
bottomed to allow for installation of new thick shoes. steering knuckle. Should it become necessary to in-
This can be done by placing a flat sided metal bar or stall a new flexible brake hose on a disc brake
tool against piston and exerting a steady force until equipped vehicle, scribe a mark on hose bracket on
bottomed. This will cause fluid to rise in the reservoir side where hose enters, and position of hose retaining
so be sure and remove a quantity of fluid from the clip underneath (Fig. 4). Be sure at reassembly, that
reservoir before hand. open end of retaining clip is facing out and away
(2) Slide new shoe and lining into caliper with ears from caliper.
of shoe resting on bridges of caliper (Fig. 7). Be sure (5) Slowly slide caliper assembly up and away from

Fig. &Removing Brake Shoe and Lining Fig. 7-Installing Brake Shoes and Lining

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-29
(3) Remove shoe and lining assemblies.
(4) Remove bridge bolts that hold two halves of
caliper together. (Make sure at reassembly that these
two bolts are used and tightened to correct torque.)
Separate assemblies.
(5) Peel dust boot out and away from caliper hous-
ing retainer and out of piston groove (Fig. 10). Re-
move remaining dust boots in same manner.
(6) Using Tool C-3999, remove each of pistons (Fig.
11). Care must be used so as not to scratch, burr or
otherwise damage piston on outside diameter. To do
so effects sealing qualities of piston. Draw piston
straight out of its bore. If a piston becomes cocked,
BRAKING
DISC
- removal is more difficult and piston or bore may be
damaged.
(7) Using a small pointed wooden or plastic tool,
remove piston seals from groove in cylinder bore (Fig.
Fig. 8-Removing or Installing Disc Bruke Caliper 12). Discard old seals. (Use care so as not to scratch
bore or the seal groove.)
brake disc (Fig. 8 ) and remove to bench for disas-
sembly. CLEANING AND INSPECTION
DlSASSEMB LI NG CALIPER Clean all parts in brake fluid and wipe dry, using
To disassemble the caliper for the installation of clean, lint free, shop towels. Using an air hose, blow
new parts (Fig. 9), proceed as follows: out the drilled passages and bores. Check the dust
(1) Remove shoe retainer spring assemblies. Re- boots for punctures or tears. If punctures or tears are
move jumper tube (armored)at caliper. evident, new boots should be installed at reassembly.
(2) Mount caliper assembly in a vise equipped with Inspect the piston bores in both housings for scoring
protector jaws. (Use caliper mounting lugs.) Remove or pitting. Install a new piston if it is pitted, scored or
transfer tube. the chrome plating is worn off. Bores that show

OUTER CALIPER HOUSING

BRAKE SHOE AND LINING ASSEMBLY

BLEEDER SCREW

INNER CALIPER HOUSING

TRANSFER TUBE
CALIPER BRIDGE BOLT
NN64B

Fig. 9-Caliper Assembly (Exploded View)

MyMopar.com
5-30 BRAKES 0

CALIPER
A

PISTC

ASSEMBLY
_ _
SEAL
-
NN432B NN434B
Fig. IO-Removing Dust Boot from Piston and Caliper Fig. 12-Removing Piston Seals from Caliper
light scratches or corrosion, can usually be cleaned (1) Clamp inner caliper half in a vise (with protec-
with crocus cloth. However, bores that have deep tor jaws) by mounting lugs.
scratches or scoring may be honed, using Tool (2-3993, (2) Dip new piston seals in clean brake fluid and
providing the diameter of the bore is not increased install in caliper grooves. The seal should be posi-
more than .002 inch. If the bore does not clean up tioned at one area in groove and gently worked
within this specification, a new caliper housing should around cylinder bore with a finger until properly
be installed. (Black stains on the bore walls are caused seated. Never use an old piston seal. (Be sure seals are
by the piston seals and will do no harm.) not twisted or rolled.)
When using hone C-3993 (Fig. 13) be sure and in- (3) Coat outside diameter of pistons with clean
stall the hone baffle before honing bore. The baffle is brake fluid and install them in cylinder bores (Fig. 14),
used to protect the hone stones from damage. After with open end of piston and boot retaining groove
honing the bore carefully, clean the seal groove with facing out of cylinder.
a stiff non-metallic rotary brush. (4) Position piston squarely in bore and apply slow
Use extreme care in cleaning the caliper after hon- steady pressure until piston is positioned. If piston
ing. Remove all dust and grit by flushing the caliper will not position itself, remove piston and check posi-
with brake fluid; wipe dry with a clean lintlers cloth tion of seal for proper position in groove.
and then clean a second time in the same manner. (5) Install a new dust boot in position in groove in
caliper and in piston. Be sure dust boot is properly
ASSEMBLING CALIPER seated. Install new remaining dust boots in same
manner.
To reassemble the disc brake caliper, (Fig. 9), (6) Install caliper half on one clamped in vise, then
proceed as follows: install assembly bolts (bridge bolts) and tighten from
70 to 80 foot-pounds. (Under no condition should
I A these bolts be substituted o r replaced by an inferior
bolt. The use of bolts other than those specified for
this purpose, could cause a caliper failure resulting
in an accident).
h (7)Install transfer tube and tighten securely. (Be
sure tube is under protective eyebrow.)
(8) Install bleeder screw but do not tighten.

Fig. II-Removing Pistons from Caliper Fig. 13-Honing Piston Bores

MyMopar.com
BRAKES 5-31
be a minimum of .050 inch from either disc face to
machined groove in outboard caliper.
(2) Install shoe and lining assemblies between cali-
per and braking disc.
(3) Install shoe retainer springs in position on cali-
per.
(4) Open bleeder screw, then reconnect brake line
at caliper housing. Allow caliper to fill with brake
fluid; then, close bleeder screw. (Be sure all air bub-
bles have escaped; bleeding caliper.) Replenish brake
fluid in master cylinder.
(5) ”Pump” brake pedal several times to actuate
piston seals and position shoe and lining assemblies.
(6) After assembling caliper unit be sure and check
for fluid tightness under maximum pedal pressures.
(Recheck master cylinder reservoir level.) Check and
Fig. 14-Installing Pistons in Caliper be sure that lower shock absorber mounting bolt has
been installed from rear and nut toward front of ve-
INSTALLING CALIPER hicle. This i s important. (Fig. 4).
Before installing the caliper assembly over the (7) Install wheel and tire assembly and tighten
brake disc, check the disc for runout and thickness wheel stud nuts to 55 foot-pounds. This i s important.
variation. Mount a dial indicator (Fig. 15) and check Install wheel cover.
the lateral runout. Runout should not exceed .0025 (8) Remove jackstands or lower hoist.
inch. If runout exceeds the specified figure, remove CAUTION: Road test the vehicle and make several
the disc and install a new one. (Be sure the wheel stops to wear off any foreign material on the brakes
bearings are adjusted to zero lash during this check.) and to seat the linings. The vehicle may pull to one
Readjust wheel bearings after check. side or the other if this i s not done.
Thickness variation of the disc, measure the disc
at 12 (twelve points) with a micrometer at a radius
approximately one inch (1”) from edge of disc. If REMOVING BRAKING DISC AND HUB
thickness measurements vary by more than ,0005 Should it become necessary to remove the braking
inch, the disc should be replaced with a new one. disc for installation of a new disc, proceed as follows:
(1) Install caliper assembly over disc and align (1) Remove wheel cover and wheel and tire as-
mounting holes. Install mounting bolts and tighten sembly.
from 50 to 80 foot-pounds. A check should be made to (2) Remove caliper assembly as described under
be sure that braking disc runs squarely and centrally “Removing Caliper” paragraph, (but do not discon-
within caliper opening. There should be approximate- nect brake line). Suspend caliper from wire hook or
ly .090 to .120 inch clearance between outside dia- loop to avoid strain on hose and damage to transfer
meter of braking disc and caliper. There should also tube.
(3) Remove grease cup, cotter pin, nut lock, nut,
thrust washer and outer wheel bearing.
(4) Pull disc and hub off wheel spindle.

INSTALLING BRAKING DISC AND HUB


(1) Slide brake disc and hub assembly on spindle.
(2) Install outer bearing, thrust washer, and nut.
(3) Tighten wheel bearing adjusting nut to 90
inch-pounds while rotating hub and disc.
(4) Position lock nut on nut with one pair of slots in
line with cotter pin hole.
PLUNGER CONTACTING
DISC APPROXIMATELY /\y
(5) Back off adjusting nut and lock assembly on
1 INCH FROM OUTER slot then install cotter pin. The resulting adjustment
should be zero (no preload) end play. (This is very
NN437 important, when checking disc runout.)
Fig. 15-Checking Braking Disc Run-ov) (6) Install a dial indicator (2-3339 (Fig. 15) and

MyMopar.com
5-32 BRAKES 0

check runout of disc on both sides. The runout should (3) Reinstall braking disc and hub assembly. Install
not exceed .0025 inch. Readjust wheel bearing clear- outer bearing, thrust washer and nut. Tighten front
ance after checking braking disc runout. wheel bearing as described previously. Install nut
(7) Clean grease cap, coating inside with wheel lock, cotter pin and grease cap.
grease (do not fill) and install cap. (4) Install caliper assembly as described under “In-
(8) Install caliper assembly as described in “Install- stalling Caliper” paragraph.
ing the Caliper” paragraph. (5) Install wheel and tire. Tighten wheel stud nuts
(9) Install wheel and tire assembly and wheel (in a star pattern) to 30 foot-pounds, then to 55 foot-
cover. pounds. Install wheel cover.
(10) Remove jackstands or lower hoist. (6) Remove jackstands or lower hoist.
(11) Road test vehicle as described in “Brake Shoe
Installation” paragraph. BLEEDING DISC BRAKE

REMOVING SPLASH SHIELD The disc brake hydraulic system can be bled
(preferably) with pressure bleeding equipment. On
Should it become necessary to remove the braking disc brake equipped vehicles, the brake pedal will
disc splash shield because of damage or the installa- require more pumping, and frequent checking of the
tion of the steering knuckle, proceed as follows: fluid level in the master cylinder during the bleeding
(1) Raise vehicle on a hoist or jackstands. operation, if pressure bleeding equipment is not used.
(2) Remove wheel cover and wheel and tire as- It will be necessary to remove the front wheel and
sembly. tire assemblies in order to gain access to the bleeder
(3) Remove caliper assembly, as described under screw, located on the outboard caliper housing at the
“Removing Caliper” paragraph. Do not disconnect top. (Fig. 1).
brake line. Never use brake fluid that has been drained from
(4) Remove grease cup, cotter pin, nut lock, nut, the hydraulic system, when bleeding the brakes.
thrust washer and outer wheel bearing. On vehicles equipped with disc brakes, be sure that
(5) Pull braking disc and hub off wheel spindle. the disc brake pistons are returned to their normal
(6) Remove bolts that attach splash shield (Fig. 16) positions and that the shoe and lining assemblies are
to steering knuckle. properly seated.
Before driving the vehicle, check the operation of
INSTALLING SPLASH SHIELD the brakes to be sure that a firm pedal has been ob-
tained.
To install the braking disc splash shield, (Fig. 16), (1) Remove wheel covers, then raise vehicle using a
proceed as follows: hoist or jackstands.
(1) Position styrafoam gasket and install splash (2) Remove wheel and tire assemblies.
shield in position on steering knuckle, with cutout (3) Bleed the front brakes first, then proceeding
section toward rear. to the right rear and left rear in order.
(2) Align mounting holes and install attaching After bleeding the brakes, proceed as follows:
bolts. Tighten to 17 inch-pounds. (1) Install wheel and tire assemblies, tightening

c
PROPORT

Fig. I6-Disc Splash Shield Mounting Fig. I 7-Checking Proportioning Valve

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-33
wheel stud nuts to 55 foot-pounds. (1) Install one of Gauge Set C-4007 and “T” in
(2) Install wheel covers. brake line between master cylinder and proportioning
(3) Remove jackstands or lower hoist. valve and remaining Gauge and “T”at output end of
valve and brake line. (Fig. 17). Be sure all joints are
TEST1NG PROPORTIONING VALVE fluid tight.
(2) Have a helper exert pressure on brake pedal
When a premature rear wheel slide is obtained on (holding pressure). Obtain a reading on master cylin-
brake application, it usually is an indication that the der output of approximately 500 p.s.i.
fluid pressure to the rear brakes is above the reduc- (3)While pressure is being held as above, reading
tion ratio for the rear line pressure and that a mal- on valve outlet Gauge should be 360-405p.s.i.
function has occurred within the proportioning valve, If the proportioning valve pressure readings do not
which should be tested. meet the specifications, the valve should be removed
To test the proportioning valve, proceed as follows: and a new valve installed.

MASTER CYLINDER
Kelsey-Hayes Disc Brakes (Four Piston)
INDEX
Page Page
Bleeding Master Cylinder ...................... 35 Installing Master Cylinder ..................... 35
Cleaning and Inspection ....................... 34 Master Cylinder Removal ...................... 33
Disassembling Master Cylinder ................ 33 Reassembling Master Cy1i nder ................ 34
General Information ........................... 33 Testing Master Cylinder ....................... 36
Hydraulic System Safety Switch ............... 36 Testing Hydraulic System Safety Switch . . . . . . . . 36

GENERAL INFORMATION
The tandem master cylinder (Fig. 1) is of the to the safety switch and the front brakes.
compensating type with the reservoirs cast integrally. The master cylinder used on vehicles not equipped
The master cylinder consists of a front and rear pis- with power brake units is serviced in the same man-
ton (in tandem) two outlets, with 1 containing a ner as the master cylinder with power brakes with
residual pressure valve and spring (rear brake line one exception, the master cylinder with power brakes
outlet only), (Fig. 3). does not include the push rod.
The front outlet tube from the master cylinder is The drum brake master cylinder is different than
connected to the hydraulic system safety switch (Figs. the disc brake master cylinder and is covered in the
8 or 9) and thence to the rear brakes. The rear out- service brake section of this group.
let tube from the master cylinder is also connected

SERVICE PROCEDURES
MASTER CYLINDER REMOVAL 4) clean the outside of the master cylinder thoroughly.
(1) Press bail to one side and remove cover and
Should it become necessary to service the master gasket. Empty brake fluid from reservoirs.
cylinder, remove from the vehicle as follows: (2) Remove piston retaining screw and gasket (Fig.
(1) Disconnect front and rear brake tubes from 2), then slide rear piston assembly out of cylinder
master cylinder and install a plug in rear outlet. bore.
(The residual pressure valve in front outlet will (3) Upend master cylinder and tamp (open end
keep cylinder from draining). down) on bench to remove front piston and spring. If
(2) Disconnect pedal push rod (drum type brakes) front piston sticks in bore of cylinder, use air pres-
from brake pedal.
(3) Remove nuts that attach master cylinder to
sure to force piston out of cylinder. New cups must
be installed at reassembly if air pressure is used.
cowl panel and/or power brake unit, (if so equipped).
(4) Slide master cylinder straight out from cowl (4) Remove front piston compression spring from
panel and/or power brake unit, (if so equipped). bore.
(5) Using Tool T109-178 (or an easy out) remove
DlSASSEMBLlNG MASTER CYLINDER tube seats by threading tool firmly into seat, tap tool
To disassemble the master cylinder, (Figs. 1 and and seat out of cylinder body. (Fig. 2). Discard seats.

MyMopar.com
5-34 BRAKES
TO FR(

ON
-

RESIDUAL PRESSURE VALVE


AND SPRING-REAR BRAKES ONLY
REAR B R
OUTLET OUTLET SCREW \Ir ~1'27
Fig. 3-Removing or Installing Residual Pressure
Valves and Springs
Fig. I-Tandem Master Cylinder Assembly
When overhauling a master cylinder, use all parts
(6) Remove residual pressure valve and spring furnished in repair kit. Discard all used rubber parts.
from front outlet (Fig. 3).
(7) Remove rubber cups from pistons after noting
REASSEMBLING MASTER CYLINDER
position of cup lips. Do not remove center cup of
rear piston. If cup is damaged or worn. Install a new Front Piston
rear piston assembly. Before assembling the master cylinder, dip all
component parts in clean brake fluid and place on a
CLEANING AND INSPECTION clean shop towel or paper. (Assembling seals dry
Clean master cylinder thoroughly, using a suitable can ruin them.)
(1) Carefully work primary cup on end of front
solvent and dry with compressed air. Wash the cyl-
piston with the lip away from piston (Fig. 4).
inder bore with clean brake fluid and inspect for
(2) Carefully work second seal cup over rear end
scoring or pitting. Master cylinder bore walls that
of piston and into second land. (Be sure lip of cup is
have light scratches or show signs of corrosion, can
facing front of piston). (Fig. 4).
usually be cleaned with crocus cloth. However, cyl-
(3) Carefully work rear secondary cup over piston
inder bores that have deep scratches or scoring may
and into rear land. The lip must be facing toward
be honed, providing the diameter of the bore is not
rear (Fig. 4).
increased more than .002 inch. If master cylinder
(4) Slide cup retainer over stem of front piston
bore does not clean up at .002 inch when honed, the
with beveled side away from piston cup (Fig. 4).
master cylinder should be discarded and a new mas-
(5) Position small end of pressure spring into re-
ter cylinder installed.
tainer, then slide assembly into bore of cylinder
If master cylinder pistons are badly scored or cor-
(Fig. 5). Be sure cups enter bore evenly in order not
roded, replace them with new ones. The piston
to damage sealing quality of cups. (Keep well lubri-
cups and seals should be replaced when recondition- cated with brake fluid.)
ing a master cylinder.
RESIDUAL PRESSURE Rear Piston
VALVE REAR BRAKE (1) Carefully work secondary cup over rear end of
LINE ONLY
rear piston with lip of cup toward front (Fig. 4).
\
GASKET
(2) Center spring retainer of rear piston assembly
[TO REAR BRAKES
over shoulder of front piston. Push piston assemblies
into bore. Carefully work lips of cups into bore, then
seat piston assemblies. (Fig. 6).
(3) Holding pistons in seated position, install pis-
ton retaining screw and gasket. Tighten securely

/ \ PISTON (Fig. 6).


(4) Install residual pressure valve and spring (Fig.
SPECIAL TOOL
FRONT
BRAKES -
PISTON RETAINING
SCREW AND GASKET Np28 3) in front outlet then install tube seats firmly.
(When the bleeding tubes are attached, the tube seats
Fig. 2-Removing Tube Seats will be positioned correctly.)

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-35

PRIMARY PISTON
RETAINER SCREW

NPJOA

Fig. 4-Tandem Master Cylinder (Exploded View)


BLEEDING MASTER CYLINDER (5) Place cover and gasket over reservoirs and
secure with bail.
Before installing master cylinder on vehicle, it (6) Remove master cylinder from vise and install
must be bled on the bench as follows: on vehicle as follows:
(1) Clamp master cylinder in a vise and attach
bleeding tubes Tool C-4029 (Fig. 7). INSTALLING MASTER CYLINDER
(2) Fill both reservoirs with approved brake fluid.
(3) Using a wooden stick or dowel (power brake (1) Install master cylinder on vehicle, aligning
equipped vehicles) depress push rod slowly. (Note push rod with cowl panel opening (manual) or power
air bubbles.) Allow pistons to return under pressure brake push rod with master cylinder piston.
of springs. Do this several times or until bubbles (2) Slide over mounting studs. Install attaching
cease to appear (Fig. 7). nuts and tighten to 9 foot-pounds.
(3) Connect front and rear brake tubes and tighten
(4) Remove bleeding tubes from cylinder and install
to 150 inch-pounds.
plug in rear outlet. (As tubes are removed, fluid re-
(4) Bleed brakes at wheel cylinders, using regular
maining in tubes will syphon out.)
procedure, being sure fluid level is maintained. (See
N O T E FLUTES Bleeding the Brake System).
7) ON PRIMARY
FRONT PISTON

REAR PISTON ASSEMBLY


I

PISTON RETAINING
SCREW AND GASKET

REAR PISTON ASSEMBLY 'NP32

Pig. 5-Installing Fronp Piston and Spring Fig. 6-hstalling Rear Piston Assembly

MyMopar.com
5-36 BRAKES 0

BUBBLES
of the brake system does not result in failure of the
entire hydraulic brake system. As an example, failure
of the rear brake system will leave the front brake
system still operative.
As pressure falls in one system, the other system’s
normal pressure forces the piston to the inoperative
side; contacting the switch terminal, causing a red
warning light to come on in the instrument panel,
thus warning the operator of the vehicle, that one of
the systems has failed and should be repaired.
The safety switch is mounted on the frame in a
vertical position, with the brake tubes connected,
as shown in (Fig. 8).
Fig. 7-Bleeding Master Cylinder If a malfunction occurs within the switch, discon-
TESTING MASTER CYLINDER nect tubes from body assembly and install a new as-
sembly. The component parts of the switch body are
Be sure that the master cylinder compensates at not serviced. However the switch unit can be re-
both ports. This can be done by applying the pedal moved if a malfunction occurs, and a new ‘switch unit
lightly with the engine running (power brakes) and installed.
observing for a gyser of fluid squirting up in the If a new safety switch or body assembly is installed,
reservoirs. This may only occur in the front chamber be sure and bleed the brake system.
and so to determine if the rear compensating port is
open, it will be necessary to pump up the brakes TESTING HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SAFETY
rapidly and then hold the pedal down. Have an ob- SWITCH
server watch the fluid in the rear reservoir while
the pedal is raised. A disturbance in the fluid indi- The brake warning light flashes only when the
cates that the compensating port is open. parking brake is applied with the ignition key turned
“ON”. The same light will also illuminate should one
of the two service brake systems fail when the brake
HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SAFETY SWITCH pedal is applied. To test the system turn the ignition
The hydraulic system safety switch (Figs. 8 and 9) key “ON’, and apply the parking brake. If the light
fails to light, inspect for a burned out bulb, discon-
is used to warn the vehicle operator that one of the
nected socket, a broken or disconnected wire at the
hydraulic systems has failed. A failure in one part
switch.
FROM MASTER CYLINDER To test the service brake warning system, raise the
PORT STAMPED “F” car on a hoist and open a wheel cylinder bleeder
,SWITCH BODY while a helper depresses the brake pedal and observes
T BRAKE TUBE
the warning light. If the light fails to light, inspect
for a burned out bulb, disconnected socket, a broken
PISTON SEAL “0”RING or disconnected wire at the switch. If the bulb is not
SWITCH SEAL “0”RING
SAFETY SWITCH

SWITCi ASSEMBLY

N ASSEMBLY
MASTER CYLINDER
STAMPED “R”

NP16A
MOUNTING /’
BRACKET
>) NP34
Fig. 9--Hydraul% System Safety Switch
Fig. 8-Hydraulic System Safety Switch (Sectional) (Exploded View)

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-37
burned out and the wire continuity i s proven, re- fitting mounted on the frame r a i l in the engine com-
place the brake warning switch in the brake line Tee partment below the master cylinder.

KELSEY-HAYES DISC BRAKE (FLOATING CALIPER)

INDEX
Page Page
Assembling Ca Iiper ............................ 45 Installing Brake Disc and Hub .................. 47
Bleeding Disc Brake ........................... 48 Installing Caliper .............................. 45
Brake Shoe Installation ........................ 43 Metering Valve ................................ 41
Brake Shoe Removal .......................... 42 Refinishing (Refacing) Braking Disc ............. 47
Cleaning and Inspection ...................... 42-44 Removing Braking Disc and Hub ................ 47
Checking Braking Disc for Run-out Removing Caliper from Vehicle ................. 43
and Thickness .............................. 46 Routine Maintenance-30,000 Miles ............. 41
Disassembling Caliper ......................... 43 Service Diagnosis .............................. 37
Disc Brake Service Precautions ................. 42 Specifications ................................. 56
General Information ........................... 38

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
EXCESSIVE PEDAL (a) Air, leak, or insufficient fluid in sys- (a) Check system for leaks and bleed.
TRAVEL tern or caliper.
(b) Warped or excessively tapered shoe (b) Install new shoe and linings.
and lining assembly.
(c) Excessive disc runout. (c) Check disc for runout with dial in-
dicator. Install new disc.
(d) Rear brake adjustment required. (d) Check and adjust rear brakes.
(e) Loose wheel bearing adjustment. (e) Readjust wheel bearing to specified
torque.
(f) Damaged caliper piston seal. (f) Install new piston seal.
(g) Improper brake fluid (boil). (g) Drain and install correct fluid.
(h) Power brake malfunction. (h) Check and correct power unit.
BRAKE ROUGHNESS OR (a) Excessive thickness variation of brak- (a) Check disc for thickness variation
CHAlTER (PEDAL ing disc. using a micrometer.
PUMP1NG) (b) Excessive lateral runout of braking (b) Check disc for lateral runout with dial
disc. indicator. Install new disc.
(c) Rear brake drums out-of-round. (c) Regrind rear drums and check for
out-of-round.
(d) Excessive front bearing clearance. (d) Readjust wheel bearings to specified
torque.
EXCESSIVE PEDAL (a) Brake fluid, oil or grease on linings. (a) Install new shoe linings as required.
EFFORT (b) Incorrect lining. (b) Remove lining and install correct lin-
I n.g.
(c) Frozen or seized pistons. (c) Disassemble caliper and free up pis-
tons.
(d) Power brake malfunction. (d) Check and correct power unit.
PULL (a) Brake fluid, oil or grease on linings. (a) Install new shoe and linings.
(b) Unmatched linings. (b) Install correct lining.
(c) Distorted brake shoes. (c) Install new brake shoes.
(d) Frozen or seized pistons. (d) Disassemble caliper and free up pis-
tons.
(e) Incorrect tire pressure. (e) Inflate tires to recommended pres-
sures.
(f) Front end out of alignment. (f) Align front end and check.
(g) Broken rear spring. (g) Install new rear spring.
(h) Rear brake pistons sticking. (h) Free up rear brake pistons.
(i) Restricted hose or line. (i) Check hoses and lines and correct as
necessary.
(j) Caliper not in the proper alignment (j) Remove caliper and reinstall. Check
to braking disc. alignment.

MyMopar.com
5-38 BRAKES 0

Condition Possible Cause Correction


NOISE Brake noise emanating when slowly releasing brakes (creep-groan)
Groan-
(a) Not detrimental to function of disc brakes-no corrective action re-
quired. (Indicate to operator this noise may be eliminated by slightly
increasing or decreasing brake pedal efforts.)
Rattle- Brake noise or rattle emanating at low speeds on rough roads, (front
wheels only).
Shoe anti-rattle spring missing or not (a) Install new anti-rattle spring or po-
properly positioned. sition properly.
Excessive clearance between shoe (b) Install new shoe and lining assem-
and caliper. blies.
Scraping- (a) Mounting bolts too long. (a) Install mounting bolts of correct
length.
Loose wheel bearings. (b) Readjust wheel bearings to correct
specifications.
FRONT BRAKES HEAT UP Operator riding brake pedal. (a1 Instruct owner how to drive with disc
DURING DRIVING AND brakes.
FAIL TO RELEASE Stop light switch improperly adjusted. (b) Adjust stop light to allow full return
of pedal.
Sticking pedal linkage. (C) Free up sticking pedal linkage.
Frozen or seized piston. (d) Disassemble caliper and free up pis-
ton.
Residual pressure valve in master (e) Remove valve. (See Fig. 15).
cylinder.
Power brake malfunction. (f 1 Check and correct power unit.
LEAKY WHEEL Damaged or worn caliper piston seal. (a) Disassemble caliper and install new
CYLINDER seal.
(b) Scores or corrosion on surface of (b) Disassemble caliper and hone cylin-
cylinder bore. der bore. Install new seal
GRABBING (a) Causes listed under “Pull.” (a 1 Corrections listed under “Pull.”
OR UNEVEN (b) Power brake malfunction. (b) Check and correct power unit.
BRAKING ACTION
BRAKEPEDALCAN BE (a) Air in hydraulic system or improper (a) Bleed system.
DEPRESSED WITHOUT bleeding procedure.
BRAKING EFFECT (b) Leak past primary cup in master cyl- (b) Recondition master cylinder.
inder.
(c) Leak in system. (C) Check for leak and repair as required.
(d) Rear brakes out of adjustment. (d 1 Adjust rear brakes.
(e) Bleeder screw open. (e) Close bleeder screw and bleed entire
system.
GENERAL INFORMATION
The Kelsey-Hayes single piston, floating caliper disc the outboard portion of the caliper and two on the
brake assembly (Fig. l), consists of the hub and disc inboard side (Fig. 3). Four machined abutments on
assembly, the caliper, shoes and linings, splash shield the adaptor, position and align the caliper, fore and
and adaptor. aft. Two positioners installed over the guide pins, con-
The cast iron braking disc has 40 (forty) cooling trol the movement of the caliper along with the piston
fins (or louvres) that are cast integrally between the seal, and assists in maintaining proper shoe clearance
two machined braking surfaces (Fig. 2). When the and are also required to hold the inner bushing in
wheel is in motion, the rotation of the disc cooling place.
fins supplies air circulation between the braking sur- The guide pins are also used to radially locate and
faces for efficient cooling of the disc and prolonged restrain both shoes, while all of the braking force is
lining life. The braking disc is protected from road taken by the caliper on the outboard shoe and ma-
splash (inboard side) by a shield bolted to the steering chined lug (Fig. 9) on the adapter for the inboard
knuckle and by the wheel and tire on the outboard shoe.
side. The caliper is a one piece casting with the inboard
The single piston caliper assembly floats through side containing the single piston cylinder bore. The
four rubber bushings on two steel guide pins threaded steel piston is 2-3/4 inches in diameter and is nickle
into the adaptor. Two of the bushings are inserted in and chrome plated for anti-corrosion and long wear.

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-39

BLEED SCREW NU1

Fig. 1 -Floating Caliper Assembly (Single Piston)


The square cut rubber piston seal is located in a ma-
chined groove in the cylinder bore and provides a
Fig. 2-Floating Caliper Assembly (Sectional)
hydraulic seal between the piston and the cylinder
wall (Fig. 4). The adaptor is mounted to the steering bore area.
knuckle by two special nylock bolts (Fig. 5). As the brake pedal is depressed, hydraulic pressure
A moulded rubber dust boot installed in a groove in is applied against the piston. This force is transmitted
the cylinder bore and piston, keeps contamination to the inboard brake shoe and lining and the inboard
from the cylinder wall and piston. The boot has a braking surface of the disc. As force increases against
viping lip (Fig. 6) that prevents contamination in the the disc from the inner lining, the caliper assembly

BUSHING\ COOLING FINS

ANTI-RATTLE SPRING.

DISC
BRAKE

‘ADAPTOR
DISC

ADAPTOR - ;HOE

TIONER
BUSH

\
I
POSITIONER
CALIPER I
LINING I WASHER
BLEEDER SCREW (PART OF BUSHING)
NUSA
Fig. 3-Floating Caliper Assembly (Sectional)

MyMopar.com
5-40 BRAKES 0

BOLT

BOLT

A
NU4A

Fig. 4-Disc Brake Assembly (Sectional)

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-41
moves inboard, sliding on the guide pins, thus provid- CALIPER
ing a clamping force on the disc. HOUSING
When the brake pressure is released, the piston RAKE PRESSURE
seal (distorted by applied pressure) returns to its
normal position, pulling the piston back to released
position, while the two positioners force the caliper
outboard to create a slight running clearance between
outer shoe and the disc.
Automatic adjustment is obtained by outward relo-
cation of the piston as the inboard lining wears and
the inward movement of the caliper as the outboard DUST BOOT NN427B
lining wears, thus maintaining correct adjustment at
Fig. 6-Piston Seal Function for Automatic
all times. Adjustment

METERING VALVE Do not get oil or grease on the braking disc or lin-
ings. If the linings (pads) are worn to within .030 inch
All Kelsey-Hayes Floating Caliper disc brake of the shoe, replace both sets of shoe and lining as-
equipped vehicles are equipped with a pressure meter- semblies, (inboard and outboard) on the front wheels.
ing valve. The valve is located on the left frame rail. It is necessary that both front wheel sets be replaced
The use of the metering valve is to better match the whenever a respective shoe and lining is worn beyond
front disc brakes with the rear drum brakes on the specifications or damaged.
vehicle. This results in improved braking and steer- Check all brake tube connections for possible leaks.
ing control on icy surfaces. Install new flexible hoses as required.
Check adapter plate to knuckle bolts for specified
ROUT1N E MA1NTENANCE-30,000 Miles torque (75to 100 Foot Pounds).

Check Brake Lines, Hoses and Linings Shoe and Lining Wear
Raise all four wheels. Remove one of the front If a visual inspection does not adequately determine
the condition of the lining, a physical check will be
wheel and tire assemblies and inspect the braking
necessary. To check the amount of lining wear, re-
disc, linings and caliper. Inspect front brake flexible
move the wheel and tire assemblies, and the calipers.
hose for signs of cracking or deterioration. Replace Remove the shoe and lining assemblies. (See “Brake
brake hose if rubber cover is penetrated. (The wheel
Shoe Removal” paragraph). Three (3) thickness meas-
bearings should be inspected at this time and repacked urements with a micrometer should be taken across
if necessary). The caliper assembly must be removed the center of the shoe and lining; One reading at each
in order to inspect the inner wheel bearing. (Refer to end and one reading in the center. When an assembly
“Brake Shoe Removal” paragraph). has been worn to a thickness of .180inch, it should be
replaced. If a shoe and lining does not require re-
placement, reinstall, making sure each shoe and posi-
tioner is returned to their original positions. (See
“Brake Shoe Installation” paragraph). It is normal for
the inboard lining to show slightly more wear than
the outboard.

Brake Roughness
The most common cause of brake roughness (or
chatter) with disc brakes are excessive variation in
disc thickness and/or excessive disc face runout.
These can be easily checked with a dial indicator and
a 2” micrometer (vernier type preferred). If either of
the measurements are out of specification, the disc
must be refinished or replaced. Refer to “Refinishing
(Refacing) Braking Disc” paragraph.
Other less prevalent causes of roughness can be the
use of some types of non-standard lining and extreme
abrasion of the disc faces. Also, vehicles which stand
Ffg. 5-Disc Brake Caliper Mounting unused for periods of time in areas of high humidity

MyMopar.com
5-42 BRAKES n

or salt air may incur rust on the disc which could (4) The front wheel bearing end play is important
cause a temporary brake surge and roughness. Nor- and must be within specifications.
mally however, this condition should correct itself (5) Be sure vehicle is centered on the hoist before
after a short period of usage. If rust is severe enough servicing any of the front end components to avoid
roughness will not clear up and the disc must be re- bending or damaging disc splash shield on full right
surfaced or replaced. or left hand turns.
(6) Before vehicle is moved after any brake service
DISC BRAKE SERVICE PRECAUTIONS work, be sure and obtain a firm brake pedal.
(7) Dragging the brakes (common result of left foot
(1) Grease or any other foreign material must be application) should be avoided during vehicle opera-
kept off the caliper assembly, surfaces of the braking tion.
disc and external surfaces of the hub, during service (8) The wheel, tire, hub and disc assembly cannot
procedures. Handling the braking disc and caliper be removed as an assembly. The caliper assembly must
should be done in such a way as to avoid deformation be removed before removal of the hub and disc as-
of the disc and scratching or nicking the brake linings sembly.
(pads). (9) As lining wears, reservoir level will go down.
(2) If inspection reveals that the square sectioned If fluid has been added between relines, then reser-
caliper piston seal is worn or damaged, it should be voir overflow may occur when the piston is pushed
replaced immediately. back into the new lining position. Overflowing can be
(3)During removal and installation of a wheel and avoided in this case by removal of a small amount of
tire assembly, use care not to strike the caliper. fluid before overflow occurs.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
BRAKE SHOE REMOVAL
(1) Raise vehicle on a hoist or jackstands.
(2) Remove front wheel covers, and wheel and tire
assemblies.
(3) Remove caliper guide pins, positioners that at-
tach caliper to adaptor and anti-rattle spring.
(4) Remove caliper from disc by slowly sliding cali-
per assembly out and away from braking disc (Fig.
7).-Support caliper firmly so as not to damage flexible
brake hose.
(5) Slide outboard shoe and lining assembly out of
caliper. Slide inboard shoe and lining assembly out of
adaptor (Fig. 8).
(6) Remove outer bushings from caliper by pressing
out of bore (Fig. 13), using a suitable tool. Discard
bushings.
(7) Slide inner bushings (flanged) off guide pins and
discard. Remove positioners from guide pins and dis-
card.

CLEANING AND tNSPECTlON


Check for piston seal leaks (evident by brake fluid
in and around boot area and inboard lining) and for
any ruptures of piston dust boot. If boot is damaged,
or fluid is evident, it will be necessary to disassemble
caliper assembly and install a new seal, boot, (and
piston if damaged or corroded.) (Refer to “Disas-
sembling Caliper Assembly” paragraph). Check the
mating surfaces of the abutments on the caliper and
adaptor. If corroded or rusty, clean surfaces with wire
brush. Inspect braking surfaces of disc. Fig. 7-Removing or Installing Caliper

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-43
through bushing, caliper, adaptor, inboard and out-
board shoes, into outer bushings in caliper and anti-
rattle spring.
(6) Press IN on end of guide pins and thread pin
into adaptor, USING EXTREME CARE SO AS NOT TO
CROSS THREADS. Tighten from 30 to 35 foot-pounds.
Be sure tabs of positioners are over machined surfaces
of caliper (Fig. 1).
(7) Pump brake pedal several times until a firm
pedal has been obtained.
(8) Check and refill master cylinder reservoirs (if
necessary) with approved brake fluid as required. (It
should not be necessary to bleed the system after
shoe and lining removal and installation). However,
if a firm pedal cannot be obtained bleed the brake
system as described in “Bleeding Brake System” para-
graph. It may have been necessary to remove fluid to
put in new linings as fluid is pushed back into master
cylinder.
(9) Install wheel and tire assemblies and wheel cov-
ers.
(10) Remove jackstands or lower hoist.

REMOVING CALIPER FROM VEHICLE


It will be necessary to remove the caliper to install
a new piston seal and boot.
(1) Raise vehicle on a hoist or jackstands.
(2) Remove front wheel covers and wheel and tire
assemblies.
(3) Disconnect front brake flexible hose from tube
Fig. 8-Removing or Installing Brake Shoes and at frame mounting bracket. Plug brake tube to pre-
Lining vent loss of fluid, or prop brake pedal to any position
below the first inch of travel. Disconnect hose from
BRAKE SHOE INSTALLATION caliper.
When installing new shoe and lining assemblies, it (4) Remove guide pins and positioners that attach
will be necessary to also install new positioners, inner caliper to adaptor. Carefully slide caliper out and
bushings and outer bushings. away from disc and adaptor, while holding outboard
(1) Slowly and carefully push piston back into bore shoe and lining assembly. Remove inboard shoe and
until it is bottomed. Watch for possible reservoir over- lining from adaptor.
flow. See Step 9 of “Disc Brake Service Precautions”.
(2) Install new inner guide pin bushings in caliper D ISASSEMB LI NG CALI PER
with flanged end on inboard side (Fig. 3). Compress
flanges of outboard bushing in fingers and work into (1) Mount caliper assembly in a vise equipped with
position in hole from the outboard side of caliper (Fig. protector jaws (Fig. 10). (Caution: Excessive vise pres-
18). sure will cause bore distortion and binding of piston).
(3) Slide new shoe and lining assemblies into posi- (2) Remove dust boot. (Fig. 11).
tion in adaptor and caliper (Fig. 8), being sure that (3) Using Tool C-4087, remove piston from caliper
metal portion of shoe is fully in recess of caliper and (Fig. 10). Care must be used so as not to scratch, burr
adaptor. or otherwise damage piston on outside diameter. To
(4) Holding outboard lining in position, carefully do so effects sealing qualities of piston. Draw piston
slide caliper down into position in adaptor and over straight out of its bore. If a piston becomes cocked
disc. Align guide pin holes of adapter, inboard and removal is more difficult and piston or bore may be
outboard shoes. (Fig. 3). damaged. CAUTION: UNDER NO CONDITION
(5) Install new positioners over guide pins with SHOULD AIR PRESSURE BE USED TO REMOVE
open ends toward outside, and with stamped arrows PISTON FROM BORE. PERSONAL INJURY COULD
pointing upwards (Fig. 1).Install assembled guide pins RESULT FROM SUCH PRACTICE.

MyMopar.com
5-44 BRAKES 0

INNER
BUSHING

BLEEDER SCREW

ANTI-RATTLE SPRING

OUTER BUSHING
PIN
L

INNER BUSHING/ N
CALIPER,

ADAPTER
SHOE AND-
LINING \-

SHOE AND LINING

NUSA

Fig. 9-Caliper Assembly (Exploded View)


(4) Using a small, pointed, wooden or plastic stick, (6) Remove inner bushing and discard. Remove
work piston seal out of its groove in piston bore (Fig. bleeder screw.
12).Discard old seal. Do not use a screwdriver or other
metal tool for this operation, because of possibility of CLEANING AND INSPECTION
scratching piston bore or burring edges of seal groove. Clean all parts using alcohol or a suitable solvent
(5) Remove outer bushings from caliper by pressing and blow dry, using compressed air. Blow out all
out of bore, (Fig. 13) using a suitable tool. Discard drilled passages and bores. (Whenever a caliper has
bushings. been disassembled, and a new boot and seal must be
n installed at reassembly). Inspect the piston bore for
scoring or pitting. Install a new piston if it is pitted,
scored or the plating is severely worn. Bores that
show light scratches or corrosion, can usually be
cleared with crocus cloth. However, bores that have
deep scratches or scoring should be honed, using

\k

b -
-- a
I

PISTON BORE

NU324 NU28

Fig. 10-Removing Piston from Caliper Fig. I I -Removing or installing Piston Dust Boot

MyMopar.com
L\ BRAKES 5-45
WOODEN OR PLASTIC STICK
- . D &
SPECIAL HONE

PISTON BORE

Fig. 14-Honing Piston Bore


Fig. 12-Removing Piston Seal side of boot. Install in caliper by working into outer
groove, using fingers only. (Boot will seem larger than
Tool C-4095, providing the diameter of the bore is not
diameter of groove, but will snap into place when
increased more than .002 inch. If the bore does not properly positioned in groove) (Fig. 16).Using a fore-
clean up within this specification, a new caliper hous-
finger, slide around inside of boot to be sure it is
ing should be installed. Black stains on the piston are seated, or correctly installed.
caused by the piston seal and will do no harm.
(4) Plug high pressure inlet to caliper and bleeder
When using Hone C-4095, coat the stones and bore
screw hole, then coat piston with a generous amount
with brake fluid. After honing the bore, carefully clean
of lubricant (as specified above). With fingers spread-
the seal and boot grooves with a stiff non-metalic
ing boot, work piston into boot and press down on
rotary brush (Fig. 14).
piston. (The entrapped air below piston will force boot
Use extreme care in cleaning the caliper after hon-
around piston and into its groove as piston is de-
ing. Remove all dirt and grit by flushing the caliper
pressed). (Fig. 17). Remove plug, then carefully push
with brake fluid; wipe dry with a clean, lintless cloth
piston down the bore until bottomed. Caution: Force
and then clean a second time in the same manner or
must be applied uniformly to avoid cocking.
until clean cloth shows no signs of discoloration.
(5)Install new inner guide pin bushings in caliper
ASSEMBLING CALIPER with flanged end on inboard side (Fig. 3). Compress
(1)Clamp caliper in vise (with protector jaws), (Fig. flanges of outboard bushing in with fingers and work
10). Caution: Excessive vise pressure will cause bore into position in hole from the outboard side of the
distortion and binding of piston. caliper (Fig. 18).Press IN on bushing, using finger tips
(2) Dip new piston seal in lubricant (supplied with or small plastic stick (Fig. 18) until seated. Be sure
kit) Ucon #LB1145Y24 (or equivalent) and install in flanges extend over caliper casting evenly on both
groove in bore. Seal should be positioned at one area sides. Install bleeder screw.
in groove and gently worked around the groove, using Before installing caliper assembly on vehicle, in-
clean fingers, until properly seated. NEVER USE AN
spect braking disc. Conditions as described in “Check-
OLD PISTON SEAL. (Be sure seal is not twisted or
ing Braking Disc for Runout and Thickness” para-
rolled). (Fig. 15). graph.
(3) Coat new piston boot with lubricant (as speci- INSTA LLING CALI PER
fied above) leaving a generous amount of lubricant in-
(1) Examine lining for wear damage, or fluid con-
tamination if its condition is found satisfactory it may

SEAL IN GROOVE

CAL

I
NU32

Fig. 13-Removing Outer Bushings Fig. 15-Instaflhg Piston Seal

MyMopar.com
5-46 BRAKES 0

PISTON INSTALLE

PLUG NU33

Fig. 16-Installing Piston Dust Boot NU35

be reused. If not usable both front brakes must be re- Fig. 18-lnstalling Outer Bushings
lined with new. If old lining is to be reused, be sure under maximum pedal pressures. (Recheck master
linings and positioners are installed in their original
cylinder reservoir level).
position.
(10) Install wheel and tire assembly and tighten
(2) Connect flexible brake hose to caliper and tight-
wheel stud nuts to 65 foot-pounds. This is important.
en securely.
Install wheel cover.
(3)Install new inboard shoe and lining adaptor (11) Remove jackstands or lower hoist.
(Fig. 8). Holding outboard shoe and lining in position (12) Road test vehicle and make several stops to
in caliper, carefully slide caliper down into position wear off any foreign material on the brakes and to
in adaptor and over disc. Align pin holes of caliper, seat the linings. The vehicle may pull to one side or
adaptor and inboard and outboard shoes. the other if this is not done.
(4) Install positioners over guide pins with open
ends toward outside and arrows pointing upwards.
(Fig. 1).Install assembled guide pins through bush- CHECKING BRAKING DISC FOR RUNOUT
ing, caliper, adaptor, inboard and outboard shoes and AND THICKNESS
into outer bushings in caliper. (1) Mount dial indicator C-3339 on steering arm
(5) Press IN ON END GUIDE PINS AND THREAD with plunger contacting disc approximately one (1)
PINS INTO ADAPTOR. USING EXTREME CARE SO inch from edge of disc. (Fig. 19).
AS NOT TO CROSS THREADS. Tighten from 30 to 35
foot-pounds. (Be sure tabs of positioners are over ma-
chined surfaces of caliper) (Fig. l).
(6) Remove plug from brake tube and install flex-
ible brake hose. Tighten securely. Avoid twisting hose.
(7) With bleeder screw open, allow caliper to
“gravity” fill with brake fluid, then close bleeder
screw. (Be sure all air bubbles have escaped; replenish
brake fluid in master cylinder. Bleed brakes as de-
scribed under “Bleeding Brakes” paragraph).
(8) Pump brake pedal several times until a firm
pedal has been obtained.
(9) After bleeding caliper, check for fluid tightness
T
CALIPER \

DUST BOOT

NU34
Fig. 19-Checking Braking Disc Run-out and
Fig. 17-Installing Piston (Through Boot) Thickness

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-47
(2) With wheel bearings adjusted to zero end play,
check lateral runout. (Both sides of disc). Runout
should not exceed .0025 inch. If runout is in excess
of specification, install a new disc and hub assembly DISC THICKNESS
or reface disc, being careful not to remove more than
.015 inch from each side of disc. Be sure and readjust
wheel bearings after check. (MAX. ALLOWABLE)
(3) Thickness variation of disc should be made in
conjunction with runout. Measure thickness of disc at
twelve (12) equal points with a micrometer at a radius
approximately one (1)inch from edge of disc. If thick-
ness measurements vary by more than .0005inch, disc
should be removed and resurfaced or a new disc and
hub assembly installed. (Fig. 19).
(4) Light scoring and/or wear is acceptable if heavy
scoring or warping is evident, the disc must be re-
finished or replaced (See Refinishing (Refacing) Brak-
ing Disc). If cracks are evident the hub and disc assem-
bly must be replaced.

REMOVING BRAKING DISC AND HUB


(1) Raise vehicle on hoist or jackstands. Remove
wheel cover and wheel and tire assembly.
(2) Remove caliper assembly, as described under
‘‘Removhq Caliper” paragraph, (but do not disconnect
brake line). Suspend caliper from wire hook or loop
to avoid strain on flexible hose.
(3) Remove grease cap, cotter pin, nut lock, nut,
thrust washer and outer wheel bearing.
(4) Pull disc and hub off wheel spindle.

INSTALLING BRAKING DISC AND HUB


(1) Slide brake disc and hub assembly on spindle.
(2) Install outer bearing, thrust washer and nut.
(3) Tighten wheel bearing adjusting nut to 90 inch
pounds while rotating disc and hub. Recheck disc run- J
out as described previously.
(4) Position lock nut on nut with one pair of slots SURFACE FINISH
MICRO INCHES\
in line with cotter pin hole.
( 5 ) Back off adjusting nut and lock assembly one
slot.
(6) Clean grease cap, coating inside with wheel
TOTAL VARIATION
I N THICKNESS
-
grease (do not fill cap) and install cap. Clean both (12 EQUAL POINTS)
NU99
sides of braking disc with alcohol or suitable solvent.
(7) Install caliper assembly, as described in “Install- Fig. 20-Disc Specifications
ing Caliper” paragraph.
(2) Runout or wobble.
R E FI NISH ING (R E FAC1 NGI B RAKI NG DISC (3) Thickness variation (Parallelism).
(4) Dishing or distortion (Flatness).
Before refinishing or refacing a braking disc, the If a vehicle has not been driven for a period of time,
disc should be checked and inspected for the following the discs will rust in the area not covered by the lin-
conditions: ing and cause noise and chatter, excessive wear and
(1) Scoring, rust, impregnation of lining material scoring of the discs and lining. Wear ridges on the
and worn ridges. discs can cause temporary improper lining contact

MyMopar.com
5-40 BRAKES 0

if ridges are not removed before installation of new


lining (pads).
Lining deposit on the disc, may cause erratic fric-
tion characteristics if new lining is installed without
resurfacing or cleaning the disc.
Excessive runout or wobble in a disc can increase
pedal travel due to piston knockback and increase
seal bushing wear due to necessity of caliper to follow
the disc wobble.
Thickness variation in a disc can also result in pedal
pulsation, chatter and surge due to variation in brake
output when disc section is uneven.
Dishing or distortion can be caused by extreme heat
and abuse of the brakes.

Resurfacing Braking Disc


This operation can be used when the disc surface
is rusty or has lining deposits. A sanding disc attach-
ment will remove surface contamination without re-
moving much material. It will generally follow varia-
tions in thickness which are in the disc.

Ref acing Braking Disc


If scoring is deep, runout or thickness variation is
beyond limits, or other distortion is apparent, the disc
should be refaced on a brake lathe equipped for disc
machining. (Fig. 21). After machining a disc, a grinder
may be used to remove tool marks.
A new disc and hub assembly should be installed if
the old one cannot be refaced to bring it within speci-
fications without removing an excessive amount of
material. Do not remove more than .050 inch per disc.
Brake operation may be affected if an excess of ma-
terial is removed.
Both sides of the braking surface should be ma-
chined or ground when servicing since small varia-
tions in resurfacing machines may cause the newly ABRASIVE DISC
finished surface to be out of parallel with the opposite
unfinished side resulting in a thickness variation be-
yond acceptable limits. Disc brakes are very sensitive
to thickness variation.
The following chart and (Fig. 20) shows the location
and tolerances of required specifications when serv-
icing the braking disc: Fig. 2 I -Refacing Braking Disc
Minimum Thickness Micro
Brake Design Thickness Thickness Variation Runout Finish
Kelstar Kelsey-Hayes 1.000-1.010 0.980 .0005 .0025” 15-80
CAUTION: be followed closely, and the correct brake disc mount-
When refacing a braking disc (Fig. 21), the manufac- ing adaptors must be used to obtain the required
turers of the refacing equipment instructions should specifications.

BLEEDING DISC BRAKE require more pumping, and frequent checking of the
fluid level in the master cylinder during the bleeding
The disc brake hydraulic system can be bled operation. Never use brake fluid that has been drained
manually or with pressure bleeding equipment. On from the hydraulic system, when bleeding the
disc brake equipped vehicles, the brake pedal will brakes.

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-49

VALVE CODY

Fig. 23-Proportioning Valve


malfunction has occurred within the proportioning
valve, which should be tested.
To test the proportioning valve, proceed as follows:
A (1) Install one of Gauge Set (2-4007 and “T” in
brake line between master cylinder and proportioning
Fig. 22-Checking Proportioning Valve valve and remaining Gauge and “T” at output end
On vehicles equipped with disc brakes, be sure that of proportioning valve and brake line. (Fig. 22). Be
the disc brake piston is returned to a normal position sure all joints are fluid tight.
and that the shoe and lining assemblies are properly (2) Have a helper exert pressure on brake pedal
seated. (holding pressure). Obtain a reading on master cylin-
Before driving the vehicle, check the operation of der output of approximately 500 p.s.i.
the brakes to be sure that a firm pedal has been ob- (3) While pressure is being held as above, reading
tained. on valve outlet Gauge should be 360-405 p.s.i.
(1) Raise vehicle using a hoist or jackstands. If proportioning valve pressure readings do not
(2) Bleed brakes in usual manner, starting with meet specifications, the valve should be removed
right rear, then proceeding to left rear, right front and a new valve installed.
and left front in order.
After .bleedingthe brakes, proceed as follows: Balancing Front Wheels (Disc Brake
(1) Remove jackstands or lower hoist. Equipped Vehicles)
(2) Test drive vehicle to be sure brakes are oper- To balance front wheels on a disc brake equipped
ating correctly and that pedal is solid. vehicle, the normal procedure for static balancing
as described under “Wheel Balance” in the Wheels,
TESTING PROPORTIONING VALVE Bearings and Tires Section of this manual should be
followed. Dynamic balancing of front wheels can be
When a premature rear wheel slide is obtained on accomplished by the normal procedure when wheels
brake application, it usually is an indication that the are removed from the vehicle, but Manufacturer’s
fluid pressure to the rear brakes is above the 50% recommendations should be followed closely when
reduction ratio for the rear line pressure and that a attempting to balance wheels while on the vehicle.

MASTER CYLINDER
(Floating C a l i p e r Disc Brakes)
INDEX
Page Page
Bleeding Master Cylinder ...................... 51 Master Cylinder Removal ....................... 50
Cleaning and Inspection .......................
Disassembling Master Cylinder
50
.................
50
Reassembling Master Cylinder .................. 51
Testing Master Cylinder ........................ 52
General Information ........................... 49 Testing Hydraulic System Safety Switch ........ 53
Hydraulic System Safety Switch ...............
52 Pressure Metering Valve ....................... 53
Installing Master Cylinder ...................... 52

GENERAL INFORMATION
The tandem master cylinder (Fig. 1) (1 and 1/8 reservoirs cast integrally. The master cylinder con-
inch bore) is of the compensating type with the sists of a front and rear piston (in tandem) two out-

MyMopar.com
5-50 BRAKES 0

lets, with 1 containing a residual pressure valve and with power brake units is serviced in the same manner
spring (rear brake line outlet only) (Fig. 3). as the master cylinder with power brakes with one
The front outlet tube from the master cylinder is exception, the master cylinder for power brakes does
connected to the hydraulic system safety switch (Figs. not include the push rod.
8 or 9) and thence to the rear brakes. The rear out- The drum brake master cylinder is different than
let tube from the master cylinder is also connected the disc brake master cylinder and is covered in the
to the safety switch and the front brakes. service brake section of this group.
The master cylinder used on vehicles not equipped

SERVICE PROCEDURES
MASTER CYLINDER REMOVAL (5) Using Tool T-109-178 (or an easy out) remove
tube seats by threading tool firmly into seat, tapping
(1) Disconnect front and rear brake tubes from tool gently with a hammer (Fig. 2). Discard seats.
master cylinder and install a plug in rear outlet. (The (6) Remove residual pressure valve and spring
residual pressure valve in front outlet will keep cylin- from front outlet (Fig. 3).
der from draining). (7) Remove rubber cups from pistons after noting
(2) Disconnect pedal push rod (standard brakes) position of cup lips. Do not remove center cup of
from brake pedal. rear piston. If cup is damaged or worn, install a new
(3) Remove nuts that attach master cylinder to rear piston assembly.
cowl panel and/or power brake unit (if so equipped).
(4) Slide master cylinder straight out from cowl CLEANING AND INSPECTION
panel and/or power brake unit (if so equipped).
Clean master cylinder thoroughly, using a suitable
DISASSEMBLING MASTER CYLINDER solvent and dry with compressed air. Wash the cylin-
der bore with clean brake fluid and inspect for scor-
To disassemble the master cylinder, (Figs. 1 and 4),
clean the outside of the master cylinder thoroughly.
(1) Press bail to one side and remove cover and
gasket. Empty brake fluid from reservoirs.
(2) Remove piston retaining screw and gasket (Fig.
4), then slide rear piston assembly out of cylinder
bore.
(3) Upend master cylinder and tamp (open end
down) on bench to remove front piston and spring. If
front piston sticks in bore of cylinder, use air pres-
sure to force piston out of cylinder. New cups must
be installed at reassembly if air pressure is used.
(4) Remove front piston compression spring from
NP36
bore.
BAll Fig. 2-Removing Tube Seats
TAB

STER CYLINDER
TUBE SEA' BODY

I
OUTLET TO I - RESIDUAL PRESSURE
REAR BRAKES OUTLET TO VALVE AND SPRING
FRONT BRAKES NP35 NP37 (REAR BRAKE CONNECTION ONLY)

Fig. 3-Removing or Installing Residual Pressure


Fig. I --Tandem Master Cylinder Valve and Spring

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-51
ing or pitting. Master cylinder bore walls that have front of piston.) (Fig. 4).
light scratches or show signs of corrosion, can usually (3) Carefully work secondary piston cup over piston
be cleaned with crocus cloth. However, cylinder bores and into rear land. The lip must be facing toward
that have deep scratches or scoring may be honed, rear (Fig. 4).
providing the diameter of the bore is not increased (4) Position small end of pressure spring into re-
more than .002 inch. If master cylinder bore does not tainer, then slide assembly into bore of cylinder (Fig.
clean up at .002 inch when honed, the master cylinder 5). Be sure cups enter bore evenly in order not to
should be discarded and a new master cylinder in- damage sealing quality of cups. (Keep well lubricated
stalled. with brake fluid.)
If master cylinder pistons are badly scored or
corroded, replace them with new ones. The piston Rear Piston
cups and seals should be replaced when recondition- (1) Carefully work secondary cup over rear end of
ing a master cylinder. rear piston with lip of cup toward front (Fig. 4).
When overhauling a master cylinder, use all parts (2) Center spring retainer of rear piston assembly
furnished in repair kit. Discard all used rubber parts. over shoulder of front piston. Push piston assemblies
into bore. Carefully work lips of cups into bore, then
REASSEMBLING MASTER CYLINDER seat piston assemblies (Fig. 6).
(3) Holding pistons in seated position, install pis-
Front Piston ton retaining screw and gasket. Tighten securely (Fig.
Before assembling master cylinder, dip all com- 6).
ponent parts in clean brake fluid and place on a clean (4) Install residual pressure valve and spring (Fig.
shop towel or paper (assembling seals dry, can ruin 3) in front brake outlet, then install tube seats firmly.
them). (When the bleeding tubes are attached, the tube seats
(1) Slide thin washer over stem of front piston, will be positioned correctly.)
followed by primary cup. (Be sure lip is away from
piston.) (Fig. 4). BLEEDING MASTER CYLINDER
(2) Carefully work seal cup over rear end of piston Before installing master cylinder on vehicle, it
and into second land. (Be sure lip of cup is facing must be bled on bench as follows:
ER

RESIDUAL PRESS1
VALVE

M
,ASTER CYLINDER
BODY

FRONT PISTON
SPRING

B3

YjPdNGI
TUBE SEAT I
TUBE SEAT
~
\
WASHER
/ SEAT

/ P R I Y R Y CUP

REAR PISTON
NP38A

Fig. 4-Tandem Master Cylinder (Exploded View)

MyMopar.com
5-52
BUBBLES

WOODEN STICK

PISTON SPRING

BLEEDING TUB

Fig. 7-Bleeding Master Cylinder


rod with cowl panel opening (Manual) or power brake
NP39 push rod with master cylinder piston.
(2) Slide over mounting studs. Install attaching
Fig. 5-Installing Front Piston and Spring nuts and tighten to 9 foot-pounds.
(3) Connect front and rear brake tubes and tighten
(1)Clamp master cylinder in a vise and attach to 150 inch-pounds.
bleeding tubes Tool C-4029 (Fig. 7). (4) Bleed brakes at wheel cylinders, using regular
(2) Fill both reservoirs with approved brake fluid. procedure, being sure fluid level is maintained. (See
(3) Using a wooden stick or dowel (power brake “Bleeding Brake System”.)
equipped vehicles) depress push rod slowly. (Note
air bubbles.) Allow pistons to return under pressure TESTING MASTER CYLINDER
of springs. Do this several times or until bubbles
cease to appear (Fig. 7). Be sure that the master cylinder compensates at
(4) Remove bleeding tubes from cylinder and install both ports. This can be done by applying the pedal
plug in rear outlet. (As tubes are removed, fluid re- lightly with the engine running (power brakes) and
maining in tubes will syphon out.) observing for a gyser of fluid squirting up in the
(5) Place cover and gasket over reservoirs and se- reservoirs. This may only occur in the front cham-
cure with bail. ber and so to determine if the rear compensating
(6) Remove master cylinder from vise and install port is open, it will be necessary to pump up the
on vehicle as follows: brakes rapidly and then hold the pedal down. Have an
observer watch the fluid in the rear reservoir while
INSTALLING MASTER CYLINDER the pedal is raised. A disturbance in the fluid indi-
cates that the compensating port is open.
(1)Install master cylinder on vehicle, aligning push
HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SAFETY SWITCH
The hydraulic system safety switch (Figs. 8 and 9)

I is used to warn the vehicle operator that one of the


hydraulic systems has failed. A failure in one part
of the brake system does not result in failure of the
entire hydraulic brake system. As an example, failure
of the rear brake system will leave the front brake
system still operative.
As pressure falls in one system, the other system’s
normal pressure forces the piston to the inoperative
side; contacting the switch terminal, causing a red
REAR PISTON SET
SCREW AND GASKET warning light to come on in the instrument panel,
thus warning the operator of the vehicle, that one of
the systems has failed and should be repaired.
NP40 The safety switch is mounted on the frame in a
vertical position, with the brake tubes connected, as
Fig. 6-Installing Rear Piston Assembly shown in (Fig. 8).

MyMopar.com
0 BRAKES 5-53
FROM MASTER CYLINDER ignition key "ON", and apply the parking brake. If
the light fails to light, inspect for a burned out bulb,
disconnected socket, a broken or disconnected wire
at the switch.
To test the service brake warning system, raise the
PISTON SEAL "0"RING
car on a hoist and open a wheel cylinder bleeder
while a helper depresses the brake pedal and observes
the warning light. If the light fails to light, inspect
for a burned out bulb, disconnected socket, a broken
or disconnected wire at the switch. If the bulb is not
burned out and the wire continuity is proven, re-
place the brake warning switch in the brake line
Tee fitting mounted on the frame rail in the engine
PISTON ASSEMBLY compartment below the master cylinder.
FROM MASTER CYLINDER
PORT STAMPED "R" PRESSURE METERING VALVE
All disc brake vehicles are equipped with a
REAR BRAKE TUBE pressure metering valve (Figs. 1 and 2). The valve is
located on the left frame rail. The use of the metering
NP16A valve is to better match front disc brakes with the
rear drum brakes, resulting in improved braking and
Fig. 8-Hydraulic System Safety Switch steering control on icy surfaces.
(Sectional) Due to operating characteristics of the valve, which
If a malfunction occurs within the switch, discon- causes complete shut-off of the flow of brake fluid
nect tubes from body assembly and install a new between approximately 3 and 135 psi, front brake
assembly. The component parts of the switch body bleeding proceedures should be done as follows:
are not serviced. However, the terminal unit can be (1) Gravity Bleed: This method of bleeding is not
removed if a malfunction occurs, and a new terminal effected by the metering valve, as fluid pressures are
unit installed. always below 3 psi. Remove master cylinder reservoir
If a new safety switch body assembly is installed, cover and gasket, then fill reservoirs with approved
bleed the brake system. brake fluid. Open disc brake bleeder screws, and allow
fluid and air to drain until stream of fluid is free of
air.
TESTING HYDRAULIC SYSTEM SAFETY (2) Pedal Bleed: This method of bleeding is not
SWITCH effected by the metering valve, as fluid pressures are
The brake warning light flashes only when the in excess of 135 psi. Follow normal procedure of
parking brake is applied with the ignition key turned pumping pedal and opening bleeder screws. Do not
"ON". The same light will also illuminate should
one of the two service brake systems fail when the
brake pedal is applied. To test the system turn the
SAFETY SWITCH

RIGHT FRONT
@k BODY
SAFETY SWITCH
BRAKE TUBE

/
BODY ASSEMBLY
FllTlNG

\MOUNTING
BRACKET
DUST S
PLUG
VAL\
MOUNTN
I G-?
BRACKET
G \
a -
NP24

Fig. 9-Hydraulic System Safety Switch


(Exploded V i e w ) Fig. I-Metering Valve Assembly

MyMopar.com
5-54 S PEC1FICAT10 NS 0

TO MASTER CYLINDER BRAKE the front brakes. However, the valve (Fig. 2) can be
TUBE ASSEMBLY-FRONT -I((( METERING held open manually by using Tool C-4121, to pull the
TO MASTER CYLINDER BRAKE TUBE valve stem down.
ASSEMBLY-REAR
MASTER CYLINDER TEE \ lVE CAUTION: Under no condition should a rigid clamp,
wedge or block be used to depress the valve stem, as
AND SAFFTY SWITCH
4-
FRONT BRAKE
TUBE (RIGHT)\
h
I =- this can cause an internal failure in the valve, result-
ing in complete loss of front brakes.
TO PROPORTIONING
VALVE
+ It should be noted that the pressure release valve
stem is in its uppermost position when there is no
pressure present. No attempt should be made to fur-
ther depress the valve stem.
PROPORTIONING’ Checking Metering Valve
FRONT (1) A slight “bump” can be felt by the foot as the
TO’ REAR- BRAKE TUBE (LEFT)
BRAKE HOS- m” m 1
r T 414 brake pedal is stroked. This bump will occur after the
pedal has been stroked about 1inch.
Fig. 2-Meiering Valve (Mounting) (2) A visual check will show that the valve stem ex-
pump master cylinder dry! tends slightly when the brakes are applied and re-
(3) Pressure Bleed: This method of bleeding is in- tracts when the brakes are released.
fluenced by the metering valve. Bleed pressure, which (3) In case of a metering valve malfunction, remove
is normally about 35 psi, is high enough to cause the valve and install a new one.
metering valve to close, stopping the flow of fluid to

SP ECIFICATIONS
BRAKES-SERVICE AND PARKING
Dart 6 Cyl. V-8 & H.D.
Type ............................................. Duo-Servo Single Anchor Duo-Servo Single Anchor
DRUM DIAMETER ................................ 10” Front 9” Rear 10”
NUMBER OF BRAKE SHOES ...................... 8 8
Front ........................................... 2-1I 4” Wide 2-9/16’ wide
Rear ........................................... 2-1116” Wide 1-13116” wide
BRAKE LINING ................................... Extruded Asbestos-Bonded Extruded Asbestos-Bonded
Front Primary ................................... 2-114 x 8-112” 2-112” wide 8-112” long
Front Secondary ................................ 2-1/4 x 11” 2-112” wide 11” long
Rear Primary .................................... 2 x 7-518” 1-314” wide
Rear Secondary ................................. 2 x 9-518’’ 1-3I 4” wid e
Thickness Primary ................................ 3116” 3116” 3116’
Secondary .............................. 114“ 1/4” 114“
WHEEL CYLINDER ................................ 4 per car 4 per car
Front Wheel Cylinder Bore ....................... 1” 1-3116”
Rear Wheel Cylinder Bore ....................... 13116” 15116”
MASTER CYLINDER BORE ........................ 1” 1”
Challenger 6 Cyl. V-8 & H.D. & Sub.
Type ............................................. Duo-Servo Single Anchor Duo-Servo Single Anchor
DRUM DIAMETER ................................ 10” 1CY‘
(Heavy Duty) ................................... 11” 11”
NUMBER OF BRAKE SHOES ...................... 8 8
WIDTH (Standard)
Front ........................................... 2-112” 2-112”
Rear ........................................... 2-112” 2-112“
(HEAVY DUTY)
Front ........................................... 3” 3“
Rear ........................................... 2-112“ 2-112”
BRAKE LINING (IO-INCH) ......................... Extruded Asbestos-Bonded Extruded Asbestos-Bonded
Front Primary ................................... 8-112” 8-112“
Front Secondary ................................ 11” 11”
Rear Primary ................................... 8-112“ 8-112”

MyMopar.com
0 S PEC I F ICAT10 NS 5-55
Rear Secondary ................................. 11" 11"
BRAKE LINING (11 INCH)
Front Primary ................................... 9-114" 9-114"
Front Secondary ................................ 12-118"
Rear Primary ................................... 9-114"
Rear Secondary ................................. 12-118"
Thickness Primary ................................ 3116" 3116"
Secondary ............................. 114" 114"
WHEEL CYLINDER
Front Wheel Cylinder Bore ....................... 1-3116" 1-3116"
Rear Wheel Cylinder Bore ....................... 15116"
MASTER.CYLINDER BORE ......................... 1"

KELSEY-HAYES DISC BRAKE


Dart
Type of Brake .............................................. Fixed Caliper Disc
Location ................................................... Front Wheels Only
Master Cylinder Reservoir ................................... Horizontal Tandem (Dual)
Proportioning Valve Location ................................ Left Sill
Brake Adjustment .......................................... None (Automatic)
Residual Valve Location .................................... In Master Cylinder Outlet (to rear
brakes only)
CALIPER ASSEMBLY
Shoe and Lining Removal ................................... Radially Outward (Remove Clips)
Number of Pistons ......................................... 4 (Each Unit)
Piston Diameter ............................................ 1-518''
Piston Bore Diameter ....................................... i.636"
Maximum Allowable (After Honing) ........................ 1.638"
Piston Seals ................................................ Moulded Rubber (Square Section)
.092" Wide, .lo0Radial Thickness
Piston Dust Boots .......................................... External Moulded Rubber
4 Per Unit
Bleeder Screw Location .................................... Outer Housing 318"
Transfer Tube Type ......................................... Short Overhead
BRAKING DISC
Type ....................................................... Ventilated Cast 1ron
Diameter Outside ........................................... 11.04"
Inside ............................................ 6.91"
Disc Runout (Maximum Allowable) T.I.R. ...................... .0025"
Disc Surface Finish ......................................... 15 to 80 Micro Inches
Disc Thickness ............................................. .810"
Disc Parallelism (Total Variation in Thickness) ................ .0005"
BRAKE SHOE AND LINING
Type ....................................................... Bonded
Lining Thickness ........................................... .400" (Nominal)
Width ...................................................... 1.84"
Length ..................................................... 4.82"
Braking Area ............................................... 8.50" Sq. InJSegment
Maximum Wear (Minimum Thickness Allowed) ................ Not less than 1/32" lining at any point
or a minimum shoe and lining thick-
ness of .180"
MASTER CYLINDER
Piston Bore Diameter ....................................... 1"
Maximum Bore Diameter Allowable (After Honing) ............ .002" O.S.
Residual Valve .............................................. Rear Brakes Only
DISC SPLASH SHIELD
Type ....................................................... Vented-Stamped Steel
Mounting .................................................. 3 Bolts to Knuckle
PR 0P0 RTI0NING VALVE
Type ....................................................... Pressure Control
P.S.I. Cut In ................................................ 300 P.S.I.
Reduction in Rate of Rear Line Pressure Build Up ............ After 300 P.S.I. Actuation Pressure.
WHEELS
Type ....................................................... Drop Center
Diameter ................................................... 14 x 4-1/2J Special

MyMopar.com
5-56 SPECIFICATIONS 0

TIGHTENING REFERENCE
Foot-Pounds Inch-Pounds
CaliDer Mounting Bolts ...................................... 50-80
Caliper Assembly Bridge Bolts ............................... 70-80
Disc Splash Shield Bolts .................................... 17
Caliper Bleeder Screw ....................................... 100
Shoe Clips (Retainers) ...................................... 7-9
Brake Tube Fitting Nuts to Proportioning Valve ................ 90-100
Wheel Assembly to Front Wheel Hub and Disc Assembly Nuts ... 55
KELSEY-HAYES DISC BRAKE
(Floating Ca Ii per)
Challenger
Type of Brake .............................................. Floating Caliper
Location ................................................... Front Wheels Only
Master Cylinder ............................................. Horizontal Tandem (Dual)
Metering Valve Location ..................................... Left Front Frame Rail
Brake Adjustment ........................................... None Required
Residual Valve Location (Rear Brakes Only) ................... In Master Cylinder Outlet
CALIPER ASSEMBLY
Shoe and Lining Removal .................................... Bottom, Caliper Removed
Number of Pistons .......................................... 1 Each Unit
Piston Diameter ............................................ 2-3/4”(2.751”-2.753”)
Piston Bore Diameter
Maximum Allowable (After Honing) ......................... 2.757“
Piston Seal ................................................. Moulded Rubber (Square Section)
.126”Wide-120” Radial Thickness
Dust Boot .................................................. Moulded Rubber (External)
1 Per Unit
Bleeder Screw Location ...................................... Inner Housing 318”
BRAKING DISC
Type ....................................................... Ventilated Cast Iron
Diameter (Outside) .......................................... 11.75”
(Inside) ........................................... 7.725”
Disc Run-out (Maximum Allowable) T.I.R. ...................... .0025“
Disc Surface Finish ......................................... 15 to 80 Micro Inches
Disc Thickness ............................................. 1.m1.010
Disc Parallelism (Total Variation in Thickness) ................. ,0005”
BRAKE SHOE AND LINING
Type ....................................................... Bonded
Lining Thickness ............................................ .1.80“
^^.. ...
.460” - . I).
(Nomina
Wide .............. ......................................... (At Center)
Long .............. ......................................... 6.02“
Braking Area ....... ......................................... 10.V’
Maximum Wear (Mirtimum Thickness Allowed) ................ Not less than ,030”Lining ait any
point or a minimum shoe and lining
thickness of .180”
MASTER CYLINDER
Piston Bore Diameteir ........................................ 1-118“
Maximum Bore Dianieter Allowable (After Honing) ............. .002” O.S.
Residual Valve ..... ......................................... Rear Brakes Only
DISC SPLASH SHIE:LD
Type ....................................................... Vented-Sta mped Steel
Mounting ................................................... 3 Bolts to Knuckle
WHEELS
Type ....................................................... Drop Center
Diameter ................................................... 14~5.00-14~6.00

MyMopar.com
0 TIGHTENING REFERENCE 5-57

TIGHTENING REFERENCE
POWER BRAKE TlGHTENlNG
REFERENCE
Pedal Link to Pedal Bolt ........................................... 30 Foot Pounds
Master Cylinder Mounting Nuts ...................................... 100 Inch Pounds
Power Brake Unit to Dash Nuts ...................................... 150 Inch Pounds

MyMopar.com
0 GROUP 6

CLUTCH
CONTENTS
Page Page
CLUTCH-SERVICI NG .................. 4 GENERAL INFORMATION .............. 1
CLUTCH HOUSING ALIGNMENT ........ 9 SERVICE DIAGNOSIS .................. 2
CLUTCH PEDAL FREE PLAY . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SERVICE PROCEDURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
CLUTCH RELEASE BEARING . . . . . . . . . . . 7 SPECIFICATIONS ...................... 10
CLUTCH RELEASE FQRK ............... 7 STEAM CLEANING PRECAUTIONS ...... 10
PI LOT BUSH I NG-C RANKSHAFT TO TIGHTENING REFERENCE ............. 11
TRANSMISSION DRIVE PINION . . . . . . . 7 TORQUE SHAFT AND BEARlNGS ........ 8
GENERAL INFORMATION
The clutches used on all models are a single, dry Some models have centrifugal rollers assembled
disc type (Figs. 1 and 2), with no adjustment for wear between the pressure plate and cover. These rollers
being provided in the clutch itself. The clutch pedal are provided to increase the normal load on the disc
linkage, however, is provided with an adjustable rod assembly at higher engine speeds. As the engine speed
to maintain specified pedal free play. increases, the centrifugal force of the rollers causes
The three pressure plate release levers are preset them to act as wedges between the cover and pressure
during manufacture and no attempt should be made plate and exert greater force against the disc.
to adjust them in service.
The clutch sizes for the various car models are de- Clutch Pedal and Bracket (Fig. 3 and 4)
scribed in specification charts at end of this section. The clutch pedal is connected to the torque shaft
The Semi-centrifugal type clutch (Fig. 2), combines through a vertically positioned rod. A non-adjustable
the feature of low pedal effort with that of a clutch over-center spring is provided between the pedal and
capable of transmitting the full torque of the engine. the pedal bracket to allow easy clutch pedal operation.
DISC

bPRING

PLATE '

NR179

Fig. I -Clurch Dfsussembled

MyMopar.com
6-2 CLUTCH 0

SLEE

RELEASE LEVER

EYEBOLT NUTS
NY7OA

Fig. 2-Clutch Disassembled (Semi Centrlfugall


The upper end of the clutch pedal pivots in the ings. These bearings do not require periodic lubrica-
pedal bracket on two needle bearings or nylon bush- tion.

SERVICE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
CLUTCH CHATTER (a) Worn or damaged disc assembly. (a) Replace disc assembly.
(b) Grease or oil on disc facings. (b) Replace disc assembly.
(c) Improperly adjusted cover assembly. (c) Replace clutch assembly.
CLUTCH SLIPPING (a) Burned, worn, or, oil soaked facings. (a) Replace disc assembly.
PEDAL STOP
PLAIN WASHER

BUSHING \

OVER-CENTER SPRING

.I

[-/r CLUTCH PEDAL

~ E M B L
FRAME SIDE RAIL
Y
'
PEDAL ROD
ov NP131B

Fig. %Clutch Pedal and linkage fBcrrP)

MyMopar.com
0 CLUTCH 6-3
Condition Possible Cause Correction
(b) Insufficient pedal free play. (b) Adjust release fork rod.
(c) Weak or broken pressure springs. (C) Replace clutch assembly.
DIFFICULT GEAR (a) Excessive pedal free play. (a1 Adjust release fork rod.
SHIFTING (b) Worn or damaged disc assembly. (b) Replace disc assembly.
(c) Improperly adjusted cover assembly. (c) Replace clutch assembly.
(d) Clutch disc splines sticking. (d) Remove disc assembly and free up
splines or replace disc.
CLUTCH NOISY (a) Dry clutch linkage. (a) Lubricate where necessary.
(b) Worn release bearing. (b) Replace release bearing.
(c) Worn disc assembly. (C) Replace disc assembly.
(d) Worn release levers. (d) Replace clutch assembly.
(e) Worn or dry pilot bushing. (e) Lubricate or replace bushing.
(f) Dry contact pressure plate lugs in (f) Lubricate very lightly.
cover.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
CLUTCH PEDAL FREE PLAY (4) Adjust interlock rod as described below.
The only adjustment required for the clutch is the
Gearshift Interlock (Fig. 5 ) (6 Cyl. only)
pedal linkage adjustment to provide the prescribed (1) Disconnect clutch rod swivel from interlock
clutch pedal free play. The adjustment is necessary pawl.
to restore pedal free play reduced by normal clutch (2) Adjust clutch pedal free play as specified.
wear. (3) When first-reverse lever on transmission is in
Adjusting Clutch Pedal Free Play neutral (middle detent) position, the interlock pawl
(1) Inspect condition of clutch pedal rubber stop will enter the slot in first-reverse lever.
(Figs. 3 or 4).If stop is damaged, install a new one. (4) Loosen swivel clamp bolt and slide swivel on
(2) On 6 cyl. models with A-903 transmission discon- rod to enter pawl. Install washers and clip. Hold inter-
nect gearshift interlock rod by loosening rod swivel lock pawl forward and tighten swivel clamp bolt to
clamp screw (Fig. 5). 100 inch-pounds. Clutch pedal has to be in full re-
(3) Adjust fork rod by turning self-locking adjust- turned position during this adjustment.
ing nut (Figs. 6 or 7) to provide 5/32 inch free move- CAUTION: Do not pull clutch rod rearward to en-
ment at end of fork. This movement will provide pre- gage swivel in the pawl.
scribed one-inch free play at pedal. (5) Shift transmission in normal manner from neu-

SEALING. WASHER (2)

iL
NR181

Fig. 4-Clufch Pedal and Linkage (Challenger)

MyMopar.com
Removal
(1) Remove transmission. See “Manual Transmis-
sion,” Group 21, for detailed procedure.
(2) Remove clutch housing pan.
(3) Remove one end of return sprnig from clutch
2ND-3RD LEVER release fork and the other end from torque shaft lever
or clutch housing (Fig. 6 or 7).
(4) Remove spring washer securing fork rod to
1ST.-REVERSE LEV torque shaft lever pin and remove rod from pin and
release fork (Figs. 6 or 7).
(5) On all models with the A-903 transmission, re-
PLAIN WASHE move clip and plain washer securing interlock rod to
SPRING WASHER torque shaft lever and remove spring washer, plain
washer and rod from torque shaft.
(6) Remove clutch release bearing and sleeve as-
sembly from clutch release fork (Fig. 8 ) then remove
release fork and boot from clutch housing.
- (7) Mark clutch cover and flywheel (Fig. 9) to
NN107A
maintain their same relative positions when reinstall-
Fig. 5-Gwrshift Interlock 16 cyl. & A903 Trans. Only) ing clutch assembly.
(8) Loosen and back off clutch cover attaching
tral to first, and from neutral to reverse (disengage
bolts, one or two turns at a time, in succession, to
clutch while shifting and engage clutch when in gear).
Clutch action should be normal. avoid bending cover flange.
(6)Disengage clutch and shift halfway to first or (9) Remove clutch assembly and disc from clutch
reverse. Clutch should now be held down by interlock housing.
to within 1or 2 inches of floor. CAUTION: Handle clutch and disc carefully to avoid
contaminating the friction surfaces.
CLUTCH-SERVICI NG
Cleaning and fnspection
Improper operation or excessive wear may impair (1) Use compressed air to clean dust out of clutch
the clutch function to a point where it may be nec- housing. Inspect for oil leakage through engine rear
essary to remove and replace the disc, and/or clutch main bearing oil seal and transmission drive pinion
assembly. Should this become necessary, proceed as seal. If leakage is noted, it should be corrected at
follows: this time.

11 \ \ i PEDAL ROD CLUTCH HOUSING \k ._


CLUTCH HOUSING

SPRING WASHER

DAMPENER WASHER

ORK RETURN SPRING

f R A M E SIDE RAIL

Fig. &Torque Shaft and Linkage (Dart)

MyMopar.com
0 CLUTCH 6-5

CLUTCH HOUSING

SPRING WASHER

SCREW
(6-CYL. MODELS ONLY) FORK

TORQUE SHAFT

FRAME SIDE RAIL FORK‘IRETURN


cnn
ardNG
PLAIN WASHER
INTERLOCl: ROD --.
III
III
c ~ -18 CU. IN. ENGINE
(6 CYL. A903 TRANS. ONLY) FORK RETURN SPRING’ ONLY
8-CYL. EXCEPT 318 CU. IN. RELEASE FORK
NR185B

Fig. 7-Torque Shuft and Linkage (Challenger)


(2) Friction face of flywheel should have a uni- If necessary to replace bushing, proceed as detailed
form appearance throughout entire disc contact area. under “Crankshaft to Transmission Drive Pinion Pilot
If there is evidence of heavy contact on one portion Bushing.”
of wear circle and a very light contact 180 degrees (5) The end of transmission main drive pinion
from that portion, flywheel may be improperly should be smooth and bright, without grooves and
mounted or sprung. In either case, a dial indicator ridges.
mounted on clutch housing with plunger in contact (6) The disc assembly should be handled without
with wear circle, should show no more than .003 inch touching facings. Replace disc if facings show evi-
runout throughout complete rotation of flywheel. dence of grease or oil soakage, or wear to within less
(3) Friction face of flywheel should also be free
than .015 inch of rivet heads. The hub splines and.f
from discoloration, burned areas, small cracks,
grooves or ridges. splines on transmission main drive pinion should be <,
(4) The bushing pressed in end of crankshaft should
be smooth and show no excessive wear. A new trans-
mission main drive pinion can be used to gauge size of
bushing.

RETURN SPRING d? \. BEARING AND SLEEVE

RELEASE FORK

RETAININGSPRING’ CLUTCH HOUSING/


NN95A
Fig. 8 4 l v t c h Releuse Fork, Bearing and Sleeve Fig. 9-Marking Clutch and Flywheel

MyMopar.com
6-6 CLUTCH 0

a snug fit without signs of excessive wear. Metallic of grease. Place lubricant in radius back of bushing.
portions of disc assembly should be dry and clean (2)Clean the surfaces of flywheel and pressure
and show no evidence of having been hot. Each of plate thoroughly with fine sandpaper or crocus cloth,
the arched springs between facings should be un- and make certain that all oil or grease has been re-
broken and all rivets should be tight. moved.
(7) Wipe friction surface of pressure plate with (3)Hold clutch disc, pressure plate and cover in
kerosene, mineral spirits or other suitable solvent. mounting position, with springs on disc damper fac-
(8) Using a straightedge, check pressure plate for ing away from the flywheel. Do not touch disc facing,
flatness. The pressure plate friction area should be as contamination may result in clutch chatter. Insert
flat within .015 inch and free from discoloration, a Clutch Disc Aligning Arbor through hub of disc
burned areas, cracks, grooves or ridges. and into bushing (Fig. 10).If an Arbor is not available,
(9) Inner ends of release levers should have a uni- use a spare transmission drive pinion.
form wear pattern. (4) Install clutch cover attaching bolts (after align-
(10)Using a surface plate, test cover for flatness. ing balance punch marks, (Fig. 9), but do not tighten
All sections around attaching bolt holes should be in them. The special 12 point bolts used on 11 inch
contact with surface plate within .015inch. clutches for 383 cu. in. and larger engines, require no
(11) The cover should be a snug fit on pressure lock washers. The use of lock washers would create
plate lugs. interference problems.
If clutch assembly does not meet these require- (5)To avoid distortion of the clutch cover, bolts
should be tightened a few turns at a time (alternately)
ments, it should be replaced.
until they are all snug. Tighten 5/16 inch bolts to
(12) Examine condition of clutch release bearing. 200 inch-pounds, 3/8 inch bolts to 30 foot-pounds. Re-
CAUTION: The clutch release bearing is a prelubri-
move Arbor (or drive pinion if used).
cated, sealed thrust bearing and should not be im-
(6) Fill cavity of bearing sleeve with Lubricant.
mersed in solvent.
Also apply a film of lubricant to release fork pads of
The bearing should turn freely, when held in the sleeve (Fig. 11).
hands under light thrust load, with no evidence of (7) Position release bearing and sleeve assembly in
roughness. clutch housing as far forward as possible.
(13) If bearing is noisy, rough or dry, install a new (8) Lubricate fork fingers and retaining spring, at
one on sleeve as detailed under “Clutch Release Bear- pivot contact area (Fig. 11)with a film of grease.
ing.” (9) Engage fork fingers under clutch sleeve retain-
ing springs. Be sure retaining springs on sleeve have
lnstallatlon 3
lateral freedom (Fig. 8).
The grease recommended for use during reassem-
bly procedures is Automotive Multi-Purpose Grease
(10)Be sure groove in seal is engaged in seal open-
ing flange in clutch housing (Fig. 8).
NLGl Grade 2 E.P. or Multi=Mileage Lubricant, Part
Number 2525035.
(11)Insert threaded end of fork rod assembly in
(1)Lubricate transmission drive pinion pilot bush- hole in end of release rod fork (Figs. 6 or 7). Install
ing in end of crankshaft with about one-half teaspoon eye end of fork rod on torque shaft lever pin and
secure with spring washer.
(12)Install one end of return spring to clutch re-
lease fork and the other end to torque shaft lever or
clutch housing (Fig. 6 or 7).
(13) On 6 cyl. with A-903 transmission, install
spring washer, plain washer and interlock rod in
FORK CONTACT SLEEVE CAVITY
AREAS/ \
RETAINING SPRING

...-.
CONTACT AREA NR133

Fig. IO-Clutch Disc Aligning Arbor Fig. I 1-Clutch Lubricatfon Points

MyMopar.com
Q CLUTCH 6-7
torque shaft lever and secure with plain washer and sides of fork contact areas, pivot contact area, edge of
clip. pivot, also the cavity inside clutch sleeve and the fork
CAUTION: Do not lubricate splines or pilot end of pads (Fig. 11).
transmission drive pinion when installing transmis- (3) Install clutch release fork in housing, being
sion. These areas must be kept dry. careful to engage flat retaining spring in hole in pivot
(14) Install transmission as detailed in “Transmis- and under retaining springs of bearing sleeve.
sion Installation,” Group 21. (4) Install dust seal over release fork and engage
(15) Adjust clutch linkage as detailed under “Ad- groove of seal in clutch housing (Fig. 8).
justing Clutch Ped: 11Free Play.” (5) Insert fork rod assembly in 1iole in release
fork. Install eye end of fork rod on tor’que shaft lever
PILOT BUSHIN(;-CRANKSHAFT TO pin and secure with spring washer (Fig. 6 or 7).
TRANSMlSSl0 N DRIVE PINION (6) Install one end of return spring to clutch release
tm-1- --.a LL- ..LL-- --.a
L- L ------
-L-l?L
lever or clutch
~ L I I ~ I~- I I ULO Lurqut: S I I ~ I L
A U I ~~ I I UL I I U

Tools called out are part of Bushing Service Tool housing (Fig. 6 or 7).
Kit C-3887-A. (7) Adjust clutch linkage as described under “Ad-
justing Clutch Pedal Free Play”.
Removal
(1) Thread bushing puller SP-3631 into bushing CLUTCH RELEASE BEARING (Removed from
firmly and squarely, about 3 or 4 turns. Clutch)
(2) Place receiving cup SP-3633 over threaded shaft
of puller and install nut SP-1191 down against cup. Removal
(3) Hold puller and turn nut to draw bushing out of (1) Examine condition of bearmg. If bearing is
crankshaft. noisy, rough or dry when rotated by hand, under light
thrust load, remove bearing from sleeve.
lnstallation (2) Support bearing in a vise or press and press
(1) Soak new bushing in oil before installing. out sleeve.
(2) Place handle SP-3549 on head SP-3551 and use (3) Clean sleeve in solvent and remove all old lubri-
this tool to drive new bushing into crankshaft flush cant.
to end.
(3) Place one-half teaspoon of grease in crankshaft Assembly
cavity behind bushing. CAUTION: Exercise care when installing a new clutch
release bearing to avoid damaging bearing race. Never
CLUTCH RELEASE FORK drive bearing on sleeve with a hammer. Usa,either
of following two methods.
Removal
(1) Remove one end of return spring from clutch Vise Method
release fork and the other end from torque shaft lever (1) Position new bearing on sleeve and place old
or clutch housing (Fig. 6 or 7). bearing against face of new bearing.
(2) Remove spring washer securing fork rod to (2) Support parts in a vise and carefully press new
torque shaft lever and remove rod from torque shaft. bearing on sleeve (Fig. 12). Make certain bearing is
(3) Pry dust seal out of clutch housing and remove seated on shoulder of bearing sleeve. Rotate bearings
from release fork (Fig. 8). as they are pressed together.
(4) Grasp outer end of clutch fork and pull fork out
and free of retaining springs and pivot (Fig. 8). The Press Method
clutch fork has a riveted flat retaining spring that is (1) Support sleeve on press bed.
engaged in a hole in the pivot. The clutch release
fork pivot is an ’L’ shaped bracket bolted inside the
clutch housing.
(5) Remove fork from clutch housing.

lnstallation
(1) The grease recommended for use during reas-
sembly procedures is Automotive Multi-Purpose
Grease NLGl Grade 2 E.P. or Multi-Mileage Lubri-
cant, Part Number 2525035.
(2) Before installing release fork, lubricate both Fig. 12-Replacing Clutch Release 6euring

MyMopar.com
6-8 CLUTCH 0

(2) Position new bearing on sleeve and place old (9) Slide or lift frame end of torque shaft from
bearing on new one. torque shaft bracket, depending on type of bracket,
(3) Bring press ram into contact with old bearing and remove torque shaft assembly from vehicle.
and apply sufficient pressure to seat new bearing (10) Disassemble torque shaft assembly by remov-
against shoulder of sleeve. Rotate bearings as they ing snap ring, ball studs, seals and bearings.
are pressed together.
Cleaning and Inspection
Lubrication (1)Clean all parts in kerosene, mineral spirits or
Before installing bearing and sleeve assembly, lub- other suitable solvent. Remove all grease from inside
ricate parts as follows: torque shaft.
(1)Fill cavity of bearing sleeve with the previously (2)The two ball studs should be bright and free
recommended Automotive Multi-Purpose Grease. from scratches, ridges or other surface imperfections.
NLGI grade 2 EP, (Fig. 11). (3) The inner surfaces of bearings should also be
(2)Also, apply a film of this same lubricant to re- smooth and free from surface scratches or embedded
lease fork pads of sleeve. foreign material. The wear pattern should be uniform
(3)A film of the same type lubricant should be ap- over entire surface.
plied to the pivot contact area of fork retaining spring (4) Replace worn or cracked rubber seals.
and contact areas of fork fingers.

lnstallation lnstallation
(1) Install bearing and sleeve assembly in clutch (1)Install new seals on ball studs (Figs. 6 or 7).
housing, engaging fork under sleeve springs (Fig. 8). (2)Coat counterbored ends of torque shaft, torque
Be sure springs have lateral freedom.
shaft bearings and ball studs with Multi-Mileage
CAUTION: Do not lubricate splines or pilot end of
Lubricant, Part Number 2525035, or Automotive
transmission drive pinion when installing transmis-
Multi-Purpose Grease, NLGI grade 2 EP.
sion. These areas must be kept dry.
(3) Install bearings on ball studs and push studs
(2)Install transmission as detailed in “Transmission and bearings into torque shaft. Install snap ring on
Installation,” Group 21. frame end of shaft.
(4) On Dart models, insert ball stud through frame
(3)Adjust clutch linkage as detailed under “Ad-
justing Clutch Pedal Free Play.” side rail bracket and position inner stud and bracket
against clutch housing. Install two bracket bolts and
TORQUE SHAFT AND BEARINGS washers and tighten to 200 inch-pounds. Install washer
and nut on end of outer stud and tighten to 40 foot-
Removal pounds (Fig. 6 or 7).
(1) On all models, remove spring clip securing (5) On Challenger place torque shaft assembly
pedal rod to torque shaft lever pin (Figs. 6 or 7) and in approximate position and thread inner ball stud
remove pedal rod from pin. into clutch housing. Tighten stud to 40 foot-pounds.
(2) On 6 cylinder models equipped with A-903trans- Position frame end of torque shaft in slatted frame
mission, remove clip and plain washer securing gear- bracket. Install lockwasher and nut on stud and
shift interlock rod to torque shaft lever and remove tighten to 40 foot-pounds (Fig. 7).
spring washer, plain washer and rod from torque (6) Install pedal rod on torque shaft lever pin and
shaft. secure with spring washer (Fig. 6 or 7).
(3) Remove one end of return spring from clutch (7) Insert threaded end of fork rod assembly in hole
release fork and the other end from torque shaft lever in end of release fork. Install eye end of fork rod on
or clutch housing (Fig. 6 or 7). torque shaft lever pin (Fig. 6 or 7) and secure with
(4) If so equipped, detach outer torque shaft return
spring washer.
spring from hook attached to torque shaft lever and
(8) Install one end of return spring to clutch release
spring bracket.
(5)Remove spring washer securing fork rod assem- fork and the other end to torque shaft lever or clutch
bly to torque shaft lever pin and remove rod from pin housing (Fig. 6 or 7).
(Fig. 6 or 7). (9) On models so equipped, connect outer torque
(6) Remove nut and cone washer from frame end shaft return spring between hook on torque shaft
ball stud. lever and spring bracket.
(7) On Dart models, remove two screws and wash- (10) On 6 cyl. models, install plain washer and gear-
ers securing ball stud bracket to clutch housing shift interlock rod in torque shaft lever (Fig. 6) and
(Fig. 6). secure with spring washer, plain washer and clip.
(8) On Challenger, unscrew ball stud from clutch (11)Adjust clutch linkage.
housing (Fig. 7). (12)Adjust interlock rod.

MyMopar.com
0 CLUTCH 6-9
CLUTCH HOUSING ALIGNMENT n

When performing adjustments or repairs that in-


volve removing the clutch housing, it will be neces-
sary to check transmission mounting bore runout and
squareness to the crankshaft when reassembling.
0
Bore Runout
(1) Replace one flywheel to crankshaft bolt with a

m9
bolt about 3 inches long. Mount Dial Indicator C-3339
on this bolt with a “C” clamp (Fig. 13).
(2) With C-771 Flywheel Turning Tool, turn fly-
wheel while noting dial indicator needle deflection. o3
Bore out-of-round must not exceed .008 inch maxi- REAR FACE OF ENGINE BLOCK N Y 1601A
mum total indicator reading, or .004 inch, one-half
total indicator reading. Fig. 14-Offset Dowel Diagram (6 cyl.)
(3) Excess bore runout can be corrected by install- (No. 1736353).
ing correct size offset dowels (Fig. 14 or 15). These (8) To install dowels, remove clutch housing and
dowels are available in three offset sizes and they old dowels from rear face of engine block.
must be installed in pairs of the same size: .007 inch,
(9) Install both dowels with slots parallel and
Part Number 1736347; .014 inch, Part Number aligned in direction to correct bore runout. (Slot indi-
1736348 and .021 inch, Part Number 1736353. cates direction of maximum dowel eccentricity). Both
(4) To illustrate recommended correction proce-
dowels must be inserted into engine block, up to off-
dure, assume total indicator reading is .020 inch, in set shoulder.
a direction which approximates 2 o’clock on engine
(10) Install clutch housing to engine block bolts.
block (Figure 14 or 15, depending on model). Tighten 7/16 inch bolts to 50 foot-pounds and 3/8
(5) In this case, housing is off crankshaft centerline
inch bolts to 30 foot-pounds.
.010 inch (one-half total indicator reading) which is
(11) Remount dial indicator and remeasure bore
.006 inch greater than allowable limit of .004 inch
runout. Small corrections can be made by removing
(one-half total indicator reading). clutch housing (if necessary) and turning dowels with
(6) In the case under consideration, installation of
a screwdriver to shift housing and bring bore within
two .007 inch dowels will bring runout within the limits.
allowable limits of .004 inch or .010 inch minus .007
inch (dowels)which equals .003 inch runout. Face Squareness
(7) The amount of eccentricity of the dowel will (1) Relocate Dial Indicator (Fig. 16) and rotate fly-
produce a total indicator reading change of double wheel, using Tool C-771. If total indicator reading is
the dowel eccentricity, therefore, select a pair of greater than .006 inch, note amount of total indicator
dowels with the nearest to one-half of total indicator reading and location of lowest indicator reading (i.e.,
runout of bore. For runout (total indicator reading) point where indicator arm or follower is extended
of .009” through .020”, use a .007” dowel (No. farthest).
1736347); .022” through .034”, use .014” dowel (No.
1736348) and .036” through .050”, use .021” dowel
I 12

INCjlC

2
O’CLOCK
f
9 3

REAR FACE OF
ENGINE BLOCK

NR135 ....-
K M 6 I
I

Fig. 13-Measuring Clutch Housing Bore Runout Fig. 15-Offset Dowel Diagram (8 cyf.)

MyMopar.com
6-10 SPECIFICATIONS 0

bolts to 50 foot-pounds and 3/8 inch bolts to 30 foot-


pounds.
(3) Install clutch release bearing, fork, linkage and
transmission. Adjust clutch linkage.
STEAM CLEANING PRECAUTIONS
Since the clutch housing has provisions for ventila-
tion, condensation from steam vapors tend to accumu-
late on the internal clutch mechanism when the
vehicle is steam cleaned. The facings of the disc will
absorb moisture, and the force exerted by the pres-
sure plate, will bond the facings to flywheel and/or
pressure plate, if car is allowed to stand for some
'6-Mwsuring Clutch Housing Face Squareness time before use. If this condition occurs, it will neces-
(2) To correct squareness, place proper thickness sitate replacement of disc assembly, flywheel and/or
shim stock between clutch housing and engine block clutch assembly. Immediately after cleaning opera-
or between transmission and clutch housing. After tion, start engine and "slip clutch" in order to dry
remeasuring squareness, tighten 7/16 inch housing off disc assembly, pressure plate and flywheel.

SPECIFICATIONS
DART-CHALLENGER
APPLICATION CHART
Trans. Cover & Press. Disc Engine Car
Size Speeds Plate Assy. No. Assy. No. Cu. In. Model*
9-114'' 3 1 1 198-225 U
9-112ft 3 2 2 198-225 Opt. L
10-112" 3 or 4 3 3 318 U
10-112" 4 4 3 340 U
11" 3 or 4 5 4 383 J
11" 4 6 5 426 J
11" 4 7 5 440 J

*L= Dart J =Challenger

COVER AND PRESSURE PLATE ASSY.


I DENTIFICAT10N CHART
Assy. Part Springs Mounting Bolt Centrifugal
Size No. Number* No. & Color Circle Diu. Assist Rollers
9-114" 1 2525464 3 Red Stripe 10-518" 0
9-112" 2 2800827 3 White 10-518" 0
10-112" 3 2122255 3 White-6 Plain 11-518" 6
10-112If 4 2409688 6 W h i t e 4 Tan 11-518" 6
11" 5 3410157 6 W h i t e d Tan 11-518" 6
11" 6 3410158 9 White-3 Plain 11-518'' 3
11" 7 3410159 9 White? Plain 11-5/8" 6
*Part numbers subject to change during model year.

MyMopar.com
0 TIGHTENING REFERENCE 6-11

CLUTCH DISC ASSY.


IDENTIFlCATlO N CHART
Assy. Part Facing Dia. Springs Spline
Size No. Number* Outside x Inside No. 8 Color Inside Dia.
9-114" 1 2448336 9-114" x 6" 6 Enclosed 15116"
9-112" 2 2401120 9-112" x 6-112" 6 Enclosed 15116"
10-112" 3 2266232 1@-112" x 6-112" 5 Green-5 Tan 15116"
11" 4 3410160 11" x 6-112" 5 Green-5 Tan 15116"
11" 5 3410161 11" x 7" 5 Plain 1-1116"

*Part Numbers subject to change during model year.

TIGHTENING REFERENCE
POUNDS POUNDS
FOOT INCH FOOT INCH
Clutch Cover to Flywheel Bolts (5116"). . 200 Flywheel Bolts (All except 426 Hemi) ... 55
.
Clutch Cover to Flywheel Bolts (318"). . 30 . . ..
Flywheel Bolts (426 Hemi) . . .. . . . . . 70
..
Clutch Fork Pivot Bolts ... .. . . . ... . . 200 Torque Shaft Ball Stud ....... ... ..... 40
Clutch Housing to Engine Bolts (3/8"). . 30 Torque Shaft Ball Stud Nut ........ .... 40
Clutch Housing to Engine Bolts (71169.. 50 Torque Shaft Ball Stud Bracket Bolts .. 200
Clutch Housing Pan Bolts ............ 200 Transmission to Clutch Housing Bolts.. 50

MyMopar.com
0 GROUP 7

COOLING
CONTENTS
Page Page
ACCESSORY BELT DRIVES . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP ............ 7
CONVERSION TABLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 REVERSE FLUSHING COOLING SYSTEM . 6
ENGINE WATER TEMPERATURE GAUGE . 9 SERVICE DIAGNOSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... 1
FAN ................................. 3 SPECIFICAT10 NS ...................... 10
FLUID FAN DRIVE ..................... 3 TIGHTENING REFERENCE ........... . . . 12
PRESSURE TESTING COOLING SYSTEM . 8 THERMOSTAT ........................ 6
PRESSURE TESTING RADfATOR CAP . . . . 7 TRANSMISSION OIL COOLER . . . . . . . . . . . 5
RADIATOR ............................ 4 WATER PUMP ........................ 4
RADIATOR HOSES ..................... 7
GENERAL INFORMATION
In order to provide satisfactory protection for the The maximum cooling system consisting of a larger
wide variety of corporation models the cooling system radiator and on some models radiator shrouds and/or
of each must be tailored to specific needs. To do this hood-to-yoke and bumper to yoke seals are used to
effectively the Corporation offers five basic systems: provide protection against overheating for unusually
(1) Standard severe operation requirements.
(2) Air Conditioning The trailer towing package is a combination of the
(3) High Capacity Fan maximum cooling package and the high capacity fan,
(4) Maximum Cooling as necessary to provide protection against overheat-
(5) Trailer Towing ing when towing trailers.
The standard system consists of a tube and spacer For internal cooling system protection each cooling
type radiator, 16 psi radiator pressure cap, centrifugal system is factory equipped with sufficient permanent
water pump, 190°F. thermostat*, and a four or seven type anti-freeze for -20°F. protection. It is recom-
blade fan. See specifications for application. mended that the coolant be changed annually to in-
The cooling system for air conditioned equipped sure adequate anti-freeze and corrosion protection.
vehicles generally requires a greater capacity radiator Air conditioned cars require year round protection
along with a fan shroud, special centrifugal water with permanent type anti-freeze with a minimum of
pump and drive ratio, larger fan, and thermostatically + 15°F. protection for summer operation and addi-
controlled fan drive (in some installations). See speci- tional anti-freeze in the winter according to the pre-
fications for applications. vailing temperatures.
An optional capacity fan to protect against over-
heating for unusual operating conditions is available. *318-383-2BBL. have a 195' thermostat.

SERVlCE DIAGNOSlS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
EXTERNAL LEAKAGE (a) Loose hose clamp. (a) Replace the hose clamp. .
(b) Hose leaking. (b) Replace the hose.
(c) Leaking radiator. (c) Repair or replace the radiator a s
necessary.
(d) Water pump leaking through vent (d) Replace the water pump.
hole.
(e) Loose core hole plug. (e) Install new core hole plug.
(f) Damaged gasket, or dry gasket, if (f) Replace gaskets as necessary.
engine has been stored.
(g) Cylinder head bolts loose, or tightened (g) Replace the cylinder head gasket and
uneven Iy. torque head in correct sequence.
(h) Leak at heater connection. (h) Clean the heater connections and
replace the hoses and clamps if
necessary.
(i) Leak at water temperature sending (i) Tighten the water temperature send-
unit. ing unit.

MyMopar.com
7-2 COOLING SYSTEM 0

Condition Possible Cause Correction


(j) Leak at water pump attaching bolt. (j) Tighten the water pump attaching
bolts to 30 foot-pounds.
(k) Leak at exhaust manifold stud. (k) Seal and re-drive the stud.
(I) Cracked thermostat housing. (I) Replace the thermostat housing.
(m) Dented radiator inlet or outlet tube. (m) Straighten the radiator inlet or outlet
tube as necessary.
(n) Leaking heater core. (n) Repair or replace the heater core.
( 0 ) Cracked or porous water pump hous- (01 Replace the water pump assembly.
ing.
(p) Warped or cracked cylinder head. (p) Replace the cylinder head.
(4)Cracked cylinder block. (4)Replace the cylinder block.
(r) Sand holes or porous condition in (r) Replace the cylinder block or cylinder
block or head. head as necessary.
(s) Faulty pressure cap. (s) Replace pressure cap.
(t) Loose or stripped oil cooler fittings. (t) Tighten or replace as necessary.

INTERNAL LEAKAGE (a) Faulty head gasket. (a1 Install a new head gasket.
(b) Refer to causes (f), (g), (p), (91, (r) and (b) Refer to corrections (f), (g), (p), (91,
(t) listed under External Leakage. (r) and (t) listed under External Leak-
age.
Crack in head into valve cornpart- (c) Pressure test cooling system, replace
ment. the cylinder head.
Cracked valve port. Pressure test cooling system, replace
the cylinder head.
Crack in block into push rod cornpart- (e) Pressure test cooling system, replace
ment. the cylinder block.
Cracked cylinder wall. Pressure test cooling system, replace
the cylinder block.
Leaking oil cooler. (g) Repair or replace the oil cooler.

POOR CIRCULATION (a) Low coolant level. (a1 Fill radiator to correct level.
(b) Collapsed radiator hose. (A bottom (b) Replace the hose and spring.
hose with faulty spring may collapse
only a t medium or high engine
speeds.)
Fan belt lose, glazed, or oil soaked. (c) Tighten or replace the fan belt as
necessary.
Air leak through bottom hose. (d) Reposition hose clamps or replace
the hose. Check radiator outlets for
dents or out-of-rounds.
Faulty thermostat. (e) Replace the thermostat.
Water pump impeller broken or loose (f) Replace the water pump.
on shaft.
Restricted radiator core water pas- (g) Flush the radiator thoroughly or rod
sages. out if necessary.
Restricted engine water jacket. Flush the engine cooling system thor-
oughly.

OVERHEATING (a) Blocked radiator air passages. (a) Clean out the radiator air passages.
(refer to Causes and (b) Incorrect ignition timing. (b) Time the engine ignition system.
Corrections listed (C) Low engine oil level. (c) Add engine oil to the correct level.
under “Poor Circulation”) (d) Incorrect valve timing. (d) Correct the engine valve timing.
(e) Inaccurate temperature gauge. (e) Replace the temperature gauge.
(f) Restricted overflow tube. (f) Remove restriction from overflow
tube.
Faulty radiator pressure cap or seat. (g) Replace the radiator cap. Clean or re-
place seat.
Frozen heat control valve. (h) Free up manifold heat control valve.
Dragging brakes. (i) Adjust the brakes.
Excessive engine idling. (j) Increase idle R.P.M. or stop engine.
Frozen coolant. (k) Thaw out cooling system, add anti-
freeze as required.
Faulty fan drive unit. (I) Replace the fan drive unit.
(m) Faulfy temperature sending unit. (m) Replace the sending unit.

MyMopar.com
0 COOLING SYSTEM 7-3
Condition Possible Cause Correction
OVERFLOW LOSS Overfilling. (a) Adjust coolant to the correct level.
(Also refer to Causes and Coolant foaming due to insufficient (b) Flush the radiator and add antifreeze
Corrections listed under corrosion inhibitor. as required.
“Poor Circulation and Blown head gasket. (c) Replace the head gasket
Overheating”) Broken or shifted lower hose spring. (d) Replace lower hose.
CORROSION Use of water containing large concen- (a) Use only clean soft water with anti-
tration of lime and minerals. freeze.
Insufficient corrosion inhibitor. (b) Use antifreeze as required.
Use of antifreeze for extended length (c) Drain cooling system and replace with
of time. new antifreeze.
TEMPERATURE TOO Faulty thermostat. (a) Replace the thermostat.
LOW-S LOW ENGINE Inaccurate temperature gauge. (b) Replace the temperature gauge.
WARM-UP Faulty temperature sending unit. (c) Replace the sending unit.
WATER PUMP NOISY Seal noisy. (a) Add Water Pump Lube.
Bearing corroded. (b) Replace water pump.
ACCESSORY DRIVE BELTS
INSUFFlC l ENT Belt too loose. (a) Adjust belt tension.
ACCESSORY OUTPUT Belt excessively glazed or worn. (b) Replace and tighten as specified.
DUE TO BELT SLIPPAGE
BELT SQUEAL WHEN Belts too loose. (a) Adjust belt tension.
AC C ELERAT1NG Belts glazed. (b) Replace belts.
ENGINE
BELT SQUEAK AT IDLE Belt to loose. (a)
Adjust belt tension.
Dirt and paint imbedded in belt. (b)
Replace belt.
Non-uniform belt. (c)
Replace belt.
Misaligned pulleys. (d)
Align accessories (file brackets or use
spacers as required).
Non-uniform groove or eccentric pul- (e) Replace pulley.
ley.
BELT ROLLED OVER IN Broken cord in belt. (a) ReDlaCe belt.
GROOVE (b) Belts not matched (A/C). (b) Install matched belts.
BELT JUMPS OFF (a) Belt too loose. (a) Adjust belt tension.
(b) Belts not matched (AlC). (b) Install matched belts.
(c) Misaligned pulleys. (c) Align accessories.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
FAN FLUID FAN DRIVE
There are no repairs to be made t o the fan. I f the CAUTION: To prevent silicone fluid from draining
fan i s bent or damaged i t should be replaced. into fan drive bearing and ruining the grease, do not
place drive unit with shaft pointing downward.
Removal
(1) Remove shroud attaching screws, separate
Torque Control Drive
shroud from radiator, position shroud rearward on The Torque Control Drive (Fig. 1)i s a silicone fluid
engine. Fan attaching screws can now be removed. filled coupling connecting the fan to the fan pulley.
(2) On models equipped with fluid fan drive, re- The unit allows fan to be driven in normal manner at
move fan drive attaching screws. The fan and fluid low engine speeds while limiting the top speed of the
fan drive are removed as a unit. fan to a pre-determined level at higher engine speeds.
lnsf allat ion
Use correct fan spacer, if required, so clearance Thermal Control Drive
between fan blades and radiator is 3/4 to 1-1/4 inches. Air conditioned vehicles only, the Thermal Control
No fan spacer permitted with fluid fan drive regard- Drive (Figs. 2 and 3) is essentially the same as the
less of fan blades to radiator clearance. Install one Torque unit except for a thermostatic spring on the
piece shroud on vehicles so equipped. Tighten fan drive face. This thermostat senses temperature from
belt as outlined in “Belt Tension Specifications”. the radiator and engages the drive for higher fan

MyMopar.com
7-4 COOLING SYSTEM

NK480A

Fig. I--Torque Control Fan Drive Fig. %Thermal Control Fan Drive (31 8 - 3 8 3 4 0 Cubic
Inch Engine with 2.93: 1 or Higher Axle Ratio)
speed if temperature from the radiator rises above a
certain point. (2)Loosen power steering pump, idler pulley and
In case of engine overheating during slow car speed alternator. Remove all belts.
or idle operation, increase engine speed to approxi- (3)Remove fan, spacer (or fluid drive) and pulley.
mately 1000 rpm in neutral gear. If condition is not CAUTION: To prevent silicone fluid from draining
corrected by increasing engine speed, replace fan into fan drive bearing and ruining the grease, do not
drive unit with a unit known to be operating properly place drive unit with shaft pointing downward.
and test by operating vehicle under same conditions. (4) Remove the bolts attaching the water pump
Replace original drive unit assembly if trouble was body to the housing. Remove the water pump and dis-
corrected with test unit. card gasket.

WATER PUMP installation


(1)Install water pump body on housing, using a
Note: The water pump is serviced only as an assembly. new gasket.
When replacing the water pump do not install a stand- (2)Tighten bolts to 30 foot-pounds. Rotate pump
ard water pump on any air conditioned vehicle or vice shaft by hand to be sure it rotates freely. Install pul-
versa. See specifications for proper pump. ley, spacer (or fluid drive) and fan.
(3)Tighten nuts to 15 foot-pounds. Install fan
Removal shroud if so equipped. Fill the cooling system and test
(1) Drain the cooling system. (Remove fan shroud for leaks. Tighten belts as outlined in “Belt Tension
if so equipped and set back on engine). Specifications”.

RAD IAT0 R
Removal
(1) Drain cooling system.
(2) On vehicles with automatic transmission, dis-
connect oil cooler lines at radiator bottom tank.
(3) Remove upper and lower radiator hoses (using
pliers C-3250).
(4) Remove shroud attaching screws, separate
shroud from radiator, position shroud rearward on
engine for maximum clearance.
(5) Remove radiator attaching screws.
(6) Radiator can now be lifted free from engine
NP54l
compartment. Care should be taken not to damage
radiator cooling fins or water tubes during removal.
Fig. 2-7hermal Control Fan Drive (318
Cubic Inch Engine W i t h 2.76: 1 Axle Ratio) Fan damage should always be avoided.

MyMopar.com
0 COOLING SYSTEM 7-5
lnstallation erated air passes through the heater core. Anti-freeze
(1) Slide radiator down into position behind is necessary to prevent the heater core from freezing
radiator support and install attaching screws. in hot weather when the air conditioner is being used.
(2) Install fan shroud (if so equipped), connect
hoses, and connect transmission oil cooler lines, if TRANSMISSION OIL COOLER
so equipped.
(3) Fill cooling system to 1-1/4" below filler neck The transmission oil cooler is located in the bottom
seat with water and anti-freeze, as required. After radiator tank (water cooled), which is an integral part
warm-up, re-check coolant level. of the radiator.
(4) On vehicles with automatic transmission, meas- Some models are equipped with an auxiliary oil
ure transmission oil level after warm-up and add oil cooler (air cooled) mounted ahead of the radiator and
as required. is connected in series with the standard transmission
oil cooler (Fig. 4).
Cleaning In case of a leak, engine coolant may become mixed
(1) Drain cooling system and refill with clean soft with transmission fluid, also, transmission fluid may
water and a reliable cooling system cleaner. enter cooling system. Both cooling system and trans-
(2) Operate engine according to directions on mission should be inspected in event cooler is leaking.
Cleaner label.
(3) After cleaning operation, flush entire cooling Testing Oil Cooler for Leaks
system until water runs clean. (1) Disconnect both oil cooler lines at radiator.
(4) Regardless of climate, the cooling system should (2) Connect a pressure gauge to one cooler con-
be refilled with sufficient permanent type anti-freeze nection and a shut off valve to the other. Close the
for -20°F protection. To insure adequate corrosion valve.
protection. (3) Connect a source of air pressure to the valve.
(5) If vehicle is equipped with air conditioning the (4) Coat all fittings with oil.
cooling system must contain anti-freeze all year (5) Open the test valve and apply (up to 100 psi) air
round. This is necessary because in the reheat-cycle pressure. Oil bubbles will identify any fitting joint
system used on all vehicles, except Dart, cold refrig- leaks. Repair all joint leaks.

CROSSMEMBER

NR255A

Fig. 4-Oil Flow-Transmission Coolers- Hemi Automatic

MyMopar.com
7-6 COOLING SYSTEM 0

(6) Close the valve. Gauge reading will then drop neck, using soft water and anti-freeze, depending on
if cooler is leaking. season or if equipped with air conditioning.
(9) Engine should be operated until temperature
Repairing Oil Cooler gauge indicates normal operating temperature, then,
The transmission auxiliary oil cooler being all alu- continue an additional five minutes to release any air
minum can be repaired by a local reliable radiator trapped in system.
service having the equipment for alumibrazing or (10) Check for leaks and coolant level; correct as
heliarc. necessary.
(1) Remove radiator from vehicle.
(2) Remove radiator bottom tank. Reverse Flushing Radiator
(3),Melt the soft solder holding the cooler to the (1) Drain cooling system and remove hoses from
tank. engine.
(4) Remove the stamped retainer nuts holding the (2) Install Tool C-3514, or other suitable flushing
cooler fittings to the bottom tank and remove the gun in radiator lower outlet.
cooler: (3) Fill radiator and turn on air in short blasts.
(5) Install a new cooler or repair the old cooler CAUTION: Internal radiator pressure must not ex-
with silver solder and reinstall as follows: ceed 20 psi, as damage to radiator may result.
(6) Position oil cooler in bottom tank and install (4) Continue this procedure until water runs clean.
the stamped retainer nuts on oil cooler fittings. It is a good policy to reverse flush heater core any
(7) ,Use soft solder to secure the cooler in the tank. time the radiator i s reverse flushed.
(8) Attach bottom tank to radiator using soft (5) Fill cooling system to 1-1/4 inches below filler
solder. neck, using soft water and anti-freeze, depending on
(9) Install, radiator as described in Paragraph season or if equipped with air conditioning.
“Radiator”. (6) Engine should be operated until temperature
(10) Fill cooling system and test for leaks. gauge indicates normal operating temperature, then,
If the transmission operates properly after repair- continue an additional five minutes to release any air
ing the leak, drain the transmission and torque con- trapped in system.
verter while hot, remove the transmission oil pan (7) Check for leaks and coolant level; correct as
and inspect for sludge, rust, dirty or plugged inlet necessary.
filter. If none of these conditions are found, recon- THERMOSTAT
ditioning may not be necessary. Reassemble, using
Transmission Fluid AQ-ATF-2848A. The thermostat is actuated by a pellet containing a
copper-impregnated wax, as shown in (Fig. 5). As
REVERSE FLUSHING THE COOLING SYSTEM the temperature of the pellet increases, the wax ex-
pands and opens the valve. A 190” thermostat is
Reverse flushing of the cooling system is the forc- standard equipment.* The use of 160° thermostat or
ing of water through the cooling system, using air alcohol type anti-freeze i s not recommended.
pressure in a direction opposite to that of the normal If the thermostat does not close completely when
flow of water. cold, the engine will warm up slowly or not at all,
and heater performance will also be impaired. Poor
Flushing Cylinder Block heater performance may also be due to valve open-
(1) Drain radiator and remove hoses at radiator. ing at too low a temperature. Too high a valve open-
(2) Remove thermostat and reinstall thermostat ing temperature or a valve that will not open can
housing. cause overheating.
(3) Install Tool C-3514, or other suitable flushing *318-383-2BBL.have a 1%”thermostat.
gun to inlet hose.
(4) Connect water hose of gun to a pressure water
source and air hose of gun to a pressure air source.
(5) Turn on water, and when cylinder block is
filled, turn on air (up to 20 psi) in short blasts.
(6) Allow cylinder block to fill between blasts of
air.
(7) Continue this procedure until water runs clean.
Test thermostat and if satisfactory, reinstall: other-
EIGHT GLINDER SIX CYLTNDER NU348
wise, replace using a new housing gasket.
(8) Fill cooling system to 1-1/4 inches below filler Fig. 5-Thermortuts

MyMopar.com
0 COOLING SYSTEM 7-7
Removul
(1)Drain cooling system down to thermostat level IPRESSURE CAP
or below.
(2)Remove upper radiator hose from thermostat
housing.
(3) Remove thermostat housing bolts and remove
thermostat and housing.
Testing 'Thermostat
(1) Visually inspect thermostat to make sure valve
closes tightly. If valve does not close completely due
to dirt, sand or other foreign material, carefully clean
Fig. 7-resting Pressure Cap
the sealing edge making sure the sealing edge is
not damaged. If valve does not close tightly when suction at medium or high engine speeds. If this
clean, install a new thermostat. spring is misplaced in hose, it should be repositioned.
(2)Immerse thermostat in a container of warm If this spring is deformed hose must be replaced.
water so that pellet of thermostat is completely cov-
ered. The pellet must not touch bottom or sides of
RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP
container. Radiators are equipped with a 16 psi cap, as stand-
(3) Heat the water and stir it continuously (to in- ard equipment (Fig. 6).
sure uniform temperature) and check water tempera- WARNING: When removing pressure cap, turn coun-
ture with a thermometer at the point when a .001" terclockwise to stop, without downward pressure on
feeler gauge can be inserted into valve opening. The cap, permitting built-up pressure to escape through
feeler gauge should pass freely into the valve open- over-flow tube. This will prevent hot water from spray-
ing at a water temperature of 187" to 194°F. for a ing out of radiator filler opening. To complete removal
190" thermostat and a water temperature of 192" to apply downward pressure and turn counterclockwise.
199" for a 195" thermostat. If outside of this range,
replace thermostat. PRESSURE TESTING RADIATOR CAP
(4)Continue heating water to approximately 210°F Select the short neoprene seal and metal adapter
for a 190" thermostat and 215" temperature for a from the kit, Tool C-4080.Slip the seal on the tube at
195" thermostat. The thermostat valve should be the bottom of the instrument. Then attach either end
fully open at this temperature. If it is not, replace of the short adapter to the instrument. Dip the pres-
thermostat. sure cap in water and apply cap to end of adapter.
Working the plunger, as shown in (Fig. 7) bring the
lnstullution pressure to 16 pounds on the gauge. If the pressure
(1)Using a new gasket, position thermostat so cap fails to hold the pressure within a range of 14-17
pellet end is toward engine and attach with bolts pounds, replace the cap with a new tested cap.
through thermostat housing. The brass vent valve at the bottom of the cap
(2) If removed, reinstall or replace the upper hose.
should hang freely. If the rubber gasket has swollen
(3)Fill cooling system to 1-1/4inches below filler
neck with water and anti-freeze.
RADIATOR HOSES
The hoses are removed and installed using hose
clamp pliers C-3250.
A hardened, cracked, swollen or restricted hose
should be replaced.
The reinforcement spring inside the lower hose is
necessary to prevent collapsing of the hose due to

Fig. 6-Radiator Pressure Cap Fig. 8-Pressure Testing Cooling System

MyMopar.com
7-8 COOLING SYSTEM 1)

NK481 NK484A

ROLLER ASSY.

be 1/2 inch below neck of radiator.


(2) Attach the Tester Tool C-4080 to the radiator,
as shown in (Fig. 8 ) and apply 15 pounds pressure. If
the pressure drops inspect all points for external
leaks.
(3) If there are no external leaks, after the gauge
dial shows a drop in pressure, detach the tester, start
engine and run the engine to operating temperature
in order to open the thermostat and allow the coolant
to expand. Reattach the tester and pump to 7 lbs.
pressure while the engine is running. Race the en-
gine, and if the needle on the dial fluctuates it indi-
and prevents the valve from hanging loosely, replace cates a combustion leak, usually a head gasket.
the cap. Do not use a replacement cap without this WARNING: Pressure builds up fast. Any excessive
vent valve. amount of pressure built up by continuous engine
operation must be released to a safe pressure point.
PRESSURE TESTING COOLING SYSTEM NEVER PERMIT PRESSURE TO EXCEED 20 Ibs.
(1) With engine not running, wipe the radiator (4) Remove the wires from the spark plugs on one
filler neck sealing seat clean. The water level should bank and operate the engine on the opposite bank.

MyMopar.com
0 COOLING SYSTEM 7-9
If the needle continues to fluctuate, it indicates a however, there may be internal leaks which can be
leak on the bank still in operation. If the needle determined by removing the oil dip-stick and if water
ceases to fluctuate, the leak is in the bank, from globules appear intermixed with the oil it will indi-
which combustion has been released. cate a serious internal leak in the engine. If there is
( 5 ) If the needle on the dial does not fluctuate, race an internal leak, the engine must be disassembled,
the engine a few times and if an abnormal amount the leak located and necessary new parts installed.
of water emits from the exhaust system at the tail
pipe, it may indicate a leak that can be a faulty head ENGINE WATER TEMPERATURE GAUGE
gasket, cracked engine block, or the cylinder head
near the exhaust ports. For Removal, Installation and Testing procedures
(6) If the above pressure test of the cooling sys- of the water temperature sending and receiving
tem holds without fluctuation, then there is no leak, units, refer to “Electrical” Group 8 “Gauges”.

ACCESSORY BELT DRIVES


PROPER BELT TENSION the adjusting bracket has a square hole. To tighten
belts by the torque method, loosen all mounting bolts
Satisfactory performance of belt driven acces- and apply the specified torque to the accessory or
sories (Fig. 9) depends on the maintenance of proper idler. (See Specifications.) Tighten all mounting bolts
belt tension. There are two methods by which belt while the torque is applied to the accessory. If it is
tensions can be properly established. “The Torque not possible to use the torque wrench because of
Method” and “The Belt Deflection Method”. If the clearance, use an extension.
specified tensions are not maintained, belt slippage
may cause engine overheating, lack of power steering Belt Deflection Method
assist, loss in air conditioning capacity, reduced belt All belts can also be adjusted by measuring the
life. To avoid any such adverse effects, the following deflection of the belt at the mid-point between two
service procedure should be followed: Adjust all belts pulleys under a five-pound push or pull. A small
to the specified “used belt” tension at new vehicle spring scale can be used to establish the five-pound
preparation. Any belt that has operated for a mini- load. See Figure 9 for correct location at which to
mum for a half-hour is considered to be used. The measure deflection.
new belt tension specification apply for all new belt This method should be used only when it is not
replacements. possible to use the torque method. To adjust belts
by the deflection method, loosen all mounting bolts
Torque Method and use a bar to apply tensions to the belts being
All belts can be adjusted to the specified tension careful not to damage the accessory. A 1/2 inch
by use of a torque wrench. The alternator belts are ad- square drive hinge handle can be used if the acces-
justed by using a special Tool C-3841 and torque sory has a square hole. Tighten the mounting bolts
wrench Tool C-3005. and test the deflection. (See Specifications.) It may be
The special tool should be hooked at the heavily- necessary to repeat this procedure several times to
ribbed section of the alternator rectifier end shield. establish the correct tension.
Other belts can also be tightened by torque wrench if

MyMopar.com
7-10 SPECIFICATIONS 0

SP ECIFICAT10NS
DART

ENGINE SIZE 198 225 318 340

CAPACITY Quarts (With Heater)*


Radiator Width ......................... 15-19" 13-49" 1619" 15-22"
14-22" 14-22rr 17-22"
RADIATOR-Identification Number-Width
Transmission Manual 903 ................. 2998932-19' 2998932-19" 2998942-19"*
230 ................. 2998978-22" *
833 ................. 2998978-22ff
Automatic 904 ................. 2998933-19'' 2998933-19" 2998943-19"*
727 ................. 2998945-22"
Air Conditioning ........................ N/A 2998934-22" 2998944-n" 2998945-22"
Maximum Cooling ...................... 2998935-22" 2998935-22" 2998945-22" 2998978-22"*
Oil Cooler Size Standard .................. 6" 6" 10" 10"
Air Conditioning ........... N/A 6" 10" 12"
Maximum Cooling .......... 6" 6" 12" 12"
Shroud Transmission Manual ............. None None None Yes
Automatic .......... None None None Yes
Air Conditioning ..... N/A Yes Yes Yes
Maximum Cooling ... None Yes Yes Yes
Seal
Hood to Yoke .......................... None Yes** Yes Yes

FAN
Diameter-Number B l a d e r w i d t h
Standard .............................. 1 7 4 1 - 1 / 2 1 7 4 1 - 1 12 18-7-2* 18-7-2-1 / 4*
Automatic ............................. 1741-112 1741-112 1%-7-2* 18-7-2-1 /4*
Air Conditioning ....................... N/A 17-7-1-11 2 18-7-2-114 18-7-2-114
High Capacity .......................... 17-7-1-1/2 17-7-1-1/2 18-7-2-114 N/A
Spacer
Standard .............................. 1.06" 1.06" 1.40" Torque
Air Conditioning ........................ NIA 1.06" Thermal Thermal
High Capacity .......................... 1.06" 1.06" 1.40" N/A
Ratio (Fan to Crankshaft)
Standard .............................. 1.07:l 1.07:l .95:1 .95:1
Air Conditioning ....................... N/A 1.1O:l 1.3:l 1.3:l
High Capacity .......................... 1.07:l 1.07:l .95:1 N/A

WATER PUMP IMPELLER


Diameter-Number Blades
Standard ............................. 3.5W-6 3.5v-6 4.38"-8 4.38"-4
Air Conditioning ........................ 3.50"C 3.W'" 3.7w-6 3.70"-6
* 2998945 Radiator and 18-1/2-7-2-1/2 Fan and Torque Drive Used with Performance Axles 3.55, 3.91, 4.10.
** Air Conditioning and Maximum Cooling only.

MyMopar.com
&$$
CyWW -
E
$5
I-A

-m
E.
bb
r(4
I-4

w
CI -
z E5
W
A
$P
A El=
e
I
0
-m
E
:&
b h j

bb
4I-i

...
... ... ... ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . ... ... ... ... ... ... ....
e:::: .
. . . . .. .. .. .. .. .. . ..... ..... ..... ... .. ..
... ... ..
... ..... .... .
.- ..
. .. .. ...
.
..
..
..
..
..
.. .. .. ... ... ... .....
T i : : :
es j .:: .:::. ::. : .. ..
.. ..
... ... ....
. .
....
..
.. ...
..
a :. :. : .: . . . .. .
. .-. .
Q ) " "
-mm
0 :
. . . .
: : : : is
:. .:
V )

s- ~pam::: :::
' .

: : : : : :f : :

MyMopar.com
7-12 TIGHTENING REFERENCE 0

BELT TENSION SPECIFICATIONS


TORQUE METHOD
TORQUE (FT.-LBS.) TO BE APPLIED TO COMPONENTS

Used Bel* New Belt


Engine 383 383
Displacement 198 318 426Hemi 198 340 426Hemi
Cubic Inches 170 225 340 440 170 225 318 440
POWER STEERING BRACKET.. 45 45 50 70 80 80 85 120
SELF TIGHTENING ..........
ALTERNATOR
With A/C ................. 15 15 40 45 20 20 55 70
Without A/C .............. 15 15 40 40 20 20 55
-60
A/C IDLER BRACKET ........ 25 25 45 - 35 35 65
FAN IDLER ................. 40 65
~

DEFLECTION METHOD
Deflection (Inches to be applied at midpoint of
belt segment under 5 Ib. load-(See Figure 9)

Used Beltt Now Belt


Engine 383 383
Displacement 198 318 426Hemi 198 318 426Hemi '
Cubic Inches 170 225 340 440 170 225 340 440
POWER STEERING .......... 5/32" 5/32" 5/32" 5/32" 3/32" 3/32" 3/32" 3/32"
FAN BELT IDLER ........... - - - 3/32" - - - 1/16"
-
A/C IDLER ................. 118" 118" 3/16" - 3/32" 3/32" 118"
ALTERNATOR
Without A/C .............. 9/32" 9/32" 3/16" 3/16" 3/16" 3/16" 118" 3/32"
With A/C ................. - 9/32" 3/16" 9/32" 3/16" 3/16" 118" 3/16"

CONVERSION TABLE
U. S. Quart .................. 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
Imperial Quart .............. 10 10-314 11-314 12-112 13-114 14-114 15 15-314

TIGHTENING REFERENCE
Inch Foot Thread
Pounds Pounds Size
Water Pump Bolts ................................. - 30
Fan Attaching Bolts ............................... - 1518
Thermostat Housing Bolts .......................... - 30
Shroud Mounting Bolts ............................. 12 8-32
75 114-20
Radiator Mounting Bolts ........................... 95 1/4-20
Drain Cock ........................................ 150
Oil Cooler Fittings-To Radiator .................... 110
Lines to Fittings ......................... 85
Lines to Auxiliary Cooler ................. 85
Lines to Connector ...................... 50

MyMopar.com
0 GROUP 8

ELECTRICAL
CONTENTS
Page Page
ALTERNATOR AND VOLTAGE REGULATOR 15 INSTRUMENT PANELS ................ 56
BATTERY ............................. 1 SPECIFICATIONS ...................... 77
EXTERIOR LIGHTING .................. 47 STARTING MOTOR .................... 5
HEADLIGHTS ....................... 47 TURN SIGNALS ....................... 72
TAIL AND STOP LIGHTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 WINDSHIELD WIPER SYSTEM .......... 64
HORNS .............................. 74 WINDSHIELD WASHERS ............... 70
IGNITION SYSTEM .................... 28 WIRING DIAGRAMS ................... 85

BATTERY
INDEX
Page Page
Adjustment of Acid Gravity .................... 3 High Rate Discharge Test of Battery Capacity .... 4
Battery Visual Inspection ...................... 1 Specifications ................................. 77
Charging the Battery .......................... 4 Specific Gravity Test .......................... 1

SERVICE PROCEDURES
BATTERY VISUAL INSPECTION indication of how much unused sulphuric acid re-
(1) Protect paint finish with fender covers.
(2) Disconnect battery cables at battery.
mains in the solution.
A hydrometer should be graduated to read from
1.160 to 1.320,in graduations of .005 specific gravity.
I
(3) Remove battery hold-down clamp and remove Graduated markings should be not less than 1/16 inch
battery from vehicle. apart and accurate to within .002 specific gravity.
(4) Inspect battery carrier and fender side panel Graduated portion of stem should be about two inches
for damage caused by loss of acid from battery. long. Clearance between float and glass barrel, at
(5) Clean top of battery with a solution of clean smallest diameter, should be a minimum of 1/8”
warm water and baking soda. Scrub areas with a stiff around all sides and barrel must be clean.
bristle brush being careful not to scatter corrosion Liquid level of battery cell should be at normal
residue. Finally wipe off with a cloth moistened with height and electrolyte should be thoroughly mixed
ammonia or baking soda in water. with any battery water which may have just been
CAUTION: Keep cleaning solution out of battery cells added by charging battery before taking hydrometer
to eliminate weakening the electrolyte. readings. See “Adjustment of Acid Gravity.”
(6) Replace damaged or frayed cables. In reading a hydrometer, the gauge barrel must be
(7) Clean battery terminals and inside surfaces of held vertically and just right amount of fluid be
clamp terminals with Cleaning Tool MX-75. drawn up into gauge barrel with pressure bulb fully
(8) Examine battery case and cover for cracks. expanded to lift float freely so it does not touch the
(9) Install battery. sides, top or bottom of the barrel. Take a reading with
(10) Tighten battery hold-down screw nuts to 3 eye on level with liquid level in the gauge barrel. DO
foot-pounds. Observe polarity of battery terminals to NOT TILT hydrometer.
be sure the battery is not reversed. Hydrometer floats are calibrated to indicate cor-
(11) Connect cable clamps to battery posts and rectly only at one fixed temperature.
tighten securely. Coat all connections with light min- Specific gravity of battery electrolyte strength or
eral grease or petrolatum after tightening. density varies not only with the quantity of the acid
(12) If electrolyte level is low, fill to recommended in solution but also with temperature. As temperature
level with mineral-free water. increases, the density of the electrolyte decreases, and
specific gravity is reduced. As temperature drops,
SPECIFIC GRAVITY TEST the density of the electrolyte increases and the s p e
A hydrometer Tool 40-Bis used to measure specfic cific gravity increases.
gravity of electrolyte in battery cells. This gives an Specific gravity variations caused by temperatures

MyMopar.com
8-2 ELECTRICAL-BATTERY 0

must be considered and corrected to 80°F. in the A fully charged relatively new battery has a specif-
analysis of the battery, otherwise specific gravity ic gravity reading of 1.260 plus .015 minus .005.
readings will not give a true indication of state of
charge. Test Conclusions
Use a battery immersion type thermometer of the (a) Battery specfic gravity is less than 1.220 bat-
mercury-in-glass type, having a scale reading as high tery should be recharged. Make a high rate discharge
as 125” F. and designed for not over a 1-inch bulb test for capacity. If battery cells test O.K., recharge
immersion. A suitable dairy type thermometer may and adjust gravity of all cells uniformly. Test voltage
prove satisfactory for the purpose. regulator setting. Thoroughly test the electrical sys-
Draw electrolyte in and out of the hydrometer bar- tem for short circuits, loose connections and corroded
rel several times to bring the temperature of the hy- terminals.
drometer float to that of the acid in the cell and then @) Cells show more than 25 points LO25 Specific
measure the electrolyte temperature in the cell. Gravity) VariationChort circuit low cell. Loss of
The temperature correction in specific gravity read- electrolyte by leakage or excessive overcharge; try to
ing at 80” Fahrenheit is zero. Add .004 specific gravity recharge battery. See “Charging the Battery.” See
points for every 10” degrees over 80” F. and subtract “Adjustment of Acid Gravity”.
.004 specific gravity points for every 10 degrees (c) Battery specific gravity is above 1.220 and all
under 80” F. All readings must be corrected at 80 cells are even. Battery state of charge may be satis-
degrees Fahrenheit. Refer to Figure 1 and examples factory. Test by making “High Rate Discharge Test of
one and two as follows: Battery Capacity”. Test voltage regulator setting and
Example 1- all electrical connections are clean and tight.
Hydrometer Reading 1.260
Acid Temperature 20 degrees Fahrenheit TEST BATTERY CONDITION AND STATE OF
Subtract Specific Gravity .024 CHARGE WITH CAD-TIP ANALYZER-Part
Correct Specific Gravity is 1.236 Number 1-369 (Fig. 2)
Example 2-
Hydrometer Reading 1.255 (1) Check electrolyte level in all cells and add
Acid Temperature , 100 degrees Fahrenheit mineral-free water to proper level. When a car is
Add Specific Gravity .008 running, the battery is receiving a charge from the
Corrected Specific Gravity is 1.263 alternator. This charge builds up a “surface charge”
Tomp.r.hm
in the battery that must be removed before an ac-
Of. olovi(r P d n h curate test can be made.
to Add w
(2) Remove the surface charge by turning the head-
lights “on” for one minute before testing battery. If
the battery has not been operating in a car for at
least 8 hours prior to testing, Step 2 is not necessary.
IMPORTANT: Be sure that headlights, ignition and
all accessories are ”off” during test.
(3) Remove battery filler plugs and place the RED
probe in the POSITIVE (+) CELL, and the BLACK
probe in the SECOND CELL. NOTE READING.
(There will be no meter reading if the probes are

NP165
Fig. P--Testing k e r y Cells with Cad-Tip Bartoy
Fig. I-Hydrometer Reading Correction Chart Cell Analyzer

MyMopar.com
0 BATTERY-ELECTRICAL 8-3
reversed.) A manual set index pointer is provided to balance of the readings are within the first four scale
assist in making cell comparisons. Set the manual divisions-the battery is too low to make an accurate
index pointer for reference. condition test-Recharge battery and retest.
(4) Move RED probe to SECOND CELL and BLACK CAUTION: Be certain to remove "surface charge"
probe to THIRD CELL; then move RED probe to after recharge and before retesting. See "Step 2."
THIRD CELL and BLACK probe to FOURTH CELL,
etc., until all cells have been tested. Note each cell ADJUSTMENT OF ACID GRAVITY
reading so that CELL COMPARISONS CAN BE
MADE. Always store probe assembly in the space pro- Hydrometer floats usually are not calibrated below
vided in the meter case. 1.160 specific gravity and cannot indicate the condi-
tion of a battery in a very low state of charge. There-
TEST READING INTERPRETATIONS (Fig. 3) fore, it may be necessary to give the battery several
hours charge before a hydrometer reading will indi-
A-If the readings of any two cells vary FIVE cate that the battery is taking a charge.
scale divisions or more on the TOP scale-regardless If the specific gravity of all cells are not within .015
of the colored sections in which they may fall on points of specified value, corrected to 80°F:at the end
the bottom scale-The battery is at or near the point of a full charge, remove some of the electrolyte with
of failure and should be replaced. a hydrometer and add a like amount of distilled water
B-If all cells vary LESS than five scale divisions to reduce the gravity if too high, or add 1.400 Specific
on the TOP scale and all are in the GREEN section Gravity acid to raise specific gravity, if too low. Con-
of the Bottom Scale-The battery is in good condition tinue the charge so as to give the electrolyte a chance
and a safe state of charge. to mix and then read the gravity after another hour
C-If all cells vary LESS than five scale divisions of charge to note the effect of the additions. Continue
on the TOP scale but if any of the cells test in the this adjusting procedure until gravity is brought to
RED section of the BOTTOM scale-the battery is in the desired value by charging for one hour after each
good condition but is in a low state of charge--Re- adjustment.
charge at once to avoid a starting failure. Never adjust the specific gravity of any battery cell
D-If ANY cell readings are in the "RECHARGE which does not gas freely on charge. Unless electro-
AND RETEST" section of the TOP SCALE and the lyte has been lost through spilling or leaking, it
Y CONDIT,O~
~

RED BAND' GREEN BAND

A
0 a0 B

RED BAND'
RED BAND GREEN BAND
GREEN'

0 oo C
Fig. 3-BuWery State of Charge

MyMopar.com
8-4 ELECTRICAL-BATTERY 0

should not be necessary to add acid to a battery dur- Tester control knob to the OFF position.
ing its life. Acid should never be added unless one is If the voltage in the “High Rate Discharge Test”
certain that the cell will not come up to normal gravi- was under 9.5 volt, the battery should be test charged
ty by continued charging. Always make the tempera- to determine whether the battery can be satisfactorily
ture correction for hydrometer readings, as warm charged.
electrolyte will read low and this might be mistaken
for failure of the battery to rise normally in gravity. It Charging the Battery
could also be falsely concluded that the battery would Three Minute Charge Test (Fig. 5 )
not take a full charge. This test should not be used if battery temperature
is below 60 degree F.
HIGH RATE DISCHARGE TEST OF (1)Connect Battery Charger positive (+) lead to
BATTERY CAPACITY battery positive terminal and negative (4
lead to
battery negative terminal.
Satisfactory capacity tests can be made only when IMPORTANT: Be sure of correct polarity when charg
battery equals or exceeds 1.220 specific gravity at 80 ing batteries.
degrees Fahrenheit. If the reading is below 1.220 the (2)Trip Battery Charger Power Switch to ON posi-
battery should be slow charged until fully charged in tion. Turn timer switch past three minute mark then
order to secure proper test results. back to the three minute mark.
(3) Adjust Battery Charger Switch to highest pos-
Test Procedure sible rate not exceeding 40 amperes.
(1)Turn control knob of Battery-Starter-Tester to (4) When timer switch cuts off at the end of 3
OFF position. minutes, turn timer switch back to fast charge.
(2) Turn Voltmeter Selector Switch to the 16 volt (5) Use the 16 volt scale of the Battery Starter
position on test units so equipped. Tester and measure total voltage of battery posts
(3) Connect test ammeter and voltmeter positive while battery is being fast charged. If total voltage
leads to battery positive terminal. Connect ammeter during charge exceeds 15.5 volts, battery is sulphated
and voltmeter negative leads to battery negative ter- and should by cycled and slow-charged until specific
minal (Fig. 4). Voltmeter clips must contact battery gravity reaches 1.260 (See “Slow Charging”). A slow
posts or cable clamps and not ammeter lead clips. charge is preferable to bring the battery up to a full
(4) Turn control knob clockwise until ammeter charge.
reading is equal to three times ampere hour rating If specific gravity remains constant after testing
of battery. battery at one hour intervals for three hours, battery
(5)Maintain this load for 15 seconds; voltmeter is at its highest state of charge.
should read 9.5 volts or more, which will indicate that (6)Make another capacity test. If capacity test does
the battery has good output capacity. not meet specifications, replace battery.
(6)After the 15 second test, turn Battery-Starter-
Fast Charging the Battery (Fig. 6 )
If adequate time for a slow charge is not available,
a high rate (FAST) charge is permissible and will give
a sufficient charge in one hour enabling the battery
and alternator to continue to carry the electrical load.
Connect Battery Charger positive (+) lead to bat-
tery positive terminal and negative (-) lead to bat-
tery negative terminal. If battery is not removed from

NY 837A NY838B
Fig. 4-High R a t e Discharge Test Fig. 5-Three Minute Charge Test

MyMopar.com
0
w-
STARTING MOTOR-ELECTRICAL 8-5

vehicle, BE SURE ignition switch is turned off and all


electrical accessories are turned off during charging.
CAUTION: The battery can be damaged beyond re-
pair unless the following precautions are taken:
(1) Battery electrolyte temperature must NEVER
exceed 125 degrees Fahrenheit.
If this temperature is reached, battery should be
cooled by reducing charging rate or remove battery
from the circuit.
(2) As batteries approach full charge electrolyte in
each cell will begin to gas or bubble. Excessive gas-
sing must not be allowed.
(3) Do not fast charge longer than one hour.
If battery does not show a significant change in NY 839A
specific gravity after one hour of “FAST” charge, the Fig. 6-Fad Charging the Bottery
slow charge method should be used.
Remember to use temperature correction when hour battery; and 6 amperes for a 70 ampere hour
checking specific gravity. The manufacturers of high battery.
rate charging equipment generally outline the neces- The average length of time necessary to charge a
sary precautions and some models have thermostatic battery by the slow charge method at normal rates is
temperature limiting and time limiting controls. from 12 to 16 hours, however, when a battery contin-
WARNING: When batteries are being charged an ex- ues to show an increase in specific gravity, battery
plosive gas mixture forms beneath the cover of each charge should be continued even if it takes 24 hours
cell. Do not smoke near batteries on charge or which or more. Watch the temperature of batteries carefully
have recently been charged. Do not break live circuits and if the temperature of any one of them reaches
at the terminals of the batteries on charge. A spark 110°F., lower the charging rate.
will occur where the live circuit is broken. Keep all Battery will be fully charged when it is gassing
open flames away from the battery. freely and when there is no further rise in specific
gravity after three successive readings taken at hour-
Slow Charging Batteries ly intervals. Make sure hydrometer ‘readings are cor-
Many discharged batteries can be brought back to rected for temperature.
good condition by slow charging; especially batteries The rate of charge for a sulphated battery should
that are sulphated.
be no more than 1/2 the normal slow charge rate.
Battery should be tested with a hydrometer and a
record kept of the readings taken at regular intervals Many sulphated batteries can be brought back to a
throughout the charge. When a cell has a specific useful condition by slow charging at half the normal
gravity reading that is 25 points (.025) or more below charging rate from 60 to 100 hours. This long charg-
other cells, that cell is faulty and battery should be ing cycle is necessary to reconvert crystalline lead
replaced. sulphate into active materials. When a battery takes
Safe slow charging rates are determined by allow- a full charge, but is returned several times in need of
ing one ampere per positive plate per cell. Proper a recharge, check for a cracked cell partition with a
slow charging rate would be 4 amperes for a 46 syringe to provide air pressure; bubbles will appear
ampere hour battery; 5 amperes for a 59 ampere in an adjacent cell if a crack is present.

REDUCTION GEAR STARTER


INDEX
Page Page
Amperage Draw Test .......................... 7 Installing the Starter .......................... 15
Assembling the Starter ........................ 12 Removing the Starter .......................... 8
Brushes and Springs Replacement .............. 11 Resistance Test ............................... 8
Bushings Replacement ........................ 12 Service Diagnosis ............................ 6
Cleaning the Starter Parts ...................... 10 Servicing the Starter Clutch Unit ............... 12
Disassembling the Starter ...................... 9 Specifications ................................. 77
Field Coils Replacement ....................... 12 Testing the Starter (Bench Test) ................ 9
General Information ........................... 6 Testing Armature .............................. 11
Ground Circuit Test ............................ 8 Testing Field Coils for Ground .................. 11
Insulated Circuit Test .......................... 8

MyMopar.com
8-6 ELECTRICAL4TARTING MOTOR 0

GENERAL INFORMATION
The starter has a 3.5 to 1reduction gear set built noid shift device, the housing of the solenoid is in-
into the Starter assembly, which i s housed in an a h - tegral with the starter drive end housing.
minum die casting, Fig. 1. The starter utilizes a sole-
SERVlCE DIAGNOSIS
Condition Possible Cause Correction
STARTER FAILS TO (a) Weak battery or dead cell in battery. (a) Test specific gravity. Recharge or re-
OPERATE place battery as required.
(b) Ignition switch faulty. (b) Test and replace switch if necessary.
(c) Loose or corroded battery cable ter- (c) Clean terminals and clamps, replace
minals. if necessary. Apply a light film of pet-
rolatum to terminals after tightening.
(d) Open circuit, wire between the igni- (d) Inspect and test all the wiring.
' tion-starter switch and ignition ter-
minal on starter relay.
(e) Starter relay defective. (e) Test relay and replace if necessary.
(f) Faulty starter. (f) Test and repair as necessary.
(g) Armature shaft sheared. (g) Test and repair.
(h) Open solenoid pull-in wire. (h) Test and replace solenoid if neces-
sa ry.
STARTER FAILS AND (a) Weak battery or dead cell in battery. (a) Test for specified gravity. Recharge
LIGHTS DIM or replace battery as required.
Loose or corroded battery cable ter- (b) Clean terminals and clamps, replace
minals. if necessary. Apply a light film of pet-
rolatum to terminals after tightening.
Internal ground in windings. (c) Test and repair starter.
Grounded starter fields. (d) Test and repair starter.
Armature rubbing on pole shoes. (e) Test and repair starter.
STARTER TURNS, BUT Starter clutch slipping. (a) Replace clutch unit.
ENGINE DOES NOT Broken clutch housing. (b) Test and repair starter.
ENGAGE Pinion shaft rusted, dirty or dry, due (c) Clean, test and lubricate.
to lack of lubrication,
Engine basic timing wrong. (d) Check engine basic timing and condi-
tion of distributor rotor and cap.
Broken teeth on engine ring gear. (e) Replace ring gear. Inspect teeth on
starter clutch pinion.
STARTER RELAY DOES Batttery discharged. (a) Recharge or replace battery.
NOT CLOSE Faulty wiring. (b) Test for open circuit, wire between '
starter relay ground terminal post and
neutral starter switch (automatic
transmission only). Also test for open
circuit; wire between ignition-starter
switch and ignition terminal and start-
er relay.
Neutral starter switch on automatic (c) Test and replace the switch if neces-
transmission faulty. sary.
Starter relay faulty. (d) Test and replace if necessary.
RELAY OPERATES BUT FauIty wiring. (a) Test for open circuit wire between
SOLENOID DOES NOT starter-relay solenoid terminal and
solenoid terminal post.
Faulty solenoid switch or connections. (b) Test for loose terminal connections
between solenoid and starter field.
Solenoid switch contacts corroded. (c) Test and replace solenoid if neces-
sary.
Broken lead or a loose connection in- (d) Test and replace solenoid if neces-
side solenoid switch (brush holder sary.
plate).
SOLENOID PLUNGER (a) Battery low. (a) Test for specific gravity of battery.
VIBRATES BACK AND Replace or recharge battery.
FORTH WHEN SWITCH (b) Faulty wiring. (b) Test for loose connections at relay,
IS ENGAGED ignition-starter switch and solenoid.

MyMopar.com
0 STARTING MOTOR-ELECTRICAL 8-7

PLUNGER. ASSEMBLY

NU429A
Pig. !-Starter Cross Section
Condition Possible Cause Correction
(C) Lead or connections broken inside (c) Test and replace solenoid if neces-
solenoid switch cover (brush holder sa ry.
plate) or open hold-in wiring.
Check for corrosion on solenoid con- (d) Test and clean the contacts.
tacts.
STARTER OPERATES (a) Broken solenoid plunger spring or (a) Test and repair.
BUT WILL NOT spring out of position.
DISENGAGE WHEN (b) Faulty ignition-starter switch. (b) Test and replace the switch if neces-
IGNITION STARTER sary.
SWITCH IS RELEASED (c) Solenoid contact switch plunger stuck (c) Remove contact switch plunger, wipe
in solenoid. clean of all dirt, apply a film of SAE
10 oil on plunger, wipe off excess.
(d) Insufficient clearance between wind- (d) Test and repair.
ing leads to solenoid terminal and
main contactor in solenoid.
Faulty relay. (e) Test and replace relay if necessary.

SERVICE PROCEDURES
AMPERAGE DRAW TEST (with Starter Tester) “OFF”position.
Turn voltmeter Selector Switch to 16 Volt position.
Check battery electrolyte gravity with a reliable Connect heavy Positive ammeter lead (Red) to Positive
hydrometer. Gravity should be not less than 1.220 battery terminal. Connect heavy Negative ammeter
(temperature corrected). Or see that battery passes lead (Black) to Negative battery terminal.
the High Rate Discharge Test shown in the “Battery” Connect Positive voltmeter lead (Red) to Positive
section of this manual. battery terminal. Connect Negative voltmeter lead
Turn Battery-Starter Tester CONTROL KNOB to (Black) to Negative battery terminal.

MyMopar.com
8-8 ELECTRICAL-STARTI NG MOT0R 0

DISCONNECT ignition primary lead from ignition RESISTANCE TEST


ballast resistor, or primary wire from either side of
coil, to prevent engine from starting. (1)Test battery electrolyte specific gravity. Spe-
Crank engine with a remote control starter switch cific gravity should be 1.220 or above.
and observe Exact reading on Voltmeter. Stop crank- (2) Disconnect positive battery lead from battery
ing engine. Without cranking engine, turn tester terminal post. Connect an 0 to 300 scale ammeter be-
CONTROL KNOB clockwise until voltmeter reads tween disconnected lead and battery terminal post.
Exactly the same as when engine was being cranked (3) Connect a test voltmeter with 10 volt scale divi-
with the remote control starter switch. Ammeter now sion between battery positive post and starter switch
indicates starter amperage draw. Check specifica- terminal at starter solenoid.
tions. Engine should be up to operating temperature. (4) Crank engine and observe reading on voltmeter
Extremely heavy oil or a tight engine will increase and ammeter. Voltage should not exceed .3 volt. A
starter amperage draw. voltage reading that exceeds .3 volt indicates there is
high resistance caused from loose circuit connections,
INSULATED CIRCUIT TEST a faulty cable, burned starter relay or burned sole-
noid switch contacts. A current that is high and is
(1) Test battery electrolyte specific gravity. Spe- combined with slow cranking speed, indicates starter
cific gravity should be 1.220 or above. If battery spe- should be removed and repaired.
cific gravity is below 1.220, recharge battery to full
charge before proceeding with test. GROUND CIRCUIT TEST
(2) Turn voltmeter selector switch to 4 volt posi-
tion. (1) Connect test voltmeter positive lead to starter
(3) Disconnect ignition coil secondary cable. housing and voltmeter negative lead to battery nega-
(4) Connect voltmeter positive lead to battery posi- tive post.
tive post and voltmeter negative lead to solenoid con- (2) Crank engine with a remote controI starter
nector which connects to the starter field coils. switch and observe voltmeter reading. Voltmeter
The voltmeter will read off scale to the right until reading should not exceed .2 volt. A reading of .2 volt
starter is actuated. or less indicates the resistance of the ground cable
(5) Connect remote control switch to battery and and connections is normal. If voltmeter reading is
solenoid terminal of starter relay. more than .2 volt, it indicates excessive voltage loss in
(6) Crank engine with a remote starter control starter ground circuit. Make the following tests to iso-
starter switch and observe voltmeter reading. Volt- late point of excessive voltage loss. Repeating test at
meter reading should not exceed .3 volt. A voltmeter each connection.
reading .3 volt or less indicates voltage drop is normal (a) Starter drive housing.
in cables, starter relay switch solenoid switch and @) Cable terminal at engine.
connections between battery and starter motor. See (c) Cable clamp at battery.
“Starter Ground Circuit Test.” A small change will occur each time a normal por-
tion of circuit is removed from the test. A definite
If voltmeter reading is more than .3 volt, it indi-
change in voltmeter reading indicates that Iast part
cates high resistance in starter insulated circuit.
eliminated in the test is at fault.
Make following tests to isolate point of excessive
Maximum allowable voltage loss is as fallows:
voltage loss:
Battery ground cable .2 volt
(a) Remove voltmeter lead from solenoid connector
Engine ground circuit .1volt
and connect to the following points, repeating test at
Each connection .O volt
each connection. Starter terminal of solenoid, battery
terminal of solenoid, battery cable terminal at sole-
noid, starter relay and cable clamp at the battery. REMOVING THE STARTER
(b) A small change will occur each time a normal (1) Disconnect ground cable at battery.
portion of the circuit is removed from test. A def- (2) Remove cable at starter.
inite change in the voltmeter reading indicates that (3) Disconnect solenoid lead wires at solenoid ter-
the last part eliminated in test is at fault. minals.
Maximum allowable voltage loss is as follows: (4) Remove one stud nut and one bolt attaching
Battery insulated cable .2 volt starter to flywheel housing, slide automatic transmis-
Solenoid switch .1 volt
Each connection .o volt sion oil cooler tube bracket off the stud (if so
Replace faulty cables. Clean and tighten all con- equipped) and remove the starter. Do not damage
nections. cylinder block seal.

MyMopar.com
r- START1NG MOTOR-ELECTRICAL 8-9

TESTING THE STARTER (Bench Test)


LENOID LEAD WIRE
Free Running Test
(1) Place starter in a vise and connect a fully
charged, 12 volt battery to starter as follows:
(a) Connect a test ammeter (100 amperes scale) and
a carbon pile rheostat in series with battery positive
post and starter terminal.
(b) Connect a voltmeter (15 volt scale) across
starter.
(c) Rotate carbon pile to full-resistance position.
(d) Connect battery cable from battery negative I
I NU431A
post to starter frame.
(e) Adjust the rheostat until battery voltage shown Fig. 3-Unwinding or Winding Solenoid Lead W i r e
on voltmeter reads 11 volts. Amperage draw should
be as shown in specifications. of terminal screw, Fig. 2.
(4) Support brush terminal’ by placing a finger be-
Lockeddesistance Test hind the terminal and remove terminal screw.
(1) Install starter in a test bench. (5) Unwrap shunt field coil lead from starter brush
(2) Follow instructions of test equipment manufac- terminal. Starter brush holder plate with starter brush
turers and test starter against following specifications. terminal, contact and brushes is serviced as an as-
With applied battery voltage adjusted to 4 volts. sembly.
Amperage draw should be as shown in specifications. (6) Unwrap solenoid lead wire and unwind wire
from starter brush terminal (Fig. 3).
DISASSEMBLING THE STARTER (7) Remove nut (11/32 wrench), steel washer and
insulating washer from solenoid terminal.
(1) Place the starter gear housing in a vise equipped ( 8 ) Straighten solenoid wire and remove brush
with soft jaws. Use the vise as support fixture only. holder plate with brushes and solenoid as an assem-
DO NOT clamp. bly.
(2) Remove two through bolts and starter end head (9) Remove solenoid assembly from gear housing
assembly.